Information about Trove user: lizyewers

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,945,691
2 noelwoodhouse 3,982,931
3 NeilHamilton 3,452,467
4 DonnaTelfer 3,403,381
5 Rhonda.M 3,350,064
...
5142 denf 3,826
5143 balhannah 3,825
5144 historicalencounters 3,825
5145 lizyewers 3,823
5146 kezza 3,822
5147 tomhoracek 3,821

3,823 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

February 2020 384
January 2020 98
December 2019 328
November 2019 129
October 2019 559
September 2019 19
July 2019 69
June 2019 78
May 2019 4
April 2019 50
March 2019 90
February 2019 24
January 2019 141
December 2018 32
October 2018 36
September 2018 404
August 2018 24
July 2018 73
June 2018 757
May 2018 6
April 2018 283
March 2018 235

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,945,489
2 noelwoodhouse 3,982,931
3 NeilHamilton 3,452,338
4 DonnaTelfer 3,403,355
5 Rhonda.M 3,350,051
...
5134 denf 3,826
5135 balhannah 3,825
5136 historicalencounters 3,825
5137 lizyewers 3,823
5138 mccark 3,823
5139 kezza 3,822

3,823 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

February 2020 384
January 2020 98
December 2019 328
November 2019 129
October 2019 559
September 2019 19
July 2019 69
June 2019 78
May 2019 4
April 2019 50
March 2019 90
February 2019 24
January 2019 141
December 2018 32
October 2018 36
September 2018 404
August 2018 24
July 2018 73
June 2018 757
May 2018 6
April 2018 283
March 2018 235

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
THE BIOGRAPHER. MR. JUSTICE MOLESWORTH, Mr. Justice Molesworth [?] (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 15 May 1886 [Issue No.1050] page 42 2020-02-22 13:32 Court of this country, is fourth in XXX
Court of this country, is fourth in descent
the carrying of his motion for the adoption of
to read them. An elevation of the eye-
of the profession he is admitted to have been
THE BIOGRAPHER. MR. JUSTICE MOLESWORTH, Mr. Justice Molesworth [?] (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 15 May 1886 [Issue No.1050] page 42 2020-02-22 13:31 the same time he was created a uA
member of the old LegirishreCaeaciMy
proclamation of the Constitution, Jfi, g£
worth received the appointment of s<i£
General. Be assisted in framing
pwai Act, that was recruited to can? ja
the provisions of the Constftaion;^
force the provisions ot urn umstataion;ri
vrben the task of forming a Mhusttrvua
posed upon Mr. William Nicholson, ctj»||
the carrying of his motion for the adopted
vote by ballot th^ cenUeman gftghttk*
operation of Mr. Molee worth, but the m
I puimui for the fotmaUonofthialGntttqij,
subsequently abandoned. EaxfrmlSU
appointment as « inartfi judge d ft*
Court was determined upon, and «
general satisfaction; and the attooniS
solicitors of Melbourne united intB"SC
to Mr. Moleaworth, congratakdi« biaa
his elevation. The judicial depeuaaiioB
*hich the new judge vasctlkdowotoS
aide was that of equity, and fa Jj
yean be has almost unintwmtrivJ
ministered this difficult branch of ImJU.
ness, with so much skill, and iBioaany
a spirit of fairness and thorough inipafti&
as to inspire public confidence to iTmS
drote in the justice of fan derisou
In January, ISG6, he became chief jaig tf
the Court of Mines, the office bans tea
created by the Mining Statute oflBEid
in dealing with many complex
Mr. Jnsuce Molesworth acqaiwd ftn^.
lion of being a most painsiakiiKa^ial
the soundest lawyer on the Victorjutai.
In presiding over the Court of Miaaktt
to deal with what was almost anew jotts
tion; bat during the time he held the c&e
he gave general satisfaction to the soften mi
the profession. Although hs attention va
confined to the equity and mining jnrisda
tions of the court, his Bobmi possess!
also an intimate knowledge of tteprincipla
of the common law and of the cnnual
law. He gave great attend® to tie
preparation of his judgments, rind
were remarkable at rimes for tee quaint
language in which they wee s«M
Mr. Justice Moleswortb's mincer on Ac
bench was peculiar, and his method of c*
ducting business quite different boo dots
the other members of the court Hen
singularly silent daring an atgaacnt, is
thoroughly attentive. Bit though sppu«i?
quiescent, he was always krenly sppr*™*
of what was going on, and thocghseldaia'
pressing his opinion in words, h» k»W
were eloquent to those who ««* ■*
to xead f ****** An elevation of wo*
brow, a dosing of the eye, * dm*
down of one comer of the sst
showed minutely bat intbemcstexjnw
manner the thoughts which were®*!
through his Honour's mind, and w® w
judge did interrupt counsel o ».
arguments, which was addom, Mt
marks or notations {for his ^tntaflpj"
gwiwaily att*y*t**d the font of prep"®'
terrogatories) were of such * d*snrte^ I
show the direction his mind whWH
to shorten the argument
what in bia opinion were the wrif"
in fhf case. He never w®vj
discussion with count el for the
argument, or "exercise," « ttj»P*2j
called among lawyers. H»
almost inexhaasrible, and to www J
with the utmost attention to
arguments or the most compler t^^
of facts. His kindness and «*rtg*g
innior metnben of the bar were
noticeable; and though no jr
tear to pieoea or expose «
aophtstical amunent more

