Information about Trove user: catweazle

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,783,753
2 noelwoodhouse 3,897,575
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,272,427
5 Rhonda.M 3,096,310
...
827 Linton.Reynolds 51,682
828 glenaklein 51,673
829 emmireba 51,634
830 Catweazle 51,611
831 atpatterson 51,552
832 Rockingham8 51,515

51,611 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2017 47
May 2016 27
March 2015 499
February 2015 6,275
December 2014 532
November 2014 209
October 2014 67
September 2014 2,961
August 2014 13,852
July 2014 8,587
May 2014 88
August 2013 19
July 2013 351
June 2013 546
May 2013 2,997
April 2013 8,639
March 2013 5,915

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,783,551
2 noelwoodhouse 3,897,575
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,272,406
5 Rhonda.M 3,096,297
...
826 Linton.Reynolds 51,682
827 glenaklein 51,653
828 emmireba 51,634
829 Catweazle 51,611
830 atpatterson 51,552
831 Rockingham8 51,515

51,611 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2017 47
May 2016 27
March 2015 499
February 2015 6,275
December 2014 532
November 2014 209
October 2014 67
September 2014 2,961
August 2014 13,852
July 2014 8,587
May 2014 88
August 2013 19
July 2013 351
June 2013 546
May 2013 2,997
April 2013 8,639
March 2013 5,915

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Dr Horace Nutt (1838-76)
    List
    Public

    Horace Nutt was born in Canterbury, Kent, England on 7th May 1838 at 10:20pm. He was the second youngest child of John Nutt, a solicitor and town clerk for Canterbury, and Mary Ann Fowler, daughter of a major in the Royal Marines (who later joined the Coast Guard and became highly effective in combating smugglers).

    Two of Horace's older brothers (George: 1824-68, and Edwin: 1833-78) also emigrated to Australia; George married Sybell Julia Weippert (of the famous family of musicians) in 1847, but left his family in England when he emigrated in the 1850s or 1860s - his last known occupation was a digger in the Rosewood, Queensland goldfields, where he died of a fever on 26th April 1868; Edwin arrived in Australia in 1855, and married Sarah Ellen Pitt in 1859 at Avoca, Victoria before moving to Queensland where he became a successful pharmacist. He died of a fever at Cooktown, Queensland, on 27th May 1878.

    Horace had to leave England in a hurry in October 1863 as he had been having an affair with the wife (Emma Louisa) of Dr. Robert Gordon Tatham, an eminent doctor of Poplar, London, England - Dr. Tatham caught them in flagrante delicto on 14th September 1863 and gave Horace a beating before ejecting him from the house; his wife was packed off to live with her family. Horace had been living with the Tathams at 1 Montague Place, Poplar as he was training to be a doctor and was Dr. Tatham's assistant. Dr. Tatham sued his wife for divorce and named Horace as co-respondent - see the "Tatham v. Tatham and Nutt" divorce case report in The Times (London, England) dated 10th June 1864, page 11, column 3. Dr. Tatham was later awarded custody of the three children. His wife, Emma Louisa, tried unsuccessfully (in 1877 and 1880) for an award of alimony and access to the children; she died alone and poor in 1891, aged 61 - she left just £13 5s 5d in her will (to her landlord).The only son, Christopher Robert Tatham, emigrated to Melbourne between 1881 and 1887 - he married Amelia Muir in Victoria, Australia in 1887, and died at Leichardt, NSW in Dec 1928; his sisters, Alice Emma, and Elizabeth Jane, never married and remained in England.

    Horace fled England on board the "Kosciusko" of the Aberdeen Clipper Line, on which he is listed as the medical officer, and he arrived in Melbourne on 6th January 1864. In June 1864 he secured a position as assistant to Dr Thomas Henry Mayne, the resident surgeon for the mining settlement at Burra - Horace arrived in Adelaide on board the steamer "Penola" on 20th June 1864. Horace soon fell out with Dr. Mayne and a number of court cases relating to breach of contract and unfair constraint of trade ensued throughout 1865-67 (see reports in the South Australian Register and the South Australian Weekly Chronicle); Dr. Mayne died on board the "Yatala" on 16th Feb 1869, just before arriving back in England.

