Information about Trove user: melhamp

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,940,088
2 noelwoodhouse 3,979,699
3 NeilHamilton 3,445,280
4 DonnaTelfer 3,398,319
5 Rhonda.M 3,340,121
...
528 Armadale9 93,707
529 goldie444 93,655
530 wilmarlibrary 93,618
531 melhamp 93,523
532 donhp 93,517
533 ruthm1 93,382

93,523 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

February 2020 583
December 2019 630
November 2019 822
October 2019 589
September 2019 879
August 2019 980
July 2019 2,152
June 2019 6,461
May 2019 4,147
April 2019 7,008
March 2019 9,631
February 2019 10,328
January 2019 9,057
December 2018 329
November 2018 2,360
October 2018 3,976
September 2018 6,141
August 2018 2,204
July 2018 3,406
June 2018 3,025
May 2018 2,425
March 2017 832
February 2017 4,092
January 2017 3,693
December 2016 1,216
November 2016 5,859
October 2016 698

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,939,886
2 noelwoodhouse 3,979,699
3 NeilHamilton 3,445,151
4 DonnaTelfer 3,398,293
5 Rhonda.M 3,340,108
...
527 Armadale9 93,707
528 goldie444 93,655
529 wilmarlibrary 93,618
530 melhamp 93,523
531 donhp 93,517
532 ruthm1 93,382

93,523 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

February 2020 583
December 2019 630
November 2019 822
October 2019 589
September 2019 879
August 2019 980
July 2019 2,152
June 2019 6,461
May 2019 4,147
April 2019 7,008
March 2019 9,631
February 2019 10,328
January 2019 9,057
December 2018 329
November 2018 2,360
October 2018 3,976
September 2018 6,141
August 2018 2,204
July 2018 3,406
June 2018 3,025
May 2018 2,425
March 2017 832
February 2017 4,092
January 2017 3,693
December 2016 1,216
November 2016 5,859
October 2016 698

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
LETTERS FROM THE FRONT. (Article), Rutherglen Sun and Chiltern Valley Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Friday 13 August 1915 [Issue No.51] page 2 2020-02-12 15:31 had just arrived in England with a
the voyage, also the food supplied. When
writing, he was in splendid health, and
persons assembled at Mr W. M. Harrison's
reference to the young men of Lilliput,
congratulated, and all present wished
From the Front (Article), The Shoalhaven News and South Coast Districts Advertiser (NSW : 1891 - 1937), Saturday 14 October 1916 [Issue No.9508] page 3 2020-02-12 15:22 Prom the Front.
*
'Caaoatma virumque.' — Virgil.
, Writing; ..from Bor et Muler, under
data August 29, Trooper Ken. Thom
son' Bays: —
'I don't see much hope of going to j
Fraiioe for our' mob, though I fancy ,
things' Will be very quiet for some j
time to come, and by too look of
will be , tor- either past Africa or
change to either of these placas.
Things are very quiet, here at present,
cruising around - this morniug h few
raileft back, ^anS we could gee the
sheila bursting in the air from -iur
antiaircraft guns, but it didn't come
close enough for us to .try,. .our Lewis
gun. on it. 'Agood many non-coms
from this Brigade arejgettirig commis
^siops in the infantry, but they have
*npt beenfelocted yet. ^Vilfred Love
grpve; was ^recommended by Liout.
iWflfred); and -I think he stands a
ref huflftng amongst the officers, too,
tiirotbghsome^ ihem being wounded,
They established a wet; canteen over
twenty uiinutes walk from here (at
least, that is what it cakes to go over),
.they have a fairly coustaut stream of
«iintioi«^&i^:*fliui.cwp^ All out
beer-fanciers kuow tlie track pretty
well, -and -provide a lot of amusement
getting back. They rgn the canteen
on gooid lines, though, and don't allow
hands was a bit. blithered on Sunday
morning, and we were ordered to foil
in lor Church parade, ;which. is com
pV^Bory' here now. 'Old fuller,1 as
M:e call. him- didn't falk in, and the
®Bcer said 'Why' havetft you fallen
in T . Qoller said ' I lost toy disc'
\jlou .Jniow, our identity discs have
'bur name, regimental number, and
that to do with itf Guller said
Church I belong to !' Ho is about
the quietest -and most inoffensive man
in the regimen^ and weighs about 9
stone.. He was on the Peninsula
from -beginning to«ud without a
when a ballet grazed his elbow and
barely broke the skin, the moraine of
lock not to get a better one than that.
His* wo great cobbers were Curran,
D CM., and Magnire, both over 6ft,
and splendidly built Curran was I
shot dead in the Jtomani fight, and
Maguire was killed in Mie fight at
-been- like a lost sheep ever since.
Both Haguire and Curran were bush
bred, Irish colonials, and jast as mad
and asl wild as any Irishman that
ever 'swung a shillellagh when they
?got properly going, though there was
noaihig of' tile bully about them.
Guller often used to offer to. fight
them when they got a hit lively, and
got obstreperous. '; Curran was under
arrest at the time of the fight tor
trying to get to Fiance to join the
infantry tuere, «o didn t have any
of the filing line till he was*shcj
himself. —,He. was TOry daring, and
has, been reconunendud for the V.C:
f or his work'tjfuit^lay.' Maguire was
just such another, though more im
as angels, bat if anyone jostles either
Stau-g, I guess St, Peter will see the
fight of his long life ; but I ; always
?an Irishman ^ihn8olf,jio probably he
will pass than' through'. I wouldn't
beef when the war. finishes, as it will
releases lot of the contractors' sup
to keep going the way things «ro
now. Idoil't see much hope of the
months at leas J:,* for the way these
Turks are equipped 'looks -as 'if Ger
Turkith prisoriers seem heartily sick.
&'tf$(-Hfc^ Their nuwhineguns,
feVolverV feeia glasses, 'otc., f^»r tff
euperior to ours, and ( !nost|^-f the
Turks seemodin^rtS%good cofidition,
though very footsore. . I am still
up toyfhe^ffietpwn sohool later on,'
though laihBotin the first b|teh.^
Mmmh^Ami^^Mh^^. Albert
Henry (one of tite ' Waratahs'^, now
a fnember of 1-^ -3ompariy, 1st Bat
talion^st^Bngade, eays-;-— Just' A; lirip.
tblet^U^know ^#^4m.:; I have
quite recovered from ttuTknjick % had.
A^^ll in ttie Cbmyescent %np,
^d'WTW?: a ^bod th^l Exp^ctto'
'jHippojjB.f ll) do awhile there^anU then
get back to the trenches again. ' f
iared Alright last time ; it^ noXtyh;
.ijm&i bjifc-Jhat'B nothing when jaju
«ad.^ett«Hons«nd:««ter. Dfcbarlsia,
mfJtbaVjSssdarceit pinches a bit -'but
It'tfowro't often happon. Well; Qmi?.