huh did Me. Justice Mohsa-orthi JMJ
seldom betrayed any impatience of o»*|
m»ta (as be occasionally was) p*w *l
ft far what be considered an
BWori^hinpiiimatfMBi aMUDtti
excited in him a oataral mdkmtwa *" J
when he did bee bit conamgnfr y.fl
jweaaed himself in strong, Had pa*l
^pkeo English. which, perfcaje M *5)
gufht aeem to be ladting m fggl
Bm however be might exp««
there coold be nodocbt a
of thoae who beard him of tbe
of bit purpose, and of to*
of all abatns, frands, and «ttey"Ly.i
impose npoa or to take advantage » |
n««# or incapacity. Perhaps noftoEj.l
ever aat on an EnglishBench

•ota wbolrom any caese were
looking after their own interests l»®7jjjJ
baa a mod remarkable meayg« ^gl
aeemed to be able to retain tot^^l
of dm bete of any £** which „[J
beard before him, no naagah*Mf5£ii
time had elapsed. He aim a»d»ri»^1
diligent <ea&of the daily netoW**
on manj-occasion!, be wwu«*"£i^f
to sdyerttemsntene lad. n
ins Worn bim. Like
»wy be was. when be bad <®cr ^.j
up bis nandjoifficnlt to

▼mood that he was —~ *» w^:"f
to admit hia error. Bj the penenu. ^ w#j
of the profession be is admitted to _
on the whole the greatest
lueprcaidmlinVictota.
the same time he was created a nominee
member of the old Legirslative Council. On the
proclamation of the Constitution, Mr Moles
worth received the appointment of Solicitor
General. He assisted in framing the Elec
toral Act, that was required to carry into
force the provisions of the Constitution; and
when the task of forming a Ministry was im
posed upon Mr. William Nicholson, owing to
the carrying of his motion for the adoption of
vote by ballot that gentleman sought the co-
operation of Mr. Molesworth, but the nego
tiations for the formation of this Ministry was
subsequently abandoned. Early in 1856, the
appointment of a fourth judge of the Supreme
Court was determined upon, and in June of
that year the position was conferred upon
Mr Molesworth. The appointment gave
general satisfaction; and the attoneys and
solicitors of Melbourne united in an address
to Mr. Molesworth, congratulating him on
his elevation. The judicial department over
which the new judge was called upon to pre
side was that of equity, and for nearly 30
years he has almost uninterruptedly ad
ministered this difficult branch of legal busi.
ness, with so much skill, and in so manifest
a spirit of fairness and thorough impartiality
as to inspire public confidence to an unusual
degree in the justice of his decisions.
In January, 1866, he became chief judge of
the Court of Mines, the office having been
created by the Mining Statute of 1865, and
in dealing with many complex minig cases,
Mr. Justice Molesworth acquired the reputa
tion of being a most painstaking judge, and
the soundest lawyer on the Victorian bench.
In presiding over the Court of Mines he had
to deal with what was almost a new jurisdic
tion; but during the time he held the office
he gave general satisfaction to the suitors and
the profession. Although his attention was
confined to the equity and mining jurisdic
tions of the court, his Honour possessed
also an intimate knowledge of the principles
of the common law and of the criminal
law. He gave great attention to the
preparation of his judgments, which
were remarkable at times for the quaint
language in which they were worded.
Mr. Justice Molesworth's manner on the
bench was peculiar, and his method of con
ducting business quite different from that of
the other members of the court. He was
singularly silent during an argument, but
thoroughly attentive. But though apparently
quiescent, he was always keenly appreciative
of what was going on, and though seldom ex-
pressing his opinion in words, his features
were eloquent to those who knew how
to read them. An elevation of the eye-
brow, a closing of the eye, a drawing
down of one comer of the mouth,
showed minutely but in the most expressive
manner the thoughts which were passing
through his Honour's mind, and when the
judge did interrupt counsel in their
arguments, which was seldom, his re-
marks or notations (for his interruptions
generally assumed the form of pregnant in-
terrogatories) were of such a character as to
show the direction his mind was taking on
the subject under discussion, and thus tended
to shorten the argument by showing
what in bhis opinion were the salient points
in the case. He never entered into
discussion with counsel for the mere sake of
argument, or "exercise," as it is generally
called among lawyers. His patience was
almost inexhaustible, and he would listen
with the utmost attention to the most proXX
arguments or the most complex statements
of facts. His kindness and courtesy to the
junior members of the bar were especially
noticeable; and though no judge could
tear to pieces or expose a false or
sophistical argument more thoroughly

