Information about Trove user: ianwright

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,938,441
2 noelwoodhouse 3,978,724
3 NeilHamilton 3,443,038
4 DonnaTelfer 3,397,929
5 Rhonda.M 3,338,052
...
706 pmburdon 67,379
707 French 67,364
708 Dreamingoutloud 67,224
709 IanWright 67,170
710 ianrenard 67,083
711 franm 66,778

67,170 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

February 2020 267
January 2020 38
December 2019 180
October 2019 3
March 2019 10
September 2018 43
June 2018 36
April 2018 119
March 2018 64
December 2017 8
September 2017 16
July 2017 44
April 2017 211
March 2017 219
February 2017 7
January 2017 333
December 2016 456
November 2016 232
October 2016 661
September 2016 460
August 2016 823
July 2016 720
June 2016 345
May 2016 629
April 2016 1,142
March 2016 873
February 2016 514
January 2016 1,339
December 2015 800
November 2015 1,491
October 2015 520
September 2015 969
August 2015 1,187
July 2015 1,839
June 2015 2,269
May 2015 667
April 2015 1,131
March 2015 1,398
February 2015 2,109
January 2015 2,654
December 2014 1,427
November 2014 2,692
October 2014 2,255
September 2014 1,271
August 2014 1,465
July 2014 1,600
June 2014 1,680
May 2014 2,562
April 2014 1,966
August 2013 1
June 2013 43
May 2013 101
April 2013 271
March 2013 206
February 2013 40
January 2013 230
December 2012 213
November 2012 380
October 2012 291
September 2012 73
August 2012 42
July 2012 1,394
June 2012 272
May 2012 203
April 2012 429
March 2012 151
February 2012 261
January 2012 653
December 2011 240
November 2011 105
October 2011 362
September 2011 415
August 2011 176
July 2011 770
June 2011 412
April 2011 278
March 2011 465
February 2011 341
January 2011 443
December 2010 623
November 2010 805
October 2010 524
September 2010 734
August 2010 1,166
July 2010 1,173
June 2010 626
May 2010 1,849
April 2010 1,103
March 2010 545
February 2010 787
January 2010 1,232
December 2009 716
November 2009 222
April 2009 5
March 2009 41
February 2009 573
January 2009 544
December 2008 547
November 2008 192
September 2008 37
August 2008 121

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,938,239
2 noelwoodhouse 3,978,724
3 NeilHamilton 3,442,909
4 DonnaTelfer 3,397,903
5 Rhonda.M 3,338,039
...
704 French 67,330
705 MaxineM 67,269
706 Dreamingoutloud 67,173
707 IanWright 67,170
708 ianrenard 67,067
709 franm 66,778

67,170 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

February 2020 267
January 2020 38
December 2019 180
October 2019 3
March 2019 10
September 2018 43
June 2018 36
April 2018 119
March 2018 64
December 2017 8
September 2017 16
July 2017 44
April 2017 211
March 2017 219
February 2017 7
January 2017 333
December 2016 456
November 2016 232
October 2016 661
September 2016 460
August 2016 823
July 2016 720
June 2016 345
May 2016 629
April 2016 1,142
March 2016 873
February 2016 514
January 2016 1,339
December 2015 800
November 2015 1,491
October 2015 520
September 2015 969
August 2015 1,187
July 2015 1,839
June 2015 2,269
May 2015 667
April 2015 1,131
March 2015 1,398
February 2015 2,109
January 2015 2,654
December 2014 1,427
November 2014 2,692
October 2014 2,255
September 2014 1,271
August 2014 1,465
July 2014 1,600
June 2014 1,680
May 2014 2,562
April 2014 1,966
August 2013 1
June 2013 43
May 2013 101
April 2013 271
March 2013 206
February 2013 40
January 2013 230
December 2012 213
November 2012 380
October 2012 291
September 2012 73
August 2012 42
July 2012 1,394
June 2012 272
May 2012 203
April 2012 429
March 2012 151
February 2012 261
January 2012 653
December 2011 240
November 2011 105
October 2011 362
September 2011 415
August 2011 176
July 2011 770
June 2011 412
April 2011 278
March 2011 465
February 2011 341
January 2011 443
December 2010 623
November 2010 805
October 2010 524
September 2010 734
August 2010 1,166
July 2010 1,173
June 2010 626
May 2010 1,849
April 2010 1,103
March 2010 545
February 2010 787
January 2010 1,232
December 2009 716
November 2009 222
April 2009 5
March 2009 41
February 2009 573
January 2009 544
December 2008 547
November 2008 192
September 2008 37
August 2008 121