    After leaving Dr. Mayne, Horace took up various positions, initially as a pharmacist (working for Wilhelm/William Bock in Kooringa from Aug 1865 to July 1866), but then as a doctor or medical assistant in several South Australian towns (including Adelaide, Angaston, Barossa West, Bridgewater, Burra, Clare, Greenock, Kapunda, Kooringa, Nuriootpa, Stirling, and Troubridge), before coming to an untimely end in Clare on 12th January 1876, aged 37 years - he had apparently only been back in the town for a week prior to his demise. Dr. Bain and Dr. Elam, his assistant, treated Horace for his illness, and were present at his death.

    Interestingly, Dr John William Devereux Bain was one of Dr. Robert Gordon Tatham's contemporaries; both doctors were born in Poplar, London, but it is not known whether they were on familiar terms or not. Tatham was born in 1829, and qualified as M.R.C.S. in 1856; Bain was born in 1838 (Apr-Jun quarter, so the same age as Horace) and qualified as M.R.C.S. in 1864; Horace never attained formal medical qualifications. It's very likely that Dr. Bain was aware of the Tatham v. Tatham and Nutt divorce case in 1864, especially as it was quite a scandal in London (he was living in London at the time that he qualified in 1864, about half a mile from the Tathams, at his father's house in Brunswick Place, Poplar; his father, William Pellew Bain, was also a doctor). Dr. J.W.D. Bain emigrated to Australia in 1864, where he established his practice in Clare, SA - see his 1903 obituary for more details (near the end of the attached list of items), and the 18th January 1868 report of Dr. A.E. Davies' farewell dinner (Dr. Davies was returning to England and handed over his practice in Clare to Dr. Bain, who had been working for him since mid-1865); also note that the latter article contains a comment from Dr. Davies that shows that Horace's one-time employer and court case adversary, Dr. Mayne, was a childhood friend of Dr. Bain. N.B. Mayne was born in 1828/9, so was about the same age as Dr. Tatham, and 9 years older than Dr. Bain.

    Horace's wife, Mary Ann Josephine Nutt nee Mahoney, apparently suspected that foul play may have been a factor in her husband's untimely death, so she wrote to the editor of the Northern Argus and the following reply was published on 18th January 1876:-

    [start of quotation]
    TO CORRESPONDENTS
    "M. A. J. Nutt" - No good would result from the publication of your letter. If you think there has been foul play then you should communicate with the police.
    [end of quotation]

    It is not known whether any investigation was undertaken, but it seems unlikely. I wonder if M.A.J. Nutt's letter to the Argus is preserved in the archives, or whether it was destroyed - it would be interesting to see what she wrote as there do seem to be two grounds for suspicion i.e. Dr. Bain's potential relationship with Dr. Tatham, and also his known friendship with Horace's one-time adversary, Dr. Mayne, who died in 1869; but there does not appear to be any evidence to suggest that Dr. Bain did not fulfill his professional duty of care to a patient. The reply to M.A.J. Nutt can be found in the item list attached below; also see the family notice dated 31st August 1877 for news of Dr. Elam's death.

    Horace had three sons, by three different woman:-

    #1. Edgar Nutt (1867-1867) by Elizabeth Oakford in Burra, SA.

    #2. Horace Robert "Bob" Nutt (1872-1936) by Marie Josephine O'Malley in Adelaide, SA; Bob was a well-known and respected municipal traffic officer for many years in Wagga Wagga, NSW, where he died. He married Sarah Emily Winterbottom in 1899; she died at Sydney, NSW in 1947.They had no children.

    #3. Darcy Dyson Nutt (1874-?) by Mary Ann Josephine Nutt nee Mahoney in Stirling, SA. Not much is known of Darcy as he disappeared in the early 1900s, but he had three sons by Ellen Heap (1881-1948) in Warrnambool, Victoria i.e. Darcy Edward Nutt (1903-68), Bonnaventuer Nutt (1906-80), and Harley Dyson Nutt (1908-78).

    N.B. it's possible that M.J. O'Malley and M.A.J. Nutt nee Mahoney are the same person, but this has yet to be proven.

    Footnote: a fuller picture of Horace's life is still being pieced together, but it appears that he may have used the alias of "Dr. Hamilton" as this is mentioned in his trial for larceny in July 1873 (at which he was acquitted); see South Australian Police Gazettes for 23rd July 1873 and 13th August 1873 (not available on Trove); the 23rd July 1873 editions of the South Australian Register, and the South Australian Advertiser, also carry short reports of the acquittal for allegedly stealing half-a-crown, and these can be found in the attached item list.

