Information about Trove user: noelwoodhouse

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,760,094
2 NeilHamilton 3,235,311
3 noelwoodhouse 3,221,911
4 John.F.Hall 2,466,413
5 annmanley 2,277,348

3,221,911 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

December 2017 17,594
November 2017 34,188
October 2017 4,186
September 2017 61,529
August 2017 68,600
July 2017 52,243
June 2017 49,881
May 2017 45,914
April 2017 41,548
March 2017 55,289
February 2017 72,472
January 2017 79,694
December 2016 63,629
November 2016 73,334
October 2016 62,565
September 2016 56,926
August 2016 44,985
July 2016 43,125
June 2016 41,190
May 2016 28,757
April 2016 31,729
March 2016 23,287
February 2016 27,244
January 2016 34,609
December 2015 41,261
November 2015 43,722
October 2015 32,709
September 2015 29,476
August 2015 41,219
July 2015 26,310
June 2015 27,353
May 2015 31,309
April 2015 35,339
March 2015 52,984
February 2015 39,466
January 2015 63,780
December 2014 80,352
November 2014 89,733
October 2014 85,595
September 2014 65,172
August 2014 81,494
July 2014 48,809
June 2014 31,351
May 2014 42,398
April 2014 40,724
March 2014 32,733
February 2014 34,793
January 2014 69,278
December 2013 53,205
November 2013 57,095
October 2013 62,115
September 2013 44,658
August 2013 52,528
July 2013 20,663
June 2013 8,497
May 2013 45,814
April 2013 39,065
March 2013 22,036
February 2013 56,938
January 2013 66,835
December 2012 57,961
November 2012 43,720
October 2012 15,780
September 2012 31,904
August 2012 67,698
July 2012 66,315
June 2012 60,339
May 2012 48,317
April 2012 18,550

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,760,041
2 NeilHamilton 3,235,311
3 noelwoodhouse 3,221,911
4 John.F.Hall 2,466,407
5 annmanley 2,277,278

3,221,911 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

December 2017 17,594
November 2017 34,188
October 2017 4,186
September 2017 61,529
August 2017 68,600
July 2017 52,243
June 2017 49,881
May 2017 45,914
April 2017 41,548
March 2017 55,289
February 2017 72,472
January 2017 79,694
December 2016 63,629
November 2016 73,334
October 2016 62,565
September 2016 56,926
August 2016 44,985
July 2016 43,125
June 2016 41,190
May 2016 28,757
April 2016 31,729
March 2016 23,287
February 2016 27,244
January 2016 34,609
December 2015 41,261
November 2015 43,722
October 2015 32,709
September 2015 29,476
August 2015 41,219
July 2015 26,310
June 2015 27,353
May 2015 31,309
April 2015 35,339
March 2015 52,984
February 2015 39,466
January 2015 63,780
December 2014 80,352
November 2014 89,733
October 2014 85,595
September 2014 65,172
August 2014 81,494
July 2014 48,809
June 2014 31,351
May 2014 42,398
April 2014 40,724
March 2014 32,733
February 2014 34,793
January 2014 69,278
December 2013 53,205
November 2013 57,095
October 2013 62,115
September 2013 44,658
August 2013 52,528
July 2013 20,663
June 2013 8,497
May 2013 45,814
April 2013 39,065
March 2013 22,036
February 2013 56,938
January 2013 66,835
December 2012 57,961
November 2012 43,720
October 2012 15,780
September 2012 31,904
August 2012 67,698
July 2012 66,315
June 2012 60,339
May 2012 48,317
April 2012 18,550

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
CHAPTER XIV. (Article), The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1929), Thursday 14 March 1929 [Issue No.10] page 4 2017-12-11 16:54 ful.
ful.**********************************************
CHAPTER XIV. (Article), The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1929), Thursday 14 March 1929 [Issue No.10] page 4 2017-12-11 16:54 Now -Uiit lie knew the woret, she
tried to comfort -liim, to arouse ^witiiin
enthusiasm lor, NeU'p still, equal to ter
-6wn- '*?????.?
' 'listen to her, Mr. Porrest, ain't she
fine?' she asked, raising' her Band,
- -stretching, and. pointing in -the direction*
of the diabolical door that lid Lion
I* ires .and Sweet Jf ell of Old Islington
at their 'perilous same of mabe-^ieliein.
