Information about Trove user: culroym

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,785,289
2 noelwoodhouse 3,898,417
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,274,699
5 Rhonda.M 3,098,535
...
8 annmanley 2,279,768
9 yelnod 2,229,239
10 C.Scheikowski 2,038,585
11 culroym 1,979,100
12 maurielyn 1,761,571
13 Scottishlass 1,652,273

1,979,100 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

September 2019 465
August 2019 7,241
July 2019 14,335
June 2019 24,390
May 2019 10,882
April 2019 19,462
March 2019 6,549
February 2019 4,255
January 2019 16,383
December 2018 114
November 2018 15,033
October 2018 19,158
September 2018 10,396
August 2018 9,383
July 2018 11,096
June 2018 19,578
May 2018 7,873
April 2018 3,107
March 2018 9,256
February 2018 17,758
January 2018 16,805
December 2017 17,345
November 2017 33,334
October 2017 40,451
September 2017 3,815
August 2017 24,775
July 2017 9,961
June 2017 23,106
May 2017 17,437
April 2017 33,762
March 2017 13,391
February 2017 2,102
January 2017 6,818
December 2016 6,803
November 2016 16,027
October 2016 11,662
September 2016 16,028
August 2016 20,651
July 2016 26,498
June 2016 22,576
May 2016 20,584
April 2016 19,975
March 2016 28,084
February 2016 16,713
January 2016 17,677
December 2015 7,948
November 2015 17,827
October 2015 19,125
September 2015 12,112
August 2015 26,646
July 2015 39,181
June 2015 31,757
May 2015 8,907
April 2015 6,662
March 2015 14,061
February 2015 10,364
January 2015 13,553
December 2014 18,304
November 2014 17,639
October 2014 11,057
September 2014 27,107
August 2014 30,242
July 2014 7,095
June 2014 31,246
May 2014 21,489
April 2014 23,003
March 2014 19,369
February 2014 19,364
January 2014 20,178
December 2013 22,679
November 2013 20,249
October 2013 25,354
September 2013 24,440
August 2013 26,351
July 2013 21,272
June 2013 31,158
May 2013 29,612
April 2013 25,275
March 2013 23,814
February 2013 23,751
January 2013 10,940
December 2012 10,383
November 2012 5,120
October 2012 9,700
September 2012 7,518
August 2012 4,191
July 2012 3,586
June 2012 16,524
May 2012 21,287
April 2012 7,535
March 2012 18,690
February 2012 17,112
January 2012 20,383
December 2011 9,562
November 2011 14,315
October 2011 10,553
September 2011 13,269
August 2011 25,122
July 2011 6,121
June 2011 7,179
May 2011 16,708
April 2011 23,010
March 2011 30,786
February 2011 17,374
January 2011 14,869
December 2010 10,640
November 2010 17,860
October 2010 23,116
September 2010 17,342
August 2010 15,151
July 2010 15,727
June 2010 22,303
May 2010 14,807
April 2010 13,377
March 2010 13,402
February 2010 4,258
January 2010 3,760
December 2009 2,165
November 2009 2,753
October 2009 7,935
September 2009 1,917
August 2009 1,685
July 2009 7,149
June 2009 3,283
May 2009 377
April 2009 3,876
March 2009 10,656
February 2009 596
January 2009 169
December 2008 176
November 2008 114
October 2008 25
September 2008 734
August 2008 625

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,785,087
2 noelwoodhouse 3,898,417
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,274,678
5 Rhonda.M 3,098,522
...
8 annmanley 2,279,698
9 yelnod 2,229,193
10 C.Scheikowski 2,037,470
11 culroym 1,977,625
12 maurielyn 1,761,568
13 Scottishlass 1,652,273

1,977,625 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

September 2019 465
August 2019 7,231
July 2019 14,335
June 2019 24,298
May 2019 10,863
April 2019 19,462
March 2019 6,541
February 2019 4,255
January 2019 16,383
December 2018 114
November 2018 15,033
October 2018 19,158
September 2018 10,396
August 2018 9,379
July 2018 11,096
June 2018 18,761
May 2018 7,720
April 2018 3,083
March 2018 9,234
February 2018 17,758
January 2018 16,805
December 2017 17,305
November 2017 33,316
October 2017 40,361
September 2017 3,787
August 2017 24,775
July 2017 9,961
June 2017 23,106
May 2017 17,364
April 2017 33,762
March 2017 13,390
February 2017 2,102
January 2017 6,818
December 2016 6,803
November 2016 16,027
October 2016 11,662
September 2016 16,028
August 2016 20,651
July 2016 26,498
June 2016 22,576
May 2016 20,524
April 2016 19,975
March 2016 28,068
February 2016 16,713
January 2016 17,677
December 2015 7,948
November 2015 17,827
October 2015 19,125
September 2015 12,112
August 2015 26,646
July 2015 39,181
June 2015 31,757
May 2015 8,907
April 2015 6,662
March 2015 14,061
February 2015 10,364
January 2015 13,553
December 2014 18,304
November 2014 17,639
October 2014 11,057
September 2014 27,107
August 2014 30,242
July 2014 7,095
June 2014 31,246
May 2014 21,489
April 2014 23,003
March 2014 19,369
February 2014 19,364
January 2014 20,178
December 2013 22,679
November 2013 20,249
October 2013 25,354
September 2013 24,440
August 2013 26,351
July 2013 21,272
June 2013 31,158
May 2013 29,612
April 2013 25,275
March 2013 23,814
February 2013 23,751
January 2013 10,940
December 2012 10,383
November 2012 5,120
October 2012 9,700
September 2012 7,518
August 2012 4,191
July 2012 3,586
June 2012 16,524
May 2012 21,287
April 2012 7,535
March 2012 18,690
February 2012 17,112
January 2012 20,383
December 2011 9,562
November 2011 14,315
October 2011 10,553
September 2011 13,269
August 2011 25,122
July 2011 6,121
June 2011 7,179
May 2011 16,708
April 2011 23,010
March 2011 30,786
February 2011 17,374
January 2011 14,869
December 2010 10,640
November 2010 17,860
October 2010 23,116
September 2010 17,342
August 2010 15,151
July 2010 15,727
June 2010 22,303
May 2010 14,807
April 2010 13,377
March 2010 13,402
February 2010 4,258
January 2010 3,760
December 2009 2,165
November 2009 2,753
October 2009 7,935
September 2009 1,917
August 2009 1,685
July 2009 7,149
June 2009 3,283
May 2009 377
April 2009 3,876
March 2009 10,656
February 2009 596
January 2009 169
December 2008 176
November 2008 114
October 2008 25
September 2008 734
August 2008 625

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 311,860
2 PhilThomas 128,710
3 mickbrook 107,593
4 murds5 61,555
5 GeoffMMutton 51,076
...
50 bannang 1,672
51 carmelf 1,650
52 mccoyneil 1,480
53 culroym 1,475
54 robynnnekb 1,437
55 josies0082 1,429

1,475 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2019 10
June 2019 92
May 2019 19
March 2019 8
August 2018 4
June 2018 817
May 2018 153
April 2018 24
March 2018 22
December 2017 40
November 2017 18
October 2017 90
September 2017 28
May 2017 73
March 2017 1
May 2016 60
March 2016 16


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
BY ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH. MELBOURNE, Tuesday evening. (Article), Maryborough and Dunolly Advertiser (Vic. : 1857 - 1867 ; 1914 - 1918), Wednesday 31 December 1862 [Issue No.DCCCLXXV] page 2 2019-09-04 19:30 by a roA, wbjcb
entrant, which js yery
flll w IB
Wf'^Mft TlVCPV WUW flai^l ft
Bie rate af lb 'IflM
Vlslmpe^bls tor
live.
Tlte wStlwbste It
aulte difforeotto Duoedis! wa have liot day* like
tbe somsmr ln Ttetorta, aad any ^mwot * Mat,
SheoU
IIMr^^teAi^M
deep. The snow tasilli ying on the ranges, within

