Information about Trove user: garrisonau

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,783,711
2 noelwoodhouse 3,897,575
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,272,427
5 Rhonda.M 3,096,310
...
1816 traveltrix 18,304
1817 Joondalup23 18,285
1818 glovett-ntl 18,221
1819 garrisonau 18,208
1820 Verity1 18,191
1821 Braddonboy 18,176

18,208 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 387
September 2019 20
June 2019 43
May 2019 238
April 2019 437
March 2019 68
February 2019 931
January 2019 366
December 2018 214
November 2018 111
October 2018 351
June 2018 46
May 2018 954
April 2018 319
March 2018 545
February 2018 131
January 2018 337
December 2017 480
November 2017 263
October 2017 172
September 2017 200
August 2017 99
July 2017 108
May 2017 338
April 2017 1,562
March 2017 1,536
February 2017 9
January 2017 294
December 2016 863
November 2016 549
October 2016 35
June 2016 374
April 2016 368
March 2016 396
January 2016 247
December 2015 111
November 2015 611
October 2015 1,286
September 2015 1,725
August 2015 256
July 2015 296
June 2015 135
May 2015 66
October 2010 8
September 2010 57
August 2010 266

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,783,509
2 noelwoodhouse 3,897,575
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,272,406
5 Rhonda.M 3,096,297
...
1808 Irwin25 18,313
1809 traveltrix 18,296
1810 Joondalup23 18,285
1811 garrisonau 18,208
1812 glovett-ntl 18,208
1813 Verity1 18,191

18,208 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 387
September 2019 20
June 2019 43
May 2019 238
April 2019 437
March 2019 68
February 2019 931
January 2019 366
December 2018 214
November 2018 111
October 2018 351
June 2018 46
May 2018 954
April 2018 319
March 2018 545
February 2018 131
January 2018 337
December 2017 480
November 2017 263
October 2017 172
September 2017 200
August 2017 99
July 2017 108
May 2017 338
April 2017 1,562
March 2017 1,536
February 2017 9
January 2017 294
December 2016 863
November 2016 549
October 2016 35
June 2016 374
April 2016 368
March 2016 396
January 2016 247
December 2015 111
November 2015 611
October 2015 1,286
September 2015 1,725
August 2015 256
July 2015 296
June 2015 135
May 2015 66
October 2010 8
September 2010 57
August 2010 266

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
The Birdwood Visit. Parliamentary Banquet. Talk About Neutrality. Fine Tribute to Queenslanders (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Tuesday 4 May 1920 [Issue No.14,800] page 3 2019-10-01 23:05 .salt! that by all means wa should bo
with a lower standurd tif living and a
lower system of morals. Thero were
1-aces that might have designs on Aus
tralia. If they were to oncroncli they
required'- to ho considered. Such ques
tions were engaging tlio attention of
General Birilwooil and Admiral Je-lllcoc,
anil must receive tlio consideration 'of
all who wore thinking out the future
oC Australia. (Applause.)
TALK OP REVOLUTION.
Sir. AV. '.T. Vowlcs, in supporting the
toast, assured General Birilwooil that
the Opposition represented an impor
whoio-lioarletlly behind him and the
soldiers. (Applause.) Tlieso days
thero was a lot of tulle of revolution
and of converting Queensland anil
Australia into a republic'. Ami we
heard ft lot of talk of doing away with
tlio military spirit. AVhero was tho
security in that V AVliat was tho iiso
of talking about no navy, no army V AVo
made in tlio air, Japan could lanil suf
ficient troops in -I hours to take
Queensland. (A voice : "Rot.") AVc
should he prepared ami rely on the
(Applause.) Mr. Vow lea proceeded to
acclaim the guest or tho evening in Pie
wannest of terms. (Applause.) _
Tlio toast was enthusiastically
General Birdwood, on rising to re
soul lit! Ansae." He thanked, them all
very much for the. welcome, and ex-
pre'sslitl liis plensuro at tlio fact that
when he left these, slibres ho would
still retain liis association ami com
radeship witli his ' Australians, us he
hail be-en given honorary rank In lite
Australian military forces. (Applause.!
