Information about Trove user: d.overett

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,904,687
2 noelwoodhouse 3,961,534
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,393,803
5 Rhonda.M 3,301,624
...
332 youngtucky 155,751
333 mikesk 155,701
334 wanda168 155,630
335 d.overett 155,582
336 moon 154,483
337 trevorgraham 154,103

155,582 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

January 2020 2,240
December 2019 3,312
November 2019 1,182
October 2019 2,999
September 2019 1,077
August 2019 754
July 2019 2,829
June 2019 2,062
May 2019 1,558
April 2019 1,191
March 2019 945
February 2019 1,944
January 2019 95
November 2018 17
September 2018 291
August 2018 18
July 2018 41
June 2018 49
May 2018 80
April 2018 81
March 2018 809
February 2018 50
December 2017 54
November 2017 278
October 2017 52
September 2017 51
August 2017 4,122
July 2017 4,045
June 2017 2,411
May 2017 4,911
April 2017 4,052
March 2017 1,679
February 2017 252
January 2017 109
December 2016 37
September 2016 126
August 2016 87
July 2016 985
June 2016 315
May 2016 170
April 2016 23
February 2016 1,556
January 2016 1,703
December 2015 3,531
November 2015 2,175
October 2015 4,075
September 2015 4,169
August 2015 6,040
July 2015 4,987
June 2015 4,577
May 2015 1,193
April 2015 3,419
March 2015 4,550
February 2015 4,879
January 2015 3,682
December 2014 1,620
November 2014 2,798
October 2014 4,531
September 2014 1,535
August 2014 3,976
July 2014 4,916
June 2014 5,054
May 2014 4,157
April 2014 3,460
March 2014 4,259
February 2014 2,726
January 2014 3,796
December 2013 2,442
November 2013 3,722
October 2013 2,717
September 2013 2,580
August 2013 1,689
July 2013 1,289
June 2013 396

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,904,485
2 noelwoodhouse 3,961,534
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,393,777
5 Rhonda.M 3,301,611
...
330 georgess23 155,863
331 mikesk 155,670
332 wanda168 155,630
333 d.overett 155,578
334 moon 154,386
335 trevorgraham 154,041

155,578 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

January 2020 2,240
December 2019 3,312
November 2019 1,182
October 2019 2,999
September 2019 1,077
August 2019 754
July 2019 2,825
June 2019 2,062
May 2019 1,558
April 2019 1,191
March 2019 945
February 2019 1,944
January 2019 95
November 2018 17
September 2018 291
August 2018 18
July 2018 41
June 2018 49
May 2018 80
April 2018 81
March 2018 809
February 2018 50
December 2017 54
November 2017 278
October 2017 52
September 2017 51
August 2017 4,122
July 2017 4,045
June 2017 2,411
May 2017 4,911
April 2017 4,052
March 2017 1,679
February 2017 252
January 2017 109
December 2016 37
September 2016 126
August 2016 87
July 2016 985
June 2016 315
May 2016 170
April 2016 23
February 2016 1,556
January 2016 1,703
December 2015 3,531
November 2015 2,175
October 2015 4,075
September 2015 4,169
August 2015 6,040
July 2015 4,987
June 2015 4,577
May 2015 1,193
April 2015 3,419
March 2015 4,550
February 2015 4,879
January 2015 3,682
December 2014 1,620
November 2014 2,798
October 2014 4,531
September 2014 1,535
August 2014 3,976
July 2014 4,916
June 2014 5,054
May 2014 4,157
April 2014 3,460
March 2014 4,259
February 2014 2,726
January 2014 3,796
December 2013 2,442
November 2013 3,722
October 2013 2,717
September 2013 2,580
August 2013 1,689
July 2013 1,289
June 2013 396

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 340,986
2 PhilThomas 140,690
3 GeoffMMutton 130,640
4 mickbrook 114,105
5 murds5 61,555
...
2643 cmcmull 4
2644 CShane 4
2645 czislowski 4
2646 d.overett 4
2647 DaphneF75 4
2648 dar62 4

