Information about Trove user: genean

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,708,133
2 noelwoodhouse 3,858,036
3 NeilHamilton 3,400,396
4 DonnaTelfer 3,215,563
5 Rhonda.M 3,016,197
...
145 Stanj 342,955
146 Ronda.SHambrook 341,895
147 Jodphrey 341,857
148 genean 339,837
149 Laidoha 326,320
150 dpeep 325,753

339,837 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2019 8,369
July 2019 12,314
June 2019 8,106
May 2019 12,948
April 2019 9,011
March 2019 10,626
February 2019 16,765
January 2019 19,863
December 2018 14,548
November 2018 14,814
October 2018 21,305
September 2018 21,277
August 2018 17,657
July 2018 20,448
June 2018 21,025
May 2018 7,463
April 2018 20,986
March 2018 17,324
February 2018 13,651
January 2018 17,018
December 2017 17,384
November 2017 6,199
October 2017 5,287
September 2017 5,449

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,707,949
2 noelwoodhouse 3,858,036
3 NeilHamilton 3,400,267
4 DonnaTelfer 3,215,542
5 Rhonda.M 3,016,184
...
143 Stanj 342,955
144 Ronda.SHambrook 341,895
145 Jodphrey 341,857
146 genean 339,770
147 dpeep 325,753
148 villageview1 324,613

339,770 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2019 8,369
July 2019 12,314
June 2019 8,106
May 2019 12,948
April 2019 9,011
March 2019 10,626
February 2019 16,765
January 2019 19,833
December 2018 14,546
November 2018 14,814
October 2018 21,305
September 2018 21,277
August 2018 17,657
July 2018 20,441
June 2018 21,022
May 2018 7,463
April 2018 20,962
March 2018 17,323
February 2018 13,651
January 2018 17,018
December 2017 17,384
November 2017 6,199
October 2017 5,287
September 2017 5,449

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 300,556
2 PhilThomas 121,213
3 mickbrook 106,370
4 murds5 61,555
5 GeoffMMutton 42,290
...
509 Atwork11 67
510 autumnstar 67
511 coombe.id.au 67
512 genean 67
513 hep1953 67
514 JoVo 67

67 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

January 2019 30
December 2018 2
July 2018 7
June 2018 3
April 2018 24
March 2018 1


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
THE CONDEMNED MAN, WARTON. (Article), The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Thursday 6 July 1905 [Issue No.14,815] page 4 2019-08-24 23:07 I THE CONDEMNED MAN, WARTON. |
\t the lost, meeting of the Brisbane
carried referring to the condemned tuan
Horn" Secretary under cover of the follow
mfe letter -.Sir-The following resolution
yyas c mod unanimously at our meeting
last evening and I was instructed to for
wird same on to you with the request
tint vou give it your most earnest and
«erious attention We solicit this because
the life of a fellow being is at stal e
Pe«olvcd lhnt thi Council repre
Renting the rede-rated W orl ers Political
Organisations of Brisbane and district here-
by recoids its emiphntrc protest ag-nn-,t
cipital punishment that while regretting
lint the spirit of mercy shown leny alua
the Micdonilels was not extended to the
unfortunate Krnolca recntlj executed th s
Council eorncstlv requests that the Exeeu
tive in ,iving contention to the case
of the m in \\ arion yy ill allow itself to
he influenced bv the ".ame îegard for
mercy a^ w is ey ldenccd in the Macdonald
THE CONDEMNED MAN, WARTON. |
At the lost, meeting of the Brisbane
carried referring to the condemned man
Hon. Secretary under cover of the following
letter :— .Sir-The following resolution
was carried unanimously at our meeting
last evening and I was instructed to forward
same on to you with the request that
you give it your most earnest and
serious attention We solicit this because
the life of a fellow being is at stake.
Resolved : That this Council representing
the Federated Workers Political
records its emphatic protest against
capital punishment that while regretting
that the spirit of mercy shown towards
the Macdonalds, was not extended to the
unfortunate Kanaka recently executed this
Council earnestly requests that the Exective
in giving contention to the case of the
man Warton, will allow itself to be
influenced by the same regard for mercy
as was evidenced in the Macdonald case.
WARTON'S CAREER. (Article), The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1929), Saturday 22 July 1905 [Issue No.29] page 22 2019-08-24 22:50 time in gaol he set about educating liim-;
*elf. H- read and .studied -eame^lly and L
becan-e an. -authority on nuisie aod lu-tory
and an expert at shortiiand.- 'He ftndied
espeeiaSly the lives of such mca as Frede-l
rick the Great and Kapoieoa and went into
t he minutest -details of iiieir eareeni. Oa
hvt release, ftfter sen-in^ a seniixiu-e at
reaUiiige for bm^lary. he went to Done-'
dm, Xcw- Zealand' and was soon in p-.iol.j
On connn* oitt he used to naD£rabont pt^ce^
frequented by the yorog daa^hter of a{
warder nnti] !her father induced the.dctee- ?
tires to get him a job r*ot of the t3wn.j
They did so, going so far as to procure;
tools for him? .and he was to leave oa a i
ccrtam day. He failed to do m. On the1
night of that day a member of tbe Onnedui!