quest in the following terms:— "I will, as my duty,
The snow is not yet down, nor will it be for
two or three months. Some of the miners have
however, he is very kind to me, and given me the
best bed he can on top of his goods. I pay
£3 13s a week for my board alone, at the hotel
and it is seldom I enjoy a dinner, things being
done in so rough and dirty a manner, besides
having a lot of drunken people about the room.
The only means we have of washing is by going
down to the river and having a swim, which I do
by a rock, which stop the current, which is very
fast out in the centre of the river, where it flows at
the rate of 10 miles an hour. It is impossible for
and man to swim across it; some have lost their
lives in trying it, however. The weather here is
quite different to Dunedin; we have hot days like
the summer in Victoria, and any amount of dust,
rain seldom occurring. I have been told this is the
general state of the weather, except in winter,
when it is very cold, the snow being about a foot
deep. The snow is still lying on the ranges, within
sight. The snow is not yet down, nor will it be for
two of three months. Some of the miners have
managed to get a little washdirt from the banks,
which has paid very well; they are anxiously wait-
quest in the following terms:— "I will, as my duty,**
sight. The snow is not yet down, nor will it be for
**two or three months. Some of the miners have
BY ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH. MELBOURNE, Tuesday evening. (Article), Maryborough and Dunolly Advertiser (Vic. : 1857 - 1867 ; 1914 - 1918), Wednesday 31 December 1862 [Issue No.DCCCLXXV] page 2 2019-09-04 18:53 to a late bour last night flames and smoke continued
went over the sides, aad the vessel slowly burned
near M'Pherson's station, near the Manuherikia
Jnnctioa.' Ths
having walls.There is any amount of drinking
of the world," and who is certainly a curious card.
ta whiv «« wHunyajpi iniutn^*! HHS
and hotels keeping open on the latter day.
"ember me to aU triends."
We take As subjoined paragraph upon what
»V>e t w l tbe prswlnent'tqjii of the day
(toayeAe^ar's a«VM>-^ThenMW><Mil toBerMasUtrtl.
U'tie snow is not yei il iwn, nor will it bo for
the Sovertfga. HU AAUntf replied to the re-
I M S A S F F G S ^ S
roa far your kind appreciation of my amdncti but
ai *ilenoe would eqnse tne to nSooostrootloD, I
think it better to say thi.mudjiwrdlng the object
yon —vw*.*—a^vw have view:—Deeply wnwwu touchod a* a
audi m snailr nf <uh>AJ«» If - •* ! mm* am •*—_ br ^
suchamaricof cOTfldenoo&wn so large a meeting
of tbedtaai. of Mi4bouroe, and *or^ aa lVh^
bi to sever the UM which bind me to many friends
in this cotmtry, I yet c.nuot forego the sads&ctloa
offteling thatlhAte beeuact^by no motive
of «df4ntere*t, but solely bv a d»lre for the weltsre
of the oommunlty and the independence of my
.AO^IINTHECOURAELBAVEPURTUODWITHREAPEI
to ttoOovernor 1 * 8*1*17 Redaction Bill I mtut,
tt«w&«,sai carry out my previous Intention of
m u n mWrii^r n ^ a my r nignatkm rmgnauon rer hr iter Her Ma- *t
je.ty'iaooMtanes.whioevcr the ..... bill is re-passed in
an amen led shape. I have discovered no ground in
subsequent eventtfcr changing the opinion I at the
flrrt ftlt it my duty to eicprew to the Duke o{ N«waMla,ttet
it would be for the advantage of Her
M%io*ty'» servloe if J retired rromofflceTt the dose
of the unuoaiy mm. term. Nevertheless, flmiuwtn, I am
thankful
L^tlt.*!^ to
^ ths Duke
it for having
a . -1 spared
*
me the
humiliation of being rellered at the iwy moment
tteturm wired, wpired-and ,)»)) be —rtv bappyto — remaJn » at —
iny post at A loag loftg as, M, after ifler rerUwiag reviewing the state Mie of
affairs in this ihb portion nf of Hcu* Her Ifaiaalv'a Majesty's ^Amitiirtna 'dominions,
his Grace thall deem it desirable."
Hie ertrecne sentence of the law, aays the
Argm, wa* carried iato effect yesterday morning,
PoUett, aged forty-one years, who was convicted
girl eleven years of age. Tbe execution was attended
by only about thirty persona, including the
oBcer* of the gaol present. The cnlprit was attended
hi hit last momenta by the Rev. Dr.
Cairns, who ai«o, on behalf and in the name of
the condemned, as soon as the prooM* of pinionlug
wa* completed, stated that he acknowledged
his guilt, and tbc justice of the sentence that he
was about to undergo. The usual preparation*
having been mads, As criminal proosedod to the
receiving vary slight *npr©rt Asm the execatiooer.
Tbe Rev. Dr. (kirns delivered •
short prayer, at the dose of which the drop
feU, and the condemned man appeared to die in-
by the city oonwer. Samuel Pollett was a
native of StefbrdsMie, and came to South Australia
about twenty-three year* ago. with a party oT
emigrant*, in charge of a aaitaiooAry party, wboae
of sectarian union, men and boy* of all useful trade*
enterprise The scheme failed, nod Poliett, being
liberated at an oariy agt: from hit engagement with
he worked industriously aa a mason, aid lived
frugally. Ia this way be improved lite posit ioo,
and coming to Victoria at a good tine, he
con tinned gradually ad ranting until he began
to undertake small contracts, aad «v«taally larger
pounds. reverse of fortune, boweva-, opented
unfavourably upon his mind, aad he fell into low
and depraved habit*, drinking to eaeesa, neglecting
and ill-using bit fiunily, n much so that it Is
believed that his iast wife died through the oonsequeocerofhW
ill-treatment and mlsoonduct go
Etr, however, as it Is known. It appear* that down
to the tisie when be committed % dlfwUbl Crime
fer which be wflferad, he tod aot beooaw amendable
to the law. Att through bis incarceration, down to
tbe time of his trial and eonvtetko, and
actually fer several day* after sentence, the
wretched man appeared to expeet that the capital
puni.hment would not he carried out. It wa* not,
m fret, until the official notification that hi* case
tad tea cowideted by Governor and the
Executive Council, without any remiwion of the
sentence, that he began to reconcile his mind to tbc
awful change awaiting Mm so nearly. The Bev.
I)r. Caim* attendedpdia (jreqnattly, and fes taimlaal
at length yielded to the exhoitatioM of the reverend
gentleman, and confittsed bis guilt. The unhappy
mauatoaadslapt well every day and night after
hi* condemaalton, and it was necessary to awake
request, twe his chUdren, .
to a late hour last night flames and smoke continued
went over the sides, and the vessel slowly burned
near M'Pherson's station, near the Manuherikla
having walls. There is any amount of drinking
of the world," and who is certainly a curious card;
ing till the river gets down, when they expect to
make their fortunes. In the meantime, they have
been prospecting, and have discovered a few pay-
able gullies in the ranges, which has paid the ma-
jority of them very well. Most of the business
here is done on Saturdays and Sundays, the stores
and hotels keeping open on the latter day. Re-
member me to all friends."
We take the subjoined paragraph upon what
may be termed the pre-eminant topic of the day
from yesterday's Argus:— The memorial to Her Ma-
jesty the Queen, on the subject of the Governor
and his salary, adopted by the public meeting held
at St. George's Hall on Wednesday last, was pre-
sented to Sir Henry Barkly yesterday, by a depu-
tation handed by Mr. George Rolfe, with the request
that His Excellency would transmit it to the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies, for the presentation to
the Sovereign. His Excellency replied to the re-
quest in the following terms:— "I will, as my duty,
The snow is not yet down, nor will it be for
managed to get a little washdirt from the banks,
which has paid very well; they are anxiously wait-
ing till the river gets down, when they expect to
make their fortunes. In the meantime, they have
been prospecting, and have discovered a few pay-
able gullies in the ranges, which has paid the ma-
jority of them very well. Most of the business
here is done on Saturdays and Sundays, the stores
and hotels keeping open on the latter day. Re-
member me to all friends."
We take the subjoined paragraph upon what
may be termed the pre-eminent topic of the day
from yesterday's Argus:—The memorial to Her Ma-
jesty the Queen, on the subject of the Governor
and his salary, adopted by the public meeting held
at St. George's Hall on Wednesday last, was pre-
sented to Sir Henry Barkly Rolfe, with the request
that His Excellency would transmit it to the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies, for presentation to
the Sovereign. His Excellency replied to the re-
quest in the following terms:—"I will, as my duty
forward your memorial by the earliest opportunity
for presentation to the Queen. In the position in
which I stand, I might confine myself to thanking
you for your kind appreciation of my conduct; but
as silence would expose me to misconstruction, I
think it better to say this much regarding the ob-
ject you have view:—Deeply touched as I am by
such a mark of confidence from so large a meeting
of the citizens of Melbourne, and sorry as I shall
be to sever the ties which bind me to many friends
in this country, I yet cannot forego the satisfaction
of feeling that I have been actuated by no motive
of self-interest, but solely by a desire for the welfare
of the community and the independence of my
successor, in the course I have pursued with respect
to the Governor's Salary Redaction Bill. I must
therefore, still carry out my previous intention of
once more tendering my resignation for Her Majesty's
acceptance, whenever the bill is re-passed in
an amended shape. I have discovered no ground in
subsequent events changing the opinion I at the
first felt it my duty to express to the Duke of Newcastle,
that it would be for the advantage of Her
Majesty's service if I retired from office at the the close
of the ordinary term. Nevertheless, I am
thankful to the Duke for having spared me the
humiliation of being relieved at the very moment
that term expired; and shall be happy to remain at
my post as long as, after reviewing the state of
affairs in this this portion of of Her Majesty's dominions
his Grace shall deem it desirable."
The extreme sentence of the law, says the
Argus, was carried into effect yesterday morning,
Pollett, aged forty-one years, who was convicted
girl eleven years of age. The execution was attended
by only about thirty persons, including the
officers of the gaol present. The culprit was attended
in his last moments by the Rev. Dr.
Cairns, who also, on behalf and in the name of
the condemned, as soon as the process of pinioning
was completed, stated that he acknowledged
his guilt, and the justice of the sentence that he
was about to undergo. The usual preparations
having been made, the criminal proceeded to the
receiving very slight support from the executioner.