4 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2019 4


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
VERSAILLES. (From the Graphic.) (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Friday 13 January 1871 [Issue No.10,187] page 3 2020-01-28 21:57 The Palace of Veisailles was founded in
1C61 by Louis XIV., that type of Royal
extiavagance and selfishness, v\ho little loved
the then dingy city of " banicades" and
" épieutci." It is built on the site of an old
hunting-lodge of Hcmi IV., which, lion ever, in
the reign ol Louis XIII, had been íeplaced by
a Handsome buck building, and was originally
situated in the midst of a laige foi est. The
immense park, measuring ncaily twenty miles
lound, was foimed undei the immediate super-
intendence of Le Notre. Aftei the giounds
had been laid out, no watei foi the ornamental
fountains was foithcoming, and, vi hat was more,
there seemed little chance in those days, vih'en
the science of engine« mg was decidedly limited,
of j ever tianspoiting sufficient fluid foi the
considerable woiks that had been designed. Le
Gretna Mona)que, howevei, detennined not to
be' thwaited, spent millions of his subjects'
money and thousands of his soldieis' lives in
constiucting aqueducts and othei waterwais.
Aftei innumeiableaboitive attempts and failures
ing powerful foicing-pumps at Maily, and thus
successfully accomplishedihis object '; and now
those fountains, which cost no less than'10,000
francs each time they aie set in action, aie the
chief attiaotions of tho grounds. ' The Palace,
grounds., and waterworks' cost, according, to
,The Palace itself, built by Mausaul, pai takes
|£omewhat of the Ionic st)le, and is thought by
mànj to be moie-* remarkable for its.vastness
than its aichitecluial' beauty, i all bymmetiy 01
pippoilion being lost in the immensity of
the building. The. 100ms and galleiiès aie
most splendidly 'decorated, ancLaie well'Wpithy
of'their foi mci occupants, the rust of whom,,, by-,
the-bje, was Mdllè./de ía Valliere. 'Another
^ndjntei lesiderçt was the unfoitunate Moalie',
',Antoinette,, who, with' her husband arid! son,
.MEislfoicibly conducted! back to Paris oy tlio'
ReSplùtionaiy mobriof_ 1789. Amongst*, the,
handsomest i iobms'< may i be¡,mentioned' that'
sjilendidly-miiioied saloon, the Galerie des
Glaces, and thp 'picture gallciics, which, be-
sides the statues and busts of Preñen, liei oes,
both ancient and modem, contain ovci eleven
Veinct. The Salon d'Heiculo is noted for its
splendid ceiling, whicli was painted by Lcmoine,
and lcprcsents the " Apotheosis of Ileicules."
This pictuie contains 142 figuies, and must
hat o cost a fabulous sum, as the ulti amarine
One of the chief beauties of the giounds,
vihich aie most tastefully laid out and piofuscly
studded with innumeiable vases, statuaiy, ter
îaces, and founta'ns, is the Tapis Vert. This
magnificent lawn, which baa (or rather hail, two
monthb ago) lost none of its pristine beauty,
vías a favourite resort of the com tiers of olden
secretly-married wife, Madame de Maintenon. i
The Palace of Versailles was founded in
1661 by Louis XIV., that type of Royal
extravagance and selfishness, who little loved
the then dingy city of "barricades" and
"émeutes." It is built on the site of an old
hunting-lodge of Henri IV., which, however, in
the reign ol Louis XIII, had been replaced by
a Handsome brick building, and was originally
situated in the midst of a large forest. The
immense park, measuring nearly twenty miles
round, was formed under the immediate super-
intendence of Le Notre. After the grounds
had been laid out, no water for the ornamental
fountains was forthcoming, and, what was more,
there seemed little chance in those days, when
the science of engineering was decidedly limited,
of ever transporting sufficient fluid for the
considerable works that had been designed. Le
Grand Monarque, however, determined not to
be thwarted, spent millions of his subjects'