Tlio general then nt some length told
done In war areas, and made references
in I ho work of the sen lor officers. He
described how the tltli lint Dillon was
tlio first to leave Queensland. Ho could
not say whether a Queensland!.'!' was
tins first to land on Gnfiipoli, but among
Hie verv first was the t'tli Battalion.
(Applause.)" if tliey suffered heavily
in Hie landing, they more than held
their own. He traced tho progress of
this famous battalion in Erutiee. The
general lutd o, special word of praise
for General Robertson (Toowooinba),
ami said in reference to Colonel
Butler ( A.A.M.O.), tli-t lie knew of
no man who look il greater interest in
Hip actual lighting done by ills regi
ment. Colonel Wilder-Nellgiin, lie
said, was a man Willi tho most wonder
ful resource ho luiil come across. Con
tinuing ills story, tlio general said
that tlio fiith anil 20th Battalions occu
pied the apex at Gallipoli. That, was
a very trying point, if tliey could have
got beyond that tliey might have got
tlie straits. Subsequently at Poiziorcs
owing to tho thickness of tho wire. Ho
touched on the Light Horse, which, lie
said, lie laid left In the very, very,
fine charge of General Oliauvel.
General Blrdwood spoke of the epic
advance on Damasi?iis, which resulted
armies. Of General Glasgow lie could
not spank Inn highly. Ho WiiH one of
tho liest. and most loyal ullloers that
could lie imagined, and ho (General
Blrdwood) could only hope lie would
meet Willi equal success us
a legislator. Tlio best ho could
say about Genera Glasgow was
that "lie is a limn." t Applause.)
J-I ii found thai, eevlalii Suites "Viii'iioml"
certain things, Snath Australia
cornered medical dinners, while Queeris-
la.ul seemed to laive made its corner
in gene rats. Out of fat generals prac
tically (ine-t.liird came from Queens
land. As In General White, he could
only say Hint, ho looked upon lilin as
a limit I he best staff officer ill I bo
British army. (Applause.) Ik., was
sl.'iiluli, loyal, brave, true, a wise officer,
and a good friend. General Blrdwood'
officers as listed : Generals Chauvcl,
Sellhuim, AViilte, Forsyth, Cannan,'
Coxeti, Eoott, Brand, Grant, Ooddaril,
Wilson, and Spencer-Browne, Paton.
Infantry': Colonels 'Walsh, Mullen,
Wllilfev-Nellgan, Salisbury, M'Sharry,
DiHvsun, Norrlc. Davis, Ferguson,
Travel's, Currle, Toll, Davies, Freeman,
Boarrd, Heron, Woolcook, Flhitoff,
JrnJay, Denton. Lane, Qulnn. . Arrell,
Christie, Midgioy. Milne, O'Donnell,
Ridley, Robinson, AVynler, Annand.
Hiighes, Mailer, M'Cartney, Light
l'lorso : Colonels Stoilart, Bourne,
Foster, Generals AA'llson antl Grant.
A.A.M.C. : Colonels Bods, Butler, Dixon,
Cfoll, Frnser, Hustable, Macartney,
Marks, M'Leun, SInle, AV'ooster, Sutton.
Lavraek,. Hancock, Miles, Radford,
AVieclt, Stnnsflcld, and Maunder. Chap-
laitis-: Garland, Gordon, Green, Mor-
rlngtbn, Mills, Osborn. V.C.'s: Captain
Cherry, Lieutenant Borelln, Lieutenant
P.udgen, Lance-corporal Gordon.
Tho gqnorai went on to say thnt lie
doing mora J"or them than any other
country. Before passing, lie must men
nurbes anil also by the tunncllers.
Speaking- generally, lie believed that
those who came through tho war
wore all tho better for tlio experience.
