Information about Trove user: croquet-bob

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,783,711
2 noelwoodhouse 3,897,575
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,272,427
5 Rhonda.M 3,095,387
...
58 tbfrank 677,409
59 wattlesong 661,745
60 Jeff.Noble 653,448
61 croquet-bob 643,374
62 cmt17 642,083
63 D.Leask 640,401

643,374 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 6,190
September 2019 71
August 2019 4,681
July 2019 2,757
June 2019 6,896
May 2019 6,394
April 2019 11,768
March 2019 11,240
February 2019 10,523
January 2019 5,416
December 2018 12,705
November 2018 8,094
October 2018 15,392
September 2018 11,479
August 2018 4,419
July 2018 6,466
June 2018 4,775
May 2018 7,139
April 2018 7,876
March 2018 7,850
February 2018 11,433
January 2018 7,624
December 2017 15,584
November 2017 8,749
October 2017 15,493
September 2017 18,270
August 2017 14,790
July 2017 11,326
June 2017 8,255
May 2017 10,154
April 2017 12,252
March 2017 7,330
February 2017 4,374
January 2017 8,288
December 2016 12,298
November 2016 8,589
October 2016 9,092
September 2016 14,313
August 2016 17,686
July 2016 15,052
June 2016 10,025
May 2016 16,191
April 2016 12,879
March 2016 10,752
February 2016 11,165
January 2016 10,942
December 2015 13,200
November 2015 10,807
October 2015 10,994
September 2015 9,609
August 2015 7,837
July 2015 1,160
June 2015 3,487
May 2015 4,710
April 2015 8,714
March 2015 9,016
February 2015 10,265
January 2015 12,538
December 2014 13,491
November 2014 15,184
October 2014 10,119
September 2014 4,484
August 2014 8,827
July 2014 15,622
June 2014 11,578
May 2014 6,695

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,783,509
2 noelwoodhouse 3,897,575
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,272,406
5 Rhonda.M 3,095,374
...
58 tbfrank 677,409
59 wattlesong 661,320
60 Jeff.Noble 653,448
61 croquet-bob 643,374
62 cmt17 642,081
63 D.Leask 640,401

643,374 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 6,190
September 2019 71
August 2019 4,681
July 2019 2,757
June 2019 6,896
May 2019 6,394
April 2019 11,768
March 2019 11,240
February 2019 10,523
January 2019 5,416
December 2018 12,705
November 2018 8,094
October 2018 15,392
September 2018 11,479
August 2018 4,419
July 2018 6,466
June 2018 4,775
May 2018 7,139
April 2018 7,876
March 2018 7,850
February 2018 11,433
January 2018 7,624
December 2017 15,584
November 2017 8,749
October 2017 15,493
September 2017 18,270
August 2017 14,790
July 2017 11,326
June 2017 8,255
May 2017 10,154
April 2017 12,252
March 2017 7,330
February 2017 4,374
January 2017 8,288
December 2016 12,298
November 2016 8,589
October 2016 9,092
September 2016 14,313
August 2016 17,686
July 2016 15,052
June 2016 10,025
May 2016 16,191
April 2016 12,879
March 2016 10,752
February 2016 11,165
January 2016 10,942
December 2015 13,200
November 2015 10,807
October 2015 10,994
September 2015 9,609
August 2015 7,837
July 2015 1,160
June 2015 3,487
May 2015 4,710
April 2015 8,714
March 2015 9,016
February 2015 10,265
January 2015 12,538
December 2014 13,491
November 2014 15,184
October 2014 10,119
September 2014 4,484
August 2014 8,827
July 2014 15,622
June 2014 11,578
May 2014 6,695