^.iXOttidoitt \Cob1 t -it . whuo. you re in-iiti
but when jt'soycr you be^in ^to think
* bit V^y« knew4he jninutfe ve were
to start, ana wore hoed up ready for
the word to 'hop over.' At last it
tame. Fro-n then our one though c
describa what we met -while crossing
' No Man's Land.' Tha shells, shrap
nel, and machine^ gun bullets were
than hail in a heavy etorm, but we
never stopped till we got our objec
sleep for the noise while the bombard
was a bit of a din in thj midst of it.
there was a certain amount of gran
were . coming over — tear shells, gas
shells, an'l others too numerous to
squealing for mercy — ' Mercy, Kam
erad,' 'Anzac, Mercy.' He ought
whack across the shoulder and fore
badly bent
From the Front.
"Cano arma virumque."—Virgil.
Writing from Ber et Muler, under
date August 29, Trooper Ken. Thom-
son says:—
"I don't see much hope of going to
France for our mob, though I fancy
things will be very quiet for some
time to come, and by the look of
will be for either East Africa or
change to either of these places.
Things are very quiet here at present,
cruising around this morning a few
miles back, and we could see the
shells bursting in the air from our
anti aircraft guns, but it didn't come
close enough for us to try our Lewis
gun on it. A good many non-coms
from this Brigade are getting commis-
sions in the infantry, but they have
not been selected yet. Wilfred Love-
grove was recommended by Lieut.
Wilfred), and I think he stands a
re-shuffling amongst the officers, too,
through some of them being wounded,
They established a wet canteen over
twenty minutes walk from here (at
least, that is what it takes to go over),
they have a fairly constant stream of
visitors from this camp. All our
beer-fanciers know the track pretty
well, and provide a lot of amusement
getting back. They run the canteen
on good lines, though, and don't allow
hands was a bit blithered on Sunday
morning, and we were ordered to fall
in for Church parade, which is com-
pulsory here now. 'Old Guller', as
we call, him, didn't fall in, and the
officer said 'Why haven't you fallen
in?' Guller said, 'I lost my disc.'
(You know, our identity discs have
our name, regimental number, and
that to do with it?' Guller said
'How the h— do I know what
Church I belong to!' He is about
the quietest and most inoffensive man
in the regiment and weighs about 9
stone. He was on the Peninsula
from beginning to end without a
when a bullet grazed his elbow and
barely broke the skin, the morning of
the charge here; reckoned it was stiff
luck not to get a better one than that.
His two great cobbers were Curran,
D.C.M., and Maguire, both over 6ft.,
and splendidly built. Curran was
shot dead in the Romani fight, and
Maguire was killed in the fight at
been like a lost sheep ever since.
Both Maguire and Curran were bush-
bred, Irish colonials, and just as mad
and as wild as any Irishman that
ever swung a shillellagh when they
got properly going, though there was
nothing of the bully about them.
Guller often used to offer to fight
them when they got a bit lively, and
got obstreperous. Curran was under
arrest at the time of the fight for
trying to get to France to join the
infantry there, so didn't have any
of the firing line till he was shot
himself. He was very daring, and
has been recommended for the V.C.
for his work that day. Maguire was
just such another, though more im-
as angels, but if anyone jostles either
Stairs, I guess St. Peter will see the
fight of his long life; but I always
an Irishman himself, so probably he
will pass them through. I wouldn't
beef when the war finishes, as it will
releases lot of the contractors' sup-
to keep going the way things are
now. I don't see much hope of the
months at least, for the way these
Turks are equipped looks as if Ger-
Turkish prisoners seem heartily sick
of the war. Their machine guns,
revolvers, field glasses, etc., are far
superior to ours, and most of the
Turks seemed in pretty good condition,
though very footsore. I am still
on the Lewis gun, and expect to go
up to the Zietown school later on,
though I am not in the first batch."
Writing to his brother Jack, from
France, August 8th, Pvte. Albert
Henry (one of the "Waratahs"), now
a member of D Company, 1st Bat-
talion, 1st Brigade, says:—Just a line
to let you know how I am. I have
quite recovered from the knock I had.
Am still in the Convalescent Camp,
and having a good time. Expect to
be sent to the Base shortly, and I
suppose I'll do a while there, and then
get back to the trenches again. I
fared alright last time; it's not too
bad. You have to work a bit at
times, but that's nothing when you
can get rations and water. Of course,
if that's scarce it pinches a bit; but
it doesn't often happen. Well, Jack,
I have learned what a charge is like.
I often thought I'd like to go through
one, but I never want to see another.
You don't feel it while you're in it,
but when it's over you begin to think
a bit. We knew the minute we were
to start, and were lined up ready for
the word to "hop over." At last it
came. From then our one thought
was forward—there's no time for any-
describe what we met while crossing
"No Man's Land." The shells, shrap-
nel, and machine gun bullets were
than hail in a heavy storm, but we
never stopped till we got our objec-
tive—the second line of German
sleep for the noise while the bombard-
was a bit of a din in the midst of it.
there was a certain amount of gran-
deur about it. The sky was lit up;
were coming over—tear shells, gas
shells, and others too numerous to
squealing for mercy—"Mercy, Kam-
erad," "Anzac, Mercy." He ought
to get it, too—I don't think. He
1st and 2nd lines that I got hit—a
whack across the shoulder and fore-
badly bent.
From the Front. (Article), Brighton Southern Cross (Vic. : 1896 - 1918), Saturday 10 June 1916 page 3 2020-02-06 14:00 Irom ;the ~ront.
Gunner W.ý Layh, of tlie tlih at., 3rdi
Field Artillery? A.])D., writinig to a rela
tire in B3riglhton, forwards an interesting
account of the voyagn of somei Anzacs
from -T el-?iKebir to F 'rantee. "
lie says: -"iWe left Tel el Kebir on
Miareh 21st. We "were: ordered at 9
o 'clock in the nmorning to be ready.: to
move off at 10. thot night. We had. a
very busy timei.in. getting ;eierything
ready,':and we left the station w?ith just
horses and leirness. The guns and other
things re w ill get'new. .The orders were
that -e were only to take what weo were
wearjtg, but that did not prevent the
men froni taking a cehange and also their
beds. All; the 'other ostulf they put in
kit bags anid sent ?n, butl do not know
whethelr we are likely to see them again,
unless we are veryl Jucky. We had. an
ill.niglit's train jouriney, and arrived ,in
Alexandra at -'8.30 in: the miorning.
Luckily we were. landed from the train
right alongside our boat.. After embark
ing th? hori?es, wei were taken" to our
trooip deck, which was a rotten position
right forward; which tw? decks of horses
above us: Wlhat with the smell and the
noisims they iadeo the position was not
of the best,,.aod, coupled with that, the
fooid w-as onlyo :fair. WVe had a very
sniooth passage, except for the .last day.