AVhlie we were thinking of the .soldiers
ho hoped wo' would never forget tho
fallen — tho best and l ho bravest. Ho
wished lie could tell them about them.
some men had absolutely charmed
lives, They led their men through
through. Others equally bravo were
killed In their first attack. Ho knew
of ono case in which of IIS relations
who 'went to tlio war, 117 came back ;
sons killed. Australia had como into
her nationhood. She had put lier
General Bifdwod contemptuously re
ferred to tho fact thnt Where ho was
in ono town not long ago lie heard
that smnll slips of paper hud been
printed, "Thou sbalt' pot kill," "Re
turned soldiers aro murderers." "Can
of person who would do 11?" asked tho
general "Murderers! Do you think
tlioso men went over thero for tho
purpose of murdering tlio Germans?
.they went over for tho puropse of
making sacrifices £or their country and
children The man who would mako
lust mini who would offer up his lifo
lor anybody. (Applause.) It must have
been tlio work of a skunk. Australia
did not enter tho war (o fight for her
realised we were fighting for right anil
justice. Slio realised she was lighting
"Only lust week ! was up in
Buthurst, added- tlio general, "ami
Colonel , Murphy, who did so well in
"l ohnrgo of a ship taking repat
riated Germans, told me that one of tho
men hail, a commission in his
possession, appointing him Ger
man Governor of Australia. Re
member; with tho Germans it
it wow vao vietis— woo to tho con-
ijijoped. I um tho vory Just man to
wish lor militarism. I am tlio very-
that sort. I hate tlio idea of it. 1 am
a democrat. But 1 -join with you in
tho determination that Australia shall
never bo inn do a dumping ground for
tlioso who wish to use it to create
strife anil discord. (Applause.)
With regard to what hail been said
oC Holland and Spain and. the positions
ot tlioso countries In tlio war, ho could
only think what an appalling humilia
tion, lie should have felt had ho been
it subjoet of those countries. Their
snips wore sunk and their subjects
slaughtered, nnd they could not raise a
linger or Germany would have run over
them. Ho prayed God wo should never
ho in such it position. (Applause.) He
knew; periectl.v well of the limitations
H J> Tul Pr C r"Ul!'l,0n' realised
the delenec ol ilio eouijtrv was
not. represented by any elttws or gov
ernment. .It was a mutter for the
whole people- (Applause.) Wo should
determine to advance iu sueli a wav as
our resources host enabled us to' In
conclusion. General Blrdwood, refer
ring to tlio League of Nations said
harm .j11'1 ,,ot ,hl"'= jt could do anv
Ii uus our bnutulen ilutv to
support if. until the time came who,"
A vol n oi. thanks to tho Acting p,-P.
'V,1;,'!' was moved by (ho llo,,. V. V
Ifi'dwood: Cr'- Wf'ni K'V0" ro''
said that, by all means, we should be
with a lower standard of living and a
lower system of morals. There were
races that might have designs on Aus-
tralia. If they were to encroach they
required to be considered. Such ques-
tions were engaging the attention of
General Birdwood and Admiral Jellicoe,
and must receive the consideration of
all who were thinking out the future
of Australia. (Applause.)
TALK OF REVOLUTION.
Mr. W.J. Vowles, in supporting the
toast, assured General Birdwood that
the Opposition represented an impor-
whole-heartedly behind him and the
soldiers. (Applause.) These days
there was a lot of talk of revolution
and of converting Queensland and
Australia into a republic. And we
heard a lot of talk of doing away with
the military spirit. Where was the
security in that? What was the use
of talking about no navy, no army? We
made in the air, Japan could land suf-
ficient troops in 24 hours to take
Queensland. (A voice: "Rot!") We
should he prepared and rely on the
(Applause.) Mr. Vowles proceeded to
acclaim the guest of the evening in the
warmest of terms. (Applause.)
The toast was enthusiastically
General Birdwood, on rising to re-
soul of Anzac". He thanked, them all
very much for the welcome, and ex-
pressed his pleasure at the fact that
when he left these shores he would
still retain his association and com-
radeship with his Australians, as he
had been given honorary rank in the
Australian military forces. (Applause.)
The general then at some length told
done in war areas, and made references
to the work of the senior officers. He
described how the 9th Battalion was
the first to leave Queensland. He could
not say whether a Queenslander was
the first to land on Gallipoli, but among
the very first was the the Battalion.