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
ODE TO A VIOLET. (Article), Bullfinch Budget (WA : 1910 - 1911), Saturday 4 February 1911 [Issue No.10] page 6 2019-10-17 19:44 whlob
In no garden
Where lilacs droop and blood-red -pop»
She is a Hebe flno, as you'll suppose,
And flourishes 'behind a cedar bar. •
She's fond' of motor , ride* on tfklmji!
.. nights. i
Out Coi'iwe, when tho moonbeam* kls*
She's, fond of suppor*, play*, and *ubh
A feslive soul, a merry nlrt ls ahe,
She's Just the sort of girl you'd like to
And take out for a spin aboard youi
carl • i'lij'
And say, 'tie needles* tor me to rs-Pet*)
TDK Violet nourishes othliM a -bar.
which
in no garden
Where lilacs droop and blood-red pop-
She is a Hebe fine, as you'll suppose,
And flourishes behind a cedar bar.
She's fond of motor rides on balmy
nights.
Out Coi'iwe, when the moonbeams kiss
She's, fond of suppers, plays, and such
A festive soul, a merry flirt is ahe,
She's just the sort of girl you'd like to
And take out for a spin aboard your
car;
And say, 'tis needless tor me to re-Pete,
This Violet flourishes behind a bar.
CORRESPONDENCE. OLD PROSPECTOR’S [?] (Article), Bullfinch Budget (WA : 1910 - 1911), Saturday 4 February 1911 [Issue No.10] page 8 2019-10-17 19:38 OLD PROmECTDR'b GROWL.
Tim S!if.\ writes:^r-l want tc, '.<•• i!>c
public Iniua just how iK> UOv«riitiief«
trnatfl me -ivcr ;r.e few poutnfei th*:
had to <-oir.<- io rr.e atn-r m>' iirotbcr'j
death. li<- wail ask:.-! :•-> makv a wiU,
but he said iin bad no torture.- ;>i leave
anyone, ami the tew p'lurul.s ili.ti wer«
cumlng to him. !»> saul, "i will it-ave
that t« nij- brother Tint," ami furth r
said t-hat Mr. Dick Greaves could draw-
It for him, as Miai gMUKaian had
drawn H s-vittl tinuss before. This
was taken down and u itticssed by tw >
persons, U w,i.s taken Into tho Treasury
office ano handed to Mr. Bllktt,
and he looked at me ami .-aiil, **£>jd yo-i
that money?" I replied, "No, a« I
Was down a week before my brother a
death." 1 siajKid there two neekn, anl
got no reply, afier him saying that be
fix it up for mo. Now, during thoje
two weeks llsat I was In Perth, a
burglar entered any room, and om>
was Just getting In througb the window,
and I gin out of bed to get my
revolver, but tho bed made a nojsi
and warned the Intruder, who got
come back to Kaigoorlie, and It lvas
seven wefks before I got any reply, an t
were not satisfied that 1 was tbe rlgiu
bis way thore, and hold the receipts
for the money. Now, how did I gee
all these things If I was not tihe right
pew>on? The only friends my brother
had were Mr. and -Mrs. Greaves and a
few others, and they treated htm lu»
one of their own, and X thank those
kind friends from the bottom ot my
over to a solicitor to colteot for me,
get It, too, and when he did get It tbe
turkey was small, and, of course, ho
had to have one leg, which made It
onaller still. Now, the Government:
got my sweat this I ait 17% years, going
that kept the people here, when the"e
Was no one else game to dolt, and finding
this flwrt Feet here on the great
Golden Belt, which I said manytlm-s
would have been virgin only for «ie.
and now the Bullfinch proves It as It
as the Bu'lflncfa only for me. And y*t
this Is the way the Government treated
me, even the tew pounds due to mb
they stuck to till it Was no good to
me. Now, who in the cause at all ths
good things they have at the Crog*.
such as tho water scheme and rallwa.v
passlng at tiheir doors? Of course, 'th'i
Golden Mile is the cause ot It all.
What would W.A. bo to~day only for
the Golden Mile; a.:l classes benefit
by 'the rlcliricsp of It, even tho farmers
Bet their share, and I left my blo id
In the bush for them, and got nothing
for It. I noticed in one of the pape?»
that the old prospectors are no goo.J.
rind cannot find anything now, and they
hatv to gel out of 'ihe road of Mm new
prospectors. Who made the tcr.jj fir
them ? Tho ho rue-men and bnmis-suo.i.
tall in their motor cars proapec«:;;s th«i
lo see justice done.
OLD PROSPECTOR'S GROWL.
Tim Shea writes:—I want to '.<•• the
public know just how the Government
treated me over ;r.e few pounds that
had to come to me after my brother's
death. He was ask:.-! to make a will,
but he said he had no fortune ;>i leave
anyone, and the few pounds that were
coming to him, he said, "I will leave
that to my brother Tim," and further
said that Mr. Dick Greaves could draw-
it for him, as that gentleman had
drawn H several times before. This
was taken down and witnessed by two
persons, U was taken into the Treasury
office and handed to Mr. Elliot,
and he looked at me and said, "Did you
that money?" I replied, "No, as I
was down a week before my brother's
death." I stayed there two weeks, and
got no reply, after him saying that he
fix it up for me. Now, during those
two weeks that I was in Perth, a
burglar entered my room, and one
was just getting in through the window,
and I got out of bed to get my
revolver, but the bed made a noise
and warned the intruder, who got
come back to Kalgoorlie, and it was
seven weeks before I got any reply, and
were not satisfied that 1 was the right
his way thore, and hold the receipts
for the money. Now, how did I get
all these things if I was not the right
person? The only friends my brother
had were Mr. and Mrs. Greaves and a
few others, and they treated him like
one of their own, and I thank those
kind friends from the bottom of my
over to a solicitor to collect for me,
get it, too, and when he did get it tbe
turkey was small, and, of course, he
had to have one leg, which made it
smaller still. Now, the Government
got my sweat this last 17½ years, going
that kept the people here, when there
was no one else game to do it, and finding
this first reer here on the great
Golden Belt, which I said many times
would have been virgin only for me.
and now the Bullfinch proves it as it
as the Bullfinch only for me. And yet
this is the way the Government treated
me, even the few pounds due to me
they stuck to till it was no good to
me. Now, who is the cause at all the
good things they have at the Cross,
such as the water scheme and railway
passing at their doors? Of course, the
Golden Mile is the cause of it all.
What would W.A. be to~day only for
the Golden Mile; all classes benefit
by the richness of it, even the farmers
get their share, and I left my blood
in the bush for them, and got nothing
for it. I noticed in one of the papers
that the old prospectors are no good.
and cannot find anything now, and they
have to get out of the road of the new
prospectors. Who made the tcr.jj for
them ? The horse-men and barrow-men.
tall in their motor cars prospecting the
to see justice done.
LARRIKIN LYNCH LAW. Kerbstone=Klingers’ Koercive Kapers. (Article), Bullfinch Budget (WA : 1910 - 1911), Saturday 4 February 1911 [Issue No.10] page 3 2019-10-17 19:13 Kerbstone=K!ingers' Koercive Kapers.
II the various cliuqiie-cliqting, pollpouching,
{lulpit-poundiug, biblo-buiiging
Mbf "erges of tile bethels would yiy
wore nUentiau to mornU, oi\d less nt-"
tention to denominational doctriiinl dtl*
lerences, tlie.v would be doing necessary,
and vnlunlile «'Oil;. One of tlie defect;
of democracy is that liberty is npt to
degenerate into license; «nd that large
sections of tlie popnlnoe, observing that