The Rev. Dr. Cairns delivered a
short prayer, at the close of which the drop
fell, and the condemned man appeared to die in-
by the city coroner. Samuel Pollett was a
native of Staffordshire, and came to South Australia
about twenty-three years ago. with a party of
emigrants, in charge of a missionary party, whose
of sectarian union, men and boys of all useful trades
enterprise. The scheme failed, and Pollett, being
liberated at an early age from his engagement with
he worked industriously as a mason, and lived
frugally. In this way be improved his position,
and coming to Victoria at a good time, he
continued gradually advancing until he began
to undertake small contracts, and eventually larger
pounds. A reverse of fortune, however, operated
unfavourably upon his mind, and he fell into low
and depraved habits, drinking to excess, neglecting
and ill-using his family, so much so that it is
believed that his last wife died through the consequences
of his ill-treatment and misconduct. So
far, however, as it is known, it appears that down
to the time when be committed the dreadful crime
for which he suffered, he had not become amendable
to the law. All through his incarceration, down to
the time of his trial and conviction, and
actually for several days after sentence, the
wretched man appeared to expect that the capital
punishment would not be carried out. It was not,
in fact, until the official notification that his case
had been considered by Governor and the
Executive Council, without any remission of the
sentence, that he began to reconcile his mind to the
awful change awaiting him so nearly. The Rev.
Dr. Cairns attended him frequently, and the criminal
at length yielded to the exhortations of the reverend
gentleman, and confessed his guilt. The unhappy
man ate and slept well every day and night after
his condemnaton, and it was necessary to awake
him yesterday morning, otherwise he would pro-
bably have slept until eight o'clock. On Sunday,
at his earnest request, two of his children, a girl
of eight years of age, and a boy, aged five years, were
allowed to visit him.
BY ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH. MELBOURNE, Tuesday evening. (Article), Maryborough and Dunolly Advertiser (Vic. : 1857 - 1867 ; 1914 - 1918), Wednesday 31 December 1862 [Issue No.DCCCLXXV] page 2 2019-09-04 17:33 spring Waggon, taking the West Tairei Rpad, which
Istttr U eallvd
U^CT U^thej
3«jpno4onof
plain, : ths
MIA
I
" w i t
f>«tank*>t
having a l?t of
St^Mttn^ sod baving
_
spring waggon, taking the West Tairei Road, which
There are two townships, one at the junction of
the Manuherikla and Molyneayx, and the
other at the top of the plain, the
latter is called the Upper, the Junction. The
Upper is the largest and principal one, and
is composed of one long street of tents, few buildings
having walls.There is any amount of drinking
and fighting both night and day. I find it
it very rough living here and sleep at a store kept
by a Mr. Mears, who is called the "greatest wonder
of the world," and who is certainly a curious card.
BY ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH. MELBOURNE, Tuesday evening. (Article), Maryborough and Dunolly Advertiser (Vic. : 1857 - 1867 ; 1914 - 1918), Wednesday 31 December 1862 [Issue No.DCCCLXXV] page 2 2019-09-04 17:23 Mr, Cook, of the Nag's Head Hotel, was as
TbeOttrickClnbiwtonnaooes for the bo«plta !
faitdt at the Golden Age, Marjboroucb, but enmtag,
were highly wooestfal. Jfem was a good
gb not an overflowing house, the teat
of the weather hiving had some influence
audience. TbaphcssyeffeRMflweretkemMaa
tbase at Carisbrook. Really It would be invidious
to make any di«tioctton where all was well meant
•nd good. "Perfection" was played to perfection,
and the other ofertngs made to
touching <>n the benefit* for tlie Qoapital, we are
ddighted to say these performances, and the voluntary
subscriptions from charitable donor*, hare
brought ia more than enough for tbe qualification
for the Government grant,
A paragraph in the Argm of yesladay announoed
tbe destractiao by flrt of the toe American ship
to a late bour last nigUt flame* and sioske oonliaoed
towed on ihore near the Sandridge baths, and then
is most complete, nothing whatever being saved
the ship U attributable to an act of revenge on the
part of the steward on board, who w») a Chinaman,
after setting the vessel o* fire. It is
stated that there had beee frequent qu«rre!» betwMi
him and *ome of tbe crew, and one of thee
led to his being brought before the magistrate! of
Williamstowa, and being again sect ao board the
ship. Oa Sunday night the quarrel seems to
hare been renewed, Captain Johnson being on
shore at tke time. The Chiaaman received
some in salts—amongst others. Us cheriahM tail
was cut off—and soon afterwards be seems to have
fired the vend. As the flames gathered strength,
he was Men to pan into the main chains and throw
himself ifito the sea, it if roppaed with the intention
of committing suicide. lie is mating and his
he succeeded in swiuBiht adtote. Tbe fire was
observed soon after laUllTglll. SIld it spread with
the greatest rapidity. The *wd *a< then lying
with all her yard* aerast, about a quarter of a. mile
from Sandridge old pier. A lighter wa« alongside,
and into H the crew escaped If any effective
mean* of controlling As were oa board—and few
American ships are sufflcieaUy furnished ia this
alarm being given, a cotter pot off from li.M.C.S.
Victoria, with a party headed by lieutenant Gaacoigse.
They reached the Alp after a rapid run
across the bay, and foond no one on board. The
crew bad made their esaape, and a number 4
Chinese pattcagm wen making their way to the
•bore ia one of tbe ship'* boat*. Tbe water Police
and harboar boat* were also qniddy alongside. It
was found that the 4re was aWt. and perfectly beyond
control About quarter pa*t two o'c!o<& tlie
steaming Heresies reached the burning ship, and
backing in under her bow tlie crew «aweeded In
ansbackling tbe chain. The tag then drew the unfortunate
Tstad dear of th* shipping, and towed
her asliore. Soon afterwards the masts and yard*
went over the sides, aad the vetael *lowly burned
down to the water's edge. Captain Johoaon has
lo*t all he had on board, excepting two chronometer*.
His personal las* it set down at «^00(tol
The crew aaved nothing but the clothes In which
they stood. The Kate Hooper was a ine ship, of
•ST tons. Sbe arrived on the ISA of ifee pretest
Dwath, from Hong Knng,tut had ooly disdia^ed
a limitod portion of her cargo of tea and Chinese
tobacco, wbicb was raised at between £4ifl00 and
£50,000, Itegfasta' pwMB^r tba «»rgo r'that
hat been destroyed was intsaded forSyin^i and
the Chinese psittngrrs. wbo ha»e now landed
without paying the U< oa immigrants of that nation,
wore to* that wt, Tbe «hip was not insured.
but It is understood that the cai*o was
coveted to some extent at least. Koog M«ig and
Co, to whom the trssnl vu consigned, bid inw^^^portionliitaided
tirf tltemin throe offtoes,
Tbe folio wing estnet Isgiven ia the JT. d. Matt
of Morfay last, fiom a letter reoeived from a
young man, lately widant ta CasHtyslns, and
wbo is now (tattooed at the Ounitaa Diggings,
Otago:—" We Mt Dunedin on Tueslw, la
ipring' Waggon, tAking the Wm TOrrf%>*<J,»fc£b
Uoonsidcred ttsbest, a»d aw Jbrt.day wecros*ed
theTainlRiverinapto^artdiitoppodattheBuck
Eye Hotel, where I got anoommodaied for the night
and not being pr*)*»4fer It, you may
mar M'Pherton'* stattoo, near the ManuheriW
River. The »iwhdv*ac«*«id t
reached auivdertinstinnvarfltte; na I
BO«L Tbe whole of the rosdwas in a veybsd
state, bflt ibhoed, and la many places dangenw,
havlog any amount of small mto aad b<«s 0
Mn^c^M~lhe-8oasbridge tooc tbe wi
hours to get up and then tbe passenger* had to
walk,^a&et-webadtowalk«Do*tof the way.aad
tbe MaadUiflda
Mr. Cook, of the Nag's Head Hotel, was as
The Garrick Club performances for the hospital
funds at the Golden Age, Maryborough, last evening
were highly successful. There was a good
though not an overflowing house, the heat
of the weather having had some influence
audience. The pieces performed were the same as
those at Carisbrook. Really it would be invidious
to make any distinction where all was well meant
and good. "Perfection" was played to perfection,
and the other offerings made to
touching on the benefits for the Hospital, we are
delighted to say these performances, and the voluntary
subscriptions from charitable donors, have
brought in more than enough for the qualification
for the Government grant.
A paragraph in the Argus of yesterday announced
the destruction by fire of the the American ship
to a late bour last night flames and smoke continued
towed on shore near the Sandridge baths, and then
is most complete, nothing whatever being saved.
the ship is attributable to an act of revenge on the
part of the steward on board, who was a Chinaman,
after setting the vessel on fire. It is
stated that there had been frequent quarrels between
him and some of the crew, and one of these
led to his being brought before the magistrates of
Williamstown, and being again sent on board the
ship. On Sunday night the quarrel seems to
have been renewed, Captain Johnson being on
shore at the time. The Chinaman received
some insults—amongst others, his cherished tail
was cut off—and soon afterwards he seems to have
fired the vessel. As the flames gathered strength,
he was seen to pass into the main chains and threw
himself into the sea, it is supposed with the intention
of committing suicide. He is missing and his
he succeeded in swimming ashore. The fire was
observed soon after midnight, and it spread with
the greatest rapidity. The vessel was then lying
with all her yards across, about a quarter of a mile
from Sandridge old pier. A lighter was alongside,
and into it the crew escaped. If any effective
means of controlling fire were on board—and few
American ships are sufficiently furnished in this
alarm being given, a cutter put off from H.M.C.S.
Victoria, with a party headed by Lieutenant Gascoigne.
They reached the ship after a rapid run
across the bay, and found no one on board. The
crew had made their escape, and a number of
Chinese passengers were making their way to the
shore in one of the ship's boats. The water Police
and harbour boats were also quickly alongside. It
was found that the fire was abaft, and perfectly beyond
control. About quarter past two o'clock the
steamtug Hercules reached the burning ship, and
backing in under her bow the crew succeeded
unshackling the chain. The tug then drew the unfortunate
vessel clear of the shipping, and towed
her ashore. Soon afterwards the masts and yards
went over the sides, aad the vessel slowly burned
down to the water's edge. Captain Johnson has
lost all he had on board, excepting two chronometers.