File Brigade iiving 3icar iheho^taS sair^
a house en fire. 'Bimnif^? over to the honsc,
he was -horror-*lrKken, on gsininjT adniit-'
tancc. to find tW dead Indies of tlie owner j
of the itousft, hi^ \iife, and daughter. Cu*- [
^ w-as st once mspeded. and on beir.g
crrcstedamileawcy wasioundto be in pog-1
F«sijon of a pair of ,£e}d gt3SP& titat bddj
Wmi stolen from a MiGciUirV hon.-e whirhj
bad some days previocsjy been broksn'into:
and ?ct O!i Cire. Cintrpol wKh arson and^
merger, he Tms faced ivitli a great ?&&! of .
strong -rin-um*tant«al cviilcnce. - Bat he*
delivered what- w^i? probably the most*
wonderful -a^rc'-S ever nsdc by a |ilUoncrj
to a jnrr. It- lasted ovor six' hnm-s. and ?
sheared liim an acquittal. One of tbe '
frtorit* be told was that' he had kejit onU
of -he tray of- the police Lecau-e be hiA
broken into the soHdtorV house anil set.
fire to it. ' 0c was foithviUi cfaai^tid uitlt!
that offence and sentenced to two terms of]
imprisonment — one of eighteen years a.?d
enotber of Ion yesrs. lie employed his*
spare time in pad, «.rac cf which it least}
was spent in Lyttdton. in pcrfcrfi^g hisj
ednration. and on being rdrased went back
to Victoria, -where he soon reeeirca a i*n- 1
tenee of ten years for housetireaking. Wlusi ?
Ia came out lie £ot some work on a news
paper ; but 1* could nci keep out of crime.
Going to Queensland he look a man'j Sfe.
time in gaol he set about educating himself
He read and studied earnestly and became
an authority on music and history and
an expert at shorthand. He studied
especially the lives of such men as Frederick
the Great and Napoleon and went into
the minutest details of their careers. On
his release, after serving a sentence at
Pentridge for burglary, he went to Dunedin,
New-Zealand and was soon in gaol.
On coming out he used to hang about places
frequented by the young daughter of a
warder until her father induced the detectives
to get him a job out of the town.
They did so, going so far as to procure
tools for him, and he was to leave on a
certain day. He failed to do so. On the
night of that day a member of the Dunedin
Fire Brigade living near the hospital saw
a house on fire. Running over to the house,
he was horror-stricken, on gaining admittance,
to find the dead bodies of the owner of
the house, his wife, and daughter. Butler
was st once suspected. and on being
arrested a mile away was found to be in
possession of a pair of field glasses that had
been stolen from a Solicitor’s home which
had some days previously been broken into
and set on fire. Charged with arson and
murder, he was faced with a great deal of
strong circumstantial evidence. But he
delivered what was probably the most
wonderful address ever made by a prisoner
to a jury. It lasted over six hours and
sheared him an acquittal. One of the
stories he told was that he had kept out
of the way of the police because he had
broken into the solicitor’s house and set.
fire to it. He was forthwith charged with
that offence and sentenced to two terms of
imprisonment — one of eighteen years and
another of ten years. He employed his
spare time in gaol, some of which it least
was spent in Lyttelton, in perfectIng his
education. and on being released went back
to Victoria, where he soon received a sentence
of ten years for house breaking. When
he came out he got some work on a news
paper ; but he could not keep out of crime.
Going to Queensland he look a man's life.
WARTON'S CAREER. (Article), The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1929), Saturday 22 July 1905 [Issue No.29] page 22 2019-08-24 22:04 \riRTo:rs caeeee.
Warton is declared to he identical tritb
a well-kumrn criminal varioady named,
Robert Butler. Janies AViUon, tieoige
Leigh, fiobert DoaneHy. and Kobert-Keed-j
way. He arrived in- Victoria from Iretand
in 1855. He «as then -seven years old. By ]
tfae time he &ud Iieeo in Ihe colony «ite=n
vsars he had served sentences for vamancyr1
larceny, robbery tmJar arms, and burglary. ?
amounting to thirteen years.. Doling bis:
time in gaol lie. set about educating liim-;
WARTON’S CAREER
Warton is declared to he identical with
a well-known criminal variously named,
Robert Butler, James Wilson, George
Leigh, Robert Donnelly. and Robert Needway.