(Applause.) If they suffered heavily
in the landing, they more than held
their own. He traced the progress of
this famous battalion in France. The
general had a special word of praise
for General Robertson (Toowoomba),
and said in reference to Colonel
Butler ( A.A.M.C.), that he knew of
no man who took a greater interest in
the actual fighting done by his regi-
ment. Colonel Wilder-Neligan, he
said, was a man with the most wonder-
ful resource he had come across. Con-
tinuing his story, the general said
that the 25th and 26th Battalions occu-
pied the apex at Gallipoli. That was
a very trying point. If they could have
got beyond that they might have got
the straits. Subsequently at Pozieres
owing to the thickness of the wire. He
touched on the Light Horse, which, he
said, he had left in the very, very,
fine charge of General Chauvel.
General Birdwood spoke of the epic
advance on Damascus, which resulted
armies. Of General Glasgow he could
not speak too highly. He was one of
the best and most loyal officers that
could be imagined, and he (General
Birdwood) could only hope he would
meet with equal success as
a legislator. The best he could
say about General Glasgow was
that "he is a man". (Applause.)
He found that certain States "cornered"
certain things. South Australia
cornered medical dinners, while Queens-
land seemed to have made its corner
in generals. Out of 53 generals, prac-
tically one third came from Queens-
land. As to General White, he could
only say that he looked upon him as
about the best staff officer in the
British Army. (Applause.) He was
as staunch, loyal, brave, true, a wise officer,
and a good friend. General Birdwood
officers as listed: Generals Chauvel,
Sellheim, White, Forsyth, Cannan,
Coxen, Foott, Brand, Grant, Goddard,
Wilson and Spencer-Browne, Paton.
Infantry: Colonels Walsh, Mullen,
Wilder-Neligan, Salisbury, McSharry,
Dawson, Norrie, Davis, Ferguson,
Travers, Currie, Toll, Davies, Freeman,
Boarrd, Heron, Woolcook, Flintoff,
Imlay, Denton, Lane, Quinn, Arrell,
Christie, Midgley, Milne, O'Donnell,
Ridley, Robinson, Wynter, Annand.
Hughes, Mailer, McCartney; Light
Horse: Colonels Stodart, Bourne,
Foster, Generals Wilson and Grant.
A.A.M.C.: Colonels Dods, Butler, Dixon,
Croll, Fraser, Hustable, Macartney,
Marks, McLean, Sinle, Wooster, Sutton.
Laverack, Hancock, Miles, Radford,
Wieck, Stansfield, and Maunder. Chap-
lains: Garland, Gordon, Green, Mer-
rington, Mills, Osborn. V.C.'s: Captain
Cherry, Lieutenant Borella, Lieutenant
Budgen, Lance-Corporal Gordon.
The general went on to say that he
doing more for them than any other
country. Before passing, he must men-
nurses and also by the tunnellers.
Speaking generally, he believed that
those who came through the war
were all the better for the experience.
While we were thinking of the soldiers,
he hoped we would never forget The
Fallen — the best and the bravest. He
wished he could tell them about them.
Some men had absolutely charmed
lives. They led their men through
through. Others equally brave were
killed in their first attack. He knew
of one case in which of 38 relations
who went to the war, 37 came back;
sons killed. Australia had come into
her nationhood. She had put her
General Birdwood contemptuously re-
ferred to the fact that where he was
in one town not long ago he heard
that small slips of paper had been
printed, "Thou shalt not kill", "Re-
turned soldiers are murderers". "Can
of person who would do it?" asked the
General. "Murderers! Do you think
those men went over there for the
purpose of murdering the Germans?
They went over for the puropse of
making sacrifices for their country and
children. The man who would make
last man who would offer up his life
for anybody. (Applause.) It must have
been the work of a skunk. Australia
did not enter the war to fight for her
realised we were fighting for right and
justice. She realised she was fighting
"Only lust week I was up in
Bathurst," added the General, "and
Colonel Murphy, who did so well in
in charge of a ship taking repat-
riated Germans, told me that one of the
men had a commission in his
possession, appointing him Ger-
man Governor of Australia. Re-
member with the Germans it
it was vae victis — woe to the con-
quered. I am the very last man to
wish for militarism. I am the very-
that sort. I hate the idea of it. I am
a democrat. But I join with you in
the determination that Australia shall
never be made a dumping ground for
those who wish to use it to create
strife and discord. (Applause.)