no cluss is any longer regarded ns a
superior class, and tlmt most power*i^
in tlieii oivn iiands, juingine tliemtelves
to lie the best judges of everything!'not
only in politics, but, nlao, in morals;
pud,; even, deportment, • They set Up
for themselves certain stolid ntnndards
of conduct, certain canons of taste, Mr.
how men and women ahull eat or drink;
and anybody that dares to act id contravention
of any of theso arbitrary lair*
oi the mob multitude jjoeg, go. Crftat
peril to himself or herself; for thé .act
of dieobedienoe of the will of the muttit
tude is likely to be punished gumUaril;
and ferocionvtf. '.' '." ''
Kerbstone-Klingers' Koercive Kapers.
II the various cheque-chasing, pelt-pouching,
pulpit-poundiug, bible-banging
Boanerges of the bethels wouldpay
more attention to morals, ans less at-
tention to denominational doctrinal dif-
ferences, they would be doing necessary
and valuable work. One of the defects
of democracy is that liberty is apt to
degenerate into license; and that large
sections of the populace, observing that
no class is any longer regarded as a
superior class, and that most power is
in their own hands, imagine themselves
to be the best judges of everything, not
only in politics, but, also, in morals,
and, even, deportment. They set up
for themselves certain stolid standards
of conduct, certain canons of taste, cer-
how men and women shall eat or drink;
and anybody that dares to act in contravention
of any of these arbitrary laws
of the mob multitude does so at great
peril to himself or herself; for the act
of disobedience of the will of the multi-
tude is likely to be punished summarily
and ferociously.
TRUE STORY OF THE YILGARN. Abstracted from Documents Lost for Twelve Years. ENNUIN, BULLFINCH, AND GOLDEN VALLEY. The Trials and Tribulations of the Pioneer Prospectors. (Article), Bullfinch Budget (WA : 1910 - 1911), Saturday 4 February 1911 [Issue No.10] page 1 2019-10-17 17:53 and maintain torn, If they do find auriferous
form of country-rock, It always "llvee™
to* a depth, whereas, with harder coun--
try,—as, Ifor Instance, dlorite—unle.is
the lode matter was formed before th-:
"country" it Is very liable to pinch
out, (Prospectors, llko doctors, do no:
fads, some like to see v<?rtain
mineral» or metals In the ground 'they
work. Some, for instance, want to sec
copper pyrites, others iron pyrites,,
whilst otbers, among the many pyrltic
generalS' Hve to see their pet theories
the prospector who has no fads,,
is more likely to be successful, as hr;
Of course, 'there are certain Indications
ttoit precious metal should remember
that no man can tell what Ilea In front
of his pick or what 'the next shot may
disclose, Colreavy wje pleased to see-
DJek, and wanted bin) to have some
brandy, which he courteously deofinel
more to his taste, and whilst they weiv
partaking of this Dick give'his host,
some Interesting .particulars conceiving
the reef south of Ennuin, -when
Colreavy said lie would go out an 1
have a look at It, and would start tli. 1
following morning. On getting bick t-->
Buttorley's that evening at sundown
that gentleman was "so pleased tu 8m.
l-.lin that he rubbed his hands toíJsthcr"
hi» hrispimJIty malting «uoh an Impression
on Dick that he luivnot forgotten
It lo the present day.
The Spirit of Hie Age—«BLACK and
WHITE WHISKY, "
and maintain that, if they do find auriferous
form of country-rock, it always "lives"
to a depth, whereas, with harder coun-
try,—as, for instance, diorite—unless
the lode matter was formed before the
"country" it is very liable to pinch
out. Prospectors, like doctors, do not
fads, some like to see certain
minerals or metals in the ground they
work. Some, for instance, want to see
copper pyrites, others iron pyrites,
whilst others, among the many pyritic
generally live to see their pet theories
the prospector who has no fads,
is more likely to be successful, as he
Of course, there are certain indications
that precious metal should remember
that no man can tell what lies in front
of his pick or what the next shot may
disclose, Colreavy was pleased to see
Dick, and wanted him to have some
brandy, which he courteously declined
more to his taste, and whilst they were
partaking of this Dick gave his host,
some interesting particulars concerning
the reef south of Ennuin, when
Colreavy said he would go out and
have a look at it, and would start the
following morning. On getting back to
Butterley's that evening at sundown
that gentleman was "so pleased to see
him that he rubbed his hands together"
his hospitality making such an impression
on Dick that he hasbnot forgotten
it to the present day.
The Spirit of the Age—BLACK and
WHITE WHISKY.
TRUE STORY OF THE YILGARN. Abstracted from Documents Lost for Twelve Years. ENNUIN, BULLFINCH, AND GOLDEN VALLEY. The Trials and Tribulations of the Pioneer Prospectors. (Article), Bullfinch Budget (WA : 1910 - 1911), Saturday 4 February 1911 [Issue No.10] page 1 2019-10-17 15:20 By this time thccommiaaarlat department
was in need of tfre*h supplies,
4D& it was agreed thai Greaves should
reiurh in a day or two and bring back
wUbt ti»w. iwjulred, although he was
very arutioua to see results of every
hole lined in the reef. On Dec. S, a
hole wv started 80ft south ot the
main abaft, and the reef was struck
stone along the reef, so tor as they
'bad seen, was kindly-looking, weilraiberalised
quartz, and there wa« tiJ
lack of enthusiasm on tbe. part of the
prospectors, and «bat they fully real-
ised thte Importance of their find
imply dcmoaHjwtad by the strenuous
efforts—tinder adverse ciraMnstances
—tfaey were tâefklng in 4lev»la(iQiaut
wortt, for it must be undeivtood that
m>. prospactor can fu^y devote tils
atrá^Vb and energies in wortdng
ground which he 4wUevec wilt prove
unpayable, although be may still work
pp, hoping against hope; but, when the
goid-aeaW finds a tlode carrying fair
proapeictt, the glamor of a glorious uncertalfltti"
«thnutatea Otis energies to
unconceivable exertions. No labor I*
toó bud, and bis very eoul rebel b
acalovt 1 iaseitude. for he knows not
Wbai the next hour may bring forth.
One áíhçrt, it may be the next, and bU
Ood of Mammon «nay Mtnd rev«aloJ
to him.. One little {Hug of dynamite
a cap, «iod a fuse, (he light» It and retiras,
add perhaps, it may, be, be is a
(blUtomiw, and the gtorlou* hope
hto'tmurtalned him through years
Of bani and «trenuous toh is realised
Ut !a»t. <iir. Von Site* arrived at tbi>
.bidding Dick return to Perth. A kangaroo
bad been «hot the previous day,
«ltd, as fortune would have It, the <iail
had been stewing (for torn* time, to it
wkt nçt imtn>* minutes ere Von Blbra
Sted first teste ot kangaroo - tail
sottp, which be declared was the be«t
first course be bad tasted in his life. 1
Even to' the present day, Dick is proud
oif that soup, for It ao happened on «hat
date Dick Greaves was copk. BUnketaj
ware spread early that night, aa Greaves
vtas desirous of getting an early
Mart the following morning.
Õn Friday. (Dec. fl, all hands turned
were grllllrig on the embers shortly aftfer.
-AÇ- Í o'clock Dick Was ready to
slant on the bomewarl Journey. At
12.80 hq reached yie flrst «namma
lielej H-Jiere be m«t Messrs AlUla ond
rested there uwtll S p.m., when he wide