On the trip lJife-belts were issued, and
they had- to be worn= all the time, as
there was always the risks of a sub
marine.: On Saturday, a small British
gun boat passed .us, and later on in the
out froni 3faIt the .:boat ainchored,
and' smeonseo ea-'ue out in a / siall
boat with, orders- as to where we
were` to go. Ever?oine? got- a surprise,
as we thought we were going to Mar
soelles. Instead of that, we were ordered
morning, eventially being sent on to Mar
seilles. :Toulon Harbour is very prdtty;,
We arrived at Mtar eilkls about midday
falling, which made the streets . very
muddy. The -roads are made of cobble
stones, and are not mietalled like the
roads in Aiistmrlisha Vhilit waitinig to
move off', we saw a J21of Gfriinimn prison
era pass through. We went through Mar
seilles to a little village, L, Valentiie,
about-8 miles out, where the camp was.
We stayed there until imiddilay Tlursdiay,
when we rodd once more into=M-arseilles
by a diffenrent routite, which was very
pretty.: We entrained,- and .left at 9
hours, and passed -through - some "very
pretty scenery.;, On the trip we passed
through- Lyons .andl ?iuonens, but possed:
round Paris, worse luock. Our destiniation
was- Havre, where we detrained .. and
marched to thecamp, i miles out of-the
town. It is a rest ennip until we get
fitted out.- -When?i this is.,done we will
move off, but where "renins to be sees.
From the Front.
Gunner W. Layh, of the 5th Batl, 3rd
Field Artillery, A.D., writing to a rela-
tive in Brighton, forwards an interesting
account of the voyage of some Anzacs
from Tel-el Kebir to France.
He says:—"We left Tel-el Kebir on
March 21st. We were ordered at 9
o'clock in the morning to be ready to
move off at 10 that night. We had a
very busy time in getting everything
ready, and we left the station with just
horses and harness. The guns and other
things we will get new. The orders were
that we were only to take what we were
wearing, but that did not prevent the
men from taking a change and also their
beds. All the other stuff they put in
kit bags anid sent on, but I do not know
whether we are likely to see them again,
unless we are very lucky. We had an
all-night's train jouriney, and arrived in
Alexandra at 8.30 in the morning.
Luckily we were landed from the train
right alongside our boat. After embark-
ing the horses, we were taken to our
troop deck, which was a rotten position
right forward, which two decks of horses
above us. Wlhat with the smell and the
noises they made, the position was not
of the best, and, coupled with that, the
food was only fair. We had a very
smooth passage, except for the last day.
On the trip life-belts were issued, and
they had to be worn all the time, as
there was always the risks of a sub-
marine. On Saturday, a small British
gun boat passed us, and later on in the
out from Malta the boat anchored,
and someone came out in a small
boat with orders as to where we
were to go. Everyone got a surprise,
as we thought we were going to Mar-
seilles. Instead of that, we were ordered
morning, eventially being sent on to Mar-
seilles. Toulon Harbour is very pretty,
We arrived at Marseilles about midday
falling, which made the streets very
muddy. The roads are made of cobble
stones, and are not metalled like the
roads in Australia. Whilst waiting to
move off, we saw a lot of German prison-
ers pass through. We went through Mar-
seilles to a little village, La Valentine,
about 8 miles out, where the camp was.
We stayed there until midday Thursday,
when we rode once more into Marseilles
by a different route, which was very
pretty. We entrained, and left at 9
hours, and passed through some very
pretty scenery. On the trip we passed
through Lyons and Rouens, but passed
round Paris, worse luck. Our destiniation
was Havre, where we detrained and
marched to the camp, 5 miles out of the
town. It is a rest camp until we get
fitted out. When this is done we will
move off, but where remains to be seen.
FROM THE FRONT. (Article), The North Western Advocate and the Emu Bay Times (Tas. : 1899 - 1919), Tuesday 9 January 1917 page 2 2020-02-06 12:31 ' FROM THE FRONT.
Private Ira. 'Ferguson, of the 40th
Hatt.. iii. writing to his parents at
Stanley from England under data 16th
Xovcmberf says . he never felt sp'Tvell
?in his life, and tlTcy were expec'.jng to
V transferred the following waek . tj
France. Tlicy'liad just been seiTed
with their sheenskin' coats, whitii he
lemarKea upon as Deinc spien'liu. Jn
London he met Will Tulloch. :-nd Jinn
;^tv and had 'a p:ood old yarn' wi+h
Allan Emmett. whom he describes as
'just the same as ever.' By the
rime mail Mrs. C. %.- Smith, of Stan
Icy., also received a card from her
brother,! Private P. Thompson, who is
?n 'France' doinor garrison duty, and is
not, with his battalion. Private
is a stranw coincidence that he. should
('Matty'), of Stanley, who enlisted in
Tasmania. ?'. ' . ' ?
FROM THE FRONT.
Private Ira Ferguson, of the 40th
Batt., in writing to his parents at
Stanley from England under date 16th
November, says he never felt so well
in his life, and they were expecting to
be transferred the following week to
France. They had just been served
with their sheepskin coats, which he
remarked upon as being splendid. In
London he met Will Tullochm, and also
gow [?] and had a "good old yarn" with
Allan Emmett, whom he describes as
"just the same as ever." By the
same mail Mrs. C. C. Smith, of Stan-
Iey, also received a card from her
brother, Private P. Thompson, who is
in France doing garrison duty, and is
not with his battalion. Private
is a strange coincidence that he should
("Matty"), of Stanley, who enlisted in
Tasmania.
A REGULAR PATTERN OF DEATH Curtain Falls On The Bootra Bore Tragedy (Article), Barrier Daily Truth (Broken Hill, NSW : 1908; 1941 - 1954), Monday 11 August 1947 [Issue No.12,318] page 3 2020-02-05 10:06 deposed that* No./ 3 Bore on Salisbury
Day to repair.it about 8 or 9 months
ago. He made efforts to repair It, but
1 and after a conversation with him en
had to go. to Wilcannia, sick. At Wil
May 22 when work again commenccd.
Witness used to go out at least thrc:
said nothing about the ground facing
whether they considered the work dan
| Equipment was a Southern Cross No. 2
I cattle the next night in the yards when
I saw Mason coming. He was very up
set and he said We've had a tragedy to
Billy alive. He said he waited for a:
, with Clark.
the Flying Doctor. Then he. Mason, and
that Salisbury Downs and Bootra Sta
had been engaged in the grazing indus
the bore with Henderson and it was de
cided to put George Day on the Job. He
failed to pull out the four inch columns 1
Gardiner again saw Henderson and ob
tained the services of a man named Gis
cel, who tried to pull three columns of
Job was completed. Gardiner again went
He said he had drilled down to the cas
ing with the tools, but the bit had bro
to release the tools. Witness had in
; shaft to 20 feet.
Witness stated that It was very raro
did not know anything about well sink
ing himself. There was no truth In the
with tho work because there was no
timber in it. There had been no sug
?To Mr. O'Dea: Witness said that the
bore near the woolshed was clay nil the
Did it occur to you that the same dry
shaft? -- No.
done any well sinking?— No. I'did not
! discuss It with either Mason or Clark.
You know thut a well sinker would
not need a well sinker. Mason was mak
Mr. O'Dea's question 'Don't you think
it should have beeu timbered' produced
witness Was not an expert. Asked again,
the Job again, wc would have it timbered,
when in WUcannla he had explained
what»was wanted to Clark and what was
mining experience and the Job would suit
Mr. Gaiter: You inspected tho Job
* Did you consider It safe?— Yes.
male of Clark nave details of the fatal
and put it back In working order. Hd
j bad had seven years boring experience.!