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
HARBOUR CAPSIZE. THE KATE TATHAM. A SEAMAN IMPRISONED. (Article), Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954), Tuesday 5 November 1907 [Issue No.10,293] page 5 2020-02-17 16:34 A_ SEAIAN IMfPRISONED.
Early yeatcrday morning the New Zea
land barquetLine Qete Tatham capsized in
west gale.:
The vescl, In charge of Captain J. B.
MIunns, an old and experienced trader to
the port, arrived from Sydney on Satur
Say morning. To stilten her on the run
from the southern port, the vessel had iS
usual, wao taken out after arrival, jthe
5 Jetty, North' Stockton. Arrangements
liexham early yesterday morning, and
the crew were getting ready for that eec,,
the accident occurred. Almost without aoly
warning a-north-westerly squall struck tiih
..?.L oo water forward, and sixteen feet
boands went scrambling over the side,
at No. 5 jetty. Captain Kulsen, o0 that
vdssel, was-on deck, and on seeing what
had occurred he at' once orderei a boat
to be lowered, and to proceed 'to -the res
crew' responded to the order, and a boat
was lowered and manned in double quicie
all, except Reffs, on board 'the Hans, and
receiving every atten-tion. Too much praise
his crew for their prompt- rescue of -the
due to -the Devereaux Brothers and Young
were at -work early getting snapshots of
harbour, and is not likely to be on ob
A SEAMAN IMfPRISONED.
Early yesterday morning the New Zea-
land barquentine Kate Tatham capsized in
west gale.
The vessel, in charge of Captain J. B.
Munns, an old and experienced trader to
the port, arrived from Sydney on Satur-
day morning. To stiffen her on the run
from the southern port, the vessel had 20
usual, was taken out after arrival, the
5 Jetty, North Stockton. Arrangements
Hexham early yesterday morning, and
the crew were getting ready for that when
the accident occurred. Almost without any
warning a-north-westerly squall struck the
feet of water forward, and sixteen feet
hands went scrambling over the side,
at No. 5 jetty. Captain Kulsen, of that
vessel, was on deck, and on seeing what
had occurred he at once ordered a boat
to be lowered, and to proceed to the res-
crew responded to the order, and a boat
was lowered and manned in double quick
all, except Reffs, on board the Hans, and
receiving every attention. Too much praise
his crew for their prompt rescue of the
due to the Devereaux Brothers and Young
were at work early getting snapshots of
harbour, and is not likely to be on ob-
Last Four-Master A [?] square-rigged barque of the deep water brings back to Sydney Harbour the romance of past years. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 12 August 1944 [Issue No.33,271] page 7 2020-02-13 16:52 Ar square-rigged barque of, the deep water brings
-ti THEN a big squaie-ngticd
1/1' foui -masted barque
' * heeling ovci in the wind
which filled hev full spicad of
recently íesidents of Sydneys
ocean subuibs lushed for then
field glasses But the turn
black and white ciait they
iiom some half-foigotten boys'
book of íomance
With ramas rurlpd slit torie
more scdateh at pinchoiasp in the
Haibour a ship of fantas», among
piosaic \essels elad in sobei w11-time
gie\ She wa»- the di «st ship oi hei kind
«¡pen in S\dney foi 21 years and will
undoubtedh be the last tn Usit the
port
South Head lighthouse siphtcri the
Lnu hill off the coast ont» aftei
noon and late at niRht Uirs went out
to meet her With sails »loudly un-
furled shr was to»\ed thiotiRh the
Heads at three o clock in the morning
Q>
1 AWHILL had completed * Ipngthv
non stop voyage She ran into a
temfic »-ale which cained rtwas
hei foresail and foi 16 anxious
bom s the decks weie nwnsh A
membei of the new thiown to the
rieck had his hend bidh inuued bin
the ftallant old ship aged S2 suc-
cessfully rieficd the clement«: to do an»,
fmlher remase As Hie chief mate
«¡aid When the», built hei the», knew
thpir iob But in such ciicumstances
the spamen have a stiff task It
takes four of them for CNimple to
tmn the hufie wheel In mush weathei
As befits such a ciaft the ciew
comprises diTcient laces The ships
complement of 4-> includes South Af)i
cans and fHe yoting Austnlians
All these clements lue and work
harmoniously together Thej are
mostly b«iided youths and spang wit i
alacuty to oideis Quite a menapene
of animals shates then \oyagcs The
captain owns two dogs two cats two
tortoises and two budsei lgars and the
cien has t<- own cat and dos Thpii
at." thVnotrtnrnng ol each trip, six ptgs
and lfi sheep art loaded so that, lhere
week or two- at sea.
When Finland entered the war. the
Lawhill. then owned by Gustaf Erik
son, of the Anland Islands, was
berthed in East. London. South Africa.
IjAWHILJb (3.000 tons) Is constructed
tower to l(i2ft. The fore, main,
except I hat she seems to have In-
Built as a sister ship to the Garth
in 1R92. she has sailed under a
worked as an oil sailer until she wai
sold to G. Windram and Co. in lflll
for £5.500. A. Troberg, of Marie
hamn. in the. Finnish Aaland Islands,
bought her. for £8,500 in 1914. In
1016. with a passage of 122 days from
became part "of Gustav Erikson's fleet
in 1010. and perhaps its most profit-
Lawhill" ..because of her surprising
rood freights. Between long voyages
UUT Lawhill's luck didn't, always
*J hold. In 1927.: when one of the.
120 days out from GpcIohr. Rounding
Ihp Horn =he and the Grief ran Into
but the Law hill escapea with the loss
the 20 yea is she took part in ttlp grain
races was third 12 vear.s ago
111 luck eauRht up with her again
in 1932. Steam always (fives way to
speed of a b14 sailing \essel with a
gested pa.«-sage 10 miles from Skaw
Niemen sank
One of the most remai kable features
from one end of the ship to the othei.
providing caigo «pace out of all pro-
portion to net tonnage
IT would oe a mistake howivei io
like the Law lull is a light mattei On
an a\eiage it needs two tons of new
Manila lope and about 10 000 -.qim p
feet of standaid flax canvas a jeal
Its set of 35 sails cost o\e¡ £2 000 and
more than £o00 a \ear is spent on
new cantas for maintenance
As the Lawhill sailed for ovei 20
».ears in Eriksons fleet an outline ol
the career of that i erna i kable man Is
interesting Deep-water sail has had
its da\ BUt if it hadn t been for
Enkson the big square-iiggeis he
Io\ed would have sailed o\ei then
last horizon man», ycais ago
Island» in 1873 Gustav Enkson
staited his wot king life as a bo\ ot
nine aboaid a small baique in the
Noith Sea timbei ti ade His piogic-»
Wrts lapid sea cook it 13 tnen AB
and bOi> n before he became mate of
a timbei camel at l8 mästet ol a
snnll ship foi two j cats and foi thi
np> t five mate in one of the bl,,
fotrign Romg saileis Aftei having
been maslei of «-eveial oihei veoscls at
the age of 41 he btcame a shipownet
at Manehamn
ßFCAUSF of the shipping slump
which followed the post-wat boom
shipping men aidn t «ant sail Gicat
misses of steam tonnage lay ldlp This
wa the time Enkson chose to gatnei
a fleet of square uggers Evetjbodv
»vanted to get lid of them and he ob
taincd thrm at sciap piiccs Ovei
seveial jciis he bought in Gieat
Bl itain rinlana and othei places Hi
attended ales on vessels destined foi
the ship oieak»»rs ind accumulated a
supplv of sails geai and deck fittings
such as winchTs
One of his first pint h ses altci the
war was the Lawhill in 191*1 ind b\
l<m he hid gathpied to^rthci l8 bi"
ship-, in good condition Hi« supcts«
with Ihem until 1932 put him in i
financial po»-ition lo with land tin
misfortune v blch followed As Tin
nish shipowneis dell clnefij In ccono