money and thousands of his soldiers' lives in
constructing aqueducts and other waterways.
After innumerable abortive attempts and failures
ing powerful forcing-pumps at Marly, and thus
successfully accomplished ihis object; and now
those fountains, which cost no less than 10,000
francs each time they are set in action, are the
chief attractions of the grounds. The Palace,
grounds, and waterworks cost, according, to
The Palace itself, built by Mansard, partakes
somewhat of the Ionic style, and is thought by
many to be more remarkable for its.vastness
than its architectural beauty, all symmetry or
proportion being lost in the immensity of
the building. The rooms and galleries are
most splendidly decorated, and are well worthy
of their former occupants, the first of whom, by-
the-bye, was Mdlle. de la Valliere. Another
and later resident was the unfortunate Marie
Antoinette,, who, with her husband and son,
was forcibly conducted back to Paris by the
Revolutionary mob of 1789. Amongst the
handsomest rooms may be mentioned that
splendidly-mirrored saloon, the Galerie des
Glaces, and the picture galleries, which, be-
sides the statues and busts of French heroes
both ancient and modem, contain over eleven
Vernet. The Salon d'Heicule is noted for its
splendid ceiling, which was painted by Lemoine,
and represents the "Apotheosis of Hercules."
This picture contains 142 figures, and must
have cost a fabulous sum, as the ultramarine
One of the chief beauties of the grounds,
which are most tastefully laid out and profusely
studded with innumerable vases, statuary, ter-
races, and fountains, is the Tapis Vert. This
magnificent lawn, which has (or rather had two
months ago) lost none of its pristine beauty,
was a favourite resort of the courtiers of olden
secretly-married wife, Madame de Maintenon.
MONARCH ABSOLUTE. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 18 March 1939 [Issue No.31,579] page 20 2020-01-28 21:38 to spread himself on- The Loves ol Louis '
Montespan, Maintenon de la Valliere, and oil
the others of lessei light1 But Sir Challes
Petrie is a historian with some icgard foi
the dignity of hlstoiy and while not neg-
stress on the personal qualities of 'Le Roi
Soleil," which led to his great success Sir
that Louis was by far the ablest man who
throne Coming to that throne at an early
age in the troubled times of the Fronde Louis
soon determined to be entirely King He
did not say, on atta'ning his majority "I am
the State' (this saying seems to have been
himself Thus In spite of amatory adventure
rin and later, by Colbert
Sir Charles does not gloss over He waa
the centralisation of pow»r, he was ill
informed on man} things Nevertheless ha
I long unnecessary expensive wars
i This book is also very nearly a history of
i Louis's period (he reigned for 72 years), and
I in Europe-of politics roval scheming, mlli
? Ury movement >, socioty. He?, abound guide.
Ï
to spread himself on- "The Loves of Louis"!
Montespan, Maintenon de la Valliere, and all
the others of lesser light! But Sir Charles
Petrie is a historian with some regard for
the dignity of history and while not neg-
lecting this aspect of Louis's career he lays
stress on the personal qualities of "Le Roi
Soleil," which led to his great success. Sir
that Louis was "by far the ablest man who
throne." Coming to that throne at an early
age in the troubled times of the Fronde. Louis
soon determined to be entirely King. He
did not say, on attaining his majority "I am
the State" (this saying seems to have been
himself. Thus In spite of amatory adventure
rin and later, by Colbert.
Sir Charles does not gloss over He was
the centralisation of power, he was ill-
informed on many things. Nevertheless, he
long unnecessary expensive wars
This book is also very nearly a history of
Louis's period (he reigned for 72 years), and
in Europe-of politics royal scheming, mlli-
tary movement, society. He is a sound guide.