He. told- of his association on the Job
until Clork arrived. Clark was not
Jammed at the 64-fcot level. Clark said
while but not In bores. After a con*
ferencc with Gardiner it wits decided
to the accldcnt and there were no sign*
of a fall. '1 was quite satisfied in my
own mind,' said the witness. 'We used
to test the walls every time wc went
down, stopping for examination ot differ'
cnt times. We never thought wc needed
any timber nor did we ask for any be.
cause we thought it was safe.'
that Clark was at the bottom of th«*
shaft and he (Mason) was usins a mir
was down' the shaft at that time. 'I
said 'How are you ?' and he replied '1
can get out of this' and I said to fie'
Just burled him In a flash. I should
say he was burled in about 12 feet. I
remained for f-bout 15 minute* then
I got there about 5 p.m.'
He explained notification of the acci
dent. 'We thought,' said Mason, 'that
day ana I was quite satisfied in mv own
assisted in the rescue nttcmpts. We
were good friends and Clark did not com
Job. As a matter of fact wc were bot*'
going into WllcannJa tocether the next
week.' Mascn prcduccd and tendered j
a snail naa been dug there. A round
hole was dug as It will always arch Itself
The first five feet ox the shaft was
cloy then from there to 60 feet was fine
sand, then a crystallised sand forma
Mr. Gaiter:, Was there any Indlca*
tlon of a previous fall ?— No. .
Just before the fall the men were hav
ing a smoke and witness said 'I'll go
down to finish the Job' but Clolrk said
'No. you're too heavy to pull up. I'll
go dewn.' Witness was 17 stone and
seemed to be a man of practical experi
ence and did his Job well. Gardiner
times a week and ask hew the Job way
going along, and If it was safe. Any
was obtained. Witness had dene some
well-slnklng in Queensland. A borer
seme times has to do a bit of well sink*
inp. The Zinc miners had filled the
hole to within four feet cf the top with
the sand taken out. When witness wen!
down again the eld walls were struck
To Mr. O'Dea. Mason said that the
well was not timbered because It was
week fcr the sand to dry. At the 35-foot
level it had time to dry. This was thr
sand which came awav. Mason had
not been down the hole since It had
gene past the 40-foot to 45-fcot level.
been well sinking or sunk a shaft In
Do ycu still say you're an expert after
that ?— I didn't say I u;as an expert
We had discussed the safety cf the
jcb.
When the two timbcrmen came out
j Every time Clark went down he
1 tested the wall* and when he camc up
Witness used to ask him how thing?
Mr. O'Dea: You also had the casing tc
the top with a crow bar might cfiec*
the walls?— I den't think so, but it l
It was Clark's wish that Mason die
not go down past the 45-foot level a.-.
There was vibration and the weigh;
of the machlnc— 2\'3 tons to be consid
cred.
of the Ncrth Mine, resident at 190 Zcblna
of experience with well-sinking in tha'
country. He told of meetinT Gardiner
cut. On June 30 he saw Abe Vigar anC
went out to do the Job.
spent in putting cutting plate* and tim
ber around the bc-ttom cf the shaft. The
hat was cn the head when the body was
found. On the Monday the body wa»
Qfi tn 5ft f(Vt nf trill nhnu. tV,« rr-u.
been timbered to 49 or 50 feet when wit
ness got to the bcrc and had been alterec'
for straightne.ss. The soil was natur
ally damp and it was that, that kept l:
body was recovered. He did a good Jcb
get into difficulties. Drift is very de
ceptive. When the air gets In it allows
Masrn as on expert ? — I couldn't say
man.'s ability.
You wouldn't dream of going Into that
the shaft you would know it was treach
Yea. When ycu get sand of this type
Continuing, witness said that- the In
side of the shaft would dry fn about
.shaft because he could not timber it.
Timber for the shaft would cost' about
The crowbar might have on effect on
the walls with very heavv blows. Clark
was burled with white drift sand from
this country and net to sink a well with
out timber ? — No. .
That completed the evidence. Addres
sing the bench. Mr. O'Dea stated: 'it
teen prevented, while Mason ls an ex
pert bcrcr. he la not an expert well
sinker. so you get a dangerous job being
dene by someone who does net know
enough abcut the Job. I don't want
any Indictment but this Job has caused
'.he life of a fellow being.
'Secondly. I think we are all agreed
that this should have been limbered
aua inai ,mt. Mason carried out a Job
Slslnora Pastoral Company did not make
oroper enquiries to find out the capabil
ities of Mason.' Mr. O'Dea asked the
Ccroner to add riders, to that affect to
prevent such' an occurrence happening
Mr. Oalter, after a short adjournment,
and brought In the verdict of accidental
death. »
During the final suyimlng up both Mr
Brown, on behalf of the Elsinora Pas
tcral Company, and Inspector Gorman,
fcr the Police, expressed their appreci
ation of the work dene by people in
Ms courage and fidelity in staying down
have 5tood it. He expressed thanks
to Messrs Vigar and Hopkins, the Fly
ing Doctor Service and especially to Mr
Selwyn Woolcock, the pilot, Messrs Hey
Kocd and Davis and the miners who
were unsuccessful In the first rescue at
Condolences from the Police were ex
people cf the district durln? the whole
?,m »es\?nd the women. Mrs.
white, Mrs. Gardiner and' Mrs. Oalter
111 Particular. He admired the cour
ace of Mnson,
in case of trouble?—No.
are not timbered?—I don't think so.
deposed that No. 3 Bore on Salisbury
Day to repair it about 8 or 9 months
ago. He made efforts to repair it, but
1 and after a conversation with him en-
had to go to Wilcannia, sick. At Wil-
May 22 when work again commenced.
Witness used to go out at least three
said nothing about the ground being
whether they considered the work dan-
gerous or safe?—They said it was quite
Equipment was a Southern Cross No. 2
cattle the next night in the yards when
saw Mason coming. He was very up-
set and he said We've had a tragedy to-
Billy alive. He said he waited for at
with Clark.
the Flying Doctor. Then he, Mason, and
that Salisbury Downs and Bootra Sta-
had been engaged in the grazing indus-
the bore with Henderson and it was de-
cided to put George Day on the job. He
failed to pull out the four inch columns
Gardiner again saw Henderson and ob-
tained the services of a man named Gis-
sel, who tried to pull three columns of
job was completed. Gardiner again went
He said he had drilled down to the cas-
ing with the tools, but the bit had bro-
to release the tools. Witness had in-
shaft to 20 feet.
Witness stated that It was very rare
did not know anything about well sink-
ing himself. There was no truth in the
with the work because there was no
timber in it. There had been no sug-
To Mr. O'Dea: Witness said that the
bore near the woolshed was clay all the
on top?—Yes.
Did it occur to you that the same dry-
shaft?—No.
done any well sinking?—No. I did not
discuss It with either Mason or Clark.