He arrived in Victoria from Ireland in
1855. He was then seven years old. By
the time he had been in the colony sixteen
years he had served sentences for vagrancy,
larceny, robbery under arms, and burglary. ?
amounting to thirteen years.. Doing his
time in gaol he set about educating liim-;
TROUBLE AT TOOWONG. A LAWYER AND A LADY. The Hamilton=Harding Harangue. Terrible Trouble Over a Tantalising Terrier Tyke. The Legal Gentleman Takes the Law into His Own Hands And Fails in the Mulligataway. (Article), Truth (Brisbane, Qld. : 1900 - 1954), Sunday 3 November 1907 [Issue No.406] page 5 2019-08-24 21:52 HARDING AND "HIS DOG.k '
. . MRS. HAMILTON AND HER SON.
HARDING AND HIS DOG.
MRS. HAMILTON AND HER SON.
TROUBLE AT TOOWONG. A LAWYER AND A LADY. The Hamilton=Harding Harangue. Terrible Trouble Over a Tantalising Terrier Tyke. The Legal Gentleman Takes the Law into His Own Hands And Fails in the Mulligataway. (Article), Truth (Brisbane, Qld. : 1900 - 1954), Sunday 3 November 1907 [Issue No.406] page 5 2019-08-24 21:52 'A LAWYER AND A LADY.
Witness: I had tried to catch hlrh.
The P.M.: \Vhat l: this little /sprat
of-'a boy? . . /:.-'- ./ V /; . :./ ;.
Mr. O'Rourka: Boys -ate very- slip
pery. W
The P.M. Is It not. -possible you
aro mistaken In -tho boy.?//
Witness: No; I'm certain it' was
him. I complained about him/ steaK
ing eggs ! '.. / / :/ '. .
Tho P.M. (Incredulously) : 'Stealing;
eggs! I wonder the boy was not -
put tho question; but he -saia,. ''Never/
Mr. O'Rourke said It did : not con- .
cern tho riise.
Tho P.M.: The 'question is. did you;
assault the boy or did you .riot ? That'
Is all I have to consider.
Mar/ I-IalHday, ' a domestic servant, /
employed by Mrs. Harding, saw tho
dogs fighting, and saw defendant fol
hit tho boy with a broom. The >dog
had a string V
Tho P.M. said ho thought Harding
had boon somewhat hot tempered, and'
had unnecessarily used tho, stick oh
tho boy. He would Impose a lino .of
£l, with £1 Is. doctor's fee, 5s. Sd.
costs of court/and 10s. for two wit--
iici-scs. Wlmt about professional
costs'.' ho asked.
Mr. Price : You cannot ask for pro-'
ftfsionalt costs against u brother pro-
;V3!?ionaI. .
Tho P.M.: I am not supposed -to
court I don't know who they aro,
A LAWYER AND A LADY.
______________________________
Witness: I had tried to catch him.
The P.M.: What ! this little sprat
of a boy?
Mr. O'Rourke : Boys are very slippery.
The P.M. Is it not possible you
are mistaken in the boy ?
Witness: No; I'm certain it was
stealing eggs !
Tho P.M. (Incredulously) : 'Stealing
eggs! I wonder the boy was not
put the question; but he said,. ''Never
Mr. O'Rourke said it did : not
concern the case. .
The P.M.: The question is did you
assault the boy or did you not ? That
is all I have to consider.
Mary Halliday, a domestic servant,
employed by Mrs. Harding, saw the
hit the boy with a broom. The dog
had a string
Tho P.M. said he thought Harding
had been somewhat hot tempered, and
had unnecessarily used the, stick on
the boy. He would impose a fine of
£l, with £1 Is. doctor's fee, 5s. 8d.
costs of court and 10s. for two witnesses.
What about professional costs ? he asked.
Mr. Price : You cannot ask for professional
costs against a brother professional
The P.M.: I am not supposed to
court I don't know who they are.
TROUBLE AT TOOWONG. A LAWYER AND A LADY. The Hamilton=Harding Harangue. Terrible Trouble Over a Tantalising Terrier Tyke. The Legal Gentleman Takes the Law into His Own Hands And Fails in the Mulligataway. (Article), Truth (Brisbane, Qld. : 1900 - 1954), Sunday 3 November 1907 [Issue No.406] page 5 2019-08-24 21:38 Mr.. CRourke. arid 'the P.M; tried /to
restrain defendant's flow -of language,
in order to give the "deposition cleric
time to take down the evidence, ' the
P.M. adding "I need not tell you tho
practice." The witness, however, con
tinued his story at a rapid pace, hot
waiting to hear questions by Mr.
O'Rourke. IIl3 story was that ho heard
stones on the lattice work of lils
house, heard t!ie dogs bark 'arid" tho
latch of the gate click, then' saw a
dog fighting with; his dogs, and saw
the servant-girl trying 'to separate
them vrith a broom.' Tho hoy ran out
with his . dog, and witness -called for
lilm to stop. The boy,; howcvcr/'went
on, and witness- followed hini. Cross
ing a water-table, Din. ' (loop .'and; IChi.
wide, ho slipped, and' the .fall- 'broke
his stick. He cullo'd after tlio .bov,
"If you don't stop, I'll, walk' after vo'u
till I meet a constable '
TO "ARREST /YOU" s r
Tho boy. then came back, and. whon
accused of cooling " h!s dog on h«>
culled witness ." a damned «nil
threatened to give- .him a .» ir«..v "
The' boy refused, to divulge h'3
and kicked witness on 'the'.flhlnsSvUh
his blucher boots— "in faot, he la'
fmorc respectably drsscd now than L
have ever seen him," .added the wit
ness. When the boy ' kicked lilm he'
retaliated with the ' . broken "stick,"
which was the only protection 'he had.'