'Ain't she' 'woanerfrll, sir! U
yoail just listen. She's ' got that
gift, God bless her for it— of turn
in' folk inside tfaeirseltres. ifor could
she do* it, *ut lor her own troe heart.
'iVe seen 'other folk in . tie same parts,
Mr. Forrest, some on 'em waa counted
great, men an'' women,' too, out- never
another two souls like ner an1 him. If
made a joint o* money, sut she, my Miss
Sell, was never set on that.'
She m too entranced with ner ..remin
liim intolerably. Was he listening even1!
Bis face was so blank, so weary, and
Cold. - TT«» was shut out from Nell -ui -die
?Bunt 13m. She wanted none save the
man she had with her in the num. .
? When-- Mirelda ceased speaking, quite
sudden! j- he iieard .Kelt's Toice, clear and
Tlien « pause. Why did he dally here?
Sage iras' coming to turn. His hands
and teeth mere clenched. Should he ruth
Jjart iErelda, patient watch-dog, into the
each other's arms? Hen ier roice
' ^prin, saying -in Tnild, ereryday tones:
''ShaU I do iti'*gaiiU' *? *i ? ?
Laives assented, and added ?'sugges-
tion vIucJl did not reach the unhappy
Sichard. In-s louder tone, he resumed,
? ''-Sea, if you Blesse, Ifell, inn through
it oner more. Ifs not tpiite like yonr
old interpretaSon. It seems to me, if
I hadn't come in tjmev yoa'd save lost
?ometiung'Tiial to your splendid eraft'
- She seemed to te .a little piqued. 'Hot
lost, 1 tliink, only mislaid. Lion, and
then I am. xatner tired to-night IVe
. had i trying day, so that aceounts ior
. it'-- .-.:,. , :..-?,-
** Well, I -dont want to harass yon
too much just at present,^ iiett, we're
plenty of time for other refit!ajra»ls, bn
while it is fresh in your mind,,4t might
be as veil— ^thanks avrfnlly.'' ..Here's iite
/cnei I advance' from tile door, and find
you kneeling at your prayers in .the li£
tie chapel -of Oar Lady, for tome mo
ments iradore you in JJIaice, wnile pei:
sanfa; and shopkeepers -Eteal soEUy bnt
and In 1o say their prayers. Sou turn
presenQy, iieeraie tears pour do«m your
cheekB^ you nise your Teil to wipe them
. away, j»o torn *nd perceive jne m tie
shador of .the pillar. Kow proceed from
there.' . . ,- - '
' 'There, there, if they haven't gone
and started tbe whole .tiung'*£g.ui \'.
whispered lErelda, dose- to Bichard'i
sleeve, flsflring in facing to. enter: ani
announce the visitor to her mistress dur
ing flic break. 'Wei!, Eir, (bat's just.
like me, with my wool gatherin'. talk;
sn' nxciB* mind. You'll pardon roe, I
nope, «nd .wait unto they^e through,
qiey o-ont be much longer now. Xhat
^«enc, I know it back!arde 4uwOy welL
Ifs thtiig. scene from .? SpUatered Ice,'
it is. He ran it for two years at ber
theatre in Islington, Mr. Forrest, in Syd
ney, an' Melbourne, in Kew Tork, an'
Paris, -o' otlier parts I don't (juite aSk
to mind. I dressed her for ber first ,play,
when she -was no more than a child,
shakin' alLorer like a jelly. There was
her father, seared, but happy as a king
in the orchestra, (hat night sue played
Juliet, f ?sent Mr. Adimore off with a
when lie come roun' fussin* and frighten
.-' i*g the poor little thing,.half out o* her
rits;;'-rft TFOTUia warW^nto Ber hair,
kn'. plaited it Witt niy ttiigh ol'fciala.