Didn't you ever go down?—I left it
You know that a well sinker would
ask payment at so much a foot?—We did
not need a well sinker. Mason was mak-
Mr. O'Dea's question "Don't you think
it should have been timbered" produced
witness was not an expert. Asked again,
the job again, we would have it timbered,
when in Wilcannia he had explained
what was wanted to Clark and what was
mining experience and the job would suit
Mr. Gaiter: You inspected the job
before the fall?—Yes.
Did you consider it safe?—Yes.
mate of Clark gave details of the fatal-
and put it back in working order. He
had had seven years boring experience.
He told of his association on the job
until Clark arrived. Clark was not
jammed at the 64-foot level. Clark said
while but not in bores. After a con-
ference with Gardiner it was decided
to the accident and there were no signs
of a fall. "I was quite satisfied in my
own mind," said the witness. "We used
to test the walls every time we went
down, stopping for examination at differ-
ent times. We never thought we needed
any timber nor did we ask for any be-
cause we thought it was safe."
that Clark was at the bottom of the
shaft and he (Mason) was using a mir-
was down the shaft at that time. "I
said 'How are you?' and he replied 'I
can get out of this' and I said to get
just buried him in a flash. I should
say he was buried in about 12 feet. I
remained for about 15 minutes then
I got there about 5 p.m."
He explained notification of the acci-
dent. "We thought," said Mason, "that
day and I was quite satisfied in my own
assisted in the rescue attempts. We
were good friends and Clark did not com-
job. As a matter of fact we were both
going into Wilcannia together the next
week." Mason produced and tendered
a shaft had been dug there. A round
hole was dug as it will always arch itself
The first five feet of the shaft was
clay then from there to 60 feet was fine
sand, then a crystallised sand forma-
Mr. Gaiter: Was there any indica-
tion of a previous fall?—No.
Just before the fall the men were hav-
ing a smoke and witness said "I'll go
down to finish the job" but Clark said
"No, you're too heavy to pull up. I'll
go down." Witness was 17 stone and
seemed to be a man of practical experi-
ence and did his job well. Gardiner
times a week and ask how the job was
going along, and if it was safe. Any-
was obtained. Witness had done some
well-sinking in Queensland. A borer
some times has to do a bit of well sink-
ing. The Zinc miners had filled the
hole to within four feet of the top with
the sand taken out. When witness went
down again the old walls were struck
To Mr. O'Dea, Mason said that the
well was not timbered because it was
week for the sand to dry. At the 35-foot
level it had time to dry. This was the
sand which came away. Mason had
not been down the hole since it had
gone past the 40-foot to 45-foot level.
been well sinking or sunk a shaft in
sand?—No.
way?—Yes.
Do you still say you're an expert after
that?—I didn't say I was an expert.
We had discussed the safety of the
job.
When the two timbermen came out
you put yourself under them?—Yes.
Every time Clark went down he
tested the walls and when he came up
Witness used to ask him how things
Mr. O'Dea: You also had the casing to
the top with a crow bar might effect
the walls?—I don't think so, but it is
It was Clark's wish that Mason did
not go down past the 45-foot level as
There was vibration and the weight
of the machine—2½ tons to be consid-
ered.
of the North Mine, resident at 190 Zebina
of experience with well-sinking in that
country. He told of meeting Gardiner
out. On June 30 he saw Abe Vigar and
went out to do the job.
spent in putting cutting plates and tim-
ber around the bottom of the shaft. The
hat was on the head when the body was
found. On the Monday the body was
25 to 30 feet of soil above the body. The
been timbered to 49 or 50 feet when wit-
ness got to the bore and had been altered
for straightness. The soil was natur-
ally damp and it was that, that kept it
body was recovered. He did a good job.
get into difficulties. Drift is very de-
ceptive. When the air gets in it allows
Mason as an expert?—I couldn't say
man's ability.
well-sinker?—Yes.
You wouldn't dream of going into that
country without timber?—No.
before?—Yes, at Wanaaring, Henley and
the shaft you would know it was treach-
erous?—Yes.
And that made the well dangerous?—
Yes. When you get sand of this type
Continuing, witness said that the in-
side of the shaft would dry in about
shaft because he could not timber it.
Timber for the shaft would cost about
The crowbar might have an effect on
the walls with very heavy blows. Clark
was buried with white drift sand from
this country and not to sink a well with-
out timber?—No.
That completed the evidence. Addres-
sing the bench. Mr. O'Dea stated: "It
been prevented, while Mason is an ex-
pert borer, he is not an expert well-
sinker, so you get a dangerous job being
done by someone who does net know
enough about the job. I don't want
any indictment but this job has caused
the life of a fellow being.
"Secondly, I think we are all agreed
that this should have been timbered
and that Mr. Mason carried out a job
Elsinora Pastoral Company did not make
proper enquiries to find out the capabil-
ities of Mason." Mr. O'Dea asked the
Coroner to add riders, to that affect to
prevent such an occurrence happening
Mr. Gaiter, after a short adjournment,
and brought in the verdict of accidental
death.
During the final summing up both Mr.
Brown, on behalf of the Elsinora Pas-
toral Company, and Inspector Gorman,
for the Police, expressed their appreci-
ation of the work done by people in
his courage and fidelity in staying down
have stood it. He expressed thanks
to Messrs Vigar and Hopkins, the Fly-
ing Doctor Service and especially to Mr.
Selwyn Woolcock, the pilot, Messrs Hey-
wood and Davis and the miners who
were unsuccessful in the first rescue at-
Condolences from the Police were ex-
people of the district during the whole
business, and especially the women, Mrs.
White, Mrs. Gardiner and Mrs. Gaiter
in particular. He admired the cour-
age of Mason.
A REGULAR PATTERN OF DEATH Curtain Falls On The Bootra Bore Tragedy (Article), Barrier Daily Truth (Broken Hill, NSW : 1908; 1941 - 1954), Monday 11 August 1947 [Issue No.12,318] page 3 2020-02-04 16:34 r, Curtain Falls On The Bootra I
V Bore Tragedy
A series of unfortunate and uncanny Incidents which seemed
to fit into o regular pattern of death were responsible for. the
earth. This was revealed gt the inquest at White Cliffs on
Friday. A finding of accidental death was returned, as rc
1 ported in Saturday's issue.
Events (rampfrtd thi» way:
(1) — THr«e m«n had trUd to fr«e the bore eating and failed.
(2)— R«o Maion came on tha teene and had another man to help him.
They decided to tlnfc a imafl round shaft at the ttde of tho eating and
(3)— The ataltUnt became ill with appendicitis and work was sus
wet sand, it was thought, in the wails of the shaft wero becoming allowed
(4)— Clark came afong and the job progressed. He was a light man,
Maion up from the bottom. *
The job would have been finished In another hour or so before
(6)— It was just a few minutes after 'smoko,' so a few extra minutes
on top would probably have laved Mm.
(7)— He was only burled to tha ehest In the first fall and *aid he
-8-— Just two days previous to the fatality the telephono line from
The rest of the story Is common know
ledge. The fall occurred; Mown went
to the homestead on foot and mujei*
Abe Vlgar and Tom Hopkins offered
station manager Lcs Gardiner their help.