Ho had hold of /the boy's wrist. Mrs.
Hamilton afterwards' camo oil the
scene, and when ho complained of -her
damned liar. I'll flog you."-
The P.M. again had to. interpbsa
saying, "i cannot .possibly get tho
evidence down If you go at that rate."
Witness, continuing/ r'sald that-3Uary;
one of the servants, came, and ha
said, -'Mary, what about the'stono-r
throwing at the dogs T Mary; told ;
Mrs.. Hamilton .about, tlie .boy/ sthrid-/
Ing ' within-, the .' "gate; -watching - the
dogs fight, and y 'Mrs.- 'Hamilton. used:
rmoro bad language. Witness saitlhe'
would not -stand it, but- If. .she would
thrash her . son he would not t&Jce fur
ther action. Hamilton's dog had v"
from head to tall, and the .blood -marks
make it definite about this- boy," wit
ness went on. v \ -\ "
The PiM. : "Surely Mr; = O'Rourke-
knows what he Is about in getting
, his evidence.
defendant Indulged in' a 'regular tor-
nado of words, defy'ing the efforts of
the P.M. and Mr. OrRqurke to -stop
him. The P.M.' then . said;." Tho ques-,
the day named ? 'Confine/ yourself to'
question and answer." ';/'. : / >
Sir. Price : If the' superintendent ' of
tho Sunday school-says this 'is a good
boy, would ho be: correct1? \ '/ / /. ' /
Witness: I' know nothing, about
that. I havo repeatedly seen him-
throwing stones. ' /v---
?»Ir. Price : Did you' "ever -see -him"
do any harm ? .
Witness: Ho -nearly/hit me 'once.
I have seen lilm on three occasions
throw stones in my Vard and ; at the
The P.M. : How; do you accquntjfor
his coming up 'to/you, if ; /.
HE HAD THROWN STONES ? .
to follow him . until 1/ got' a constable
The P.M. : Don't. '-u./tfclnkvVlhb-
could havo got a mfle away /In /tho1
Interval? Another thing: /If he /had
annoyed you before, why. did" not you
tako action? > -/.
Mr. O’Rourke and the P.M. tried to
restrain defendant's flow of language,
in order to give the "deposition clerk
time to take down the evidence, the
P.M. adding "I need not tell you the
not waiting to hear questions by Mr.
O'Rourke. His story was that he heard
stones on the lattice work of his
house, heard the dogs bark and the
latch of the gate click, then saw a
dog fighting with his dogs, and saw
the servant-girl trying to separate
them with a broom. The boy ran out
with his dog, and witness called for
him to stop. The boy, however, went
on, and witness followed him. Crossing
a water-table, 9in. deep and 18in.
wide, he slipped, and the fall broke
his stick. He called after the boy,
"If you don't stop, I'll, walk' after you
till I meet a constable
TO ARREST YOU"
The boy then came back, and when
accused of “sooling" his dog on he
called witness " a damned liar” and
threatened to give him a “crack.”
The boy refused, to divulge his name
and kicked witness on the shins with
his blucher boots— "in fact, he is
more respectably dressed now than I
When the boy kicked him he
retaliated with the broken stick,
which was the only protection he had.
He had hold of the boy's wrist. Mrs.
Hamilton afterwards' came on the
scene, and when he complained of her
damned liar. I'll flog you."
The P.M. again had to interpose
saying, "I cannot possibly get the
evidence down if you go at that rate."
Witness, continuing said that Mary,
one of the servants, came, and he
said, “Mary, what about the stone
throwing at the dogs ?” Mary told
Mrs. Hamilton about, the boy standing
within the gate watching the dogs
more bad language. Witness said he
would not stand it, but if she would
thrash her son he would not take further
action. Hamilton's dog had
from head to tall, and the blood marks
witness went on.
The P.M. : "Surely Mr. O'Rourke
knows what he is about in getting
his evidence.
defendant indulged in a regular tornado
of words, defying the efforts of
the P.M. and Mr. O’Rourke to stop
him. The P.M. then . said, "The
the day named ? Confine yourself to
Mr. Price : If the superintendent of
the Sunday school-says this is a good
boy, would he be: correct ?
Witness: I know nothing, about
that. I have repeatedly seen him
Mr. Price : Did you ever see him
do any harm ?
Witness: He nearly hit me once.
I have seen him on three occasions
throw stones in my yard and at the dog.