3nch WSr, jast her Toiete, taA BtaJen
bl«8 yob, sir, aa:-6T«ck'«s-?heranM's
breast. - ? - f*-'-.fi:*'i' ?*-,-.--S* ...-5
*Ab,»rs#ieu aEriSQa, ''*^nl*lunk
of it*, plvitf it »U jip,^a ffiiBMBl*
kwnright ^ity, not' lot what it Wu'l
bard, 'aiffiralt We, *itii UtUc ^. fc %t
for iniaa or body.' i3he' was «orn for the
stage, atfii'TOfe'to^i.B** Mooa.- U
ever jjm have children; sir, *n' pray «od
^k^y.-m^a-^-im. ^or the theatre
like -dneks to Bjwnd!' : -?-. -.
Sbrlooked sip at bim, sUSding, blur
refl.of ontline, and dark ocfore her in
the shadows-Jiall, far owlng^o the long,
aooafess erening,:the lamps had not yet
been l^htfed.- Hie; co«14 mctnally «mUt
iomSnto-ner wrinidea face, Jrhjie'what
bad Boa*«i from the dnwing-nxnT west
rwma and jooria, stinfing his ears,
taire's roice, sobHy ifisblent and master:
M.v f ' '???:?? ? '-??-.._ .-'.- :' ?'.; ???'/.
Now that he knew the worst, she
tried to comfort him, to arouse within
enthusiasm for, Nell's skill, equal to her
own.
"Listen to her, Mr. Forrest, ain't she
fine?" she asked, raising her hand,
stretching, and. pointing in the direction
of the diabolical door that hid Lion
Lawes and Sweet Nell of Old Islington
at their perilous game of make-believe.
"Ain't she wonnerfull, sir? If
you'll just listen. She's got that
gift, God bless her for it— of turn-
in' folk inside theirselves. Nor could
she do it, but for her own true heart.
I've seen other folk in the same parts,
Mr. Forrest, some on 'em was counted
great, men an' women, too, but never
another two souls like her an' him. If
made a joint o' money, but she, my Miss
Nell, was never set on that."
She was too entranced with her remin-
him intolerably. Was he listening even?
His face was so blank, so weary, and
cold. He was shut out from Nell in the
want him. She wanted none save the
man she had with her in the room.
When- Mirelda ceased speaking, quite
suddenly he heard Nell's voice, clear and
Then a pause. Why did he dally here?
Rage was coming to him. His hands
and teeth were clenched. Should he rush
past Mirelad, patient watch-dog, into the
each other's arms? Then her voice
again, saying in mild, everyday tones:
''Shall I do it, again?"
Lawes assented, and added a sugges-
tion which did not reach the unhappy
Richard. In a louder tone, he resumed,
"Yes, if you please, Nell, run through
it once more. It's not quite like yonr
old interpretation. It seems to me, if
I hadn't come in time, you'd have lost
something vital to your splendid craft."
She seemed to te .a little piqued. "Not
lost, I think, only mislaid. Lion, and
then I am rather tired to-night. I've
had a trying day, so that accounts for
it."
"Well, I don't want to harass you
too much just at present, Nell, we've
plenty of time for other rehearsals, butn
while it is fresh in your mind, it might
be as well—thanks awfully. Here's the
cue: I advance from the door, and find
you kneeling at your prayers in the lit-
tle chapel of Our Lady. For some mo-
ments I adore you in silence, while pea-
sants and shopkeepers steal softly out
and in to say their prayers. You turn
presently, rise, the tears pour doen your
cheeks, you raise your veil to wipe them
away, you turn and perceive me in the
shadow of the pillar. Now proceed from
there."
"There, there, if they haven't gone
and started the whole thing again!"
whispered Mirelda, close to Richard's
sleeve, clacking in failing to enter and
announce the visitor to her mistress dur-
ing the break. "Well, sir, that just
like me, with my wool gatherin' talk,
an' rovin' mind. You'll pardon me, I
hope, and wait until they're through.
They won't be much longer now. That
scene, I know it backwards pretty well.
It's the big scene from "Splintered Ice,"
it is. He ran it for two years at her
theatre in Islington, Mr. Forrest, in Syd-
ney, an' Melbourne, in New York, an'
Paris, an' other parts I don't quite call
to mind. I dressed her for her first play,
when she was no more than a child,
shakin' all over like a jelly. There was
her father, scared, but happy as a king
in the orchestra, that night she played
Juliet. I sent Mr. Adimore off with a
when he come roun' fussin' and frighten-
ing the poor little thing half out o' her
wits. I've wound pearls into her hair,
an' plaited it with my rough ol' hands.