STATE AND CHURCH GALLICANISM IN FRANCE THIRD MOORHOUSE LECTURE (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Friday 3 December 1937 [Issue No.28,482] page 2 2020-01-28 21:32 -w
Church in the age of Louis XIV. were dis-
The dominant feature of nth century

Church in the age of Louis XIV were dis-
The dominant feature of 17th century
Shy aboriginal STAR dumbfounded by City Reports ISLA BROOK in her SYDNEY SURVEY (Article), The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1933 - 1954), Saturday 28 November 1953 page 7 2020-01-28 21:27 Art classes for .
Grandmas popular
w families look like
getting landscapes for
by .Grandma.
round town is a Gran
Townshcnd.
Mr. Townshend, a for
mer art teacher at &ast /
Sydney Technical School, ij
started his grannie's class ?,
more or less by accident. ',
He was approached for Ji
lessons by several elderly ,'
women who had studied ij
art in their girlhood and',
had -been forced by ',
family responsibilities to ,?
Kive it up. With their,'
families married andij
gone they wanted to start*,
nirain. [-
At their request Mr. ?]
Townshend .started a ',
class, and it got bigcer Ji
and bigger. Most nf thp ,'
students are over 60, anrt,J
some of them, says Mr. ?,
Townshend, are amaz- J,
ingly good. J»
Who knows, we minht^
soon produce a counter- \
part of Grandma Moses,«
—the American grannie,^
who started painting inc
her seventies, and now,1,
in her eighties, is one ofS
the foremost artists of,'
America. ij
Up to date she's
* * *
Apart from his height
Art classes for
Grandmas popular
families look like
getting landscapes for
by Grandma.
round town is a Gran-
Townshend.
Mr. Townshend, a for-
mer art teacher at East
Sydney Technical School,
started his grannie's class
more or less by accident.
He was approached for
lessons by several elderly
women who had studied
art in their girlhood and
had been forced by
family responsibilities to
give it up. With their
families married and
gone they wanted to start
again.
At their request Mr.
Townshend .started a
class, and it got bigger
and bigger. Most of the
students are over 60, and
some of them, says Mr.
Townshend, are amaz-
ingly good.
Who knows, we might
soon produce a counter-
part of Grandma Moses
—the American grannie,
who started painting in
her seventies, and now
in her eighties, is one of
the foremost artists of
America.
Shy aboriginal STAR dumbfounded by City Reports ISLA BROOK in her SYDNEY SURVEY (Article), The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1933 - 1954), Saturday 28 November 1953 page 7 2020-01-27 15:32 1 -
; TF all film stars
I were ;; like
! Ngarla Konuth,
I who arrived in Syd
f ney this week, Hol
'f lywood would be a
{ vastly different
!- place.
', , 16-year-old Ngarla
ij (you don't sound the
!j'g') is the aboriginal
jistar of the Australian
'Ifilm 'Jedda'. She's
!j slender, dignified and
!? quite delightful and, as
|! well as that, she . can
?Jact. But she's very
!; shy.
', Up to date she's
Jidumfounded with the
,'vastness of Sydney and
1] overawed to speechless
', ness with her two favour
'1 ite sights — the Harbour
,- Bridge and a toy shop
11 decked for Christmas.
i| Somehow we can't
', imagine a fellow star, like
'1 Miss Marilyn Monroe, say
,? being deprived of words
11 by a toy shop. Or even
?I by Our Bridge, if it
'i comes to that.
!? * * *
;[ Even King's Cross
!; stopped to stare
;? UNDOUBTEDLY Che
1] season's most un
?, selfconscious visitor is
?i English dress designer
Ji Teddy Tinling.
' Apart from his height
(six feet five) and nis