The P.M. : How do you account for
his coming up to you, if
HE HAD THROWN STONES ?
to follow him until 1 got a constable
The P.M. : Don't you think he
could have got a mile away in the
interval? Another thing : If he had
annoyed you before, why did not you
take action?
TROUBLE AT TOOWONG. A LAWYER AND A LADY. The Hamilton=Harding Harangue. Terrible Trouble Over a Tantalising Terrier Tyke. The Legal Gentleman Takes the Law into His Own Hands And Fails in the Mulligataway. (Article), Truth (Brisbane, Qld. : 1900 - 1954), Sunday 3 November 1907 [Issue No.406] page 5 2019-08-24 21:04 TROUBLE AT T00W0NQ.
' A LAWYER AND A LADY.'; '''
The (iamiitonIiardiiig Harangue.
Tyke. _ v
The Legal Gentleman Takes the Law into His OWn Hands
And. Fails in. tbc MuliigataT/ny.
„ <—— r
Monday, October 2?, v/as a busy day
at' the. City Police Court, P.M. Rank-
; fng having his" time fully, occupied in
one portion, while Colonel Mooro had
the -other. The latter had SO trivial
eases as -a " pipc-opc-ner.
Then the . principal case was called,
the complainant being - Mrs. Jane
Harding with assaulting her son. at-
Toowong, on October 18,., Defendant
Is a son of the late - Judge Harding,
| and Is a solicitor of the Supreme,
i Court of Queensland. ..Messrs. .p'Shea
I and O'Shea w.ere instructed for the
! defence and that firm . briefed -Bar-
i rlster Fred. VS. OHourke. However,
| Mrs. Hamilton had ' Mr. - J. , B. .Price
\ to conduct her case, arid Ae - scored a
r win, despite the .formidable oppqsi-
' tlon.-'
Dr. Doda was the first witness, and
be deposed to having examined a
youth .named Robert Stewart Hamil
ton, finding a swelling of the- left . hip,
2In. long by half-an-Jcch wide,
-Mrs- Hamilton followed, and stated
that she lived In Elizabeth-street,
Tbowong. On October 18, her son
was - sent a message, which necessit
ated going past Harding's gate, and
be took her dog with him. Later on
something." and she went and saw de
shirt torn,1 and he made a complaint
thrashed her . boy for, and he said that
stones .Into the yard. She replied
"That's a lie, because. he would not do
it," Defendant said, "If he does It
again I will have him put in the -re
dogs had fought five weeks previous
ly, and if a man had "not interfered
her dog, would have killed .Harding's.
Harding had Interrupted several
threes 'whilst the foregoing evidence
caused . a fresh - outbreak. This exas
perated bi3 counsel, who turned sharp
keep quiet. Fit have to
The P.M.': "I cannot listen to two
Hamilton stated 'that Mr. Harding did
not say to her, "If yon will 'thrash
the boy I will not go to the pollub cr
take other action." There hod been
no complaints about her boy-' " sool-
hxg" his dog on to others Her son
was 18 years of age, and "was not a
bad boy. She would give his char
acter If they wished, ile had been
four yeara In the employ of Mr. Gor
don,
Harding: 111 give Ms character.
The PM. : You must net interrupt ;
I heard what you 3ald, and . it's not
Witness, continuing : When Hard
ing said that Iter son cwx-H the gate
anV threw stones In. ?he sa'.d lhat it
was a He. She didn't say "a damned
lie." or "a damn He."
Witness here excitedly Imrst forth':
"I hare been fathe and mother b«tb,
to my children, as they "have not a
father, to look after ther-.."
Witness, cntfnitag : Her Inly Mi!
her he went In to i»:ill Ids dig off de
fendant's d«T?.
Mr. O'Rnurke submitted that th»
case was Improperly before the court,
"her son to take action, whereupon Mr.
Price reported : "The boy Is not of
age. and If "a mother cannot protect
a son who can Z'-
Robert Stewart Hamilton stair T !
that while going the m'-asare for hi
mother, one of defendant's 'To/r-- cene
out of the open gni<v end attacked j
him. He - f
acd threw It, whereupon tho dog ran 1
Inside,- but returned.; to : theattack..-H'ls
.dog broke.away from him, arid enter-
ing Harding's gate,, tackled r two -.dogs
belonging/ to defendant.. . , He \vent -;lh,
pulled, his dog off, an.d'.'ran :.it; un'der
tbe fence 'of the rifle. range. Harding
then came- out arid Vcalled-ihlnt-.-'He
returned, and Harding, caught ;,Hbid of
.him,, by the shirt and .tore, it., Hard
ing' then hit him-;on the :hip.», with.,'. a.
walking -stick, 'which , broke. . Harding1
.asked', liis name,.-cbut. : witness y would
hot ;tellMm: - Harding-Jhit' him tvvlce,
and. galled him al'blackguard/ T
flrat blow 'gave the -bruise .''thie -Vdootor.
saw. He. did not aool -'his :dog'.,on'
to -'-Harding's, 'and' did 'not. .open ;;the
gate - to let his dog = in. ; Harding .-Mt
him before asking any : question. He
ricVer attempted . to ..strike .'Harding,
and did not give him 'checks or any
other provocation— he. - didn't .have
time to give him cheek.- A- boy. nained
-Allard saw 'the assault. : r / -
In answer, to : Mr." 0|Rourke, ' .the
witness " said that . he.-; toid. Allard.' :not
to tell Hardlhg his- name. ' --
. Joseph Allard, aged;- 10 years,.: was
a; very Intelligent 'witness,'; and / cor-
roboratedv what . Hamilton, had , said.