Such hair, past her knees, and Heaven
bless your, sir, as black as the raven's
"Ah," sighed Mirelda, "When I think
of her, givin' it all up, it do seem a
downright pity, not but what it was a
hard, difficult life, and little rest in it
for mind or body. She was born for the
stage, actin' runs hot in her blood. If
ever you have children, sie, an' pray God
you may, they'll set off for the theatre
like ducks to a pond!"
She looked up at him, standing, blur-
red of outline, and dark before her in
the shadowy hall, for owing to the long,
cloudless evening, the lamps had not yet
been lighted. He could actually smile
down into her wrinkled face, while what
had floated from the drawing-room went
round and round, stinging his ears,
Lawe's voice, subtly insolent and master-
ful.
CHAPTER XIV. (Article), The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1929), Thursday 14 March 1929 [Issue No.10] page 4 2017-12-11 16:34 *uat Jfojfldnt jet *er not to iwt It «*
jMjtej*bt»-* ?? ?? ; ' .^'r ??'?:
'Woriqngr—ana m feometodf toUi
b«i ejihfnkto sue; u sptired. JTi«t do
you mean,. Hiieldar1' -' ' ' '.
' MjradiTdiwiJher farad. She looked
»esj: glajto s« lim there, waiting fn
Kelli' liall beside the door of Hf^mtf
? *'-5-iWiB». .' Ber ,g»« carried, the mei
aage, *Tt cut bap rt, on Itlt iin-t,
my fault if you, being only .'»'? Toot,
jealous tiling of a man, gets jrat about
W what Via. going to sa&iiBd .maybe
it ain't wise, letting you in at all.'
^What'* lip, WtaMa?- he 'inquired
sharply, hie 'thoughts 'soddenly dark^apa
tinnaiwv..--''*^WJiy *36iTt*7oii go at once
to MisMVisbenV ' ? ? ?? .-¥?-
ShV ttnderrt Wii aBotier em^atic
slala it Oier headA' ??;?? '
? ~KS' only tfiat Bte did -say, verv de
ciaedly, noWy was *b'-be let Urit'tB
to the (drawing room, sir.' '? '- -
l'opr AfireMa n^s''^trirjn» tog-Jste
to' bf warfl/oiploinatic;- 'You^ee,«t.
Bieliany «fae added, because Tua star
''g eyes [Snowed ner'no*eo*ner of esenev
'Miar KeHis getting 19 one of Mr «4
.parts, ^ith Hr. Xaires, for the Lootln'
Glass iieatre.' ' -. x
* He began.to'look Tonal tie lull, BO
-StanA? kept, Mtb £ruV$&e;wl *i*l
rags spread over the pint jfnii jet mo
saic, in tfe hesttatMg-ittitaher of one
;who has come to * 'place jmwiflingly
«ad without ' knowing why; : and vwto
aisles to be gone 4a the instant. _
aunt couldn't get her not to put it off
for to-night."
"Working!—and is somebody with
her, although she is so tired. What do
you mean, Mirelda?"
Mirelda shook her head. She looked
less glad to see him there, waiting in
Nell's hall beside the door of the writ-
ing room. Her gaze carried the mes-
sage, "I can't help it, can I? It ain't
my fault if you, being only a poor,
jealous thing of a man, gets put about
by what I'm going to say, and maybe
it ain't wise, letting you in at all."
"What's up, Mirelda?" he inquired
sharply, his thoughts suddenly dark and
unhappy. "Why don't you go at once
to Miss Lisben?"
She tendered him another emphatic
shake of her head.
"It's only that she did say, very de-
cidedly, nobody was to be let in at all
to the drawing room, sir."
Poor Mirelda was striving too late
to be warily diplomatic. "You see, Mr.
Richard," she added, because his star-
ing eyes allowed her no corner of escape.
"Miss Nell is getting up one of her old
parts, with Mr. Lawes, for the Lookin''
Glass Theatre."
He began to look round the hall, so
glossily kept, with great blue and red
rugs spread over the pink and jet mo-
saic, in the hesitating manner of one
who has come to a place unwillingly
and without knowing why, and who
wishes to be gone on the instant.