lund vectis thev have followed (he
piictice of icUinnm thp foiern
name Seieial of Liiksons «hip
which had passed through vu ion«
hand« still boie theil rn"li h name
HI-, entcipiise leqinren coinage H
coulant take out hull însinanee and
«lill make a piont ulïîcleni to cam
on So even ship destroved Lecame a
dfad loss
Eiikson used to sav tint he loved
hi« sailing >hips and that when he
went thev woulo go too Clouds of wai
hine his fite Othei lovets of squate
nggeis vvondei whethei he still livps
and If he aoes whethei he will be toi
old to keep hi« while sails on the deep
seas
A square-rigged barque of, the deep water brings
WHEN a big squar-rigged
four -masted barque
heeling over in the wind
which filled her full spread of
recently, residents of Sydney's
ocean suburbs rushed for their
field glasses But the trim
black and white craft they
from some half-forgotten boys'
book of romance
With canvas furled she rode
more sedately at anchorage in the
Harbour a ship of fantasy, among
prosaic vessels clad in sober war-time
grey. She was the first ship of her kind
seen in Sydney for21 years and will
undoubtedly be the last to visit the
port.
South Head lighthouse sighted the
Lawhill off the coast one after-
noon and late at night tugs went out
to meet her. With sails proudly un-
furled she was towed through the
Heads at three o clock in the morning,