than did Mr Justice Molesworth, yet he
seldom betrayed any impatience of manner
until (as he occasionally was) goaded into
it by what he considered an undue want of
time or a disingenuousness in argument which
excited in him a natural indignation. And
when he did lose his equanimity he ex
expressed himself in strong, blunt, plainly
spoken English. which, perhaps to some,
might seem to be lacking in dignity,
But however he might express himself
there could be no doubt in the minds
of those who heard him of the honesty
of his purpose, and of his hatred
of all shams, frauds, and attempts to
impose upon or to take advantage of weak
ness or incapacity. Perhaps no judge who
ever sat on an English Bench ever had a
more profound sense of his duty in protect-
ing the rights of infants, of lunatics, or per-

sons who from any cause were incapable of
looking after their own interests. His Honour
has a most remarkable memory, and he
seemed to be able to retain his recollection
of the facts of any case which had been
heard before him, no matter what length of
time had elapsed. He also appeared to be a
diligent reader of the daily newspapers, for
on many occasions, he would draw attention
to advertisements he had seen in the news-
papers as to the death of persons in
reference to whom litigation was pend-
ing before him. Like all strong-minded
men, he was, when he had once made
up his mind, difficult to move, but if con-

vinced that he was wrong he never hesitated
to admit his error. By the general consensus
of the profession he is admitted to have been
on the whole the greatest magistrate who
has presided in Victoria.
THE BIOGRAPHER. MR. JUSTICE MOLESWORTH, Mr. Justice Molesworth [?] (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 15 May 1886 [Issue No.1050] page 42 2020-02-22 12:51 THE
KB, JU8TICE
Mr- Jwtice lioletvottk
lit. Jwtice Kdaroth,
Court ot uus country, ia loutfa s.
from Viscount Mokswocth,
peer of Ireland In the year l?i& tr^

niljnBIB Blum T®'tl
solicitor In Dublin, and waa i
pointed one of the »"minta hity*'

wu bom in Dublin on:
was called to the Irish bar at
1828, end, choosing the Manster rirng
future sphere of labour, ptsctiaed at n!
aire towns of the southern proving,,**
until 1858, when be resolved on
to Australia, towards which ue*
there was at that time a luge
the borne counter, owing to the <
of the gold discoveries. After a
Adelaide, Mt Molesworth and hia^l
arrived in Melbourne, where %

aided ever since. Ma MoJeswonhtuy
diately admitted to the Victorias hit, v^
was a wun»«...wj wwi iagmtlui|M
earir period, and it was not lor«befatt3
had a very extensive practice at ha J
mapd. So rapidly did be advance buy
tag position at the bar that in ie* £
a year after bis arrival in Ndbau*)
was chosen to fill the high pafoJ
Acting Chief Justice during the ri
on leave ot Sir William ATJeckett
January 4,1654. be appointed to
the duties of Mr. James Croke, s
General, then on leave of absence, an^y
the same time he was crested a uA
THE BIOGRAPHER
MR JUSTICE MOLESWORTH
Mr Justice Molesworth, who has just
resigned his position as a judge of the Supreme
Court of this country, is fourth in XXX
from Viscount Molesworth, who was made a
peer of Ireland in the year 1716. His father

