Information about Trove user: jgs383

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

No text corrections contributed yet

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Futurism
    List
    Public

    4 items
    created by: public:jgs383 2019-10-21
    User data
  2. Futurism final
    List
    Public

    20 items
    created by: public:jgs383 2019-11-06
    User data
  3. Futurism in Australia
    List
    Public

    A poem by a stanch Australian Futurist. His futurist philosophy extends past merrily the art scene which he owes the artistic slump to capitalism and consumerism. He wrote this in WWI just as the futurist movement was ending in Europe. He displays many typical futurist qualities; Utopian views, a disgust for past art, writes poetry in a obscure format which is not restricted to any iambic rhythm. He also encorporates marinetti's fetish for violence in his poem. He is very political and a staunch capitalist, hates socialism. great resource, effects of futurism on australian politics.

    8 items
    created by: public:jgs383 2019-11-03
    User data
  4. Modernism and African art
    List
    Public

    Question: "In what way did the racial and cultural bias within Europe affect artists use of African relics in the formation modernist art"
    Main search engine: Trove (with two resources from the Smithsonian)
    This project explores the extensive exploitation and appropriation of African relics (like the Etoumbi Mask, Female Figure, etc) by modernist visual artists such as Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse and Georges Braque in the formation of their abstract art. During colonisation of central and west Africa, many African relics were stolen and sold in black markets across Europe (becoming a luxury commodity). These abstract depictions of the human form caught the eye of experimental artists who wanted to deviate from the underwhelming classical art movements. Picasso for example aimed to depict the human form from multiple angles at once, on a two-dimensional canvas. Artworks from Mali and the Ivory Coast became the perfect tools for his agenda, so he incorporated these artworks (like Etoumbi Mask) into his greatest works of art (like Les Demoiselles D'Avignon 1907 which features two nude women wearing the mask). Artists appropriated the surface value aesthetic of these relics with total disregard for their cultural of social significance. Europe's dominant paradigm at the time (influenced by Freud's ideas of the pleasure and reality principle and ideas of social Darwinism): considered African culture and art to be "primitive". Therefore artists like Matisse and Braque saw African aesthetics as a means of getting in touch with people's repressed virile or sensual side. The primary and secondary resources I have chosen are proof of how much African art influenced the modernist movement (despite its influence being totally overlooked today). For example: resource 1. Is a newspaper article which showcases the racist beliefs held by white nations in the height of the modernist movement and notes that Picasso and Braque were inspired by African sculptures they saw in Paris (which they incorporated into their artworks). This newspaper was created during the modernist era and offers insight into the racist perspective most white people possessed in relation to African culture (which they saw as uncivilised). Sources 2 and 3 are reactions to the exploitation of African relics in the height of the modernist movement. Source 4 is a secondary resource which gives a brief history of the way African art was exploited by modernist artists. I have used a variety of resources (secondary and primary, artworks, newspaper clippings and journals) in order to attain a well rounded understanding of how African art was exploited by modernist artists, why it was, the impact this had on the art world and examples of exploitation.

    7 items
    created by: public:jgs383 2019-08-12
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.