IF all film stars
were likei
Ngarla Konuth,
who arrived in Syd-
ney this week, Hol-
lywood would be a
vastly different
place.
'16-year-old Ngarla
(you don't sound the
"g') is the aboriginal
star of the Australian
film "Jedda". She's
slender, dignified and
quite delightful and, as
well as that, she can
act. But she's very
shy.
Up to date she's
dumfounded with the
vastness of Sydney and
overawed to speechless-
ness with her two favour-
ite sights — the Harbour
Bridge and a toy shop
1decked for Christmas.
Somehow we can't
'imagine a fellow star, like
Miss Marilyn Monroe, say
being deprived of words
by a toy shop. Or even
by Our Bridge, if it
comes to that.
* * *
Even King's Cross
stopped to stare
UNDOUBTEDLY the
season's most un-
selfconscious visitor is
English dress designer
Teddy Tinling.
Apart from his height
(six feet five) and his
European Intelligence. (Article), Bell's Life in Sydney and Sporting Reviewer (NSW : 1845 - 1860), Saturday 26 July 1856 [Issue No.342] page 2 2020-01-26 22:15 3rd and 5 th:
When tho Queen went down to Portsmouth,
Wednesday week, to look at tho immense arma
war with renewed .rigour, she little imagined
Commons to an amount of dbcotnfort thnt tht-y
all heartily hope they may n< vcr bo destined to
to their journeys end, and theft ti ok to thc
water, but when they arrived at tho review, it
"scarce'', to escape tho universal expression of
dissatisfaction. About this timo the Bench bo
came desperate, and two judges wcte declared
hy Lord Campbell as having been seen by him
railway again 1 Well, but thero was nothing f'>r
come, first served. Tho Duchess of C. and the
Duchess of M. was pulled hack by tho ungallant
Bish >p of E.. as she was entering a first-class
I Tho directors of the Crystal Palace Company
aro making great preparations for a Me to eele
! hrato tho conclusion of Peace. lier Majesty
I will ho present, and a number of French soldiers
are coming over to take part in tho proceeding«!.
Baron Mnrochetti's large nllegoricnl figure of
Peace will bo unveiled on this occasion. Tn this
cafe tho sculptor ventures on a bold experiment
-the bust and arms of the figure aro to be
as a lay figure.' and clothed in velvet and silver,
we doubt whether this* novel feature will meet
with tho approval of artists generally. Tho re-
turn of Peace has been tho t-.ignnl for tho renewal
of speclution in various ways. Many new com-
milking, washing, and mangling companies. 'I he
Crimean inquiry appears drawing to a closo.
case, and Lord Lucan has mnde an equally
now under consideration, anil tho cuses of other
oítleers according to their rank. Tho Marquis of
annum by tho Käst India Company. 248 memo-
rials to tho Queen, with 42.000 signatures,
against tho playing of military bands for public
warded to the Homo Office for presentation to
her M nies ty. A. purse containing ¿E10O0, the
in London last week. Tho chief attractions
were a fino edition of Shnkspere, and a com-
so extremely rare that only twenty-threo copies
of tho first volume aro supposed to be extant,
the rest of tho edition having been destroyed in
tho great fire of 1666. The former, after a
£164 17; and tho latter for £200 Hs. At
Colonel Sibthorp'8 sale. .Tack Sheppard's
tobacco-box", with his portrait on tho lid, was
sold for ¿612. Rogers' pictures are being sold,
t bituary includes Mr Fox. ALP. for the connty
Newcastlo-on-Tyne.
3rd and 5 th: -
When the Queen went down to Portsmouth,
Wednesday week, to look at the immense arma-
ments that had been prepared to carry on the
war with renewed vigour, she little imagined
Commons to an amount of discomfort that they
all heartily hope they may never be destined to
to their journeys end, and then took to the
water, but when they arrived at the review, it
"scarce'', to escape the universal expression of
dissatisfaction. About this time the Bench be-
came desperate, and two judges were declared
by Lord Campbell as having been seen by him
railway again! Well, but there was nothing for
come, first served. The Duchess of C. and the
Duchess of M. was pulled hack by the ungallant
Bishop of E.. as she was entering a first-class
The directors of the Crystal Palace Company
are making great preparations for a fete to cele-
brate the conclusion of Peace. Her Majesty
will be present, and a number of French soldiers
are coming over to take part in the proceedings.
Baron Marochetti's large allegorical figure of
Peace will be unveiled on this occasion. In this
case the sculptor ventures on a bold experiment
-the bust and arms of the figure are to be
as a lay figure, and clothed in velvet and silver,
we doubt whether this novel feature will meet
with the approval of artists generally. The re-
turn of Peace has been the signal for the renewal
of speculation in various ways. Many new com-
milking, washing, and mangling companies. The
Crimean inquiry appears drawing to a close.
case, and Lord Lucan has made an equally
now under consideration, and the cases of other
officers according to their rank. The Marquis of
annum by the East India Company. 248 memo-
rials to the Queen, with 42.000 signatures,