Hickman Blaney Molesworth, practised as a
solicitor In Dublin, and was afterwards ap
pointed one of the examiners in Chancery.
Robert Molesworth, the subject of this XXXX

was born in Dublin on November 3, 1806. He
was called to the Irish bar at Easter term
1828, and, choosing the Munster circuit as his
future sphere of labour, practised as the XX
sizee towns of the southern province of Ireland
until 1852, when he resolved on emigrating
to Australia, towards which new continent
there was at that time a large exodus from
the home country, owing to the exciting news
of the gold discoveries. After a brief stop in
Adelaide, Mt Molesworth and his family
arrived in Melbourne, where they have re

sided ever since. Mr Moleworth was imme
diately admitted to the Victorian bar, which
was a comparatively small institution at that
early period, and it was not long before he
had a very extensive practice at his com
mand. So rapidly did be advance to a lead
ing position at the bar that in less than
a year after his arrival in Melbourne he
was chosen to fill the high position of
Acting Chief Justice during the absence
on leave of Sir William A'Beckett. On
January 4,1854. be appointed to perform
the duties of Mr. James Croke, Solicitor
General, then on leave of absence, about
the same time he was created a uA
GROCERS' NEW TRADING HOURS (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Saturday 2 August 1947 [Issue No.21,903] page 3 2020-02-19 18:19 jROCERS' new
Jading hours
liiDnn. y' ncw trading
he nrwi fro.cers would operate,
teoc?alli!n /ii.of thc Grocers'
'Mounced today. Maftnus)
day J, pMours wm be: Mon-
Prn SatfH y' ®-45 a.m. to 5.45
fi' Sat"rday, 8.30 a.m. to 12.30
kWs werenV?1 n th,at the new
WaRes Rnov.i i l"' of a Grocers'
ducing hn?„ ?etermination re-
tttk. urs from 46 to 44 a
GROCERS' NEW
TRADING HOURS
From Monday, new trading
hours for grocers would operate,
the president of the Grocers'
Association (Mr H. Magnus)
announced today.
The new hours will be: Mon-
day to Friday, 8.45 a.m. to 5.45
pm; Saturday, 8.30 a.m. to 12.30
pm.
Mr Magnus said that the new
hours were a result of a Grocers'
Wages Board determination re-
ducing hours from 46 to 44 a week.
GROCERS' TRADING HOURS. SUGGESTED LICENSE. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Thursday 4 May 1911 [Issue No.20,212] page 9 2020-02-19 18:12 «ItOCl'ltS' TItAIlIX*' IIOI'RS. I
I SUGGESTED LICENSE. I
Al the meeting of Hie Shop Assistants'
and Warehouse Employers' ¿Federation on
Tuesday night, Mr. W. <!. Andersen (organ-1
iserl slated that some grocers' ».hops did not
obi-en e the pro[>er hours of (losing Thcj
were open .tflei 1 o'clock on tSattirilnvs, and
trading vv«is done on 5-nind.us. Steps should
be ttkrti to han« i la« pa-aicd for the licens-
ing of grocers' sho|>s, at ti nominal sum of,
say, 10' a voir After three convictions
for trading after bonis a license should be
It vi.« mentioned that one of the reprc
setitativ-e« of the workmen on llio Ji.t
Packers' lloird bul not received tiotilteation
of the lost ineetinr, nt «hteh a chainiuui
was lo be ehilttl. 'Hie mcctins cotise
quentlv hjiscii
GROCERS' TRADING HOURS
SUGGESTED LICENSE.
Al the meeting of thee Shop Assistants'
and Warehouse Employers' Federation on
Tuesday night, Mr. W. G. Andersen (organ-
iser) stated that some grocers' shops did not
observe the proper hours of closing They
were open after 1 o'clock on Saturdays, and
trading was done on Sundays. Steps should
be taken to have a law passed for the licens-
ing of grocers' shops, at a nominal sum of,
say, 10 a year. After three convictions
for trading after hours a license should be
It was mentioned that one of the repre
setitatives of the workmen on the Tea
Packers' Board had not received notification
of the last meeting at which a chairman
was to be elected. The meeting conse
quently lapsed.
SHOP ASSISTANTS. GROCERS' TRADING HOURS. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Thursday 18 May 1911 [Issue No.20,224] page 9 2020-02-19 18:00 Ml Ol' ASSISTANTS.
cnncr.Rv TRADING nouns. I
Tr.id.tiî after hours by procera on Fri-
ll o iii.-hl-. Saturday afternoons, und dur
¡ii.- i-umliv i.» alleged by the Shop As
H-|II,N' I'ninii to be practised to o ron
? ?'anilla (\ltnt in ciH.im industrial
»ilul».