For the defence, . falter/ ;Charles
Harding entered '"j, - r.
' THE "WITNESS-BOX,
but being' lamo. ho .was 'perinitted to
take a seat at the "tabled "My. name
Is Walter Charles 'Harding ; r am a
solicitor of tho% .Supreme Court of
Queensland, practising ' at , Brisbane,"
he commenced. ' Proceeding volubly
he rattled - off that ' he lenew 'the boy
Hamilton as one of ; the . blggest' nuls-
ances In ' the Toowong neighborhood,
and had 'no doubt that he Vwas . res
ponsible for stone-throwing;' breaking
windows, and other/ annoyances.' v,
TROUBLE AT TOOWONG
The Hamilton-Harding Harangue.
Tyke.
His Own And. Fails in the Mulligataway.
_________
Monday, October 22, was a busy day
at the City Police Court, P.M. Ranking
having his time fully, occupied in one
portion, while Colonel Moore had
the other. The latter had 30 trivial
cases as a “pipe-opener.”
Then the principal case was called,
the complainant being Mrs. Jane
Harding with assaulting her son. at
Toowong, on October 18. Defendant
is a son of the late Judge Harding,
and is a solicitor of the Supreme,
Court of Queensland. Messrs. O’Shea
and O'Shea were instructed for the
defence and that firm briefed Barrister
Fred. W. O’Rourke. However, Mrs.
conduct her case, and he scored a
opposition.
Dr. Dods was the first witness, and
be deposed to having examined a youth
finding a swelling of the left hip,
2in. long by half-an-inch wide,
Mrs. Hamilton followed, and stated
that she lived in Elizabeth-street,
Toowong. On October 18, her son
going past Harding's gate, and he
took her dog with him. Later on
something, and she went and saw
shirt torn, and he made a complaint
thrashed her boy for, and he said that
stones into the yard. She replied
"That's a lie, because he would not do
it," Defendant said, "If he does it
and if a man had not interfered,
her dog, would have killed Harding's.
Harding had interrupted several
threes whilst the foregoing evidence
exasperated bis counsel, who turned
keep quiet. I’ll have to
The P.M. : "I cannot listen to two
Hamilton stated that Mr. Harding did
not say to her, "If you will thrash
the boy I will not go to the police or
take other action." There had been
no complaints about her boy "sooling”
his dog on to others. Her son was
18 years of age, and was not a bad
if they wished, he had been four
years in the employ of Mr. Gordon.
Harding : I’ll give his character.
The PM. : You must not interrupt ;
I heard what you said, and it's not
said that her son opened the gate
and threw stones in, she said that it
was a lie. She didn't say "a damned
lie." or "a damn lie."
Witness here excitedly burst forth :
"I have been father and mother both
to my children, as they have not a
father, to look after them."
Witness, continuing : Her boy told
her he went in to pull his dog off
defendant’s dogs.
Mr. O’Rourke submitted that the
case was improperly before the court,
her son to take action, whereupon Mr.
Price reported : "The boy is not of age,
and if a mother cannot protect a son
who can ?
Robert Stewart Hamilton stated that
while going the message for his mother,
one of defendant's dogs came out of th
open gate and attacked him He —
and threw it, whereupon the dog ran
inside, but returned to the attack. His
dog broke away from him, and entering
Harding's gate, tackled two dogs
belonging to defendant. He went in,
pulled, his dog off, and ran it under
the fence of the rifle range. Harding
then came out and called him. He
returned, and Harding, caught hold of
him, by the shirt and tore, it. Harding
then hit him on the hip with a walking
stick, which broke. Harding asked
his name, but witness would not
tell him. Harding hit him twice,
and called him a blackguard. The first
blow gave the bruise the doctor saw. .
He. did not ”soon” his dog on to
Harding's, and did not open the gate
to let his dog in. Harding hit him
before asking any question. He
never attempted to strike Harding,
and did not give him cheek, or any
other provocation— he didn't have
time to give him cheek. A boy named
Allard saw the assault.
In answer, to Mr. O’Rourke, the
witness said that he told Allard not
to tell Hardlhg his name.
Joseph Allard, aged;- 10 years, was
corroborated what Hamilton, had said.