With regard to what had been said
of Holland and Spain and the positions
of those countries in the war, he could
only think what an appalling humilia-
tion, he should have felt had he been
a subject of those countries. Their
ships were sunk and their subjects
slaughtered, and they could not raise a
finger or Germany would have run over
them. He prayed God we should never
be in such a position. (Applause.) He
knew perfectly well of the limitations
of a country of 5,000,000, and realised
the defence of the country was
not represented by any class or gov-
ernment. It was a matter for the
whole people. (Applause.) We should
determine to advance in such a way as
our resources best enabled us to. In
conclusion, General Birdwood, refer-
ring to the League of Nations, said
that he did not think it could do any
harm. It was our bounden duty to
support it, until the time came when
A vote of thanks to the Acting Pre-
mier was moved by the Hon. W.N.
Gillies. Cheers were given for General
Birdwood.
The Birdwood Visit. Parliamentary Banquet. Talk About Neutrality. Fine Tribute to Queenslanders (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Tuesday 4 May 1920 [Issue No.14,800] page 3 2019-10-01 21:16 General Sir William Birdwood xvns
. 'entertained at a State banquet at Par
liament House last night. The. tllnlng-
Tooirt was resplendent with bunting.
and the entrances fringed with gren-
, Cry, . and the word "Greeting" sus-
I ponded across tiro room, faced
llio guest i of honour. Tho
I Acting Frontier (Hon. .T. A.
.FJhelly) had on his right the Lieuten
ant-Governor (Hon. W. Leniton),' and
, famous general. Prominent amongst
those ' preS'ent were tho Hohic Secre
tary (Hoii. W. M/Cornmck), the Minis
ter for Agriculture (Hum. -W. N. Gil
Vowles), Altl-. ,t. M'Master (represent
ing tho Mayor of Brisbane), Aid. A.
tile Hon. B. Taylor, M.L.C., the mili-
Irving), and the .naval commandant
. (Captain Curtis), Brigadier-General .T.
J-I. Cannan. Many membetlt of both
Houses of Parliament wore present.
honoured. '
.THE LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.
the Lietoiiant-Governor," said that lie
.regarded the Lieutenant-Governor as
bteing specially qualified to parry out
the important duties of ills exalted,
ofllee with credit' to himself and satis
faction to the people. (Aplause.) Mr.
Bertram descrihed Mr. Lentum's career,
and said lhat that gentleman's expert -
enco gave lilrn unequnlled oppor-
knowledge oC tho requirements
.'The Lieutenant-Governor was a man,
the future of our great Stale. (Ap
plause.) The position , of Governor of
I Queensland lind. been occupied by men
Those men liiid filled the position, with
' credit to themselves and to tho State.
Ho ventured to say that tho present
occupant of tho position would worthily
compliment than ho, deserved. His
he took office. Ho believed lhat tho
time would come 'when tlioso who had
in halving in his good wlfo a ladylike
Woman who had endeared herself to
evefyone with whom alio had been
associated. He sincerely wished "his
health, and success ' at , Government
The Lieutenant-Governor, in respond
ing,- said that ho was taken a-' great
speak. Mr. Lennon referred , to his
bceiipancy of the Speakership, and said
that it was the nicest job, lie ever had
, in Ills life. It was taken froth him.
thought everyone knew that. Ho was
particularly happy in tho position.
Fato ordained that lie should not re
Was considered a higher olllcc. Kc
Was called there. I-Ie did not go there.
Having been called, of course, bo went.
chosen. Ho was ono of the chosen.
(Labghter.) He was pleased to say
A that His Majesty was graciously
pleased to appoint- him Lieutenant-
Governor. Ho appreciated most keenly
the commission ho held, calling upon
him to assume tho position, and upon
' them -to rentier duo obedience to him.