He readily accepted and shortly after
wards the body was released. I
Final act of the drama took place at 1
the White Cliffs Police Station on Prl
day when District Coroner, Mr. c.
Counsel for the Australian Worker*' I
Union, of which Clark had been a mem- 1
bcr, and relatives of the deceased, Mr.!
precautions In ascertaining the extent ot
Mason's ability and experience when hlr
1ns him.
the Job again he would not timber.
tragedy but as rescuer Tom ? Hopkins
country. He himself would have tim
wet clay, then down to 60 feet It waa
salt, but extremely damp. -The last few
The fall had occurrcd from about the
accede to Mr. O'Dea's ridera. In his
. opinion they were tantamount to a find
ing of criminal negligence to those con
'A,fter due consideration of the
Bore, Bootra Station, died from as
was working,' said Mr. Gaiter, thus
chapter In the history of White
Brown for the Elsinora Pastoral Coy.
the deceased and Inspector B. R. Gor
Broken Hill Courthouse acted as deposi
first witness
of the tragedy, Senior Constable Fran
In the presence of the coroner, where it
removed the body to the Wilcannia Hos
that on June 12 about 6.20 p.m., in re
him: 'Billand I were digging the shaft
crowbarrlng the bore casing. I was on
he said 'It's all right, I can get out
. down the shaft and cover him.
'I waited for about 15 minutes to
ran and walked to Bootra.'
The shaft was 51 ft. 6 Ins. to the sand
miners. Heywood and Davis, were at the
Attempts were made that morning to re
June 24 by miners from the Zinc Cor
the back were exposed. The miner's hel
-met was still on the head and the body
was in an advanced state of decomposi
tion and leaning towards the of
the shaft. On July 14 he again de
He had been in the district about, three
A question as to dependants, by Mr.
To Mr. O'Dea: I have been in the dis
In the country previously at Warren.
homestead. It had lately been retim
Witness had never done any well sink
Mr. O'Dea's questions, 'Would you say
this is very dangerous country?' and
'Would you say it was dangerous coun
try?' were objected to and disallowed.
; earth. The distances were approximate.
| In answer to Mr. O'Dea witness fur
had left the shaft earlier because tiin
j ber was not provided for it, but that wrs
! only gossip at the camps. I asked Gar
1 diner and Mason and they said that
I was definitely not correct. There was
'no sawn timber at the bore when I ar
I rived on the first occasion and saw
I nothing that could be used for timbering.
| . He was told that the man working
| with Mason had left earlier, but Mason
I had said that Fuller (the man men
[ tloned) had had to go to Hospital with
I appendicitis. At that time they were
I down about 20 feet. In Wilcannia Gar
I Witness asked Mason if he had had
jany shaft experience and Mason replied:
j I am not an experienced ;well sinker, but
I I am a licensed borer. He produced a
There was no indication from the sur
the white sand below. The mound o!
white sand at the top of the shaft wa.:
ahaft was damp.
Mr. O'Dea: There was no way 0/ con
Mr. O'Dea: There was no way of heJp
In case of trouble? — No.
Government Medical Officer and Medi
cal Superintendent of the WUcannla
Stewart gave evidence of his examina
tion of the body on July 15 at the WU
cannla Mortuary. There was no marks
more than instantaneous and was pro
bably caused by asphyxia. It was diffi
body was permeated with sand, the tex
Deceased was born at Gundagai said
not been working he had lived in Tar
in New Guinea with the 2/l4th Field
health. He was receiving a pension of 1
5/- weekly from the Repatriation De
Witness had last seen his son in Wil
Curtain Falls On The Bootra
Bore Tragedy
A series of unfortunate and uncanny incidents which seemed
to fit into a regular pattern of death were responsible for the
earth. This was revealed at the inquest at White Cliffs on
Friday. A finding of accidental death was returned, as re-
ported in Saturday's issue.
Events transpired this way:
(1)—Three men had tried to free the bore easing and failed.
(2)—Reg Mason came on the scene and had another man to help him.
They decided to sink a small round shaft at the side of the casing and
(3)—The assistant became ill with appendicitis and work was sus-
wet sand, it was thought, in the walls of the shaft were becoming allowed
(4)—Clark came along and the job progressed. He was a light man,
Mason up from the bottom.
(5)—The job would have been finished in another hour or so before
(6)—It was just a few minutes after "smoko," so a few extra minutes
on top would probably have saved him.
(7)—He was only buried to the chest in the first fall and said he
(8)—Just two days previous to the fatality the telephone line from
The rest of the story is common know-
ledge. The fall occurred; Mason went
to the homestead on foot and miners
Abe Vigar and Tom Hopkins offered
station manager Les Gardiner their help.
He readily accepted and shortly after-
wards the body was released.
Final act of the drama took place at
the White Cliffs Police Station on Fri-
day when District Coroner, Mr. C.
Counsel for the Australian Workers'
Union, of which Clark had been a mem-
ber, and relatives of the deceased, Mr.
precautions in ascertaining the extent ot
Mason's ability and experience when hir-
ing him.
the job again he would not timber.
tragedy but as rescuer Tom Hopkins
country. He himself would have tim-
wet clay, then down to 60 feet it was
salt, but extremely damp. The last few
The fall had occurred from about the
accede to Mr. O'Dea's riders. In his
opinion they were tantamount to a find-
ing of criminal negligence to those con-
"After due consideration of the
Bore, Bootra Station, died from as-
was working," said Mr. Gaiter, thus
chapter in the history of White
Brown for the Elsinora Pastoral Coy.,
the deceased and Inspector B. R. Gor-
Broken Hill Courthouse acted as deposi-
FIRST WITNESS
of the tragedy, Senior Constable Fran-
in the presence of the coroner, where it
removed the body to the Wilcannia Hos-
that on June 12 about 6.20 p.m., in re-
him: "Bill and I were digging the shaft
crowbarring the bore casing. I was on
and he said 'It's all right, I can get out
down the shaft and cover him.
"I waited for about 15 minutes to
ran and walked to Bootra."
The shaft was 51 ft. 6 ins. to the sand
miners, Heywood and Davis, were at the
Attempts were made that morning to re-
June 24 by miners from the Zinc Cor-
the back were exposed. The miner's hel-
met was still on the head and the body
was in an advanced state of decomposi-
tion and leaning towards the middle of
the shaft. On July 14 he again de-
He had been in the district about three
A question as to dependants by Mr.
To Mr. O'Dea: I have been in the dis-
in the country previously at Warren.
homestead. It had lately been retim-
Witness had never done any well sink-
Mr. O'Dea's questions, "Would you say
this is very dangerous country?" and
"Would you say it was dangerous coun-
try?" were objected to and disallowed.
earth. The distances were approximate.
In answer to Mr. O'Dea witness fur-
had left the shaft earlier because tim-
ber was not provided for it, but that was
only gossip at the camps. I asked Gar-
diner and Mason and they said that
was definitely not correct. There was
no sawn timber at the bore when I ar-
rived on the first occasion and saw
nothing that could be used for timbering.