CHAPTER XIV. (Article), The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1929), Thursday 14 March 1929 [Issue No.10] page 4 2017-12-11 16:26 view rt esnectJng yon, sit Sh»
eatl to 4*,sW«aiIr. Famst is «b
gaj^d this evening, so you needn't to
lay a p&ce for him it -tinuer. I shall
fce -atoa_«fterwarfs- Bnt the poor
Iamb am*, tbongi I d& try to — t het
to go straight to far bed. She's mit
it' again as hard as can *e. , Enakr
"She wasn't expecting you, sir. She
said to me, she said, 'Mr. Forrest is en-
gaged this evening, so you needn't to
lay a place for him at dinner. I shall
be alone afterwards. But the poor
lamb aint' though I did try to get her
to go straight to her bed. She's work-
ing again as hard as can be. Even her
CHAPTER XIV. (Article), The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1929), Thursday 14 March 1929 [Issue No.10] page 4 2017-12-11 16:25 ^'coeJdieeltne whole, krvdytimoi
poere of JTell'S room jmftiMing Mm. It
had tae mute kudness of a large tree,
the armaatketie gibw of a long-Wetf
mend. It overflowed like a fountain
wtto mewiries' of is love. . He -a*
asked Sell ia. that very room to be ha
w£db. _
3CreIda wxa standmg in the. doorway,
precisely 'a* he had pictored her. She
greeted ana and stood aside in the
had for him to pass, bidding him en- '
ter in her rough voice, which, hswner,
was always i-ajiouslj geaOe ana imi- '
ry to him under the roughness. Sto'
took his -hat and soft-case, ud ke
thanked her, aai was goiag an Btra^bt
w kH^ b^|,m, 111 ill MVC Jl»a^ 1KB ~ --?^.—
da turned the handle of the- writing^
room door on lie left. ? :
'Please to wait where a BKJe, Kr.
Forrest' she said, 'white t tell Miss
JJeH- ? ? '?'.? ' 1
'CertaMy. Is she dnssas far dm- .
aer or eating it, iEreldaT°
?iSlie sent it away- nntmtehed, sir. I'm
right-down worried about her.- She ' -
dont seera a bit herself -ever sate aha
got back: froai Streatham HilL IWt
mnr whetaer chefs see era you, Mr.
Forrest, aot bat J^a. i«y saw y«n»
flo *er a world of good. Sbe did ,aay
toe was not to be dModied. ttat shV
wajm't at konus fo a touL' . - -..
*EheH see me— yon kronf she *ffl».
MoeUa!' cried Dick, longing to eon*
fort hi darfiog. «flar Itei tryin- Snter
^hewirt esnectJng yon, sit Sh»
ingly.
He could feel the whole, lovely atmos-
phere of Nell's room enfolding him. It
had the mute kindness of a large tree,
the sympathetic glow of a long-tried
friend. It overflowed like a fountain
with memories of his love. He had
asked Nell in that very room to be his
wife.
Mirelda was standing in the doorway,
precisely as he had pictured her. She
greeted him and stood aside in the
hall for him to pass, bidding him en-
ter in her rough voice, which, however,
was always curiously gentle and kind-
ly to him under the roughness. She
took his hat and suit-case, and he
thanked her, and was going on straight
to the apartment he loved, when Mirel-
da turned the handle of the writing-
room door on the left.
"Please to wait in her a little, Mr.
Forrest" she said, "while i tell Miss
Nell—"
"Certainly. Is she dressing for din-
ner or eating it, Mirelda?"
"She sent it away untouched, sir, I'm
right-down worried about her. She
don't seem a bit herself ever since she
got back from Streatham Hill. I don't
know whether she'll see even you, Mr.
Forrest, not but I'm sure you'll
do her a world of good. She did say
she was not to be disturbed, that she
wasn't at home to a soul."
"She'll see me—you know she will,
Mirelda!" cried Dick, longing to com-
fort his darling after her trying inter-
view with his father.
view rt esnectJng yon, sit Sh»
CHAPTER XIV. (Article), The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1929), Thursday 14 March 1929 [Issue No.10] page 4 2017-12-11 16:18 ? v fHAPTEE iXH5. ' - - ?