His personal loss it set down at 2,500 dol.
The crew saved nothing but the clothes in which
they stood. The Kate Hooper was a fine ship, of
957 tons. She arrived on the 15th of the present
month, from Hong Kong, but had only discharged
a limited portion of her cargo of tea and Chinese
tobacco, which was valued at between £45,000 and
£50,000. The greater portion of the cargo that
has been destroyed was intended for Sydney; and
the Chinese passengers, who have now landed
without paying the tax immigrants of that nation,
were for that port. The ship was not insured,
but it is understood that the cargo was
covered to some extent at least. Kong Meng and
Co, to whom the vessel was consigned, had insured
the portion intended for them in three offices,
for £10,200 in all.
The following extract is given in the M. A. Mail
of Monday last, from a letter received from a
young man, lately a resident in Castlemaine, and
who is now stationed at the Dunstan Diggings,
Otago:—" We left Dunedin on Tuesday, in Cobb's
spring Waggon, taking the West Tairei Rpad, which
is considered the best, and the first day we crossed
the Tairei River in a punt, and stopped at the Buck
Eye Hotel, where I got accommodated for the night
by paying 9s. On the second day we camped at
Thompson's station, on the Deep stream. The third
day we camped on the Rock and Pillar Mountain,
and not being prepared for it, you may judge how
I enjoyed it, on a bitter cold night. The fourth
day we camped near Morrison 's station, at a place
called the Roughridge. The fifth day we camped
near M'Pherson's station, near the Manuherikia
River. The sixth day we crossed the river, and
reached our destination, arriving on Sunday after-
noon. The whole of the road was in a very bad
state, not formed, and in many places dangerous,
having any amount of small creeks and bogs to
cross and steep hills to go up and down; one
hill called the Roughbridge took the waggon seven
hours to get up and then the passengers had to
walk, in fact we had to walk most of the way, and
had tp help the waggon through the bogs &c. also
up and down the hills, which were very numerous.
It cost me £6 for the fare and 1s. per lb. for luggage,
making, including all expenses on the road, £9.
BY ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH. MELBOURNE, Tuesday evening. (Article), Maryborough and Dunolly Advertiser (Vic. : 1857 - 1867 ; 1914 - 1918), Wednesday 31 December 1862 [Issue No.DCCCLXXV] page 2 2019-09-04 16:47 (FROM OUB own CORTT£8POjn>*HT.)
The Eeera arrived from Gipps Land, and
bring* 2,500 ox. of gold.
Mr. Malhun has succeeded Messrs.Spiers
BALULKAT.
to sympathise with tbe Governor.
?
'
?
To-morrow will see tbe ooeamencemeut of the
Caledonian Gams ia oar Prince's Park, and we
hope andtrest0»ewwrthevwill betos*«ppi*fdfe
than itthe dose re lire oar wiidag. Avery Urge
concourse of risiton is expodei^ and great preparations
have been made for their rtoeptkm.
On New tear's Day (to-aonow) wettuOl hare
the benefit of two deliveries of lettW l^ tbe post,
and find that Ur. F. Omtrim lias b«en appointed on
the Post-oSce staff, so as to complet^y catty out
:
this arrangement. , • : JJ
Friday'* Gazette coatalna th« following notion,
which will be intcrosUng' to aame of our reader*
'' Thereserration of the site at AmbetstflH ai faltcting
and other purpose* of pottie ntcr*ati<», wnJer
an Order ia CouneU of £th Deoetnber,UM, wOl,
pursuant to another Order of i»h Ootober'
I86J, stand revoked upoo tbe ^ftftesiM
of four weeks from the 86th of December,
tm»; -The t m m M
bled at Petty Sessioa* at TaroffnUa .appointed
Mr. Richard Pandas Ohatsr to tie lMpector
of We^aad.M^u^Aribe.^iftSfcWsst
Loddon South, eompridngth* IbHowlnjrdJriatau of
tbe Avooa Elecioral Dbtriot, na«M>,
J t
Bandy Cr«4,Neirl,r%e, Ma»l*M '
iia Mr. William iFrederick TMebell tb
tor of HsMtiits f»
WertLoddoo Nsrth.oompOsingtiie
simtftiisflectml
ia
thtwwtefiBntav,
mites in which' Is Mr. Costick'i crasbint mMblas,
M wp?
,1,
9MnB, a*s »ui
ill,
u,
all .lull,
inracrpiiisi^newiBHv*
iW 111 j'L'll itilTlilw
a light la the lDglae-bnise, arlwffM<««IM..Il>e
workmen, who k^^eathe^lae|nMara]l/*appoitag
tbe thleves to be inside, trt , jA Wwioi,
found tbey hid made off. - The dajrl^fit «hew«4
track* panel the Urwpool Arms/ln tbe direction
of Maryborough, la quarter ths stolsn propertyw
supposed to have beMtaksn. /
, There was net so good a hoase to »it»«** tbe
Maryborongh Oarrick C3ub ^erformanoe at Osrii
Mis Hospital fuad) should Uke tobave seen t attertheles*
Mars was a reef KspsetaUe attawtelHA.
Ws have slready tadicated the 'jpleoes playe^
numdy, " l'erteuiion," " The Irish Tiger," and
" Hie Wandering Minstrel," The first piece was
admirably played for amateur*j Mr. Tootelier'a
make-up fcr Sir Lamrtnet Patrtgim,** well M his
acting of the servile beau befag rcry mueh beyood
the common. Mr- W. Dunn's Sa«i wa* sliarp Ml:
apptehendm, and Mr. Hiaiy, who played Cfatiu
Rttigm, was well up to ^a tiwrk, - In Vie difficult
part of Kate O'Brien, l^Ai^almer* took us by
surprise, whilst lbs. Wood,ln ths part of Sua*,
•at, «* she always ii, tiie aaoompllshed actreai. To
Ms iMooed«d , ^wWdt
wMt totnewbat lamely, ai&wugh Mr. Toutcher
a good deal offun into imporsonation of
PeMtRf*. l^eeveslngooaolBdsd wjtbtliewdltaiowti
toes of "The Waadering KlniWd," in
whkfe, in addltten to the Udies we have asnttonsd,
1te MrtsMS nt« assisted rmf agreeably tp Mr*.
Allbutt, who rsndewd ths p«wt very p«-
fco«y4 andlnaUdyiike jnsuaer. Mr. Cooke was
the itinerant Jem Ayy*, and Mrs. Wood played
Mr*. Oiwcw to the life. Jo this pleos Mr. W.
Bonn sang eapUally In the part of Herbert Card,
aad worthily (fbtalasdan e«ea«. The mu*ioal part
ofths petformanoewai ably managed by Madame
was good enough to tiny one of hit pleasing ballad*.
Mr, Cook, of the Nag's HaadHotsl, was as
att«Uve,»nd the Committee a* obUgingaodUbena
a* usual.
(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)
The Keera arrived from Gipps Land, and
brings 2,500 oz. of gold.
Mr. Mallam has succeeded Messrs. Spiers
BALLARAT.
to sympathise with the Governor.
To-morrow will see the commencement of the
Caledonian Games in our Prince's Park, and we
hope and trust the weather will be less oppressive
than at the time we are now writing. A very large
concourse of visitors is expected and great preparations
have been made for their reception.
On New Year's Day (to-morrow) we shall have
the benefit of two deliveries of letters by the post,
and find that Mr. F. Outtrim has b«en appointed on
the Post-office staff, so as to completely carry out
this arrangement.
Friday's Gazette contains the following notion,
which will be interesting to some of our readers :—
"The reservation of the site at Amherst for cricketing
and other purposes of public recreation, under
an Order in Council of 5th December, 1859, will
pursuant to another Order of 27th October
1862, stand revoked upon the expiration
of four weeks from the 26th of December,
1862," "The Justices of the Peace assembled
at Petty Sessions at Tarnagulla appointed
Mr. Richard Dundas Chater to to be Inspector
of Weights and measures for the district of West
Loddon South, comprising the following divisions of
tbe Avoca Electoral District, namely, Dunolly,
Sandy Creek, Newbridge, Mollagel, and Cochran's;
and Mr. William Frederick Tatchell to be Inspec-
tor of Weights and Measures for the district of
West Loddon North, comprising the following divi-
sions of the Electoral District of Avoca, namely
Korong, Inglewood, Kingower, and Jericho."
We learn from Amhurst that about two o'clock
in the morning of Sunday, the 28th inst., the pre-
mises in which Mr. Costick's crushing machine,
were entered, and three copper plates stolen there-
from. Mr. Costick was in bed at the time, but on
hearing the dog making a noise, he got up, and saw
a light in the engine-house, and he called the
workmen, who surrounded the place, naturally sup-
posing the thieves to be inside, but, on entering,
found they had made off. The daylight showed
tracks passed the Liverpool Arms, in the direction
of Maryborough, in which quarter the stolen pro-
perty is supposed to have been taken.
. There was not so good a house to witness the
Maryborough Garrick Club performance at Caris-
the Hospital fund) should like to have seen; never-
the less there was a very respectable attendance.
We have already indicated the pieces played,
namely, "Perfection," " The Irish Tiger," and
" The Wandering Minstrel," The first piece was
admirably played for amateurs; Mr. Toutcher's
make-up for Sir Lawrence Paragon, as well as his
acting of the servile beau being very much beyond
the common. Mr. W. Dunn's Sam was sharp and
apprehensive, and Mr. Healy, who played Charles
Paragon, was well up to the mark. In the difficult
part of Kate O'Brien, Miss Chambers took us by
surprise, whilst Mrs. Wood, in the part of Susan,
was, as* she always is, the accomplished actress. To
this succeeded the "Irish Tiger," which
went somewhat lamely, although Mr. Toutcher
put a good deal of fun into impersonation of
Paddy Ryan. The evening concluded with the well-
known farce of "The Wandering Minstrel," in
which in addition to the ladies we have mentioned,
the amateurs were assisted very agreeably by Mrs.
Allbutt, who rendered the part of Julia very per-
fectly, and in a lady-like manner. Mr. Cooke was
the itinerant Jem Baggs, and Mrs. Wood played
Mrs. Crincum to the life. In this piece Mr. W.
Dunn sang capitally in the part of Herbert Carol,
and worthily obtained an encore. The musical part
of the performance was ably managed by Madame
was good enough to sing one of his pleasing ballads.
Mr, Cook, of the Nag's Head Hotel, was as
attentive, and the Committee as obliging and liberal
as usual.
RAILWAY WORKS, BIG HILL. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Thursday 17 November 1859 [Issue No.1399] page 2 2019-09-04 16:09 (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDKNT.
The operations on these works are carrried on
with conaiderable activity, and about 150 men are
The open cut'ing for the approach to the tunnel
are' now taking away upwards of 2000 tons of
and lab .r economised to the greatest possible
extent. The modus opt.randi is as follows :-A.
Btone. The scotches are then removed, and the
emp'y waggons back to ba reloaded. I imagine
in leng-h. A shaft is sunk midway in
in horing towards the Sandhurst and Castlemaine
hut a large portion of the stone requ;red for the
brid»e across that creek will be obtained from this
quired in the construction of that e;!ifice.
paid on every a'ternate Saturday morning. A
the Curriers' Arma and the Buck-Eye Hotel,
about 3.50 navvies are employed at wages varying
from 7s Cd. to lis. per day. The men lave off)
worJt on Saturday eveninse at 4 p m,, and as it
very forcibly of Scott's lines
At ouco with full two hundred men ;