LAWHILL had completed a Iengthy
non stop voyage. She ran into a
terrific gale which carried away
her foresail and for 16 anxious
hours the decks were awash. A
member of the crew thrown to the
deck had his head badly injured, but
the gallant old ship aged 52 suc-
cessfully defied the elements to do any
furher damage As tie chief mate
said: "When they built her they, knew
their job." But in such circumstances
the seamen have a stiff task It
takes four of them for exmple to
urn the huge wheel In rough weather.
As befits such a craft the crew
comprises different races The ship's
complement of 45 includes South Afri-
cans and five young Australians.
All these elements live and work
harmoniously together. They are
mostly bearded youths and spring with
alacrity to orders. Quite a menagerie
of animals shares then voyagers The
captain owns two dogs, two cats, two
tortoises and two budgerigars and the
crew has it's own cat and dog. Then
at the beginning of each trip, six pigs
and 16 sheep are loaded so that there
week or two at sea.
When Finland entered the war, the
Lawhill, then owned by Gustaf Erik-
son, of the Aaland Islands, was
berthed in East. London, South Africa.
LAWHILL (3.000 tons) Is constructed
tower to 162ft. The fore, main,
except that she seems to have In-
Built as a sister ship to the Garth-
in 1892. she has sailed under a
worked as an oil sailer until she was
sold to G. Windram and Co. in 1911
for £5.500. A. Troberg, of Marie-
hamn. in the Finnish Aaland Islands,
bought her for £8,500 in 1914. In
1916. with a passage of 122 days from
became part of Gustav Erikson's fleet
in 1919. and perhaps its most profit-
Lawhill" because of her surprising
good freights. Between long voyages
BUT Lawhill's luck didn't always
hold. In 1927, when one of the
130 days out from Geelong. Rounding
the Horn she and the Grief ran Into
but the Lawhill escaped with the loss
the 20 years she took part in the grain
races was third 12 years ago.
Ill luck caught up with her again
in 1932. Steam always gives way to
speed of a big sailing vessel with a
gested passage 10 miles from Skaw,
Niemen sank.
One of the most remarkable features
from one end of the ship to the other,
providing cargo space out of all pro-
portion to net tonnage.
IT would be a mistake however to
like the Lawhill is a light matter. On
an average it needs two tons of new
Manila lope and about 10 000 square
feet of standard flax canvas a year.
Its set of 35 sails cost over £2 000 and
more than £500 a year is spent on
new canvas for maintenance
As the Lawhill sailed for over 20
years in Erikson's fleet an outline of
the career of that remarkable man is
interesting. Deep-water sail has had
it's day, but if it hadn't been for
Enkson, the big square-riggers he
Ioved would have sailed over their
last horizon many years ago.
Islands in 1873 Gustav Erikson
started his working life as a boy of
nine aboard a small barque in the
Noith Sea timber trade His progress
was rapid; sea cook at 13, then A. B.
and bos'n before he became mate of
a timber carrier at 18; master of a
small ship for two years and for the
next five, mate in one of the big
foreign-going sailers. After having
been master of several other vessels, at
the age of 41 he became a shipowner
at Mariehamn.
BECAUSE of the shipping slump
which followed the post-war boom,
shipping men didn't want sail. Great
masses of steam tonnage lay idle. This
wa the time Erikson chose to gather
a fleet of square-riggers. Everybody
wanted to get rid of them, and he ob-
tained them at scrap prices. Over
several years he bought in Great
Britain, Finland and other places. He
attended sales on vessels destined for
the ship breakers and accumulated a
supplv of sails, gear and deck fittings
such as winches.
One of his first purchases after the
war was the Lawhill in 1919, and by
1935, he had gathered together 18 big
ships in good condition. His success
with Ihem until 1932 put him in a
financial position to withstand the
misfortunes which followed. As Fin-
nish shipowners deal chiefly in second-