; With tie fresh, etrmog breeze Mw
ing against bis, iace, Richard felt in- r
vigorated and peered. Peace. «aow
jgeatiy back. He was going to N«ll. -
jibe big^ formidable, ugjy manaion whicn
ih*4 sever been a home, was. well ne
Ifajsd him, at the crest of the bm, eepa
jrated from other big mansions by plea
i-mst acres of foliage and meadows. Be
finmd m taxi at last, and was carried
away, bnt with far less speed tian love .
demanded. --.'*,
: There, was quite a. long hold-up in
tbe crowded street at Victoria— a ian
£]e «f omnibuses and iaxSg'aiul automo
biles. Was it some obscure, aimly
snaped fear that induced in him «d
absurd and feverish an 'impatience? Was
it pure ioye-eagernessr .
bell,' looking forward boyishly to th«
fafaffirr cight -o{ eld lEreJda's/tuidly,
wrmkied xaca, iomuuhid, up in. smiles of
welcome. Be would be let in to the
rliaiiniug. frieadry dzawing-room, where
in nobodjr ever €poke 'falsely or sneer
CHAPTER XIV.
With the fresh, evening breeze blow-
ing against his face, Richard felt in-
vigorated and cheered. Peace came
gently back. He was going to Nell.-
The big, formidable, ugly mansion which
had never been a home, was well be-
hind him, at the crest of the hill, sepa-
rated from other big mansions by plea-
sant acres of foliage and meadows. He
found a taxi at last, and was carried
away, but with far less speed than love
demanded.
There was quite a long hold-up in
the crowded street at Victoria—a tan-
gle of omnibuses and taxis and automo-
biles. Was it some obscure, dimly-
snaped fear that induced in him so
absurd and feverish an impatience? Was
it pure love-eagerness?
bell, looking forward boyishly to the
familiar sight of old Mirelda's kindly,
wrinkled face, crumpled up in smiles of
welcome. He would be let in to the
charming, friendly drawing-room, where-
in nobody ever spoke falsely or sneer-
SWEET NELL OF OLD ISLINGTON. (COPYRIGHT.) CHAPTER XIII.—(Continued.) (Article), The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1929), Thursday 14 March 1929 [Issue No.10] page 4 2017-12-11 16:13 ? 'Tell her what too ch*Ke. I have
Mj to deny k. She knows nje better
than you' suppose*
'Time will sbow.'
fl win go to her now^* thongU Kchr
ird; 'and tell her myselt 111 find oat
too, what this old rascal has beea at
IS i* Mrat fnr hie «vsk liearL FA
I'dns it out nC Urn.'
: .The ^resaiiro' gong boomed througb
Uie ksuse, fr«m bebw stairs.
- Eichard said coldly, -Fve changed my
mind atmit staying the week-end. 1
rre two excelient reasons.'
'Yob hare, eht? WeU, lef s hear.
'Firat of all, I can only conclude
you drove 3Css Zisben away out of the
'bvasev'.
'And if I did, what about itt 3fy
,bouse, ain't it!'
! '-That's why I won't stay!'
. The old u got to 13s feet heavily
,and wearily- * Toutl serer unite xritik
[KeB, &o help mel0 be enei' wiUt s sup
pressed passion and venom in iuB eyes.
'Well, Fve heard you say that be
fore,' returned Dick. Til go now, for
we do eseh other no good. My second,
reason for leaving you, sir, is-1 — '
^Dtan jour reasonsl What are they
to me!' ' ? ,
Ta act risking any more nonsense
from iCse Neil. I shan't see. her again,
if I can' help it. Goo^nightt
He dared not seek his gsterB and bid
the» gooi-by*, Tiey would be in thejr
rooms. Hevdreaded their questions, re
pioaehea. They wouU piabaUy burst
Jen a tiniest, hpadifte. She would be
prostrate all next day if Pick allowed;
her ta iui on -bis sbaaldeis. Eats,
was less exdtalue, but her temper was
fybrmttfi. herself bv flying: at OH Mm
foe bex pains. ,
With his suit-ease in his hand, he
stole from tbe bedroom, which feia lis
ten) lad iri-btened with ftwers and
Uttle comforS. He fett wflar likeji
tfciet Be peered canSflOTKly to right
ana lett, dreading disonay, feeifrt lett
heiu4t eacsstter Uimnt. SreTcom
ujg fte» #« towfef -ctob. «? bei way
tthef«o». Wwim.--tm.*g»-ii» , .)
ransic ittd ceased. The grannd floor . 4
wks deseitBj »f «U to* kSiSeH.:' He- ; C
got free of tie house and walked along,
seeking « taxi. ^,,,'i,
"Tell her what you choose. I have
only to deny it. She knows me better
than you' suppose."