It seemed ns if the yawning hill to Heaven,
A subterranean hoBt had given."
Fortunately, their purpose wns not so hostile to
fhese stalwart sons of toil, as they swarmed up the
PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY.-We fire extremely
gratified to find that the Municip.il Council h;is
accorded to this excellent body the uss of the
Aa we are aware that several ladies and gentlemen
highly accompi shed in musical ma'.ters declined
to attend rehearsals at any oilier plac<! than the
munity, The instrumenta istB mustered last night,
CAUTION TO PARENTS,-Yesterday, a little boy
named Kelly, about eight yearB old, who had been
the machinery unperceived, and goi the fingers
of his hand severely injured in ilie turning lathe.
THE BANKS.-1-WO believe that the Hanks will
very liberally forego the usual weekly, half holiday
for England
(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)
The operations on these works are carried on
with considerable activity, and about 150 men are
The open cutting for the approach to the tunnel
are now taking away upwards of 2000 tons of
and labor economised to the greatest possible
extent. The modus operandi is as follows :-A
stone. The scotches are then removed, and the
empty waggons back to be reloaded. I imagine
in length. A shaft is sunk midway in
and from this shaft parties are actively engaged
in boring towards the Sandhurst and Castlemaine
but a large portion of the stone required for the
bridge across that creek will be obtained from this
quired in the construction of that edifice.
paid on every alternate Saturday morning. A
the Carriers' Arms and the Buck-Eye Hotel,
about 350 navvies are employed at wages varying
from 7s 6d. to 11s. per day. The men leave off
work on Saturday evenings at 4 p m,, and as it
very forcibly of Scott's lines—
At once with full two hundred men ;
It seemed as if the yawning hill to Heaven,
A subterranean host had given."
Fortunately, their purpose was not so hostile to
these stalwart sons of toil, as they swarmed up the
PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY.-We are extremely
gratified to find that the Municipal Council has
accorded to this excellent body the use of the
As we are aware that several ladies and gentlemen
highly accomplished in musical matters declined
to attend rehearsals at any other place than the
munity. The instrumentalists mustered last night,
CAUTION TO PARENTS.-Yesterday, a little boy
named Kelly, about eight years old, who had been
the machinery unperceived, and got the fingers
of his hand severely injured in the turning lathe.
THE BANKS.- We believe that the Banks will
very liberally forego the usual weekly half holiday
for England.
No title (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Saturday 30 July 1859 [Issue No.1,488] page 5 2019-09-04 15:57 held, pn Thursday evening, at Williamstown, for the
purpose of entering into and diuctissing the particu
be established at that place. The chair was takon by
Having opened the proceedings by reading the regu
i.i- ? ? :« it si
upon Captain Perry, M.L.A., to propose tho first
resolution. That gcatlem&u, after expressing bis
opiuiona, which were quite condemnatory of the rais
ing of a rifle corps, entered into details as to the feasi
bility of ge^ing sent out three or four of the Iineof
baltle sticps which are laid up in ordinary at home,
Mr Ver'ion andseveral other gentlemen then addressed
the meeting. A number of resolutiona timiiar to
taken place at Melbourne aud its suburbs were
Suciciaa-pp at the Sheepwasii. — A rumor was
prevalent iu town luBt night that a man (whoso nama
robbed in a giog tent at the Sucop-taeh. -It would
appear that the man bid sold a liurse to the proprie
tor of tho place, for which hei received some £13,
when very shortly afcerivards, two meu, who be sup
poses ha-l seen him reccive the money, euiereel tho
tent, and knocking him down, rifled his pock-its of
tho money and made off, and have as yet eluded tha
vigilauce of the police. — Bendigo Advertiser.
Fatal Accident at the Bio Hill Railwat
Woiiks.— An accident which resulted fatally to a
man named R. Konyon, occurred yesterday forenoon
at the railway works, near the Buck Eye Hotel. Th«
sinco Monday last, waa working at one of the granite
quarries, at the Melbourne side of tue Big Hiil, and
about twelve o'clock was winding up etone from be
low with a crib winch, which was fixed; to n tri
angle formed of three poles, and steadied by a rop«
tied to a neighboring tree. While the deccu i-cl was
at the winch winding up the rope broke, avl the tri
angle giving way, one of tho poles fell on deceased,
striking bim on the head auel infixing a terrible
wound. Dr Cruikshauk, the railway surgeon, was
immediately in altendaiioo,' buc he found tiiat lifo
was extinot. Tho skull of the deCo;-sc'd ' ha-l i:een
fractured, and,. the doctor stated LhaS' doaih miuc
have been slsncst iiislAntane,us.. .The body '.van re
moved to the Buck Eye Hotel, vghpp a incfisteii&l
inquiry'will probably be held to-day. by JUr Wurdeu
Anderson, J.P, The inquest will be bold this day at
hflf-past one o'clock,— llendi$o AcvcrtUir.
held, on Thursday evening, at Williamstown, for the
purpose of entering into and discussing the particu
be established at that place. The chair was taken by
Having opened the proceedings by reading the regu-
lations, as set forth in H.M. proclamation, he called
upon Captain Perry, M.L.A., to propose the first
resolution. That gentleman, after expressing his
opinions, which were quite condemnatory of the rais-
ing of a rifle corps, entered into details as to the feasi-
bility of getting sent out three or four of the line of
battle ships which are laid up in ordinary at home,
Mr Verion and several other gentlemen then addressed
the meeting. A number of resolutions similar to
taken place at Melbourne and its suburbs were
STICKING-UP AT SHEEPWASH. — A rumor was
prevalent iu town last night that a man (whose name
robbed in a grog tent at the Sheepwash. It would
appear that the man had sold a horse to the proprie-
tor of the place, for which he received some £13,
when very shortly afterwards, two men, who he sup-
poses had seen him receive the money, entered the
tent, and knocking him down, rifled his pockets of
the money and made off, and have as yet eluded the
vigilance of the police. — Bendigo Advertiser.
FATAL ACCIDENT AT THE BIG HILL RAILWAY
WORKS. — An accident which resulted fatally to a
man named R. Kenyon, occurred yesterday forenoon
at the railway works, near the Buck Eye Hotel. The
since Monday last, was working at one of the granite
quarries, at the Melbourne side of the Big Hill, and
about twelve o'clock was winding up stone from be-
low with a crib winch, which was fixed; to a tri-
angle formed of three poles, and steadied by a rope
tied to a neighboring tree. While the deceased was
at the winch winding up the rope broke, and the tri
angle giving way, one of the poles fell on deceased,
striking him on the head and inflicting a terrible
wound. Dr Cruikshank, the railway surgeon, was
immediately in attendance, but he found that life
was extinct. The skull of the deceased had been
fractured, and, the doctor stated that death must
have been almost instantaneous. The body was re
moved to the Buck Eye Hotel, when a magisterial
inquiry will probably be held to-day. by Mr. Warden
Anderson, J.P. The inquest will be held this day at
halff-past one o'clock.— Bendigo Advertiser.
SHIPPING. ARRIVALS.--SEPTEMBER 23. (Article), The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), Monday 25 September 1905 [Issue No.8209] page 11 2019-08-29 22:29 VOYAGES OF TUB STEAMER KARITANE.
29. and passed Las Palmas on August 5. The Cape was
that the Luch Vennachar, whose non-arrival at Adelaide
the Germau-Australian line:— Altona, left Colombo
Bielefeld, left Hamburg September 16, outwartd; Duis-
SEMAJ'UORR— Arrived, September 24: iJriianma,
R.M.S., from London, via purirf, at 2 p.m.
HOKAllT. —Sailed, Sr.plember 22: Helen, hqc., frr
Diiuedin; Oonah, sir., for Sydney, at 10.10 a.m.
MELBOURNE.— Arrived, September 28: WxiUare. str..
fiom New Zealand; Cnlic, Ml., fi'mj New Toil:, via
porta; Rumbalu, fitr., from IVe.tt Australia. Septeintjf.u
24: Lnongaiu, air., from Launceatuii; Flora, rl»'., D'»m
Jjcvunport; Star-durt, .sir,, fraiu Sourabaya; Luly Mil-
iln-d, air., from Adelaide; Wilcjnnia. air., fiom Sy<lne> :
Kawatirt, btr.. from Strahan. Sailed. September :'-i:
Tropic, .sir., for Lmdun, via port; Bereuu, kieb., for
Tasmania; Heathfiebl, bqe., for NeWe.iMle; Mouralioul,
Wyandra, and l-jertv, Kirs., for Sydney; Mureeho, .str.,
for Newcastle; Bliz.i Dnvies, Utch.. frr Duck River (an
chored); Arthur, bqe., fur Ne vi-.i-.tle (anchored)', Conger,
str., for Liuncestun; IViiivatea, u.. pt Strahan; Orion,
sir., for SUnlcv; Coolgardie and Sydney, sirs., tor Ade
WILSON'S PROMONTORY (420 mllw).— Inward. Sep-
lumber 21: Wileanniu, str., at 5,80 p.m.; Wollowra,
str., nt 9.15 u.in. ; Onnuz, R.M.S.. at l» p.m. outward.
September 84: A sir., at 1.45 a.m.; a large ilr., at. 2.1. >
a.m.; GlaucuD, sir., ut U.25 a.m.; Manuwaut, Mr., ut
GABO ISLAND (238 miles). -Pu.ved, September 21: A
6tr.. yellow funnel, ut 0.5 a.m.; Ormuz, R.M.S,, at 0.35
um.; Luulfie Rolh, Mr., ut 8.30 p.m., all bound weal.
Gili2EN CAPB (218 mile#).— lV--ed, pteinb.-r 24: A
str., like Age, fioulh, at 8.20 u.m.; txmuli, «tr., at A.Ja
P.m.; Wyandra, 6tr., at 5.50 p.m.. Iwth boui.d north.
EDEN (210 miles).— Patted, .September 24: Lmrtefi,
str.. north, at 30.5 a.m.; Gabo, fitr., west, at 12.16 p.m.
M0UUYA HEADS (141 mile#).— Arrived, September
24: Ripple, fitr., from Dennagui, nt 2.15 p.m.; Coonum-
devry, Ktr., front Wagonga, at n.40 p.m. Paod : Regu,
str., at 8.80 a.m.; a fair., like WyrdUuh, at 2 p.m., butli
hound north.
.11311 VIS RAY ffi7 mile-.).— PasAid. Sqilember 21:
GravchuH, fitr., -south, at 8 a.m.; Karitane, sir., at noun;
Karori, sir., »t 12.80 p.m.; a Mr., like Ariiridgo, at 8.A)
p.m.; Prinz Eigibmumi, at 8. 80 p.m.; Eaby, sir., at 4.40
p in, ; Perth, sti\, at 5.56 p.iu . all bound north.
\amoi. Resolute, Mokoia, Mncleay. Tuifihaw, Sophia
Ann, Cavanbn, Helen Nicoll, Mrs., C'avan, bqtnfi., from
Kvdnev; Nuirn, btr., from Manila; Star of Tictnriu, str- .
from trUlmue; Coimbatore, Norwegian bqe., from Bun-
fiurv. SeiitcmlKT 34: lluishington, .tr., froi" b'liBaiiorc;
N'cwcavtli.-, l'orl Albrrl, wncl Abmlcin, hiv., frnm Syil-
iiov. failcil, Sfptopilirr 23: Wcstrali.i. 'Iiir.liau;.
Heeolutc, Sophia Ann, Mohoia. Ilel.ni NiooH, Namoi,
DuektldWld, stffl,, (or Sydney; Cavanba, atr., (ur ISyimi
Day; Maeleay. »tr„ (or Jlacleay IHver: Age, Kr., (or
Adelaide Bunumbe«t». etr,, (or Alelnouinc;
Hrlami, str., (or Rnshano; ( nl-\m ,l 1 ".'l
hqc., for tho Vrsl Coast ot Son h An « -'1'
tlrctl. l»q''.. (ur Taltal. Orptrinbrr 24. .iv',,,II:,'I|„nr: .
(or Frrnuntlo; Abb.v falnnn;. Anicr Han iiqo.,