\t Hu meet nu: of the onion on Tuesday
(v 11-. it liai« statist th.it ct ¡donee* w11»
I 11. .1.1,me.I nilli the olijivt of having
1 . I p Kalin»-« in»litiileil. A miniber of
1 , hint- wire in nie of men Working in
»li I- it ni.-lit iln-.«iiig winaloivs. li tins
.' ilnl lo i-l, the aliia-f inspector of fur-
ia'. . iMr. Mniplii) if m»pistears were
nu. t'air itteiition to this mutter. A
1 I ?! na r. ni, III uliiili it teas nll(-»cd
li' 1,1 la- w 11« alf UKO, who vvn» em
)' ia I li 1 ».iiaa.r. h.id I« deliver order»
Pur .1 5- m ihe v..ft», nnd tins paid 7/U.
Hi- I m. uni mun 8 in the mnrninix till
. I I m iln a talune on four d.ivs, vilulo
<n lulu li Inn-hod nt II) o'clock n't
1 1 ml ian Nitunlaiy nt 1 «Mack in
i1 ia n m When he ii«ked for moro
1 1 1 I a n 1- .Iit-tui'-.« d. 'J ho mmc cm.
1 1 1 « 1« «ml, hud 11 girl cngaficil nu
1 ' n -ii « itl.ii for linrt of the work,
1 ' an .thai dm sln> srrved in tho
» II, «. a ta 1 nt (Mr. Io. !.. Kelly)
1 . I'l-Ul . la al Iii lil il.p impiilioH l18 to llOW
'I 1 1 1« 1 ml. Letters »ero rend from
-1 1 1 .'i I I". 11I1. caancr.itnl.atiiiR tho union
a i' nnd adit nned on the Drapers'
Vi a, ? It-, lal it mis reported that there
v - ill! ,t imlit in the mortuary fund.
SHOP ASSISTANTS.
GROCERS' TRADING HOURS
Trading after hours by procera on Fri-
day nights, Saturday afternoons, and dur
ing Sunday is alleged by the Shop As
sistants Union to be practised to a con
siderable extent in certain industrial
suburbs.