For the defence, Walter Charles
Harding entered —
THE WITNESS-BOX,
but being lame he was permitted to
take a seat at the tabled "My name is
Walter Charles Harding ; I am a
solicitor of the Supreme Court of
Queensland, practising at Brisbane,"
he commenced. Proceeding volubly
he rattled off that he knew the boy
Hamilton as one of the biggest nuisances
in the Toowong neighborhood,
for stone-throwing, breaking windows
and other annoyances.
TAXI TRAGEDY. Hansen's Horrible End. THE UNCERTAINTY OF CISSIE. Queer Story of a Midnight Ride. (Article), Truth (Brisbane, Qld. : 1900 - 1954), Sunday 14 April 1912 [Issue No.635] page 5 2019-08-24 20:12 outside the 'Woolloongabba Hotel, and
saw John Leslie and Hansen in the taxt-j
cab, with him on the driving seat. Wit-
ness engaged Leslie to drive himself ami
one Cissie Littlo to Brunswick-street-
railway station. Leslie rvas sobei;
euougb, but Hansen was pretty drunk-!
When the cab had gonp 40 or CO yards
Hansen stand up, and the n?xt thing
hri npticcd was that th? cab struck a
Veranda post, rind as soon as th? bourp
occurred witness said he missed TTarinpn/
and cqlled out to Leslio t.
TO STOP THE CAB. ' ' m
Constable 0Flaherty said that on the
night' iu question he saw Leslie's taxi,
which was'No. 299, outride the 'Gabba
was short of carbide, hut afterwards
Cissie Littlo ahd Barnes wcro also in it.
Cissie Little, a - golden-haired dame,
;wbo was the occupant of the Inside seat
railway station. Tlie car, to her mmd,
Suddenly she saw Hansen stand up, .and
out. 'She didn't know if the driver of
terrible crash, followed by the car pull-
big up. At the time of the crash Han
sen was off tho car. f
Here the witness assumed the "oyster
or didn't want tu admit that she did.
Cissie, so ehe told Mr. Neilson, was "a
few minutes regauiiug herself," and then
ehe saw lfan&en lying on the footpath. ,
who conducted the inquiry, the query:,
'felt a bump and saw Hansen get off thq '
car. Is that correct or not?" ,
EVADED THE QUESTION. i
Mr. Neilson: Did you actually sefl
Hansen Icavo the car?— No.
Sergeant Casey: Then your statement
full.
locked dame was trying to emulate Sap-:
phira. ' :
that. she had engaged the taxicab.
Sergeant Casey: It wouldu't bo true if
Barnes said that he engaged it f— "Well/
dame! Ci
driver and brother of tho deceased, said
that he was in Butler's garage about 7)
called. He was in good health and sober-
and Wickham-street, and going over he .
saw his brother lying dead ou the foot-
path. Deceased was horn iu Denmark/
and had been iu Queensland 28 yeare.
occurred, said lie saw a crowd of people,
tv?re daqiaged, and there were marks
on the wheel. Hood iuade further ex
aminations of (he piping on the veranda
post, and fouiifi that It was damaged,
in four different places, which correspond
ded with tho marks on the four places off
tho taxi! The trades of the car also led'
up to the post, and then reared awayv
again. ;
Edwin Stephens, motor mechanic, also/
gave evidence, and the inquiry was ad«
journed until Thursday next, April 18. /
outside the Wooloongabba Hotel, and
saw John Leslie and Hansen in the taxicab,
engaged Leslie to drive himself and
one Cissie Little to Brunswick-street
railway station. Leslie was sober
euough, but Hansen was pretty drunk.
When the cab had gone 40 or 50 yards
Hansen stand up, and the next thing
he noticed was that the cab struck a
veranda post, and as soon as the bump
occurred witness said he missed Hansen
and called out to Leslie —
TO STOP THE CAB.
Constable o’Flaherty said that on the
night' in question he saw Leslie's taxi,
which was No. 299, outride the 'Gabba
was short of carbide, but afterwards
Cissie Little and Barnes were also in it.
Cissie Little, a golden-haired dame,
who was the occupant of the inside seat
railway station. The car, to her mmd,
Suddenly she saw Hansen stand up, and
out. She didn't know if the driver of
terrible crash, followed by the car pulling
was off the car.
Here the witness assumed the "oyster “
or didn't want to admit that she did.
Cissie, so she told Mr. Neilson, was "a
few minutes regaining herself," and then
she saw Hansen lying on the footpath.
who conducted the inquiry, the query :
felt a bump and saw Hansen get off the
car. Is that correct or not?"
EVADED THE QUESTION.
Mr. Neilson: Did you actually see
Hansen leave the car?— No.
Sergeant Casey : Then your statement
fall.
Sapphira.
that she had engaged the taxicab.
Sergeant Casey : It wouldn’t be true if
Barnes said that he engaged it ?— "Well,
dame.
driver and brother of the deceased, said
called. He was in good health and sober.
and Wickham-street, and going over he
saw his brother lying dead on the footpath.