He was told that the man working
with Mason had left earlier, but Mason
had said that Fuller (the man men-
tioned) had had to go to Hospital with
appendicitis. At that time they were
down about 20 feet. In Wilcannia Gar-
Witness asked Mason if he had had
any shaft experience and Mason replied:
I am not an experienced well sinker, but
I am a licensed borer. He produced a
There was no indication from the sur-
the white sand below. The mound of
white sand at the top of the shaft was
shaft was damp.
Mr. O'Dea: There was no way of con-
Mr. O'Dea: There was no way of help
in case of trouble? — No.
Government Medical Officer and Medi-
cal Superintendent of the Wilcannia
Stewart gave evidence of his examina-
tion of the body on July 15 at the Wil-
cannia Mortuary. There was no marks
more than instantaneous and was pro-
bably caused by asphyxia. It was diffi-
body was permeated with sand, the tex-
Deceased was born at Gundagai, said
not been working he had lived in Tar-
in New Guinea with the 2/14th Field
health. He was receiving a pension of
5/- weekly from the Repatriation De-
Witness had last seen his son in Wil-
and down.
Recounting his first news of the
A TILE-WALKER. SHOT IN THE HEAP. CHARGE OF CRUELTY. (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Monday 1 July 1895 [Issue No.4679] page 1 2019-12-24 08:32 SHOT m THE HEAP.
An eldorly man named Thomas Carr, a
resident of Rodcn street, WostMelbourno
was charged at tho North Melbourne
Alexander Johunon, laborer, residing
in tho Baiuo street as tho defendant,
stated that on tho afternoon of tho loth
inst., ho was on tho roof repairing some
spouting. His cat was innocently witch
ing the operation, when he noticed itsud-
denly jump up in tho air, perform souio
gymnastic feats and then fall co bho
ground. On looking ovor the sido ef the
liousa ho saw tho dofendunt with a gun
in his hand. Ho oxamincd tho cat and
found a two inch wire null firmly
embedded in it3 he«l. Ho spoke to tho
defendant, who roplicd ' (hat tho
cats wero n — nuisance." and
if ho gob n chance. Witness
informod him that his cut was a quiet,
wcll-bclmvcd one, and was nevor allowed
out after dark. It was kept inaido to kill
The defence was that nearly all tho
cats in West Melbourno congregated
nightly in defendant's pardon, and created
an unearthly row, and that ho (defendant)
was quite juciiticd in putting duwn such
Tho Bench held a diffaront view of tho
mnttcr, and ordered defendant to pay a
lino of 2s Gd, with 21s Gd coits.
SHOT IN THE HEAD,
An elderly man named Thomas Carr, a
resident of Roden street, West Melbourne
was charged at the North Melbourne
Alexander Johnson, laborer, residing
in the same street as the defendant,
stated that on the afternoon of the 15th
inst., he was on the roof repairing some
spouting. His cat was innocently watch-
ing the operation, when he noticed it sud-
denly jump up in the air, perform some
gymnastic feats and then fall to the
ground. On looking over the side of the
house he saw the defendant with a gun
in his hand. He examined the cat and
found a two inch wire nail firmly
embedded in its head. He spoke to the
defendant, who replied that the
cats were a — nuisance," and
if he got a chance. Witness
informed him that his cat was a quiet,
well-behaved one, and was never allowed
out after dark. It was kept inside to kill
The defence was that nearly all the
cats in West Melbourne congregated
nightly in defendant's garden, and created
an unearthly row, and that he (defendant)
was quite justified in putting down such
a nuisance.
The Bench held a different view of the
matter, and ordered defendant to pay a
fine of 2s 6d, with 21s 6d costs.
A Ghastly Tragedy. THE WIFE SHOT DEAD. HUSBAND SERIOUSLY WOUNDED. (Article), Gympie Times and Mary River Mining Gazette (Qld. : 1868 - 1919), Thursday 26 November 1896 [Issue No.3523] page 3 2019-12-24 08:29 Quib, described as an ironmonger, 23
'years of age, was married by Kev. iiobt.
- 'Angus, Presbyterian minister, at a
? matrimonial agency office, to Margaret
Watson, 25, spinster, of Kew, aua a
? native of Greymouth, New ZeaUnd, the
'and Annie Holt. The second marriage
certificate, however, shows several de
this apparently trivial fact may be: the
aeroi 'from which Tuesday's tragedy 'has
grown. ' Though set out as a spinster, on
her marriage with Quia .the second !cer
tificate shows that oh. 15th November,
1891, one. ^Margaret Helena Hayes,1 21
???'? years oldV became the wife of Tho.mas
?William : Watson, 22 years of aRe, at| Si.
Ignatius B. C. Church, Richmond, , the
bfficmtibg clergyman being the Rev. T.hos
' Cahill. There is also a difference in; the
: names of the parents, for though ' Grey
mouth, New Zealand,' appears as ; the
name in the 1891 marriage is given, »s
while in the certificate, bearing date! of
given as James Watson, taijor,
and the mother's Mary Con
became a widow or separated, and, meet
woman. Having deceived her lover, in
admit the truth, and allowed the marri:
of the parents so as to prevent any dis
evidently ; confessed the truth . to her
of despondency. In sympathy .with- him,
and considering herself the cause oi pis
tiouble, the Trornan has joined her hus
band in worrying into the condition; of
is that Dr. Charles Ryan ha3 succeeded by
Qain is expected to recover.
Quin, described as an ironmonger, 23
years of age, was married by Rev. Robt.
Angus, Presbyterian minister, at a
matrimonial agency office, to Margaret
Watson, 25, spinster, of Kew, and a
native of Greymouth, New Zealand, the
and Annie Holt. The second marriage
certificate, however, shows several de-
this apparently trivial fact may be the
germ from which Tuesday's tragedy has
grown. Though set out as a spinster, on
her marriage with Quin the second cer-
tificate shows that on 15th November,
1891, one Margaret Helena Hayes, 21
years old, became the wife of Thomas
William Watson, 22 years of age, at St.
Ignatius R. C. Church, Richmond, the
officiating clergyman being the Rev. Thos
Cahill. There is also a difference in the
names of the parents, for though "Grey-
mouth, New Zealand," appears as the
name in the 1891 marriage is given as
while in the certificate, bearing date of
given as James Watson, tailor,
and the mother's Mary Con-
became a widow or separated, and, meet-
woman. Having deceived her lover in
admit the truth, and allowed the marri-
of the parents so as to prevent any dis-
evidently confessed the truth to her
of despondency. In sympathy with him,
and considering herself the cause of his
trouble, the woman has joined her hus-
band in worrying into the condition of
their own hands.—Age.
is that Dr. Charles Ryan has succeeded by
Quin is expected to recover.