hand vessels they have followed the
practice of retaining the foreign
name. Several of Erikson's ships
which had passed through various
hands, still bore their English name.
His enterprise required courage. He
couldn't take out hull insurance and
still make a profit sufficient to carry
on. So even ship destroyed became a
dead loss.
Erikson used to say that he loved
his sailing ships and that when he
went they would go too. Clouds of war
hide his fate. Other lovers of square-
riggers wonder whether he still lives
and If he does, whether he will be too
old to keep his white sails on the deep
seas.
Barque Lawhill Was in Coal Trade (Article), Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954), Thursday 10 August 1944 [Issue No.21,169] page 2 2020-02-13 15:20 created so much interest, is an in
created so much interest, is an in-
years.
She was then commanded by Captain
tons of South Maitland coal, and
Four-masted Barque in Sydney (Article), Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954), Wednesday 9 August 1944 [Issue No.21,168] page 3 2020-02-13 15:14 hill (2816 tons), arrived at Syd
the Lawhill was in Glasgow fly
Britain went to war with Fin
and Gregory Westwood (Syd
hill (2816 tons), arrived at Syd-
the Lawhill was in Glasgow fly-
Britain went to war with Fin-
and Gregory Westwood (Syd-
Four-masted Barque In Sydney Harbor (Article), The Newcastle Sun (NSW : 1918 - 1954), Tuesday 8 August 1944 [Issue No.8305] page 3 2020-02-13 15:04 the four-masted barque Law
Hiuoacs, blue uuuiu uc accu muv
to an anchorage inside the har
was built at Dundee in 1892, car
ries a crew of 45 men. and
wife of Captain Arthur Soder
lund and their 17-year-old daugh
She was in Glasgow' when war
broke out. fiving the Finnish flag.
the four-masted barque Law-
glasses, she could be seenn mov-
to an anchorage inside the har-
was built at Dundee in 1892, car-
ries a crew of 45 men, and
wife of Captain Arthur Soder-
lund and their 17-year-old daugh-
She was in Glasgow when war
broke out fiying the Finnish flag.
BARQUE LAWHILL'S NEW ROLE NOW TRAINING SHIP FOR SOUTH AFRICAN CADETS (Article), Daily Commercial News and Shipping List (Sydney, NSW : 1891 - 1954), Saturday 18 November 1944 [Issue No.17,419] page 2 2020-02-13 13:33 BARQUE LAWHUL'S NEW ROLE
In August. .1939, there were less
there was no difficulty in obtain
ing the full complement of ap
from the Witwatersrand and '
accepted as members1 of the crew.
old and she is one of the last sail
tlie last century which is still
purpose of entering the Austra
2816. Her length between per
arrangements on the upper com
from aft, but originally there was n
hi' 1904, 12 years after her
' ' baklheaded. ' ' This is a nautical
term which denotes that the top
*' gallant masts were placed abaft
the topmasts: an unusual ar
After being re-rigged the Law
with which to increase the com
shipped in ever increasing quan
carry the entire world's trade be
of the globe gave the square
Under Captain Jarvis the Law
Messrs. ~Cf. 'Windrain & Co., of '
A. M. Troberg, of Mariehanin.
ing ship owner. ' :.
Under this house flag the Law
excellent passages out to Austra
to be one of Erikson 's most suc
.grain race from Australia to Eng
100 clays. Her fastest passage was
while the plodding' Lawhill
trailed ? in at the end after an
exceptionally slow trip of 140 .
days. ?
BARQUE LAWHILL'S NEW ROLE
In August,1939, there were less
On her first voyage under the
As the result of this experiment
there was no difficulty in obtain-
ing the full complement of ap-
and several untrained youths
from the Witwatersrand and
accepted as members of the crew.
old and she is one of the last sail-
the last century which is still
purpose of entering the Austra-
2816. Her length between per-
arrangements on the upper com-
prise a flying- bridge running aft
from aft, but originally there was
In 1904, 12 years after her
"baklheaded".' This is a nautical
term which denotes that the top-
gallant masts were placed abaft
the topmasts; an unusual ar-