against the playing of military bands for public
warded to the Home Office for presentation to
her Majesty. A purse containing £1000, the
in London last week. The chief attractions
were a fine edition of Shakspere, and a com-
so extremely rare that only twenty-three copies
of the first volume are supposed to be extant,
the rest of the edition having been destroyed in
the great fire of 1666. The former, after a
£164 17; and tho latter for £200 11s. At
Colonel Sibthorp's sale, "Jack Sheppard's
tobacco-box", with his portrait on the lid, was
sold for £12. Rogers' pictures are being sold,
obituary includes Mr Fox. ALP. for the county
Newcastle-on-Tyne.
LIGHT, DARKNESS AND FURNITURE. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Thursday 19 March 1857 [Issue No.3361] page 7 2020-01-26 22:02 Oh, that furniture I-could an account! of
tie needless tribulations which it causes be !
written out. what a record of seiio comic suf-
ferings wo should have on record! Like all i
who adviento fresh air and light, wo are also
ardent devotees of neatness inhouschold goar ¡
and dread fchabbiness and slovenliness. But
we protest against this insano devotion to fur
! niturc, which changes home to a darkened ex- ,
hibitiou, and"which gives to inanimate objects
a clamping power ove'r intelligent life. Why
sl-onld carpets, curtains, tete a tetes, Turkish
chairs, and Mario Antoinettes become grim
fetishes, made to torment lifo with an over
] owering sonse of their superiority ? If wo
something human or humnnising in them
let them be bronzes.'picturcB, statues, castings
oi even splendid portfolios and rare books.
Let these be the true idols, and wo will tole-
covered with noli me tangiré embroidery.
SeriouBly-our readers must bo awaro that
vc ore or less darkly on thousands of homos.
Can no one do anything to relieve it'?
Oh, that furniture!-could an account of
the needless tribulations which it causes be
written out what a record of serio comic suf-
ferings we should have on record! Like all
who advocate fresh air and light, we are also
ardent devotees of neatness in household gear
and dread shabbiness and slovenliness. But
we protest against this insane devotion to fur-
niture, which changes home to a darkened ex-
hibition, and which gives to inanimate objects
a clamping power over intelligent life. Why
should carpets, curtains, tete a tetes, Turkish
chairs, and Marie Antoinettes become grim
fetishes, made to torment life with an over-
powering sense of their superiority ? If we
something human or humanising in them -
let them be bronzes.'pictures, statues, castings
or even splendid portfolios and rare books.
Let these be the true idols, and we will tole-
covered with noli me tangere embroidery.
Seriously-our readers must be aware that
more or less darkly on thousands of homes.
Can no one do anything to relieve it? -
LIGHT, DARKNESS AND FURNITURE. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Thursday 19 March 1857 [Issue No.3361] page 7 2020-01-26 21:55 LIGHT, DARKNESS. AND FURNI
If there bo anything winch is, next to exer-
pit'portion of cloudy weather than with us,
I lit we may again urge, per contra, that the
cl(iidinC8S of those countries is counter
111. , need by a stoadier climate, and that the
iiiivcB of the former aro habitually melan
i Le ly, while, those of the latter arc provor
lially lethiugic. One thing is at least certain,
and confirmed by the experience of every one ,
familiar with inY-alids-that a bright day '
cheers and invigorates, that light is in a cer- !
Ytgetables, grow up in a weakly, sickly man
nnif deprived of it.
The Americans are, notoriously a light» ,
loving people. Our fearfully warm summers !
counsel us to build houses abundant in large ,
Yvmdows, which may be opened on occasion ,
to admit the air, und the forco of habit has i
made many among UB SO accustomed to much \
light, that we suffer from the Yvant of it.
And it is well that we acquired such a taste,
lhere is something in light eminently con-
genial with mental activity, and that bribk- ,
icFS of feeling which banishes petty troubles.
It. is established, beyond question, that a pes- ,
tilential disease, in sweeeping a street, often '.
ce nfines itself to tho shady Bide, and the an- '
nais of medicine aifoiel numerous cnseB of a
Eimilar nature, almost miraculous in their
singularity. i
Somethiug of the beneficial effects upon
health and spirits, which wo have attributed
solely to light, is undoubtedly duo to its '
vi,] tins, fresh air is generally rather scarce.
Ai d jet, with a full appreciation of theknow
h I'ge that by excluding these they are slowly
time ,-ro at this inBtant thousands of persons '
mound iw who actually devote a portion of
their activo working t-neigies to excluding
nfer to those who idly Y'egetate in lanes
nnd back streets, whore the blessed light of
heaven only linds its way by accident, or
Trio arc forced by poverty into cellars and
large comfortable houses, with numerous '
dcors mid windows, and parloms and bed- I
looms, fitted with very expensive furniture, i
Oh, that very expensive furniture ! and oil