"Time will show."
"I will go to her now," thought Rich-
ard, "and tell her myself. I'll find out
too, what this old rascal has been at
It it wasn't for his weak heart, I'd
drag it out of him."
The dressing gong boomed through
thehouse, from below stairs.
Richard said coldly, "I've changed my
mind about staying the week-end. I
have two excellent reasons."
"You have, eh? Well, let's hear.
"First of all, I can only conclude
you drove Niss Lisben away out of the
house."
"And if I did, what about it? My
house, aint it?"
"That's why I won't stay!"
The old man got to his feet heavily
and wearily. "You'll never mate with
Nell, so help me!" he cried with a sup-
pressed passion and venom in his eyes.
"Well, I've heard you say that be-
fore," returned Dick. "I'll go now, for
we do each other no good. My second,
reason for leaving you, sir, is—"
"Durn your reasons! What are they
to me!"
"I'm not risking any more nonsense
from Miss Neil. I shan't see her again,
if I can help it. Good-night!"
He dared not seek his sisters and bid
them good-bye. They would be in their
rooms. He dreaded their questions, re-
proaches. The would probably burst
Jess a violent headache. She would be
prostrate all next day if Dick allowed
her to moan on his shoulders. Kate
was less excitable, but her temper was
exhausted herself by flying at Old Man
for her pains.
With his suit-case in his hand, he
stole from the bedroom, which his sis-
ters had brightened with flowers and
little comforts. He felt rather like a
thief. He peered cautiously to right
and left, dreading discovery, fearful lest
he might encounter Margaret Niel com-
ing from the drawing-room on her way
to her room. But some time ago the
music had ceased. The grannd floor
was deserted of all but himself. He
got free of the house and walked along,
seeking a taxi.
SWEET NELL OF OLD ISLINGTON. (COPYRIGHT.) CHAPTER XIII.—(Continued.) (Article), The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1929), Thursday 14 March 1929 [Issue No.10] page 4 2017-12-11 15:25 'Oh.vtierc's another mile or two to
he covered this journey. TO see JGss
Iisben k3;pi of what yon were up ta,
even vith her in the house, and wh3e
she was waiting- for yon to come up aad
say pretty things!'
"Oh, there's another mile or two to
be covered this journey. I'll see Miss
Lisben hears of what you were up to,
even with her in the house, and while
she was waiting for you to come up aad
say pretty things!"
SWEET NELL OF OLD ISLINGTON. (COPYRIGHT.) CHAPTER XIII.—(Continued.) (Article), The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1929), Thursday 14 March 1929 [Issue No.10] page 4 2017-12-11 15:24 * When the young roan nrjed him again
to speak; ?Forrest' grew settled. ' ~*1
ia'tend to take jny.-n«» tane!' 3ie mail
ed irately.. 'Ihere'o m tatnj.'
'^From the way you Jiaitad Marie, r
jiM the sutler was of the greatest
hnportame,' dedared Dick. '
?,-I sent far »er, hecanse i Amt «Dow
?t aetvauts to get the *pper hand.
H«w did yon get on wjta. tie rajah!'
Dick toM him biicfly and coldly. For
rest was pleased, bnt 'would allow no
ptMi3,^» ta ahox. Be put, down his
empty -glass,, exclaiming:
.-Now fur ilis iosiDea with IBea
Siel.'
:.Bicfc scowled. 'We need not refer
to that agaaai1*
-T!e«d we not? Trust you for lay
ia~ dowa tie -bv;.b«t if you ..think,
voti can make up ta a girl and turn to
it™«mtefea «*» yoa'ie mdiued, you're
jolly well mistaken. . Margaret is my
guest. While ..eke U under my roof
she 5s entitled to'my pxoteetii». Wtata
more U. I won't Save fcer heart broke*,
mind that!' ?
'Her heart's very far from broken.
You know that as well, as I do Guv.'