    76 items
    created by: public:Catweazle 2013-04-14
    User data
    Tags:
  2. Professor George Parker (champion swordsman from 1851-71)
    List
    Public

    This is a collection of articles and advertisements about Professor George Parker, the celebrated swordsman (he was proficient with broadsword, sabre, scimitar, foil, bayonet, lance and single-stick, and was also a very accomplished boxer), who emigrated to Australia sometime between 1851 and 1853 (see below for the list of annotated links, in chronological order). He is thought to have been born in Great Britain about 1829, and he tragically died at the age of 42 years, after falling from a horse on 15th February 1871 at Toongabbie, Victoria, Australia. According to his death certificate, he was buried in Toongabbie on 16th Feb (the coroner's inquest was held on the same day). See the first item in this list for details of the likely location of his fatal accident.The 21st February 1871 issue of the Gippsland Times carries a tribute to Professor Parker, and also provides details of the support provided to his widow immediately after his death.

    (1) Note that the "Professor Parker" name was at first thought to be an alias used by a Corporal Newton, who served in the 1st Life Guards, but this has since been disproven - see the 5th paragraph for more details i.e. "The original Professor Parker's..."; the 6-8th paragraphs also provide a bit more background on Parker's life prior to emigrating to Australia, including the performances at the 1851 Scottish Fete at Holland Park, and at Saville House in Leicester Square, during the 1851 Great Exhibition.

    (2) The State Library of New South Wales has an ambrotype by Thomas Glaister that is thought to be a portrait of Professor Parker c.1857-58 - see: http://www.flickr.com/photos/statelibraryofnsw/7778430478/in/set-72157631058013910 Glaister's studio was located at 100 Pitt Street, Sydney, next door to the Royal Victoria Theatre - just a short distance from Professor Parker's School of Arms, at its various locations in King Street, York Street and Pitt Street. This ambrotype is also featured in the Inside History magazine (issue 11) and was added to their blog on 7th August 2012 - see: http://insidehistorymagazine.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/top-10-things-you-didnt-know-about_7.html (see item no. 9 in "Top 10 things you didn't know about Sydney"). Also see the Evening News issue of 17th June 1905 for an artist's impression of Professor Parker (c.1855) preparing to cut a sheep carcase in two: http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/114052549?

    (3) In addition to the photo and drawing, there are also other scraps of information that provide a bit more detail on the Professor's physical presence e.g. the "Molong Argus" issue of 1st February 1907 (reminiscences from the 1850s and 1860s) carried this description: he was tall (6 feet 1 1/2 inches), well-built, and had an intimidating stare - as one boxing adversary put it: " I couldn't look at 'im ; he's got an eye like an hawk — seems to be burnin' holes in ye all the time he's lookin' at ye. An' while yer a considerin' how ter get in one — blest if yer don't get one in the chops.". The 19th Feb 1870 issue of the Cornwall Chronicle also has a more detailed report than usual of Parker's act, and also provides a little more insight into his and his wife's physical appearances; intriguingly, this report also mentioned that he was "...habited in a dark rifle dress with his Crimean medal on his broad chest..." ; news reports indicate that Parker was in Australia during the Crimean War (1853-56) - there's certainly no 6+ month gap in the reports that would confirm that he was out of the country, so this needs to be followed up. Maybe his own uniform (Life Guards?) was being cleaned and he had borrowed a rifle brigade uniform? See: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65984989 (column 3)

    (4) Note that there was another Professor Parker who was also a well-known swordsman, and who may have benefited from using the original Professor's name from 1889 to 1902 (his real name was George Harford, and he joined the British Army around 1868; see the Daily News item dated 27th February 1896 for more details). Articles and advertisements mentioning the later Professor have also been included in this list for the sake of completeness i.e. as several "reminiscences" articles appeared in the 1890s and early 1900s about the original Professor Parker, it helps to make comparisons and remove any confusion between the two. George Harford is thought to have died in 1916 at Marrickville, New South Wales. There were other contemporaneous Professor Parkers, but these are not so easily confused as they were scientists and an elocutionist; however there was one Professor Parker who started performing as an escapologist in the 1890s and who styled himself the "Handcuff King"; it's possible that this was also George Harford as he did perform his swordsmanship demonstrations as part of a variety company, and may have branched out into other variety acts (his "day job" was mechanical engineer, so handcuffs would presumably have presented little challenge...).