Deceased was born in Denmark and
had been in Queensland 28 years.
occurred, said he saw a crowd of people,
were damaged, and there were marks
on the wheel. Hood made further
examinations of the piping on the veranda
post, and found that it was damaged,
with the marks on the four places off
tho taxi. The trades of the car also led
up to the post, and then reared away
again.
Edwin Stephens, motor mechanic, also
adjourned until Thursday next, April 18.
Enoggera Divisional Board. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Thursday 3 May 1894 [Issue No.6722] page 6 2019-08-24 19:44 A letter wns rend from tho: Treaenry, nd- '
rising that £500 had been paid to tho credit of
tho board 011 loan account for tlio construction of
.brnlges. Tlio minutes of tin) comriiittoo ivore
read, und . accounts to the amount, of £97 13s.
Id. wero passed for payment. On loan account
tbe sum of £88 14s. wus passed forpnymont for
Simpson road bridgo. Rates to tlio amount of
£83 had been collected during tho montb. '
Sandy Crbeic BriinoE oviir. Sam/obd Road.
Tenders weto opened for tlio-construotion of
tho Stuidy Creok bridge. Thero wore nine
tenders submitted, und upon tho motion of tlio .
hiliaicmnn, seconded by Mr. Baker, tho 'tender
of Mr. .Robert Wiilne, £240, time ton weeks, ,
wns ucoopied.
! houk of Meetino.
It was resolved on tho motion of Mr.. Paten,
that 011 imd uftor uoxt mooting tho hour of
meeting should be 2.30 p.m. .
, This was nil tho imblio business, and' tlio
mooting terminated. .
A letter was red from the Treasury, advising
that £500 had been paid to the credit of the
board on loan account for the construction of
bridges. The minutes of the committee were
read, and accounts to the amount, of £97 13s.
Id. were passed for payment. On loan account
the sum of £88 14s. was passed for payment for
Simpson road bridge. Rates to the amount of
£83 had been collected during the month.
SANDY CREEK BRIDGE OVER
SAMFORD ROAD.
Tenders were opened for the construction of
the Sandy Creek bridge. There were nine
tenders submitted, and upon the motion of the
chairman, seconded by Mr. Baker, the tender
of Mr. Robert Walne, £240, time ten weeks,
was accepted.
HOUR OF MEETING
It was resolved on the motion of Mr. Paten,
that on and after next meeting the hour of
meeting should be 2.30 p.m.
This was all the public business, and the
meeting terminated.
Enoggera Divisional Board. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Thursday 3 May 1894 [Issue No.6722] page 6 2019-08-24 15:53 Enoggara Divisional Board.
Theriisual monthly mooting of the Enoggcra
Divisional Board was hold yesterday afternoon
in tho lioaHl Hall, Enoggora. There were
present Mossrs. O. H. Chamberlain (chairman),
J. Ptitcn, T.iBooiiiffOU) E. Onsnolr> Wt Bolioiv
and J. F, Cole. Tho minutes of last meeting
wero rend and confirmed.
correspondence.
Tlio following norrespondonoe in wards was:
read und » dealt. with ; From tho
I'liriuga Divisional Board, referring to
tho tollbars upon tlio Toowong roiid,
and requesting tho board to co-nporatp
with tlio Tnringa Board in amending the Act
under which tolls enii bo established. No
action to ho taken at present. From tlio Under
now stack road from Esk; allowed to Btuud
letter 111 reference to tlio roail ' to his houso was
referred to tlio 'Works Committee. From Dr.
louding to .his property be niadoj tho matter
wns loft hi tbocliairmun's hands.' From Mujur
Lynler, complaining that a mistako had boon
mndo ui tho vuluatiou of his property, and re
although the time for appeal lint! expired. Tho.
board took no action." . 1 -
Finance. . . / .
ENOGGERA DIVISIONAL BOARD
The usual monthly meeting of the Enoggcra
Divisional Board was held yesterday afternoon
in the Board Hall, Enoggora. There were
present Messrs.. C. H. Chamberlain (chairman),
J. Paten, T. Robinson, E. Cusack, W. Baker,
and J. F. Cole. The minutes of last meeting
were read and confirmed.
CORRESPONDENCE
The following correspondence in wards was:
read and dealt with ; From the Taringa
Divisional Board, referring to the
tollbars upon the Toowong road,
and requesting the board to co-operate
with the Taringa Board in amending the Act
under which tolls can be established. No
action to be taken at present. From the Under
new stack road from Esk ; allowed to stand
letter in reference to the road to his house was
referred to the Works Committee. From Dr.
leading to his property be made ; the matter
was left in the chairman’s hands. From Mujur
Lyster, complaining that a mistake had been
made in the valuation of his property, and
although the time for appeal lint expired. The
FINANCE

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Archibald Watson - Family
    List
    Public

    To enable the career and family to be separate yet remain connected.

    15 items
    created by: public:genean 2017-12-25
    User data
  2. Mrs Drew’s Paddock
    List
    Public

    Later - Toowong Sports Ground and

    70 items
    created by: public:genean 2018-09-22
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.