a start'for E'.igli'buddln, which pla-e
be .reached at «.«0. Having lost bU
billy, 'lie could not maloe tea. that evening,
(but had "a good drink of good
witer," and then found some bardic»,
JPhe damper, howwer, had become very
dry iand'^hwd, and the tneal was hardly
a (success, Borne Ikangaroòs came to
the water-bole shortly after dark, and
Dick's rifle aocounted for one of them,
necessary addition to the laxder. Here
It was all granite country- Dick's
bauds were still very bad Wish Barcoo
rot, and hte eyes were still sore-
He bad a camp under a tree that night,
and was up. again at. 4 o'clock nest
morning. -Mi'ls and Barry had giver
ban same rice, and that and stewel
kangaroo formed a flair breakfast. At
Dick gave his horse a good- feed, after
which he tried to catch Anste/s horse,
and Parry and 'Brook Beans bad returned.
ready." Including cabbage, and no
doubt Greaves did tampte justice to the
meil, which must have been a welcome
other blabkfeEows' comestibles. Dick
had a good rest in the bay-loft that
night, and for the. next two days "had
brought Sutteriey'js boiae beck for M>.
Tarrigçn, where he arrived about 11
a.m.. and then had dinner, afterwards
going out to feave a lock at a r«-f. As
it was Dick's indention to go and see
Butterley aaid he would show Greave.-
where Cplimvy was camped at Cowerdlne
Well, abou'i S retire frcm Yarrlgcoi.
Dick, ifor some reason or another,
was anxious to te3l Colreavey
about the gold-bearing reef 'he had
found 12 or 14 miles south of Eiuilun.
Hhe next morning, after partaking of
an -early ibreakTast (5 o'clock), Dick and
have a look at the country In that direction.
Oolrea/vey had same stone in
bis possession which he seemed to
otherwise impressed, and said ho
to outs' gold, on account of its granitic
thinking be had something good
from whence be bad obtained th?
rock, said he. did not know exaitly
where be bad found it; but Greaves was
not anxious*» know, and did not press
so much so indeed that tihey will o-nly
pay cursor}' attention to it, whilst
other gold-seekere taCmost swear by
lode format)onu In granitic ccur.try,
By this time the commissariat department
was in need of fresh supplies,
and it was agreed that Greaves should
return in a day or two and bring back
what they required, although he was
very anxious to see results of every
hole fired in the reef. On Dec. 8, a
hole was started 90ft south of the
main shaft, and the reef was struck
stone along the reef, so far as they
had seen, was kindly-looking, well-mineralised
quartz, and there was no
lack of enthusiasm on the part of the
prospectors, and that they fully real-
ised the importance of their find is
amply demonstrated by the strenuous
efforts—under adverse circumstances
—they were making in development
work, for it must be understood that
no prospector can fully devote his
strength and energies in working
ground which he believes will prove
unpayable, although he may still work
on, hoping against hope; but, when the
gold-seeker finds a lode carrying fair
prospects, the glamor of a glorious uncertainty
stimulates his energies to
unconceivable exertions. No labor is
too hard, and his very soul rebels
against lassitude, for he knows not
what the next hour may bring forth.
One shot, it may be the next, and his
God of Mammon may stand revealed
to him. One little plug of dynamite
a cap, and a fuse, he light» it and retires,
and perhaps, it may, be, he is a
millionaire, and the glorious hope
which has sustained him through years
of hard and strenuous toil is realised
at last. Mr. Von Bibra arrived at the
didding Dick return to Perth. A kangaroo
had been shot the previous day,
and, as fortune would have it, the tail
had been stewing for some time, so it
was not many minutes ere Von Bibra
had his first taste of kangaroo - tail
soup, which he declared was the best
first course he had tasted in his life.
Even to the present day, Dick is proud
of that soup, for it so happened on that
date Dick Greaves was cook. Blankets
ware spread early that night, as Greaves
was desirous of getting an early
start the following morning.
Õn Friday, Dec. 9, all hands turned
were grilling on the embers shortly after.
At 6 o'clock Dick was ready to
start on the homeward journey. At
12.30 he reached the first gnamma
hole, where he met Messrs Mills and
rested there until 3 p.m., when he made
a start for E'.ighbuddin, which place
he reached at 6.30. Having lost his
billy, he could not make tea that evening,
but had "a good drink of good
water," and then found some bardies,
The damper, howwer, had become very
dry and hard, and the meal was hardly
a success. Some kangaroos came to
the water-hole shortly after dark, and
Dick's rifle accounted for one of them,
necessary addition to the larder. Here
it was all granite country. Dick's
hands were still very bad with Barcoo
rot, and his eyes were still sore.
He had a camp under a tree that night,
and was up again at 4 o'clock next
morning. Mills and Barry had given
him some rice, and that and stewed
kangaroo formed a fair breakfast. At
Dick gave his horse a good feed, after
which he tried to catch Anstey's horse,
and Parry and Brook Evans had returned.
ready." including cabbage, and no
doubt Greaves did ample justice to the
meal, which must have been a welcome
other blackfellows' comestibles. Dick
had a good rest in the hay-loft that
night, and for the next two days "had
brought Butterley's horse back for Mr.
Yarrigen, where he arrived about 11
a.m., and then had dinner, afterwards
going out to have a look at a reef. As
it was Dick's intention to go and see
Butterley said he would show Greaves
where Colreavy was camped at Cowerdine
Well, about 6 miles frcm Yarrigen.
Dick, for some reason or another,
was anxious to tell Colreavey
about the gold-bearing reef he had
found 12 or 14 miles south of Enniun.
The next morning, after partaking of
an early breakfast (5 o'clock), Dick and
have a look at the country in that direction.
Colreavey had same stone in
his possession which he seemed to
otherwise impressed, and said he
to carry gold, on account of its granitic
thinking he had something good
from whence he bad obtained the
rock, said he did not know exactly
where he had found it; but Greaves was
not anxious know, and did not press
so much so indeed that they will only
pay cursory attention to it, whilst
other gold-seekers almost swear by
lode formations in granitic country,
TRUE STORY OF THE YILGARN. Abstracted from Documents Lost for Twelve Years. ENNUIN, BULLFINCH, AND GOLDEN VALLEY. The Trials and Tribulations of the Pioneer Prospectors. (Article), Bullfinch Budget (WA : 1910 - 1911), Saturday 4 February 1911 [Issue No.10] page 1 2019-10-17 14:51 Something—maybe that inconnwehènsihle
intuition which invarlaWy aiooomjK»nies
tihe superstition of alii ^avag<>
races—jiromiited the black to acrutlnlsc
the contents of the bag, and on-?
glance waa quite sufficient excuse for
him to part with his -burden. H-i
he carried it, and earnestly untreated
him to return l'i to the spot whence
liu had obtained It, exhorting tile while
that "that one stagier wild pfeiUh."
That evening s camp was made pear
during the night was ndt conducive
of sleep, and a «hot Srei In the
direction of -ihe mournful sound In no
wise diminished the cry of the ^sntnes.