After being re-rigged the Law-
with which to increase the com-
shipped in ever increasing quan-
carry the entire world's trade be-
of the globe gave the square-
Under Captain Jarvis the Law-
Messrs. G. Windram & Co., of
A. M. Troberg, of Mariehamn.
ing ship owner.
Under this house flag the Law-
excellent passages out to Austra-
to be one of Erikson 's most suc-
grain race from Australia to Eng-
100 days. Her fastest passage was
while the plodding Lawhill
trailed in at the end after an
exceptionally slow trip of 140
days.
BARQUE LAWHILL'S NEW ROLE NOW TRAINING SHIP FOR SOUTH AFRICAN CADETS (Article), Daily Commercial News and Shipping List (Sydney, NSW : 1891 - 1954), Saturday 18 November 1944 [Issue No.17,419] page 2 2020-02-12 17:03 It was, however, through a for--;
of the Union of South Africa be
at the port of Mariehanin in the
Aaland Islands, arrived off Buf
Railways and Harbours Admini
for the Union Government, re
turning with cargoes of whe.at
improved and. enlarged in order
To-day, therefore, South Afri
training for a career at sea have'
the opportunity of acquiring con
to the cadets of Baltic and Ger
? On her first voyage under the
Union flag the Eailway Admini
cadets as apprentices on the Law
captain stated that the ship en
weather he had experienced dur
stood up to the- rigours of the
? As the result of this experiment
It was, however, through a for-
of the Union of South Africa be-
at the port of Mariehamn in the
Aaland Islands, arrived off Buf-
Railways and Harbours Admini-
for the Union Government, re-
turning with cargoes of wheat
improved and enlarged in order
To-day, therefore, South Afri-
training for a career at sea have
the opportunity of acquiring con-
to the cadets of Baltic and Ger-
On her first voyage under the
Union flag the Railway Admini-
cadets as apprentices on the Law-
captain stated that the ship en-
weather he had experienced dur-
stood up to the rigours of the
As the result of this experiment
KURRI KURRI. (Article), The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 - 1939), Monday 1 June 1908 [Issue No.4486] page 3 2020-01-17 12:02 KURR1 KURRI.
The death took place at 1ns resilience,
TCurri. As previously reported, Mr. Robert
son burst a blood vessel in his stoinuch,
over ready to assist in any movement
cently oponed business as a draper and clo-
and Bro. J. Bill, P.W.M., read thw Masonic
KURRI KURRI.
The death took place at hiss residence,
Kurri. As previously reported, Mr. Robert-
son burst a blood vessel in his stomach,
ever ready to assist in any movement
cently opened business as a draper and clo-
and Bro. J. Bill, P.W.M., read the Masonic
MESSRS. A. AND J. BROWN'S COLLIERIES AT MINMI. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 12 May 1860 [Issue No.6842] page 8 2020-01-16 13:20 MESSRS A. AND J. BROWN'S COLLIERIES AT MINMI.
made to the Government many months
weeks.
Advertising (Advertising), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 12 March 1859 [Issue No.6478] page 2 2020-01-16 12:49 steam ongineä, railway locomotives, wharf, &o., are pre-
and dust," to the extent of 500 tons per day. At p-cscnt
their shipping staitli will bo nt the terminus of their own
railway at Hexham ; but in about one month thoy will bo
able to load ships of large tonnage at Newcastle, «t a deep
water wharf. Apply, in Nowca.stle or at the, mines, to
J. and A. BROWN; or, in Sydney, to their agente,
N.B.-Contracts for cargoes of coal or coke, deliverablo
dinners, daily, 12 till 3, 1shilling. excellent soups, etc.
steam engines, railway locomotives, wharf, &c., are pre-
and dust," to the extent of 500 tons per day. At prescnt
their shipping staith will be at the terminus of their own
railway at Hexham ; but in about one month they will be
able to load ships of large tonnage at Newcastle, at a deep
water wharf. Apply, in Nowcastle or at the mines, to
J. and A. BROWN; or, in Sydney, to their agents,
N.B.-Contracts for cargoes of coal or coke, deliverable

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.