lulu; litniral do Nourlur, l'rrnoh bqo... Jo.'..
bqt'., lor tho Wont Coast o( Sunlit Amnio., Aim, ..r.,
C'iivan, bqine., for Sydney.
! both bound south. ,, , -13.
BKIaLlNliBIt HEADS# CA'> nubs). -Sailed, bept-nmer
24: Premier, lct'b.. toe S.vdiay. at 4.20 p.m. ...
f'OFK'S IIARROR (240 nub-:).— sailed. September
Xoon-bar, str., at <;.:t» a.m.; llonigo, C'ooloon, strs., al
5VOOLGGOEGA (251 mltoV-- Septeinbtq -
Warrego, Ktr., at 8 p.m.; Cavanb.i. .sir., at p.m., both
bound north. , . , . . Cir,
RICHMOND RIVER HEADS GUI mib'#).— Arrived. P-
t ember 23: City of Crafton. str.. at 5.3" a.m.; ton )M.
str., ut 12.20 p.m.; Rurunda. (iovernment tug, at J-.o
P.m., irom Sydney. Sailed. September 2.1: St.
Coorne. str., at 5.15 pin., (or Sydney; I'ynnonl, >ti., at
12,15 u.m., (or lirisbane; Burunda. (Iovernment tu„, at
0.15 a.m. Fu.-s.nl: A lartre sir., like one of t.rnnan line,
at <1 a.m.; Allimfa. str.. at 0.25 a.m.: Colar, sti., at
2,1" p.m.; a larjre sir., at 2..7I p.m.; Peresriw, str., at
4 3" p.m., all bound north.
MYRON" RAY (515 mile.-).— Sailed, September -J.
N'corebar. str., (or Sydney, at 7.20 p.m.
TWRKl) HEADS (314 mili-s).- -Aimed. September — .
Admiral, ktoli., at 2.15 r-tn. ; Elir-t Alien, bRtnc., al
I 30 p.m., liolli (rem Sydney.
lilitSllANli. — Arrived, Septemlirr 23: Jeluni;, sir.,
from Bondon; Queensland, atr., (rem Rockbanipton; I y>-
n.uut, str., from Rieluuond River; Innammcka, str.,
(rem Cairns. Sailed. S pteiuher 25: Modonn-a nr., for
Svdnrv; Tinana and Uarrabool, airs., for Rockbampton;
Aramae, str., for (Awktown; Ilarcoo, str., (or lowns-
"iluCINDA POINT.— Arrived, September 23: Lady Nor
man, Hr„ from Dundaberjf. ,
TWNSVILLE.— Arrived, Soplember 23: Arawatta, sir.,
from Cooktowin
VOYAGES OF THE STEAMER KARITANE.
29, and passed Las Palmas on August 5. The Cape was
that the Loch Vennachar, whose non-arrival at Adelaide
the German-Australian line:— Altona, left Colombo
Bielefeld, left Hamburg September 16, outward; Duis-
SEMAPHORE— Arrived, September 24: Britannia,
R.M.S., from London, via ports, at 2 p.m.
HOBART. —Sailed, September 22: Helen, bqe., for
Dunedin; Oonah, str., for Sydney, at 10.10 a.m.
MELBOURNE.— Arrived, September 28: Waikare. str..
from New Zealand; Cutic, str., ffrom New York, via
ports; Bembla, str., from West Australia. September
24: Loongana, str., from Launceston; Flora, str., from
Devonport; Stassfurt, str,, from Sourabaya; Lady Mil-
dred, str., from Adelaide; Wilcannia. str., from Sydney
Kawatirt, str.. from Strahan. Sailed. September 23
Tropic, str., for London via port; Berean, ktch., for
Tasmania; Heathfield, bqe., for Newcastle; Moorabool,
Wyandra, and Laertes, strs., for Sydney; Mareeba, str.,
for Newcastle; Eliza Davies, ktch.. for Duck River (an
chored); Arthur, bqe., for Newcastle (anchored) ; Coogee,
str., for Launceston; Warsatea, atr, for Strahan; Orion,
str., for Stanley; Coolgardie and Sydney, strs., for Ade-
WILSON'S PROMONTORY (426 miles).— Inward. Sep-
tember 24: Wilcannia str., at 5.30 p.m.; Wollowra,
str., a 9.45 u.in. ; Ormuz, R.M.S.. at 9 p.m. outward.
September 24: A str., at 1.45 a.m.; a large str., at. 2.15
a.m.; Glaucus, str., at 6.25 a.m.; Manawatu, str., at
GABO ISLAND (238 miles). -Passed, September 21: A
str.. yellow funnel, at 6.5 a.m.; Ormuz, R.M.S,, at 0.35
a.m.; Louise Roth, str., at 3.30 p.m., all bound west.
GREEN CAPE (218 miles).— Passed, September 24: A
str., like Age, south, at 8.20 a.m.; Onnah, str., at 5.35
p.m.; Wyandra, str., at 5.50 p.m.. both bound north.
EDEN (210 miles).— Passed, September 24: Laertes
str.. north, at 10.5 a.m.; Gabo, str., west, at 12.10 p.m.
M0RUYA HEADS (141 miles).— Arrived, September
24: Ripple, str., from Bermagui, at 2.15 p.m.; Coonum-
derry, str., from Wagonga, at 3.40 p.m. Passed : Bega,
str., at 8.30 a.m.; a str., like Wyrallah, at 2 p.m., both
bound north.
JERVIS BAY (87 miles).— Passed. September 21:
Gracchus, str, south, at 8 a.m.; Karitane, str., at noon;
Karori, str., »t 12.20 p.m.; a str., like Ashridge, at 2.30
p.m.; Prinz Sigismund, at 2.30 p.m.; Easby, str., at 4.40
p.m. ; Perth, str, at 5.50 p.m . all bound north.
Namoi, Resolute, Mokoia, Macleay. Tarshaw, Sophia
Ann, Cavanba, Helen Nicoll, strs., Cavan, bqtne, from
Sydney ; Nairn, str., from Manila; Star of Victoria, str.,.
from Brisbane; Coimbatore, Norwegian bqe., from Bun-
bury. September 24: Heighington, str., from Singapore ;
Newcastle, Port Albert, and Aberdeen, strs., from Syd-
ney. Sailed, September 23: Beagle. Westralia, Tarshaw,
Resolute, Sophia Ann, Mokoia. Helen Nicoll, Namoi,
Duekenfield, strs., for Sydney; Cavanba, str., for Byron
Bay; Macleay. str„ for Macleay River: Age, str., for
Adelaide Burrumbeet, str., for Melbourne ; St.
Helena, str., for Brisbane; County of Flint,
bqe., for the West Coast of South America; An-
dretta, bqe. for Taltal. September 24. Kooringa, str.,
for Fremantle ; Abby Palmer; American bqe., for Hono-
lulu; General de Negrier, French bqe, Jean Baptiste,
bqe., for the West Coast of South America, Alice
Cavan,, bqine., for Sydney.
both bound south. ,, , -13.
BELLINGER HEADS (230 miles). -Sailed, September
24: Premier, ktch for Sydney. at 4.20 p.m.
COFF'S HARBOUR (240 miles).— sailed. September
Noonebar, str., at 6.30 a.m.; Dorrigo, Cooloon, strs., al
WOOLGOOLGA (251 miles). Passed, September 24;
Warrego, str., at 3 p.m.; Cavanba, str. at 3 p.m. ; both
bound north.
RICHMOND RIVER HEADS (331 miles).— Arrived. Sey
tember 23: City of Grafton. str.. at 5.30 a.m.; Tomki,
str., at 12.20 p.m.; Burunda. Government tug, at 12.5
p.m., from Sydney. Sailed. September 23: St.
George, str., at 5.15 p.m., for Sydney; Pyrmont, str., at
12.15 p.m., for Brisbane; Burunda, Government tug, at
0.15 a.m. Fu.-s.nl: A large str., like one of German line,
at 9 a.m.; Allinga. str., at 9.25 a.m.: Colac, str., at
2.10 p.m.; a large str., at 2.30 p.m.; Peregrine, str., at
4.30 p.m., all bound north.
BYRON BAY (345 miles).— Sailed, September 23
Noorebar. str., for Sydney, at 7.20 p.m.
TWEED HEADS (374 miles).- -Arrived. September — .
Admiral, ktch., at 2.15 p.m. ; Eliza Allen, bgtne., at
1.30 p.m., both from Sydney.
BRISBANE. — Arrived, September 23: Jelunga, str.,
from London; Queensland, str., from Rockhampton; Pyr-
mont, str., from Richmond River; Innamincka, str.,
from Cairns. Sailed. September 23: Wodonga, str., for
Sydney; Tinana and Barrabool, strs., for Rockhampton;
Aramac, str., for Cooktown; Barcoo, str., for Towns-
ville.
LUCINDA POINT.— Arrived, September 23: Lady Nor-
man, str. from Bundaberg.
TOWNSVILLE.— Arrived, September 23: Arawatta, str.,
from Cooktown.
SHIPPING. ARRIVALS.--SEPTEMBER 23. (Article), The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), Monday 25 September 1905 [Issue No.8209] page 11 2019-08-29 21:14 Kennedy, Lawrie, I). Williamson, K (.. Utirie, Hi.
Ziele, Messrs. 11. V. Mnflit, DeDj., J. IjonU",
Michael, .1. Alnlkearns, Turner, J. Daniel, J. R. M Don
ald, J. Kavanagh, B. A. Mihon, r. Brottn, M. J.
Jlint.v, S. Ureensill, and J. E. S.iertvood; also 4d in lilt
8tU«hus, sir., 3759 tons, M'Donald, for Melbourne.
PROJECTED DEPARTUHEfc'.— THIS DAY.
Buecntanr, str., for London and Antwerp, I a-
panui, str., for Dunkirk, London, and Liverpool, ua
Adelaide; Weatralla, str., for lMcirl, J'1 101 '
str.. for Stndian, Devonport, Butme, jui "u>nkJ . at
tu>nn- Xninol sir., for Newcastle, at 11 p.m., L.uci>, air, ;
for South Coast ports, at 2 p.m. ;
ft'! RSaTe1 M a tqua r i ea n d
am. . _
' IMTORT.. '
Wollumbin, str., from Tweed River: 220 bgs mar ,
17 cs sundries, 62 pine loss. viil porii: 1
Airiie. str.. from Singuijore ant 1 Bat «n ' os.,,, ,
421 bgs copra, 2 wlnelies, -J India. .S/hllii-a 15" is nut
bos rice. 15S0 bgs tapioca. 40 "uU0CK,., .m I
oil, 063 bis rattans, 50 bgs |>oi>i>or, l.« ,
pkgs nutmegs. 40 bells '"alacva J ,.a- 1"" ,
canes, 1033 bgs copper ' , ' u meili- !
sr«:
The Austrian wur#hip 'anther has left for Auckland.
morning from London, via porta, and berthed at Hie
afternoon from Loudon, via port>. Her mails will be
Tno J1. and O. R.M.S. Victoria arrived at Colombo
from Australia on the 21st instant. 1
The Gorman mail steamer i'rinz KigLsmund returned
Wouhvioh Dock to-morrow for cleaning ami painting.
Tin- German mail ntcauur Seydlitz Icit Adelaide on
Saturday, in Louiinuatiun of Iter voyage Rvm Sydney tu
Bietucii.
Noumea on Saturday, and berthed at tho M.M, Wharf
at the Quay. She left Noumea at noon on the 26ih
parage.
NEW V. AND O. STEAMERS.
Crtird and Co., of Greenock, for tho construction of four
large steamers, cacti capable of carrying about 12,030 turns
cargo. The comfort of travellers is to tie welt provided i
for, and first and .second saloon passengers only will, us I
The steamer Laertes, of the Ocean S„S, Compan/'a 1
line, is expected at Sydney to-day from Gljsguw via
ports. She passed Eden ut 10.5 a.m. yesterday. The
The steamer Culie, of the U.S. and A.S. line, arrived
nt Melbourne on Saturday, on route from Now York to
terday stated that soundings showed 15tt. on the bar,
and 13ft, iu iitiido channel at high water. Or; Satur
day Clarence llcad-j reported "16ft. ou the bar, Kht,
on tho crossing; rise of tide, 8ft. 6iii, at high water."
THE S.S. BUCEXTAUR.
The steamer llnccntanr, running under the auspices of
the Fedcral-IIouldcr-Shire-Bueknalt Jim's, was among
tlic arrivals on Saturday. She is from Brisbane, when
she loaded u quantity of wool and other cargo. The
steairer completes inr loading here fur London, Dun
kirk, und Antwerp. Site anchored below Garden Island
on arrival. j
The barques limn ha ami Clan Mac L.od arrived at
I cargoes of timber, and took tip anchorage in John-
6tcne'« Bay. The IHroHm left Kaipara on the 11 1 !» Inst,,
and on the fifth day out she encountered strong gules.
Stormy conditions continued until the 21st iust.. the
wind veering from tlic north-west to the south-west,
prevailed. ,
The Clan Mac Lood left Hokianga on Hie 7th just.
ShortJy after leaving port, south-west to Westerly v-inds
set In and rapidly increased to tho force of a gale.
The French barque Marie Madeleine, ll«2 Ion?. Cap
tain Policy, anchored at Teoudie, New Caledonia, on Sep
tember )1. 1
The French barque Joliettc, Captain Simon, left Thio,
The I'rench ship Eugene Peigelin, Captain Lo Nor-
mutid, lelt Thio, New Caledonia, on September 8, e ilh
a cargo of 313.3 ton of nickel ore.
on July la for 'J'hio, New Caledonia, where she i ex
VOYAGE) OF TUB STEAM BR KAIUTANE.
Hie Union S.S. Company's new steamer Kariiano,
which arrived at Sydney last night, made tho vovago
from Liverpool in 57 day?. She left Liverpool on July
; 29. a lid passed Las Palmas on August a. The Cape was
easting on a conqiorite tiaek. with -lldeg. es the high-
ct Parallel. Cape Otway was passed at 10 a.m. on tiic
22nd iust. Throughout the passage moderate weather
was cxporieiuad.
Captain Evans, who has charge of the Karitaiic, ranks
as a lieutenant in the Koval Naval Re-eiv-. The oilier