tbore carpets, whose colouis are more costly ¡
nrtl better worth preservation than the rosy
tinta in the cheeks of the young I What !
»i'tter if Miss Julia or young Master Bobby
sp- nd their in-door life in a " chiaroscuro," i
T hich makes them sallow white, so long as
the silken curtains remain intact in their ;
primitive crimson ? How many n houBo ia i
this city haB even the rooms which are in 1
daily and frequent use closed, for fear -
hit excess of light should damage j
a quantity of tasteless upholstery? j
II r w many a highly-respectable mansion is a
receptacle of Cimmerian darkness during a -
greater part of the dny_. Wo pardon it in the '
a shrino which ia enjoyed ull the moro for
being shrouded in neatness and mystery, and I
it is well that caTeful housekeepers shoulel j
have n curtain realm where their passion for
preserving furniture intact may have full I
Fcope to elaborato a maBtor-proof. But there i
me fow among our rendors who cannot rejal '
deadly-silent and tidily dismal homes, Yvbcre ,
almost every room is a darkened area, sacred !
to the grim divinity of Furniture. I
LIGHT, DARKNESS. AND FURNI-
If there be anything winch is, next to exer-
proportion of cloudy weather than with us,
but we may again urge, per contra, that the
cloudiness of those countries is counter-
balanced by a steadier climate, and that the
natives of the former are habitually melan-
choly, while, those of the latter are prover-
bially lethargic. One thing is at least certain,
and confirmed by the experience of every one
familiar with invalids-that a bright day
cheers and invigorates, that light is in a cer-
vegetables, grow up in a weakly, sickly man-
ner if deprived of it.
The Americans are, notoriously a light-
loving people. Our fearfully warm summers
counsel us to build houses abundant in large
windows, which may be opened on occasion
to admit the air, and the force of habit has
made many among us so accustomed to much
light, that we suffer from the want of it.
And it is well that we acquired such a taste.
There is something in light eminently con-
genial with mental activity, and that brisk-
ness of feeling which banishes petty troubles.
It is established, beyond question, that a pes-
tilential disease, in sweeping a street, often
confines itself to the shady side, and the an-
nais of medicine afford numerous cases of a
similar nature, almost miraculous in their
singularity.
Something of the beneficial effects upon
health and spirits, which we have attributed
solely to light, is undoubtedly due to its
wanting, fresh air is generally rather scarce.
And yet, with a full appreciation of the know-
ledge that by excluding these they are slowly
there are at this instant thousands of persons
around us who actually devote a portion of
their active working energies to excluding
refer to those who idly vegetate in lanes
and back streets, where the blessed light of
heaven only finds its way by accident, or
who are forced by poverty into cellars and
large comfortable houses, with numerous
doors and windows, and parlours and bed-
rooms, fitted with very expensive furniture.
Oh, that very expensive furniture ! and oh