'(Laughter.) Ho sincerely hoped that
, they would remember and render
obedience accordingly. Tn tho past he
had been inclined to indulge In "fortllor
in re." Tii his exalted position lie chose
to adopt "suavlter in modo." (Liuigh-
, tor.) The Lieutenant - Governor
sketched ills career, and said
.that ho ' -had endeavoured to live
an honest life. Ho had driven
a baker's cart, hail managed a hank,
and had . engaged in commerical
pursuits. He had brought up a largo
. tho war. (Aiiplnu.se.) It was the- first
' time ho had referred tp the fact. His
son-in-law and tlireo or four of his
nephews also went. Ho lovoil Queeiis-
. land and tho Queensland sun. Its
Tliey kopt up their spirits. (Applause.)
lie thanked Mr.- Bertram sincerely for
the maimer In which lie had referred
to him. Ho hoped that what ever posi
tion lie held, ho would acquit himself
at least us a man. lie would go down,
ratlior than bo a traitor or double
of other people. Tliey would forgive
him., lie felt sure, for tho exhibition of
it slight measure of heat on -that occa
sion. Ills appointment' had not been
Brisbane. Tho Proas had seen tit to
criticise him in a variety of ways, lie
had never complained, niiil did not
bear investigation could afford to dis
regard absolutely, not only tho critic
everybody. In conclusion, Mr. Lonncn
. Haiti that ho had had tho honour nnd
being tho. almost constant companion
of their guest, and lie bud enjoyed the
vividly General Bird wand', s war per
l)ad gone to fight for King and Em
pire. (Applause,.) All credit was dun
to General Birdwond for the grout
skill. lie showed in bundling the men.
when, they called him "Birdie" that
appealed tn him (tho Lieutenant-Gov
felt sure that General Blrdwood would
liy away with our hearts, and llmi
tliey would remain with him l'or ever
,MU. FIUELLY'S SPEECH'.
Mr. Eiliolly submitting "Our Dis
tinguished Guest," saiil that thuy were
assembled to glvo u measure of wel
come such ns could lie expected from
.the Queensland Parliament tn the man
unil soldier who laid been in charge
of Australian troops during the partial
of the war. It had Weil said lliaL llio
war, but proved adaptable. .Tttst as
the man In cliargo must have been an
adaptable man to prove tile efficiency
of his operations. . Wo wanted
lii whatever wo did. (Hear, hear.)
He wits sure that 110 British general,
whether ho cinno from English. -Irish,
Scottish, or Welsh . stock could have
that night, who had so endeared hjni-
sclf -to tfto men. 'His (the generul's)
visit to Australia was going to bo a
now cductitioji; He "would ilnd in the
worker a. reflex of the soldier. The
good soldier wis not tho bfid working
The good soldier had to bo fed with
tile best possible food, and given tho
host possible conditions. So also must
lie tlio good working man, who hart
fo rear, educate, anil equip liis family
for tho lm.tllo of life. (Applause.)
Mr. Eiliolly proceeded to refer to Mr.
Lennon, and said liis typo was true,
Wlillc. ho (Mr. Eilietly) was in charge
of tho Government ho intended to deal
Willi "Mr. Lennon ill a very gingerly
fashion, because, a man who litul
passed through such experience' as lmd
Mr. Lennon needed to bo so dealt with.
Tlio Acting Premier, went on to say
that lie Intd mot General Blrdwood in
London. Ho then had been surrounded
with liis young generals. The spirit
was there amongst them. Our -Aus
war, wore found to be quite as capable,
as the Australian private In his hobby
tho peace Conference. Tho United
States and Canada at one time tolerat
to become armed t" the teeth. The
United States forecast a. navy bigger
than the British navy. Wo hoped as
Australians that tlio brains and
ability of the leaders of tho army
"At olio tlmo," proceeded Mr. Fihelly,
"I stood strongly for Australia main
atmoHphero of war round tho world ono
would say, better bo like Norway,
'Sweden,' "Denduirit,' Switzerland, and
Spain than have- our mothers and
fathers howoil down at the loss of the
dubious purpose. ("No, no.") Thero is
no better placo to express opinions than
'amongst the people of tho legislature.
uttering the sentiments licit! by any
one -man Y" Continuing, Mr. Eihelly
General Sir William Birdwood was
entertained at a State banquet at Par-
liament House last night. The dining
room was resplendent with bunting
and the entrances fringed with green-
ery, and the word "Greeting" sus-
pended across the room, faced
the guest of honour. The
Acting Premier (Hon. J.A.