A Ghastly Tragedy. THE WIFE SHOT DEAD. HUSBAND SERIOUSLY WOUNDED. (Article), Gympie Times and Mary River Mining Gazette (Qld. : 1868 - 1919), Thursday 26 November 1896 [Issue No.3523] page 3 2019-12-24 08:25 & Ghastly Tragedy.
at Middle Park about 10 p.m. He waa
sbaggering from Bide to side of the foob
path and was bareheaded.. His appear
his quavering voice, as he said 'I did it,
I did it,' seemed to support that pre
sumption, until a3 he swayed beneath
he waa badly wounded. Then it was seen
that his clothing waa saturated with
blood. ' I did it, I did it, ' he repeated
had happened,, ' Ib was an arrange
ment,' he replied slowly. ' We were to
die together— to die together.' ' Who
were to die V demanded Foster. ' We
were to— she was to die nrst ana tnen
die— I can't die— I can'b diej' he plain
Foster led the man to the Middle Park,
ConBtable Foster procured a cab, and as
soon as possible conveyed bhe injured man
bhe beach, and a few yards north of the
. Middle Park baths discovered the body of
a young -women lying face downwards on
the sand. The woman was quieb dead,
nat. Tne Dotty was carried to tne morgue
with the hafe and revolver. The hat
removing his hat. After firing, .however,
put In ib the two marriage certificates of
communication .addressed to him.
to the police, he and his wife had not gob
mutually. Fixing upon the nexb nighfc
at their residence ab 10 Napier-street, -
the cram to Sonth Melbourne. Alighting at
Bleak House, they walked along the Es
planade until reaching a spot near tha
for some minutes. Then they bade each :
other good-bye, and the woman took the '
revolver and, raising it to her head fired. '
The shot, however, did nofc appear to take -
effect, for she handed the weapon bsok to ?'??
her husband and said, ' You do it,
Alec.' Quin then said, ''Good bye,
Maggie,' and fired a shoe into his wife's
right temple, which killed her instantly. :
As she fell back he lifted tho weapon
again and discharged ifc at; his own fore
head. The bullet entered his b?airi, but,
nevertheless, seemed to dohim little harm,
and, staggering to his feefc, he walked up
:and down tha beach for a fow seconds. ?
Then, maddened by pain, ho rushed into
the sea waist deep', and, throwing himself
Jdown; endeavoured to drown . himself.
?His courage failing aftor three attempts,
?Quin returned to the.besch, and scrambl
. According to the documents found, it
A Ghastly Tragedy.
at Middle Park about 10 p.m. He was
staggering from side to side of the foot
path and was bareheaded. His appear-
his quavering voice, as he said "I did it,
I did it," seemed to support that pre-
sumption, until as he swayed beneath
he was badly wounded. Then it was seen
that his clothing was saturated with
blood. "I did it, I did it," he repeated
had happened. "It was an arrange-
ment," he replied slowly. "We were to
die together—to die together." "Who
were to die?" demanded Foster. "We
were to—she was to die first and then
die—I can't die—I can't die," he plain-
Foster led the man to the Middle Park
Constable Foster procured a cab, and as
soon as possible conveyed the injured man
the beach, and a few yards north of the
Middle Park baths discovered the body of
a young women lying face downwards on
the sand. The woman was quiet dead,
hat. The body was carried to the morgue
with the hat and revolver. The hat
removing his hat. After firing, however,
put in it the two marriage certificates of
communication addressed to him.
to the police, he and his wife had not got
mutually. Fixing upon the nexb night
at their residence ab 10 Napier-street,
the tram to South Melbourne. Alighting at
Bleak House, they walked along the Es-
planade until reaching a spot near the
for some minutes. Then they bade each
other good-bye, and the woman took the
revolver and, raising it to her head fired.
The shot, however, did not appear to take
effect, for she handed the weapon back to
her husband and said, "You do it,
Alec." Quin then said, ''Good bye,
Maggie," and fired a shot into his wife's
right temple, which killed her instantly.
As she fell back he lifted the weapon
again and discharged it at his own fore-
head. The bullet entered his brain, but,
nevertheless, seemed to do him little harm,
and, staggering to his feet, he walked up
and down the beach for a few seconds.
Then, maddened by pain, he rushed into
the sea waist deep, and, throwing himself
down, endeavoured to drown himself.
His courage failing after three attempts,
Quin returned to the beach, and scrambl-
According to the documents found, it
LATE NULLA ROBERTS KILLED IN ACTION BRILLIANT FOOTBALL CAREER (Article), The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), Wednesday 6 October 1915 [Issue No.1646] page 3 2019-12-24 08:07 "Nulla Roberts was one of tho best three-
to-day from ono of Ills old Wallaroo Club
legal und sporting circles tills morning that
Tho parents of tlio late Mr. Roberts for
many years lived at Bathurst, where' bis
(architect's branch). It was at All Saints-
College/ -at Bathurst, that young Roberts
learnt to play Rugby football. The prin
cipal of the college then was tho Rev. id. E.
Bean and Captain Charles Bean, the Com
were close colleagues of tho deceased In
minence as a wing three-quarter in tho
matches between Bathurst . and Orange.
Bud But lor, a relative of the late Sir Fran
wing with Roberts. 1-Ie, too, was one of the
i'nnthfill rnmihitlnn hnr) nrAPArfnrl him. nnd frit
many seasons he wus regarded as the most
brilliant .three-quarter who had over donned
tho jersey for the fumous school. When he
left school he wus articled to the legal firm
of Messrs. Laurence and M'Luch.an, and was
admitted on November Hi, 1895, to practice
as a solicitot and' attorney of tho Supreme
Court , of New South Wales. For several
.and Roberts. Mr. Lane (Paddy), who was
under liis own name.
Now South Wales against Queensland In 1800,
and ho again played aguinst tho northern
State in 1802 and 1SU3. In the same year he
Now Zealand. Ho was a strong sprinter and
a deadly tackier, and undoubtedly ono of the
tho old Rugby Union code. lie was a close
took an interest in golf. He was in his 15111
"Nulla Roberts was one of the best three-
to-day from one of his old Wallaroo Club
legal und sporting circles this morning that
The parents of the late Mr. Roberts for
many years lived at Bathurst, where his
(architect's branch). It was at All Saints
College at Bathurst that young Roberts
learnt to play Rugby football. The prin-
cipal of the college then was the Rev. E. E.
Bean and Captain Charles Bean, the Com-
were close colleagues of the deceased in
minence as a wing three-quarter in the
matches between Bathurst and Orange.
Bud Suttor, a relative of the late Sir Fran-
wing with Roberts. He, too, was one of the
football reputation had preceded him, and for
many seasons he was regarded as the most
brilliant three-quarter who had ever donned
the jersey for the famous school. When he
left school he was articled to the legal firm
of Messrs. Laurence and M'Lachlan, and was
admitted on November 18, 1895, to practice
as a solicitot and attorney of the Supreme
Court of New South Wales. For several
and Roberts. Mr. Lane (Paddy), who was
under his own name.
New South Wales against Queensland In 1890,
and he again played against the northern
State in 1892 and 1893. In the same year he
New Zealand. He was a strong sprinter and
a deadly tackier, and undoubtedly one of the
the old Rugby Union code. He was a close
took an interest in golf. He was in his 45th

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.