'\vnal a srasdee you are, I declare,
and * regular Son .Joan. Whatever
yoa jbsi c&eose ta say, I saw enough
witt my jbtb, eyes ta know~ that you
ire tying.'
?Sr, fna, go too far.'
When the young man urged him again
to speak, Forrest grew nettled. "I
intend to take myown time!" he snarl-
ed irately. "There's no hurry."
"From the way you baited Marie, I
judged the matter was of the greatest
importance," declared Dick.
" I went for her, because I don't allow
my servants to get the upper hand.
How did you get on with the rajah?"
Dick told him briefly and coldly. For-
rest was pleased, but would allow no
pleasure to show. He put down his
empty glass, exclaiming:
"Now for this business with Miss
Niel."
Dick scowled. "We need not refer
to that again!"
"Need we not? Trust you for lay-
ing down the law; but if you thinkk,
you can make up to a girl and turn to
someone else when you'r inclined you're
jolly well mistaken. Margaret is my
guest. While she is under my roof
she is entitled to my protection. What's
more is, I won't have her heart broken,,
mind that!"
"Her heart's very far from broken.
You know that as well as I do Guv."
"What a grandee you are, I declare,
and a regular Don Juan. Whatever
you may choose to say, I saw enough
with my own eyes to know that you
are lying."
"Sir, you go too far."
SWEET NELL OF OLD ISLINGTON. (COPYRIGHT.) CHAPTER XIII.—(Continued.) (Article), The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1929), Thursday 14 March 1929 [Issue No.10] page 4 2017-12-11 15:18 asiia sire. 'He had swung old For-,
rest to ti« own purpose. 'Da this,
and I'm quit of the business,- bad been
his war-cry, and -the diamond BJfrduint,
who gave in to » other huma* being,
bad been obliged to submit sttHenlr. j
He eould not dispute Dick's -v»loe* He
bad -aa atiractire way with. the. bie,
Uryers, -s*Jrli a jj.e. for ihstanc?, &« the'
Indian ; Prince. All 'ths staic. Forrest1
{ecjdaf -that tbe .bn5iu'#M might law
pushed ahead vi*h even longer Strides |
liad be been abfe to weercnnio.ihp f3iotic
tuples wh;eh eovexred bis ' sbn'.-t con-!
duet. ? ?:.?' ?.?; i
Richard's eagi^asieiit in .Street Ke9
of Old Islington was the last Etnnr.
Forrest kited 'kirn1 and feared him When
it came to the point, he was cv-fcusty
on, when bis blood was up and tabt
He was getting bid.
He eat thete, canscSpns ' of age, . of
physical weakBesa'^ajad -feebleness. £«tt
with the bomiae; \ whisky tingling
throojdi his frame, be felt the coldness!
and thhiness of his blood. !
It ran --.lowly. What had SeJl, the.
deuce take her, cried out to lio, start-'
ly before she left the room? Some
once he t»H the 1%]; secret Well, ta
didn't care to lose Bicbard juet vet.
Bichard ms DsefuL Besides Old iUn
Forrest bad promised . himself the joy
of breakiBg his co-a*B heart. i
his power even over so autocratic a man
as his sire. He had swung old For-
rest to his own purpose. "Do this,
and I'm quit of the business," had been
his war-cry, and the diamond merchant,
who gave in to no other human being,
had been obliged to submit sullenly.
He could not dispute Dick's value. He
had an attractive way with the big
buyers, such a one, for instance, as the
Indian Prince. All the same, Forrest
decided that the business might have
pushed ahead with even longer strides
had he been able to overcome the idiotic
scruples which governed his son's con-
duct.
Richard's engagement to Sweet Nell
of Old Islington was the last straw.
Forrest hated him and feared him. When
it came to the point, he was curiously
on, when his blood was up and hot.
He was getting old.
He sat there, conscious of age, of
physical weakness and feebleness. Even
with the burning whisky tingling
through his frame, he felt the coldness
and thinness of his blood.
It ran slowly. What had Nell, the
deuce take her, cried out to him, short-
ly before she left the room? Some-
once he told the ugly secret. Well, he
didn't care to lose Richard just yet.
Richard was useful. Besided Old Man
Forrest had promised himself the joy
of breaking his son's heart.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.