At the meeting of the union on Tuesday
evening it was stated that evidence was
being gathered with the object of having
XXXX proceedings instituted. A number of
XXXX were made of men working in
shops at night dressing windows. It was
decided to ask the chief inspector of fac-
tories, Mr Murphy if inspectors were
giving their attention to the matter. A
letter was read in which it was alleged
that a lad of XX years of age, who was em-
ployed by a grocer, had to deliver orders
four days in the week, and was paid 7/6.
His hours were from 8 in the morning till
6 o'clock in the evening on four days, while
on Friday he finished at 10 o'clock at
night and on Saturday at 1 o'clock in
the afternoon. When he asked for more
money he was dismissed. The same em-
ployer it was said, had a girl engaged as
a XXXX worker for part of the week,
while on other days she served in the
shop. The secretary (Mr. L. L. Kelly)
was requested to make inquiries as to how
they were paid. Letters were read from
Sydney and Perth, congratulating the union
on the award obtained on the Drapers'
Wages Board. It was reported that there
was still a credit in the mortuary fund.
SALES OF PROPERTY. (Detailed lists, results, guides), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Wednesday 22 April 1891 [Issue No.11,280] page 4 2020-02-16 15:37 SALES OP PROPERTY.
SALES OF PROPERTY
SALES OF PROPERTY. (Detailed lists, results, guides), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Wednesday 22 April 1891 [Issue No.11,280] page 4 2020-02-16 15:37 Messrs. Musno and Baillteu report having sold by
auction, nt their rooms, yesterday (coo jointly with Car
Messrs. Munro and Baillieu report having sold by
auction, at their rooms, yesterday (conjointly with Car
Advertising (Advertising), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Saturday 11 April 1891 [Issue No.4670] page 3 2020-02-16 15:32 TUESDAT, Slat APIUL >
At Twelv O'clock.
In the Rooms, t«S Ctotlloa strati . c
Vafaabis Freehold .
HOTEL PROPEBTf,
Comtrcf ' |
DUHWOOD ROAD and ELGIN STREft.
Grand Rent Irodudng rrapsrty, . , ' '
MUNRO and BA1LI.1F.U (conjointly with CAW; .
to bei l bv AuJrroNA ll4, rv4vea toauuetieee';
Tnat valuable freehold ' .
HOTEL PROPERTY, - - - w;
"L"" £ Burwend mart red I
U:lij s'rewt. Hawthorn, know area ton ,>Sii
RAILWAY HOTEL ' >
1 ha bouts D coDiuueted of brick, ad«oatadai 11 1
trams, l.rlcs rtabllneand ranch bona. oad-la tek-ttf
Ism for four years from 1st January. UDLnlaiaMtof
of LSOt per annum.' -n-'1
land 40ft. frontoce to Durwood Rond!by sdsMtkfflr -
Note.— To parties la aeafrh cf n geodf proptlty tttlV ,
is strongly recommeodsd, aa th rwntals oa tk tt i
plratlon ran fas comldarwbty Inermisd, Uffitoffig'
Iwra paid for a isnewal of laoNfnaa MMMW.
l>O0 US. . . . .. - - - i .
Titto al Bale.
TUESDAY, 21st APRIL
At Twelve O'clock.
In the Rooms, 243 Collins street
Valuable Freehold .
HOTEL PROPERTY
Corner of
BURWOOD ROAD and ELGIN STREET
Grand Rent Producing Property
MUNRO and BAILLIEU (conjointly with CAW
NEY and KELLY), have received instructions
to SELL by AUCTION
That valuable freehold
HOTEL PROPERTY
situate at the corner of Burwood road and
Elgin street Hawthorn, known as the
RAILWAY HOTEL
This house is constructed of brick, and sontains 15
rooms, brick stabling and coach house, and is let on
lease for four years from 1st January. 1891, ??? rental
of L200 per annum.
Land 40ft. frontage to Burwood Road by a depth of
Note.— To parties in search of a good property this
is strongly recommended, as the rentals on the ex-
plratlon can be conslderably increased, L??? ?????
been paid for a renewal of lease as a landlord's
bonus
Terms of Sale
Presentation to Prof. Miller. (Article), Sportsman (Melbourne, Vic. : 1882 - 1904), Monday 31 October 1887 [Issue No.350] page 7 2020-02-16 15:17 ana toasts the chairman made a prcsbiitatiou
to the Professor, on bebaU of tli.i club, of a
iu.replythankcd the members for their kind
weight Gneco -Roman champion of toe world.
recic&aun oy irnucssor miliar, ana tne toast oi
Professor Au!>ert. the Hawlborn Amateur ,
Athletic Club ana several others, Mr. Carter
from America. The toacfc of the chairman
concluded a very pkasont evening.
and toasts the chairman made a presentation
to the Professor, on bebalf of the club, of a
in reply thanked the members for their kind
weight Greco -Roman champion of toe world.
recitation oy Professor Miller, and tne toast of
Professor Aubert. the Hawthorn Amateur ,
Athletic Club and several others, Mr. Carter
from America. The toast of the chairman
concluded a very pleasant evening.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.