Wild blacks were also abou'-.,
tut did not assume any unfriendly attitude.
Next day some oplendld-teoking
Ironstone coun'cry was found and
then to return. Die following
morning work was continued on.inother
for water, where Brook Bvajis had
arrived )n the meantime. Same ciher
their absence, but did not go oat
to look at reef. This , was believed
seeing the prospectors. Phffijp,
after a carefinl scrutiny of their ti*<ck%
said: "Two white man, one block'-tolow;
tihlnk ao from York way," and
the camp that night for a drink. .
Tihe horses Were shod on D«c. S,
wliich 3s only one of the inuitUtarlouu
jobs a prospector ]• obliged to ttt^tle.
He must aleo be able to AHM «
pick at the primitive forge ha et^ats,
and also to know the exaoft bdue-heat
-—which Is obtained after he has Orat
dipped the point In wafer and s&waa
the temper of the «teel to run dowh to
tare tip—wiien «be pick U ftacqred
right into the water to cool, then hi
must know Jiow to sbarpen and temper
oft the hammer" at a cherry-red heat,
be bored Is very hard, the drill muit
Sometimes '.tie «eel may have a peculiar
temper, but necessity soon te&chci
the prospector to understand these/lit-'
tic motaltlc Idiosyncrasies, and lie of.
ten takes a keen delight In 'testing his
skill against the stubborn nature'of
the metal. It was a very hot day, pud
both ot Dick's hands -were very tail
with Barcoo rot, but notwhihstand'ing
the reef, although they oouid -not .'stop
from Lukin's with McCann's paj';y.
Poor Tim aftcrntirds died of thirst
between Ktmuiti and Oolden Vallov,
and was burled where too was found,
rlose to Laite Deborah. Ho \v»» a
good busliman, hut It is pre table that
thirst drove him mail, BS otherwise?,
being In country lie knew fairly. «yell,
he must have been able to roach 'ttiq
water In the main day-pan at Ennuin.
Harry Atattey. advising Greaves and
Palee that be was to be put on with
there in sinking a main shaft on the
until ftiraber orders. Ttai also brought
welcome tetters frcm home, wihich bad
been «eat out by a bUcbieUow to
Walgoon tLukln's home). A tnln-jr
named BuUtvan, a Victorian, also «ame
out to work with them. Abotft this
time the rush bad fairly set li, and
party, after pwty arrived 4n hot taste,
t well-known in sporting circles) and
puts-. Tom Blaeley (the prospector ?Z
Sósttiera Cross), Saw FaiUkner, ani
Jh|l Haxman, who is now driving cax>
No. ts in Perth. On Dec. the billy
WW boUitiK soon after daylight, and
as 'soon as breakfast had been disposed
of, Greaves and Paine, a«companled
by .Tim Shea, went out to th;
mf and started work. Tim started on
the main «bsft, and Dick and Tea
vwftt on in another hole, getting foms
g»ód-«tone, showing some strong colors
àli through it. The reef was about 3
teti wide in the bottom cf the bole.
Whilst they were working, AfcsCami
and Hart}- Knight caane to have a look
at the fturaation. The quarts was very
bald, so the projectors took some of
it to camj) to roast, so as to make it
more ffiahúe Sor dollying purposes,
this mede of treatment being wellknown
to alt eokJ-seeicrR. A number
of pm^ièçto were panned off, sotmo
ahowlngagood lallo! gold and others
prospects were certainly mo& encouraging.
Something—maybe that incomprehensible
intuition which invariably accompanies
the superstition of all savage
races—prompted the black to scrutinise
the contents of the bag, and one
glance was quite sufficient excuse for
him to part with his burden. He
he carried it, and earnestly entreated
him to return it to the spot whence
he had obtained it, exhorting the while
that "that one gingier wild pfellah."
That evening a camp was made near
during the night was not conducive
of sleep, and a shot fired in the
direction of the mournful sound in no
wise diminished the cry of the canines.
Wild blacks were also about,
but did not assume any unfriendly attitude.
Next day some splendid-looking
ironstone country was found and
then to return. The following
morning work was continued on another
for water, where Brook Evans had
arrived in the meantime. Some other
their absence, but did not go out
to look at reef. This was believed
seeing the prospectors. Phillip,
after a careful scrutiny of their tracks
said: "Two white man, one black fellow;
think ao from York way," and
the camp that night for a drink.
The horses were shod on Dec. 6,
which is only one of the multifarious
jobs a prospector is obliged to tackle.
He must also be able to sharpen a
pick at the primitive forge ha erects,
and also to know the exact blue-heat
-—which is obtained after he has first
dipped the point in water and allowed
the temper of the «teel to run down to
the tip—when the pick is plunged
right into the water to cool, then he
must know how to sbarpen and temper
off the hammer" at a cherry-red heat,
be bored is very hard, the drill must
Sometimes the «eel may have a peculiar
temper, but necessity soon teaches
the prospector to understand these lit-
tle metallic idiosyncrasies, and he of-
ten takes a keen delight in testing his
skill against the stubborn nature of
the metal. It was a very hot day, and
both ot Dick's hands were very bad
with Barcoo rot, but notwhihstanding
the reef, although they could not stop
from Lukin's with McCann's party.
Poor Tim afterwards died of thirst
between Ennuin and Golden Valley,
and was buried where he was found,
close to Lake Deborah. He w aas
good bushman, but it is probable that
thirst drove him mad, as otherwise,
being in country he knew fairly well,
he must have been able to reach the
water in the main clay-pan at Ennuin.
Harry Anstey, advising Greaves and
Paine that he was to be put on with
them in sinking a main shaft on the
until further orders. Tim also brought
welcome letters from home, which had
been sent out by a blackfellow to
Waigoon (Lukin's home). A miner
named Sullivan, a Victorian, also came
out to work with them. About this
time the rush had fairly set in, and
party after party arrived in hot haste,
(well-known in sporting circles) and
party. Tom Riseley (the prospector of
Southern Cross), Sam Faulkner, and
Jim Harman, who is now driving cab
No. 36 in Perth. On Dec. 7 the billy
was boiling soon after daylight, and
as soon as breakfast had been disposed
of, Greaves and Paine, accompanied
by Tim Shea, went out to the
reef and started work. Tim started on
the main shaft, and Dick and Ted
went on in another hole, getting some
goo stone, showing some strong colors
all through it. The reef was about 5
feet wide in the bottom of the hole.
Whilst they were working, McCann
and Harry Knight came to have a look
at the formation. The quarts was very
hard, so the prospectors took some of
it to camp to roast, so as to make it
more friable for dollying purposes,
this mode of treatment being well known
to all gold-seekers. A number
of prospects were panned off, some
showing a good tail of gold and others
prospects were certainly most encouraging.
TRUE STORY OF THE YILGARN. Abstracted from Documents Lost for Twelve Years. ENNUIN, BULLFINCH, AND GOLDEN VALLEY. The Trials and Tribulations of the Pioneer Prospectors. (Article), Bullfinch Budget (WA : 1910 - 1911), Saturday 4 February 1911 [Issue No.10] page 1 2019-10-17 08:15 teeth tvero c4ean and intact—a cranioiogical
indication of youtii. n>e find
v.as unotkserved toj the other meraiers
