Information about Trove user: kjgriffn

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

No text corrections contributed yet

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Final Research Project
    List
    Public

    24 items
    created by: public:kjgriffn 2015-11-03
    User data
    Tags:
  2. HIST274 Body of Historical Evidence
    List
    Public

    Research Question: Who did the 1982 Falklands War really benefit?

    Primary Source Collection: Due to the nature of the question the primary source collection will be compiled from different archival collections. These archival collections will include: Trove, The Times Digital Archive and the Margaret Thatcher Foundation Digital Archive. Due to its broad collection of sources Trove has provided newspaper articles and illustrations that are relevant towards the question. The Times Digital Archive includes newspaper articles and will focus more on the British perspective of the research question. Finally, the Margaret Thatcher Foundation Digital Archive will provide transcripts for Thatcher’s speech to the House of Commons in relation to the Falklands crisis.

    Description: This research question will explore the opposing sides in the 1982 Falklands Conflict. The question will examine the military and political motivations by Britain and Argentina over the Falkland Islands. This conflict was embroiled by a geographical claim of sovereignty and confrontations between Britain and Argentina dating back over one and a half centuries. Argentina’s claim was based on ancient treaties forged during Spain and Portugal’s conquest of the New World. Britain countered with the UN benchmark of self-determination - Britain had administered the islands for over half a century and the population of the Falklands was British and, above all, wished to remain so. Argentina’s decision to invade the Falklands can be attributed to its countries new military leader Lieutenant General Leopoldo Galtieri. The decision to retaliate against the Argentinian invaders was finalized by British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. At wars end General Galtieri resigned as both President and commander in chief of the army. In Britain, the war proved to be a turning point for Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, basking in the role of Churchillian war leader and winning the 1983 General election by a landslide majority. The motivations and decisions made by both leaders can be brought into question considering the economic policies of both were in bad shape.

    The main benefactor for the Falklands War was Margaret Thatcher and the conservative party, victory in election of 1983 was bolstered by the Falklands War. To grasp the motivations and decisions made by Thatcher herself, Thatcher's War: The Iron Lady on the Falklands (Source 1) will be consulted. This source will provide information as to why Thatcher believed the decision to retaliate against Argentina would benefit Britain. This source along with MT notes for speech to House of Commons (Source 11) and FCO letter to No.10 (Source 12) in Thatcher’s own words will allow the research question to be answered from the British perspective. In contrast to Thatcher’s belief that the Falkland Islands were of strategic importance The Battle for the Falklands (Source 4) will be used to not only provide background information but also argue that the Falklands War was used by Thatcher to bolster her failing economic polices. The Falklands War: Understanding The Power Of Context In Shaping Argentine Strategic Decisions (Source 15) will be helpful towards examining why Argentina believed invading the Falklands would be beneficial. The Falklands War: Causes and Lessons (Source 13) will be a great help in understanding the specific intentions and motivations for invasion from a broad international context.
    The illustration of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and Argentine President Leopoldo Galtieri (Source 3) though comical displays the true motivations for the Falklands War. Understanding the meaning of this source has provided helpful information towards the research question. Along with "That one's going to be a lot tougher" (Source 10) both illustrations focus on the failure of economic policies by both Britain and Argentina and will therefore will helpful towards the main thrust of the research question – Britain’s victory bolstered Thatcher’s popularity and government.

    Newspapers from Trove (Sources: 2, 6, 7, 8, 9) and The Times Digital Archive (Sources: 5, 16, 17, 18) will be helpful because they provide different accounts of the political and military aspects during the Falklands War. Trove newspapers will be more helpful because they do not contain many pro-British pieces which talk-up the Falklands War. The most notable is Summing up the Falklands operation: Was it worth the cost? (Source 2) an Australian newspaper article questioning the worth of the Falklands War and will help considerably towards the research question. Trove newspapers that contain pro-British articles were chosen because they discuss the benefit of British retaliation against Argentina, helpful because they relate directly to the question. The most notable Times newspaper article is Why neither side is worth backing (Source 5) because it does not talk-up either side but instead criticizes both leaders motivations for the Falklands War, an ideal piece for the research question as it argues what both sides seek to benefit.

    18 items
    created by: public:kjgriffn 2015-08-03
    User data
  3. HIST322 Research
    List
    Public

    6 items
    created by: public:kjgriffn 2015-07-29
    User data
  4. Normandy Landings
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:kjgriffn 2015-08-02
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.