Information about Trove user: eacton

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,856,376
2 noelwoodhouse 3,927,775
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,379,356
5 Rhonda.M 3,202,651
...
42135 ds67 20
42136 dsymons 20
42137 Duffmann 20
42138 eacton 20
42139 earthwand 20
42140 eBob 20

20 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

September 2018 20

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,856,174
2 noelwoodhouse 3,927,775
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,379,335
5 Rhonda.M 3,202,638
...
42097 ds67 20
42098 dsymons 20
42099 Duffmann 20
42100 eacton 20
42101 earthwand 20
42102 eBob 20

20 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

September 2018 20

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Alcohol Australia
    List
    Public

    9 items
    created by: public:eacton 2019-04-09
    User data
  2. Assessment 3 - looking for proof they murdrered
    List
    Public

    2 items
    created by: public:eacton 2018-09-17
    User data
  3. Baby Farmers HIST281 Assessment 2
    List
    Public

    How were the crimes of John and Sarah Makin represented in New South Wales newspapers?

    The main archival collection used to research this question was Digitised Newspapers between 1892 -1893. The National Library’s Trove data base and search engine proved to be a valuable way of accessing this material.

    I have a fascination with crime, in particular serial killers. I began my research with an initial Google search using the term "Australian serial killers". One of the results that came back was Kathleen Folbigg who killed four of her infants between 1991 and 1999. This was too recent of a crime for the purpose of this exercise, however it gave me the idea of looking into ‘killers of children’ as my broad interest area.

    I subsequently used a variety of search terms to explore Trove, based around ‘child killers’ and ‘baby killers’. In the process of doing this, the name Makins kept arising, so I decided to explore this, narrowing the search through decade filters and another term that kept appearing in my searches, “Baby Farming”. By using the advanced search function on Trove including the term “John Makin”, ‘NSW’ between the years “1892 and 1894 returned 181 sources. List items 2.3.5, 6,7,9 and 28 are examples of some of the more detailed newspaper reports, including transcripts of witness statements about the events. Some of the articles have multiple subheadings, with some headlines using emotive words like ‘dead infants” and “bodies unearthed”. But the content of most articles are very matter-of-fact and informative. There are numerous other newspaper articles not included in this list which can be analysed to get a good understanding of how the Makin case was portrayed.
    Some of the links to non-academic secondary source websites are useful in that they provide clues about further primary sources to research. E.g. items 11 and 21, as well as the entry in the Australian dictionary of Biography (item 15).

    Investigation of the colourful and euphemistic term “baby farming” revealed that in late 19th century in Australia, this was how police, courts, and the media referenced the illegal trade of illegitimate children by desperate mothers, and that it was a common occurrence and practice. As my research further indicated, behind the euphemism there were very grim realities.

    John Makin originally a drayman from Dapto NSW( List #11) and his wife Sarah, are infamous for being Baby farmers in New South Wales. After John suffered an injury and was unable to work they turned to baby farming as a means of income. On October 11 1892 James Hanoney( list #11 and #15) a pipe contractor discovered the remains of two babies in the backyard of a Macdonaldtown home (map of Macdonaldtown was located through city of Sydney archives list #13) that had previously been occupied by the Makins. The police later discovered the remains of 5 more infants in various locations of the backyard. After further investigations at 11 separate homes the Makins had tenanted revealed 13 infant bodies although other sources say only 12.


    The Makins' trial was held in the Sydney Supreme Court, and the courthouse was packed to overflowing each day with huge crowds waiting outside constantly being updated by runners on the progress in the courtroom. The case became known as “The Great Baby Farming Case’ especially in the Evening news (see list). Both Sarah and John were sentenced to death by hanging, however the jury recommended Sarah be spared the death penalty and subsequently sentenced to life and was released in 1911. John was hanged in August of 1893 at Darlinghurst Gaol.


    The Makins crimes brought baby farming to the attention of authorities and helped influence policy change in child protection such as the Children's Protection Act 1892 (1892 - 1902).

    28 items
    created by: public:eacton 2018-08-13
    User data
  4. Ella Baker
    List
    Public

    Civil Rights Activist Ella Baker

    25 items
    created by: public:eacton 2019-08-18
    User data
  5. James Tyson
    List
    Public

    Australia's first millionaire

    4 items
    created by: public:eacton 2019-03-20
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.