Fihelly) had on his right the Lieuten-
ant-Governor (Hon. W. Lennon), and
famous general. Prominent amongst
those present were the Home Secre-
tary (Hon. W. McCormack), the Minis-
ter for Agriculture (Hon. W.N. Gil-
Vowles), Ald. J. McMaster (represent-
ing the Mayor of Brisbane), Ald. A.
the Hon. D. Taylor, M.L.C., the mili-
Irving), and the naval commandant
(Captain Curtis), Brigadier-General J.
H. Cannan. Many members of both
Houses of Parliament were present.
honoured.
THE LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.
the Lieutenant-Governor", said that he
regarded the Lieutenant-Governor as
being specially qualified to carry out
the important duties of his exalted
office with credit to himself and satis-
faction to the people. (Applause.) Mr.
Bertram described Mr. Lennon's career,
and said lhat that gentleman's experi-
ence gave him unequalled oppor-
tunities of acquiring a first-hand
knowledge of the requirements
The Lieutenant-Governor was a man,
the future of our great Stale. (Ap-
plause.) The position of Governor of
Queensland had been occupied by men
Those men had filled the position with
credit to themselves and to the State.
He ventured to say that the present
occupant of the position would worthily
compliment than he deserved. His
he took office. He believed that the
time would come when those who had
in having in his good wife a ladylike
woman who had endeared herself to
everyone with whom she had been
associated. He sincerely wished His
health, and success at Government
The Lieutenant-Governor, in respond-
ing, said that he was taken a great
speak. Mr. Lennon referred to his
occupancy of the Speakership, and said
that it was the nicest job, he ever had
in his life. It was taken from him.
thought everyone knew that. He was
particularly happy in the position.
Fate ordained that he should not re-
was considered a higher office. He
was called there. He did not go there.
Having been called, of course, he went.
chosen. He was one of the chosen.
(Laughter.) He was pleased to say
that His Majesty was graciously
pleased to appoint him Lieutenant-
Governor. He appreciated most keenly
the commission he held, calling upon
him to assume the position, and upon
them to render due obedience to him.
(Laughter.) He sincerely hoped that
they would remember and render
obedience accordingly. In the past he
had been inclined to indulge in "fortiter
in re". In his exalted position he chose
to adopt "suaviter in modo". (Laugh-
ter.) The Lieutenant-Governor
sketched his career, and said
that he had endeavoured to live
an honest life. He had driven
a baker's cart, had managed a bank,
and had engaged in commercial
pursuits. He had brought up a large
the war. (Applause.) It was the first
time he had referred to the fact. His
son-in-law and three or four of his
nephews also went. He loved Queens-
land and the Queensland sun. Its
They kept up their spirits. (Applause.)
He thanked Mr. Bertram sincerely for
the manner in which he had referred
to him. He hoped that whatever posi-
tion he held, he would acquit himself
at least as a man. He would go down,
rather than be a traitor or double
of other people. They would forgive
him, he felt sure, for the exhibition of
it slight measure of heat on that occa-
sion. His appointment had not been
Brisbane. The Press had seen fit to
criticise him in a variety of ways, he
had never complained, and did not
bear investigation, could afford to dis-
regard absolutely, not only the critic-
everybody. In conclusion, Mr. Lennon
said that he had had the honour and
being the almost-constant companion
of their guest, and he had enjoyed the
vividly General Birdwood's war per-
had gone to fight for King and Em-
pire. (Applause,.) All credit was due
to General Birdwood for the great
skill he showed in handling the men.