those carpets, whose colours are more costly
and better worth preservation than the rosy
tints in the cheeks of the young! What
matter if Miss Julia or young Master Bobby
spend their in-door life in a "chiaroscuro,"
which makes them sallow white, so long as
the silken curtains remain intact in their
primitive crimson ? How many a house in
this city has even the rooms which are in
daily and frequent use closed, for fear
lest excess of light should damage
a quantity of tasteless upholstery?
How many a highly-respectable mansion is a
receptacle of Cimmerian darkness during a
greater part of the day. We pardon it in the
a shrine which is enjoyed all the more for
being shrouded in neatness and mystery, and
it is well that careful housekeepers should
have a certain realm where their passion for
preserving furniture intact may have full
scope to elaborate a master-proof. But there
are few among our readers who cannot recall
deadly-silent and tidily dismal homes, where
almost every room is a darkened area, sacred
to the grim divinity of Furniture.
SEARCH FOR RARE BOOKS IN TURKEY. (Article), Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 - 1856), Tuesday 11 September 1855 [Issue No.2813] page 4 2020-01-26 21:38 SBEAncI FOR RARE BooS INx TURXEY.--M.
Lebarbicr, a member of the Ecole Franoaise
at Constantinople, has addressed various re
mission, and M. Reinaud, member ofthe in.
summary of them. It appears .that M.i Le
Latin manuscripts which still e3ist at Con
mosques and colleges. It is supposed .that
they contain the remains of the literary 'trea
which 3. Lebarbier was specially directed to
* Moadjam al Bohian," being a geographical
dictionary composed by Yakout m the thir
two copies of it exist. Another work' i 'an
monuments, &c., of Egypt, written by 'Abd.
As IISHn DUEL.---A-n Irishman, who was
him outside of the line, it was:to go for no
SEARCH FOR RARE BOOKS IN TURKEY.--M.
Lebarbier, a member of the Ecole Francaise
at Constantinople, has addressed various re-
mission, and M. Reinaud, member of the in-
summary of them. It appears .that M. Le
Latin manuscripts which still exist at Con-
mosques and colleges. It is supposed that
they contain the remains of the literary trea-
which M Lebarbier was specially directed to
"Moadjam al Bohian," being a geographical
dictionary composed by Yakout in the thir-
two copies of it exist. Another work is an
monuments, &c., of Egypt, written by Abd-
AN IRISH DUEL.---An Irishman, who was
him outside of the line, it was to go for no-
Classified Advertising (Advertising), The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), Thursday 29 July 1830 [Issue No.1846] page 3 2020-01-26 17:11 BY MR. BODENHAM, I
Soven o'clock precisely, at his Spacious Rooms.
"R. BODENIIAM has the honour
tralia, that ho has received instructions from the
Exocutors of the late RonEUT Howe, Esq. His
Majesty's Printer, to Sell that well-selected nnd
having kept back compouent parts of some of the
refers his friends to the inspection of the nnrces of
Gazette, from this Day's dato.
Purchasers under ¿£10, Cash; above that sum,
2, 4, and 6 months, approved bills will bo taken.
Purchasers of from ¿£150 to <£300, approved
bills will bo taken, at 6 and 12 months.
BY MR. BODENHAM,
Seven o'clock precisely, at his Spacious Rooms.
MR. BODENHAM has the honour
tralia, that he has received instructions from the
Executors of the late Robert Howe, Esq. His
Majesty's Printer, to Sell that well-selected and
having kept back component parts of some of the
refers his friends to the inspection of the names of
Gazette, from this Day's date.
Purchasers under £10, Cash; above that sum,
2, 4, and 6 months, approved bills will be taken.
Purchasers of from £150 to £300, approved
bills will be taken, at 6 and 12 months.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Goimbla
    List
    Public

    2 items
    created by: public:d.overett 2013-06-20
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.