of die party and the ghastly OSMOTIC
object 'was quickly traced In Dixk'n
specimen 'bag, which be shortly afterwards
handed to Ptólílp to «airy.
teeth were clean and intact—a craniological
indication of youth. The find
was unobserved by the other members
of the party and the ghastly osseoTIC
object was quickly placed in Dick's
specimen bag, which he shortly afterwards
handed to Philip to carry.
TRUE STORY OF THE YILGARN. Abstracted from Documents Lost for Twelve Years. ENNUIN, BULLFINCH, AND GOLDEN VALLEY. The Trials and Tribulations of the Pioneer Prospectors. (Article), Bullfinch Budget (WA : 1910 - 1911), Saturday 4 February 1911 [Issue No.10] page 1 2019-10-17 08:11 week, for "ilrji, Colreavy," read Mr.
tiie camp on the last day of 'the month.
Neither Greaves, Paine nor tile black i
ha<l any sleep the previous night, oa
account of a deadly Implacable thlret,
and at dawn of day a.l realised some
form of moisture must he obtainsj
Miought of gold new; tliey were prospecting
for wu'ier, and all the boundless
came across being nager roots, v.'hicn
Jack (round for tliem. These roots, although
they do not contain enoug-tj
moisture to thoroughly allay thira':,
are juicy enough to damp the lipj,
EhirEt if these couid be found in «uliiciif.t
of these and oilier roots,
which few white men' know of, that
of thirst. Anyone who has be-en. out
truffile-hunting would, if he had heard,
ot nager-roms. have a gopd chance of
procuring the latter ir. retry much the
They are usually icuttd w&hin a radius
of a few yards of a serial! trifoliatcd
sinKle-steraimed triie, and though always
under the Kiirface — sometimes
to a «teplh cf fully two feet—are easily
lucated. mvJng to the presence of a
split or crack in the ground JuBt.abov:?
lies covered «p. The root ItsoLf resembles
in sonic degree that of a
ueed will which «-very one is familiar,
prospectors, alter having thus somewhat
more ilieholden to Jack, who presently
returned with his <hat nearly full of
Gne fat hardies, which were roasted
portion of the morning- meal. What
maggots! On the morning of Dee. 1,
188", it was decided the only safe
route -to look for water was right back
However, parched as they were, tha
old Adam re-asserted its&Uf, ami the
allurements of an ironstone- reef proves
irresistible to nhem as prospectors,
a email quantity cf gold bearing stone
lielng bagged for dollying purposes,
the dish. The partf 8t&:i have a great
says it would bo worth while for
Icok about for this reef. It lies D
f«v miles to the south of the big salt
lake between En nu in and Mt. Jacksjn,
but is not on t'lie present road to that
;;ovv murh-'Jalfced-of iflcM. svrd is within
This «country is now all within the
Mt. Jackson belt, and In the diary it
such a soothsavlng ap this is worthy
of record, and ihiw 'true it proves that
them, (for It is well within the
hounds of possibility that, perhaps,
tvlthln a few days, there may be discovered
ago in the now time-worn pages of ths
old track lo Mt. Jackson, as the party
«'Ilidi rniffht possibly have contained
some nf the lluid they were so much
in "ted of- It was la'te when they got
hack to their old camp at Ennutn and
rushed the niuidy elay pan containing
the germ-Uden water, from whence
Greaves maintains ho carried away
with him' the hydatids which caused
l.lm years of Buffering and many surgical
uwaitlng their rruirn, and amongst
those were three of the historical 4tftag-
Bed Thirteen—I.e., Jim Mclnerney, Tom
Carroll, and Hurry Dowd—who anade
famous Itlmbcrley rush In 1888,
Harry Dowd, 'before he developed Ihi)
gold-fever, was ft tcniustone engraver,
and apparently Ills erstwhile airt had
become a secondary paw of his existence,
for he carved hie name, also
date, on every conceivable object wbleil
wou'd -bear the impress of the limited
tools he bad in this possession, and
no doubt many of these impression»
are still deelpher&Me to bear witness
game days previously, and were anxious
to know where \tae pioneers bad ben,
looking around for better country ana
tt-at retired to tbeic blankets aft 10.16
that night. .At 4.10 next morning, after
from Stores left behind in the dray
as a main supply, it was decided to «o
oif the ma ire, but mooting of Importance
wis found, and As they were still
camp at * o'clock. Mr. Cameron returned
towards borne about T, and a
•fí tf» e-venhip Oft Sunday, TtSt. S.
prospecting w the south was rteaum^d
and some good cout»ay waa saen. Dick
found a WBokXeiloWs skull in some
week, for "Mrs. Colreavy," read Mr.
the camp on the last day of the month.
Neither Greaves, Paine nor the blacks
had any sleep the previous night, on
account of a deadly implacable thirst,
and at dawn of day all realised some
form of moisture must be obtained
thought of gold now; they were prospecting
for water, and all the boundless
came across being nager roots, which
Jack found for them. These roots, although
they do not contain enough
moisture to thoroughly allay thirst,
are juicy enough to damp the lips,
thirst if these couid be found in sufficient
the presence of these and other roots,
which few white men know of, that
of thirst. Anyone who has been out
truffle-hunting would, if he had heard,
of nager-roots. have a good chance of
procuring the latter in very much the
They are usually found w&hin a radius
of a few yards of a small trifoliated
single-stemmed tree, and though always
under the surface — sometimes
to a depth cf fully two feet—are easily
located, owing to the presence of a
split or crack in the ground just above
lies covered up. The root itself resembles
in some degree that of a
weed will which every one is familiar,
prospectors, after having thus somewhat
more beholden to Jack, who presently
returned with his hat nearly full of
fine fat bardies, which were roasted
portion of the morning meal. What
maggots! On the morning of Dec. 1,
1887, it was decided the only safe
route to look for water was right back
However, parched as they were, the
old Adam re-asserted itself, and the
allurements of an ironstone reef proved
irresistible to them as prospectors,
a smal quantity cf gold bearing stone
being bagged for dollying purposes,
the dish. The party still have a great
says it would be worth while for
look about for this reef. It lies a
few miles to the south of the big salt
lake between Ennuin and Mt. Jackson,
but is not on the present road to that
now much-talked-of field, and is within
This country is now all within the
Mt. Jackson belt, and in the diary it
such a soothsaying as this is worthy
of record, and how true it proves that
them, for it is well within the
bounds of possibility that, perhaps,
within a few days, there may be discovered
ago in the now time-worn pages of the
old track to Mt. Jackson, as the party
which might possibly have contained
some of the fluid they were so much
in need of. It was late when they got
hack to their old camp at Ennuin and
rushed the muddy clay pan containing
the germ-laden water, from whence
Greaves maintains he carried away
with him the hydatids which caused
him years of suffering and many surgical
awaitlng their return, and amongst
those were three of the historical "Rag-
ged Thirteen—i.e., Jim McInerney, Tom
Carroll, and Hurry Dowd—who made
famous Kimberley rush in 1888,
Harry Dowd, before he developed the