When they called him "Birdie" that
appealed to him (the Lieutenant-Gov-
felt sure that General Birdwood would
fly away with our hearts, and that
they would remain with him forever
MR. FIHELLY'S SPEECH.
Mr. Fihelly submitting "Our Dis-
tinguished Guest", said that they were
assembled to give a measure of wel-
come such as could be expected from
the Queensland Parliament to the man
and soldier who had been in charge
of Australian troops during the period
of the war. It had been said that the
war, but proved adaptable. Just as
the man in charge must have been an
adaptable man to prove the efficiency
of his operations. We wanted
in whatever we did. (Hear, hear.)
He was sure that no British general,
whether he came from English, Irish,
Scottish or Welsh stock could have
that night, who had so endeared him-
self to the men. His (the general's)
visit to Australia was going to be a
new education. He would find in the
worker a reflex of the soldier. The
good soldier was not the bad working
The good soldier had to be fed with
the best possible food, and given the
best possible conditions. So also must
be the good working man, who had
to rear, educate and equip his family
for the battle of life. (Applause.)
Mr. Fihelly proceeded to refer to Mr.
Lennon, and said his type was true,
While he (Mr. Fihelly) was in charge
of the Government he intended to deal
with Mr. Lennon in a very gingerly
fashion, because a man who had
passed through such experience as had
Mr. Lennon needed to be so dealt with.
The Acting Premier went on to say
that he had met General Birdwood in
London. He then had been surrounded
with his young generals. The spirit
was there amongst them. Our Aus-
war, were found to be quite as capable,
as the Australian private in his hobby
the peace conference. The United
States and Canada at one time tolerat-
to become armed to the teeth. The
United States forecast a navy bigger
than the British navy. We hoped as
Australians that the brains and
ability of the leaders of the army
"At one time," proceeded Mr. Fihelly,
"I stood strongly for Australia main-
atmosphere of war round the world one
would say, better be like Norway,
Sweden, Denmark, Switzerland and
Spain than have our mothers and
fathers bowed down at the loss of the
dubious purpose. ("No, no.") There is
no better place to express opinions than
amongst the people of the legislature.
uttering the sentiments held by any
one man?" Continuing, Mr. Fihelly
GOOMERI GOOMERI, February 28. (Article), Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1860 - 1947), Friday 2 March 1934 [Issue No.19,756] page 2 2019-09-25 13:59 GOOMERI ,
? o ?
Obituary,— Another pioneer of Goo-
spent in the Goomeri district at 'Un-
daban.' There she resided until a
'couple of years ago when she removed
ter predeceased her, and she is sur
when Miss s. Thurlow jand G. Toop de
Trucking, of Pigs. — Mr. J. E. An»
GOOMERI

Obituary.— Another pioneer of Goo-
spent in the Goomeri district at "Un-
daban". There she resided until a
couple of years ago when she removed
ter predeceased her, and she is sur-
when Miss S. Thurlow and G. Toop de-
Trucking, of Pigs. — Mr. J. E. An-
No Title (Article), Toowoomba Chronicle (Qld. : 1917 - 1922), Saturday 16 July 1921 [Issue No.162] page 5 2019-09-22 17:50 "Window .to "bo -unveiled tomorrow
. '^Sunday) morning, at 11
Toowoomba,. in memory of the
late "3fr. and Mrs. j. Bobthi Desigiied
by Mr; G. E.-Tute" and-eiecuted- by
R. S. Ex'ton and Co., Limited. ''-The
Clironicle" is indebtea to the -courtesy
of the Brisbane " Courier "j for
the tfse . of .the above" Jjlocki. V ^L- ., .
^ . —F.'.W. Thiol phOfib. < -
Fine window to be unveiled tomorrow
(Sunday) morning, at 11
Toowoomba, in memory of the
late Mr. and Mrs. J. Booth. Designed
by Mr. C. E. Tute and executed by
R. S. Exton and Co., Limited. "The
Chronicle" is indebted to the courtesy
of "The Brisbane Courier" for
the use of the above block.
—F.W. Thiel photo.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Canon David John Garland, the architect of Anzac Day
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:garrisonau 2015-05-28
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.