officers on the vi»vl are:— Chief, Mr. MWlistor; second,
Mr. Ferguson; chief engineer, Mr. Morton; second en
gineer, Air. OzamL; third engineer, Mr. M'lmies.
TUB LOCH YBXNAOIIAR — PROBABLY BLOWN
-SOUTHWARD.
Ill Melbourne shipping circles Hie general opinion Is
| (hut the L>eh Vennuchar, whose mm-arrival at Adelaide
i bus caused anxiety, has been blown far out of Inr
the vessel not boen seen and reported by the steamer
; Vongala no anxiety would have he-en aroused, as she is
; by no means overdue in the s.-nse of making an unrea
sonably lung voyage from Glasgow. It riot intiequeiiily
happens that a vessel is blown a hundred milis or mure
to leeward by heavy 6tcnns, and the clunevs of her re-
covering this "lust ground" within a reasonable lime
depend entirely upon a favorable change in weather. Din
ing n voyage over thousands of miles a ship may get a
bleaily, serviceable breeze, which will enable her to
make splendid progress for day, or poibly weeks to
gether, only lo find herself "stuck tip" or blown back
lain on by head gales. Tuere are a number of "Loch"
agreed that the jsjch Vennachar will ultimately be re
I
I < J MR M A N A U.sTR AH AN' LINK.
I The following an- the movements of the steamer of
the Germau-Australian line:— Altotni, left Colombo
August 18, homeward; Ajioldu, left .Vlgoa Bay September
19, outward, due Melbourne about October 9: Augs
burg. left Adelaide Siptemlx-r 18, homewaid; Beigedorf,
at- Sydney; Berlin, lelt Colombo August to. homeward;
Bielefeld, left Hamburg September 16, outwatd; Duis-
burg, fitst fruit steamer from Palias about September 16,
Smyrna alwjut .vptember 21. lor Freinantle, Adelaide,
Melbourne, Sydney; Btbing, lelt Hamburg Augti-a 10,
outward, due Fiv mantle October S; Kss-n. at. Sydney;
Flenrintrg. at Hamburg; llarburg, arrived Sourabaya
: August 12, homeward; Itzohoe, Kit Albany August 20,
homeward; Kiel, at. Sydney, to leave September 27,
homeward; laui.-z, arrived Adelaide September 26, out
ward; Magdeburg, arrivtd .Maeussj r, August 35, home
ward; OttYnbm'li, h'R Hamburg August 20, outward,
due Melbourne October 19; Oltciuen. lelt Hamburg Sep-
timber 10, outwatd, due Melbourne November 2; Sonne-
bourne October 2; StWml, lelt Sourabaya September ,
duo Melbourmi September 24; Varzin, paed Thursday
island September i2, homeward.
NEW ZEALAND .SHIPPING.
COODB ISLAND. Saturday.— Thn Norwegian steamer
Thode Fagelund passed hire this morning, hound to
Tl.M.k Mildura arrived at Thursday Island from Syd
ney at 8.26 a.m. to-day.
FRDMANTLB.— Arrived, September 2:1: Kyarra, str..
from eastern State, at 11.85 p.m. S-pK-mbcr 21; Obra,
btr., from Calcutta, at 7.1<> a.m.; Walnute. rttr., from
eastern Stales, at 8 a.m. Sailed. September 24: Aeon,
str., for eastern State, at 12.26 a.m.
ADELAIDE. — Arrived. September 21 : RriUtmu.
R.M.S., from London via port-; Australian, -tr., from
btr., fur Brentvn via ports; I-mx, str., fur Lunoju;
Urantala, sir., for Albany.
Kennedy, Lawrie, I). Williamson, K (.. Utirie, Dr.
Ziele, Messrs. H. V. Wright, Kelly, J. C. Thomas,
Michael, J. Mulkearns, Turner, J. Daniel, J. R. M Don
ald, J. Kavanagh, E. A. Wilson, T. Brown, M. J.
Minty, S. Greensill, and J. E. Sherwood; also 43 in lilt
steerage.
Gracehus, str., 3750 tons, M'Donald, for Melbourne.
PROJECTED DEPARTURES.— THIS DAY.
Bucentaur, str., for London and Antwerp, Pa-
panui, str., for Dunkirk, London, and Liverpool, via
Adelaide; Westralia, str., for Hobart, at noon; Karori,
str.. for Strahan, Devonport, Burnie, and Stanley, at
noon;- Namoi, str., for Newcastle, at 11 p.m.; Eden, str,
for South Coast ports, at 2 p.m. ; Nerong, str., for Nam-
bucca River, at 5 p.m.; Electra, str., for Manning River,
at 2 p.m.; Rosedale str., for Port Macquarie and
Bellinger River, at 5 p.m.; Tuncurry, str., for Cape
Hawke, at 5 p.m.; Wauchope, str., for Port Macquarie
at 5 p.m., Illawarra, str., for South Coast ports, at 5
p.m.; Elax, str., for Sourabaya, via Newcastle, at 10
a.m.
IMPORTS.
Wollumbin, str., from Tweed River: 220 bgs maize,
17 cs sundries, 62 pine logs.
Airlie. str., from Singapore and Batavia, via ports;
421 bgs copra, 2 winches, 25 hides, 639 bgs tin ore, 6829
bgs rice. 1580 bgs tapioca. 46 bullock hides, 150 cs nut
oil, 663 bis rattans, 50 bgs pepper, 13 pkgs mace, 29
pkgs nutmegs, 46 bells malacca canes, 20 pkgs split
canes, 1033 bgs copper ore, and sundries.
Oroya, R.M.S., from London, via ports; 11 cs medi-
cine, 9 tanks, 5 pkgs confectionery, 37 pkgs machinery
14 cs hosiery, 12 steel axles, 160 steel tyres, 14 cs photo
The Austrian warship Panther has left for Auckland.
morning from London, via porta, and berthed at the
afternoon from Loudon, via ports. Her mails will be
The P. and O. R.M.S. Victoria arrived at Colombo
from Australia on the 21st instant.
The German mail steamer Prinz Sigismund returned
Woolwich Dock to-morrow for cleaning and painting.
The German mail steamer Seydlitz left Adelaide on
Saturday, in continuation of her voyage from Sydney to
Bremen.
Noumea on Saturday, and berthed at the M.M. Wharf
at the Quay. She left Noumea at noon on the 26th
passage.
NEW P. AND O. STEAMERS.
Caird and Co., of Greenock, for the construction of four
large steamers, each capable of carrying about 12,000 tons
cargo. The comfort of travellers is to be well provided
for, and first and second saloon passengers only will, as I
The steamer Laertes, of the Ocean S.S. Company's
line, is expected at Sydney to-day from Glasgow via
ports. She passed Eden at 10.5 a.m. yesterday. The
The steamer Cufie, of the U.S. and A.S. line, arrived
at Melbourne on Saturday, on route from New York to
terday stated that soundings showed 15ft. on the bar,
and 13ft, in inside channel at high water. On Satur-
day Clarence Heads reported "16ft. onu the bar, 13th
on the crossing; rise of tide, 8ft. 6in, at high water."
THE S.S. BUCENTAUR.
The steamer Bucentaur, running under the auspices of
the Federal-Houlder-Shire-Bucknall lines, was among
the arrivals on Saturday. She is from Brisbane, where
she loaded a quantity of wool and other cargo. The
steamer completes her loading here for London, Dun
kirk, and Antwerp. Site anchored below Garden Island
on arrival.
The barques Hirotha and Clan Mac Leod arrived at
cargoes of timber, and took up anchorage in John-
stone's Bay. The Hirotha left Kaipara on the 11th inst,,
and on the fifth day out she encountered strong gales.
Stormy conditions continued until the 21st inst., the
wind veering from the north-west to the south-west,
prevailed.
The Clan Mac Leod left Hokianga on the 7th inst.
ShortJy after leaving port, south-west to Westerly winds
set in and rapidly increased to the force of a gale.
The French barque Marie Madeleine, 1192 tons. Cap-
tain Polles, anchored at Teoudie, New Caledonia, on Sep
tember 11.
The French barque Joliette, Captain Simon, left Thio,
The French ship Eugene Pergelin, Captain Le Nor-
mand, left Thio, New Caledonia, on September 8, with
a cargo of 3133 ton of nickel ore.
on July 15 for Thio, New Caledonia, where she is ex-
VOYAGES OF TUB STEAMER KARITANE.
The Union S.S. Company's new steamer Karitane,
which arrived at Sydney last night, made the voyage
from Liverpool in 57 days. She left Liverpool on July
29. and passed Las Palmas on August 5. The Cape was
easting on a composite track, with 44deg. as the high-
est parallel. Cape Otway was passed at 10 a.m. on the
22nd inst. Throughout the passage moderate weather
was experienced.
Captain Evans, who has charge of the Karitane, ranks
as a lieutenant in the Royal Naval Reserve. The other
officers on the vessel are:— Chief, Mr. M'Alister; second,
Mr. Ferguson; chief engineer, Mr. Morton; second en-
gineer, Mr. Ozamis; third engineer, Mr. M'Innes.
THE LOCH VENNACHAR — PROBABLY BLOWN
SOUTHWARD.
In Melbourne shipping circles the general opinion is
that the Luch Vennachar, whose non-arrival at Adelaide
has caused anxiety, has been blown far out of her course
the vessel not been seen and reported by the steamer
Yongala no anxiety would have been aroused, as she is
by no means overdue in the sense of making an unrea-
sonably long voyage from Glasgow. It not infrequently
happens that a vessel is blown a hundred miles or more
to leeward by heavy storms, and the chances of her re-
covering this "lost ground" within a reasonable time
depend entirely upon a favorable change in weather. Dur-
ing a voyage over thousands of miles a ship may get a
steady, serviceable breeze, which will enable her to
make splendid progress for day, or possibly weeks to
gether, only to find herself "stuck up" or blown back
later on by head gales. There are a number of "Loch"
agreed that the Loch Vennachar will ultimately be re
GERMAN-AUSTRALIAN LINE.
The following are the movements of the steamer of
the Germau-Australian line:— Altona, left Colombo
August 18, homeward; Apolda, left Algon Bay September
19, outward, due Melbourne about October 9: Augs-
burg, left Adelaide September 18, homeward; Bergedorf,
at Sydney; Berlin, left Colombo August 16. homeward;
Bielefeld, left Hamburg September 16, outwartd; Duis-
burg, first fruit steamer from Patras about September 16,
Smyrna about September 21. for Fremantle, Adelaide,
Melbourne, Sydney; Eibing, left Hamburg August 19,
outward, due Fremantle October 8; Essen, at Sydney;
Flensburg, at Hamburg; Harburg, arrived Sourabaya
August 12, homeward; Itzehoe, left Albany August 26,
homeward; Kiel, at Sydney, to leave September 27,
homeward; Lacisz, arrived Adelaide September 26, out-
ward; Magdeburg, arrived Macassar, August 15, home
ward; Offenbach, left Hamburg August 26, outward,
due Melbourne October 19; Ottensen. left Hamburg Sep-
tember 10, outward, due Melbourne November 2; Sonne-
bourne October 2; Stassfurt, left Sourabaya September 8,
due Melbourne September 24; Varzin, passed Thursday
Island September 12, homeward.
NEW ZEALAND SHIPPING.
GOODE ISLAND. Saturday.— The Norwegian steamer
Thode Fagelund passed here this morning, bound to
Manila.
H.M.S. Mildura arrived at Thursday Island from Syd
ney at 8.20 a.m. to-day.
FREMANTLE.— Arrived, September 23: Kyarra, str..
from eastern State, at 11.35 p.m. September 21; Obra,
str., from Calcutta, at 7.40 a.m.; Waimate. str., from
eastern States, at 8 a.m. Sailed. September 24: Aeon,
str., for eastern States, at 12.20 a.m.
ADELAIDE. — Arrived. September 21 : Britannia,
R.M.S., from London via ports; Australian, str., from
str., for Bremen via ports; Fesex, str., for London;
Grantala, str., for Albany.
COOLGARDIE NEWS. GOLD ESCORT. COOLGARDIE, April 12. (Article), Kalgoorlie Miner (WA : 1895 - 1954), Wednesday 13 April 1898 [Issue No.734] page 4 2019-08-29 20:12 COOLGARDIE MEWS.
GOLD ESCORT. :
fBY Telegraph.]
Coolgaudie, April 12.
COOLGARDIE NEWS.
[BY TELEGRAPH.]
COOLGARDIE, April 12.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. "Loch Ard Gorge"
    List
    Public