gold-fever, was a tombstone engraver,
and apparently his erstwhile art had
become a secondary part of his existence,
for he carved his name, also
date, on every conceivable object which
would bear the impress of the limited
tools he bad in his possession, and
no doubt many of these impressions
are still decipherable to bear witness
some days previously, and were anxious
to know where the pioneers had been,
looking around for better country and
that retired to their blankets at 10.15
that night. At 4.40 next morning, after
from stores left behind in the dray
as a main supply, it was decided to go
of the maire, but nothing of importance
was found, and as they were still
camp at 4 o'clock. Mr. Cameron returned
towards home about 7, and a
of the evening. On Sunday, TtSt. S.
prospecting to the south was resumed
and some good country waa seen. Dick
found a blackfellows skull in some
NEWS AND NOTES. (Article), Bullfinch Budget (WA : 1910 - 1911), Saturday 28 January 1911 [Issue No.9] page 4 2019-10-17 07:45 the mining Jndustry, and for the State,
rlnce it could speak with authority 1 ok
Hjelialf.'io'f individuals Who jtfljflit''Ua'-ff
Mlti«f welfht per^?r.al,ly. wfta'tfysr tjheir
'woh'i fS'Wcovires* cr iirbduceM, -^nd
there ie lii'vch need at the> prejeht :tltr,e
- for Its;vesitBCl-tatlon,. prcvlfllng there be
ptf P!,l#ic|pStJbh in party ' pbjitici.
There. 'Ig a movement on' fcoi- for".refcrmltig
the Assiclatl jn on stable -lyjes,
but Ijt- Is, dpubtful whether tl}e.4vjieJe
State: can adequately represented
In 011'e body.; There is a wide.varlanc?
cf opinion in dlfferen: distritts' ,\vlicr»
different cpnditlDiis prevail'on su^h
linportftht points as developmental fc'uV
•idles Md iwtter}' charges. It lri'a.v, bi?,
osnclatbns, whose .flelfegttes
could meet In conference at intervals
,011 poncyr.|ed action in preferrlng. ct-r-'
tjln t^itfMji' to. tlie Ministry cr';«Vfn
[t'> PaTlismt'iit. And it Is oti.'.aJli. that
If formed on u proper .basis, a^Prot-'
pet'ioro' i'.nd Leaseholders' Aspbciafldn'
,would have'-more wclglit-u-itlt, t?ie tu.\-
payers than '.he plaints of lijdividaals
or parties.•"
Harr?' Uvjief, the famous Scotch
comedian. >v1icse weekly, sala'r.v-bovel's;
around '£1000, was once a. ofiliftjr ,ln;
the mining industry, and for the State,
since it could speak with authority on
behalf of individuals who might have
little weight personally, whatever their
worth as discoverers or producers. And
there is much need at the present time
for its resuscitation, providing there be
no participation in party politics.
There is a movement on foot for reforming
the Association on stable lines,
but it is dpubtful whether the whole
State can adequately represented
in one body. There is a wide variance
of opinion in different districts where
different conditions prevail on such
important points as developmental sub-
sidies and battery charges. It may be
associations, whose delegates
could meet in conference at intervals
on concerted action in preferring. cer-
tain requests to the Ministry or even
to Parliament. And it is certain that
If formed on a proper basis, a Pros-
pectors and Leaseholders' Association
would have more weight with tax-
payers than the plaints of individuals
or parties.
Harry Lauder, the famous Scotch
comedian, whose weekly salary hovers
around £1000, was once a collier in
NEWS AND NOTES. (Article), Bullfinch Budget (WA : 1910 - 1911), Saturday 28 January 1911 [Issue No.9] page 4 2019-10-16 23:42 the cl-.ief- inspector:—"! beg to Infcrm
you 1.1--.em the I»th Inst, I ir.specied an
crchard and gsrden at DonnybrcoU, occupitd
by Chinese. I fcun<l larvae of
tomato tiles and ferment flies lnfp£t:^g
iomataeo, but r.J traces of fruit rty.
One heavUy-laden peach tree, on which
fruit ii now ripe. Is gruwiiiR quite close
prcof that, the larvae in tcmatoes are
Who sent the telegram ta head cilice
concerning this matter-were misled as
to the identity of the maggots by ihe
fact ot their Jumping in the same manner
eeem that there was'r.o fruit fly In the
to Gecrge W. Wickens, that so far as
of ihe presence of larvae of tomato (tie.
chesrful at being able to show that
"the gentlemen who sent the teiegrim
to .h-Md office were misled ai '• hi the
identity of the maggots by .;lu> fact or
threlr Jumping In, -the same manner as
larvae cf fruit fly." I'gli! Are we to
suffer with equanimity inaggets in tomatoes
because ihe peaches are fre?
from fruit fly ? Are we to eat the frultvegeli
ble produce of tl'.rse pestiferous
Ch'neiie so long as the fruit happens
to be clean? Mr, George W. Wickens
tnlfht almost be suspected of a keen
scr.se of hunvcr—of mor? thun ave.-i.gc
WfTr's iAi^rjtifj-^-yfval and lnilitary
espert-s of. ''manr^.'^untrjes are
afmi'i that' war •-ts 5 "in tha
sir." - They are not ' unanimous,'as
to -Whether the JirK clash will be' that
cf Britain anjj. Germany or a .conflict
bectVftfjfij'Ajnerjcit. and .Ja'uan. for su
premacy of the. Pacific. they are
all positlvt-.ly. cerwlli that a blk »'ar
te Inevitable. .Rven In:"tliijs' remote uii-J
Uh* ivllway 10 BuUlinch-ha^ lit-M) ccrtiploted
und rails and f.i-ieulngs aiv
The line shaulil lie 'ready f'<r trafllc
n March 10. , ;
A Bullfinch Joke.—A Weld Clubbertold
this yarn on a v.'ry recent visit to
Bulltlr.tli; A well-known tUted man of
Perth arranged an eleven o'clock fcupprr
ror uv.j doEen bacht'.cr friends, iit
Ills prhv.it ,osldeiioc. He arraiiBi'd
uiili a iH-ninii-il ehaiiffeiir t.> op -n tl:.'
ul 10.45. A few minutes later *t)v h. *:
drove up; t'cunil everything lA r-*.Vilnes.i
for the banquet, acid lnund
cards of iiivitatle«n in his Liv.ifI
pocket. A banquet without wiii<
not tn hit Ili'.iiB, and ilie innocvn',
Afte-r tiVe storm had ep. it it eif, lie
said te> Ihe wstcnlsheil ciia.'-i'eui'-
lever minJ, my goad man. T 1 ic:v'rway
out of thi.?. Take your v.-o-;
drive down to iiie Weld Club, and brins
up a scrai.ii party. Hire alMV.. 1 -."abs
and taxis that may be neoesstry."
A Mining Expert. —Larccmbe, of
e Kalgvui-lie School of: iH,iniiS.
is Ijeen telling tlitin • Uilng-i
DVer Sydiiey way. C.O.G.L., who was
over there specially ljr 'th* "Si'ieqce
I'ongi ess, spoke some wise, .nvtfds
which, in view of his geological kcotvledge,
should be imtresiing to • W.A.
mining men'. Wli.-n asked to proi'.odn e
an oplr.ijn on tlie liull-Iinch ^-outJtrv
Larcomin' baulked. He said-, "It must |
be remembered that in\\\.\. geilil, apart
t'raiu alluvial, generally occurs ir. four
ways, viz., t'i) Lcde fsflMttwtl «l
Veins or reefs; C3) As iillirg- along
fault plans; (4) Along veinsvof connexions
Or Jjints, etc. And I-arcombe
knows what h'o's talking about.
Was a tlrst-i-or.or pupil under'Professor
David at Sydney University, afwrwtwds
attached to X.S.W. Ge«'bfelcal
Survey Staff for T years, then, was selected
to take a collection of N.Zc sped,
Wiaith of .he Daminion; fulfilled .several
pu'vaie engageir.ei.i;?, and then
succsed.-d Keith-Ward as ourator and
lecturer on mir.Ing-gfology to the Kil--
gctsriie Schuo! of Min.es. Fc-r the tia't
a c-ojnpl.ee examination cf. ths
irir.es along tin' Boulder Belt and the
fti'iilts are .a be publlsn^d Ir.- a brocl-aii
wr.j.h shouid be in eager demand
Prospectors' Plaints.—During ,Ue
Xm:* stiEsn, wJwmi many -outback
crs fortgatherjd fa .-'iii'i. ci:y*; a
fre-qoent topic of conversation r was "the
v n;cnt need for a resurrec-tlon of th° defunct
Prospectors and Leaseholders A>i-
F"> iatioii'. It Is passing strange that'thlB
ac>i|tl4tlon, which aid much good w'ork,
and realised many mutual benelit^ior
gnic-seekera and gold-winners.duringJbe^
lean yesrj>, should have petered out'o;*.
ex tuaec jup*. on the eve of a pharp. revii
sl in ibe tnlulog industry- ot tlie St^te.
Till: association did uot die Crou lock Jit
Irterest or support. Whilst the Ek'Scutive
T-isiianed its efforts to leglt|ma:e-3fU»
is, siif-li as the eubaidisinf of fcehulae
(li'ospertbrs or small allows, and 'an
r.ri»llqration of battery charges ana con.
djitions, the. Association was a live,
virile Ijody, comprising wiihlii Its
r-c.'iilcn (vorldiig miners and prospectors
in "ull.partB of the State. Unfortun-
- Wtc^y; the leading spirits of the .organ-.
Ifition arbitrarily turned It in'jo a poll-
• ileal body prior to 'ihe last generil
clectijos and attempted to use the. In-
Rucni-e df the Associitlon Tor the t/pno-
Ot'of Jilnl&'.fr Gregory In . ills trough
Il3ht with Dick Buzacott for tlie lle:ieies
seat. Naturally enough, tills treat-
eO 'a s5'ii)siii..in. the ranUe,'ind-a usWul
. r.r-il valuajj'.e AssopiatJort iradyoii!'
foded 'to nothing but a nam*. Obv!-
<;wly'.'stlch-an oreanlca'tlon >bpld do
much fqod vvorlt for.'its meipbelre, for
the mining Jndustry, and fdrcl'he Btete.
the chief-inspector:—"I beg to inform
you that on the 19th inst, I inspecied an
orchard and garden at Donnybrook, occupied
by Chinese. I found larvae of
tomato flies and ferment flies linfecting
tomatoes, but no traces of fruit fly.
One heavily-laden peach tree, on which
fruit is now ripe is growing quite close
prcof that, the larvae in tomatoes are
who sent the telegram to head office
concerning this matter were misled as
to the identity of the maggots by the
fact of their jumping in the same manner
seem that there was no fruit fly in the
to George W. Wickens, that so far as
of the presence of larvae of tomato flies
cheerful at being able to show that
"the gentlemen who sent the telegram
to head office were misled as to the
identity of the maggots by the fact of
their jumping in the same manner as
larvae cf fruit fly." Ugh! Are we to
suffer with equanimity maggets in tomatoes
because the peaches are free
from fruit fly ? Are we to eat the fruit-vegetable
produce of these pestiferous
Chinese so long as the fruit happens
to be clean? Mr. George W. Wickens
might almost be suspected of a keen
sense of humor—of more than average
War's Alarms.—Naval and Military
esperts of many countries are
agreed that war is "in the
air." - They are not unanimous as
to whether the first clash will be that
of Britain and Germany or a conflict
between America and Japan. for su-
premacy of the Pacific. But they are
all positively. certain that a big war
is inevitable. Even in this remote and
the railway to Bullfinch has been completed
and rails and fastenings are
The line should be ready for traffic
on March 10.
told this yarn on a very recent visit to
Bullfinch. A well-known titled man of
Perth arranged an eleven o'clock supprr
for two dozen bachelor friends, at
his private residence. He arranged
with a borrowed chauffer to open the
ul 10.45. A few minutes later the host
drove up; found everything lA r-*.Vilnes.i
for the banquet, and also found
cards of invitation in his breast
pocket. A banquet without guests was
not to his liking, and ilie innocvn',
After the storm had spent itself, he
said to the astonished chauffer
"Never mind, my good man. There is
a way out of this. Take your car,
drive down to the Weld Club, and bring
up a scratch party. Hire all the cabs
and taxis that may be necessary."
A Mining Expert. —Larcombe, of
the Kalgoorlie School of Mines,
is been telling them things
over Sydney way. C.O.G.L., who was
over there specially for the Science
Congress, spoke some wise words
which, in view of his geological knowledge,
should be interesting to W.A.
mining men. When asked to pronounce
an opinion on the Bullfinch country
Larcombe baulked. He said-, "It must |
be remembered that in W.A. gold, apart
from alluvial, generally occurs in four
ways, viz., (1) Lode formations; (2)
Veins or reefs; (3) As fillirg along
fault plans; (4) Along veins of connexions
or joints, etc. And Larcombe
knows what he's talking about.
Was a first-honor pupil under Professor
David at Sydney University, afterwards
attached to N.S.W. Geological
Survey Staff for 7 years, then was selected
to take a collection of N.Z. speci-
Wealth of the Dominion; fulfilled several
private engagements, and then
succeeded Keith Ward as curator and
lecturer on mining-geology to the Kal-
goorlie School of Mines. For the past
a complete examination of the
mines along the Boulder Belt and the
results are to be published in a brochure
which shouid be in eager demand
Prospectors' Plaints.—During the
Xmas season, when many outbackers
foregathered in the city, a
frequent topic of conversation was the
urgent need for a resurrection of the defunct
Prospectors and Leaseholders As-
sociation. It is passing strange that this
association, which did much good work,
and realised many mutual benefitsb for
gold-seekera and gold-winners during the
lean years, should have petered out of
existence just on the eve of a sharp. revival
in the mining industry of the State.
The association did not die from lack of
interest or support. Whilst the Executive
confined its efforts to legitma:e-3fU»
is, such as the subsidising of genuine
prospectors or small shows, and an
amelioration of battery charges and con-
ditions, the Association was a live,
virile body, comprising within its
ranks working miners and prospectors
in all parts of the State. Unfortun-
ately, the leading spirits of the organ-
isation arbitrarily turned it into a poli-
tical body prior to the last general
elections and attempted to use the in-
fluence of the Associitlon for the bene-
fit of Minister Gregory in his tough
fight with Dick Buzacott for the Menzies
seat. Naturally enough, this creat-
ed a schism in the ranks, and a useful
and valuable Association gradually
faded to nothing but a nama. Obvi-
ously such an organisation could do
much good work for its members, for
the mining Jndustry, and for the State,

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. G R Bell
    List
    Public

    George Renison Bell, prospector and miner

    69 items
    created by: public:croquet-bob 2014-11-04
    User data
  2. Gordon B enlisted as a volunteer
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:croquet-bob 2014-08-29
    User data
  3. John Beattie family etc, Tas
    List
    Public

    John Beattie family and related families, Tas

    293 items
    created by: public:croquet-bob 2014-05-18
    User data
  4. N.E. Railway
    List
    Public

    Development of the N.E. railway line

    1 items
    created by: public:croquet-bob 2016-06-15
    User data
  5. Norman G Cunningham family
    List
    Public

    104 items
    created by: public:croquet-bob 2014-05-20
    User data
  6. Political commentary
    List
    Public

    Random political utterings

    1 items
    created by: public:croquet-bob 2016-06-22
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.