    39 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-11-15
    User data
  2. "Rev Father Michael Mahon"
    List
    Public

    18 items
    created by: public:culroym 2019-05-20
    User data
  3. Cars of the 1920's and 1930's
    List
    Public

    Riley, 1926
    Reo

    22 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-02-01
    User data
  4. Dog sat on the Tuckerbox
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:culroym 2018-11-18
    User data
  5. Gundagai
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:culroym 2018-11-18
    User data
  6. HISTORY OF AIR TRAVEL
    List
    Public

    Series in the Age newspaper

    3 items
    created by: public:culroym 2016-06-10
    User data
  7. Hugh A Borland
    List
    Public

    29 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-11-25
    User data
  8. IN SEARCH OF VICTORIA
    List
    Public

    Motoring Tour

    29 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-11-18
    User data
  9. Lismore Floods
    List
    Public

    26 items
    created by: public:culroym 2017-05-29
    User data
  10. Mining - Northern Queensland Articles by Hugh A Borland.
    List
    Public

    Printed in The Northern Herald Cairns, during 1939.

    40 items
    created by: public:culroym 2014-12-10
    User data
  11. Moondye Joe
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-06-05
    User data
  12. MOONDYNE
    List
    Public

    CHAPTER VI

    2 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-06-05
    User data
  13. Nelson P Whitelocke
    List
    Public

    Great-grand-son of Lieutenant William Lawson

    8 items
    created by: public:culroym 2017-05-18
    User data
  14. OUTLINE OF HISTORY
    List
    Public

    H G WELLS - The Romance of Mother Earth

    3 items
    created by: public:culroym 2016-01-22
    User data
  15. Pioneers and Explorers
    List
    Public

    25 articles appearing in the Longreach Leader 1937-38

    25 items
    created by: public:culroym 2014-02-09
    User data
  16. Potosi
    List
    Public

    Potosi sailings (Orient R.M.S.)

    1 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-12-31
    User data
  17. The Bycroft Boys
    List
    Public

    Serial by Yarcoo

    11 items
    created by: public:culroym 2014-09-29
    User data
  18. The Southern Cross
    List
    Public

    Chapter 1 19/09/1931

    6 items
    created by: public:culroym 2016-10-05
    User data
  19. Treasure Trove
    List
    Public

    Articles by Bernard Cronin

    10 items
    created by: public:culroym 2014-02-09
    User data
  20. WHEEL NOTES By FORTIS
    List
    Public

    Motor cars and cycles and road conditions early days

    40 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-07-09
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.