    (5) The original Professor Parker's champion swordsman status was first mentioned in an Australian newspaper on 30th April 1853 (The Courier - advertising his first performance in Melbourne on 2nd May 1853) and this states that he was a gold medal winner at the 1851 Scottish Fete in Holland Park, London; however, no record of his award has yet been found under the name of Parker. A Corporal Newton (of the 1st Life Guards) won the gold medal for swordsmanship at the 1851 Scottish Fete, and at first it seemed that he might have used "Professor Parker" as his "stage name"; however, Corporal Newton died in England on 21st January 1854, so this theory was disproved - see the reference to the London Standard (25th Jan 1854) in the list of UK newspaper articles below. Also see the 3rd item in the main list of newspaper articles for a description of Newton's medal. The similarity between Corporal Newton's and Professor Parker's performances is reinforced by the article in the April 1850 edition of the "Household Narrative of Current Events" (published by Charles Dickens, the well-known author) in which Corporal Newton of the 1st Life Guards severs a sheep carcass in half with a single stroke from his broadsword (at the Life Guards' Rustic Sports, in front of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert) i.e. this is Professor Parker's signature feat in his subsequent shows during the 1851 Great Exhibition, and later in Australia and New Zealand (from 1853 onwards). See the 4th item in the list below. More research is required, but it does look as if the feats of swordsmanship displayed by Professor Parker were frequently attempted by members of both Life Guards regiments; it isn't clear who was the originator of the feats - it may have been Parker, but more evidence needs to be found to prove this one way or another.

    (6) The (London) Standard issue of 2nd August 1851 carried a report of a private fete at Hanover Park on 1st August in which Professor Parker took part; but, rather oddly, the reporter stated that the results of the swordsmanship feats at the 1851 Scottish fete had been misreported i.e. Professor Parker was also a gold medal winner winner, and that he (Parker) would shortly receive a medal for his victory (using the bayonet) against Corporal Newton (who wielded broadsword and target). Confirmation that Parker was in the Life Guards can be found in the 23rd January 1858 issue of the "Empire"; however, Parker claimed that he was in the 2nd Life Guards regiment (see advert in the Gippsland Times, 24 Jan 1871), whereas Newton was in the 1st regiment. In 1851, the 2nd Life Guards were based in Hyde Park barracks (very close to the site of the Great Exhibition), but I haven't been able to find Parker on the 1851 census return (for the barracks, or elsewhere). Also see the Bell's Life in Sydney article of 3rd November 1860 in which Parker's medal is mentioned i.e. "...wearing upon his left breast the Champion Medal of England, for bayonet against broadsword and shield, in July, 1851..."

    (7) Several news items and advertisements mention that Professor Parker was formerly of Saville House (and sometimes the Linwood Gallery, which was located within Saville House) in Leicester Square, London; and one advertisement mentions that he entertained 200,000 people at Saville House during the 1851 Great Exhibition - see the 15th August 1854 edition of the "Empire" newspaper in this list. This incredible number would mean that upwards of 8,000 people per week, on average, would have seen his demonstrations of swordsmanship (as the Great Exhibition ran from early May to mid-October). The history of Saville House and the Linwood Gallery can be found on the British History website: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=41120 See the section titled "Nos. 5 and 6 Leicester Square: Savile House", which is located about half-way down the (very long) page.

    (8) A report in the 14th April 1870 issue of the Geelong Advertiser states that Professor Parker left the British Army prior to his arrival in Australia; a Mr Coppin was said to have engaged the Professor's services for a tour of the colonies - this was probably George Selth Coppin, the theatrical manager: http://oa.anu.edu.au/obituary/coppin-george-selth-3260 Also, the 20th April 1851 issue of Bell's Life in London carried an advert for an assault of arms at Savile House and this stated that Parker was an "ex-Life Guardsman", so it looks as if he had left the army before the 1851 Great exhibition was opened.

    (9) In Professor Parker's long letter to "Bell’s Life in Sydney and Sporting Chronicle" (well worth reading as it describes some of the sniping and bad feeling that had been directed at him), which was published on 13th July 1861, he mentioned that he had been in Australia 7 years, which doesn't quite match with his first Australian performance in Melbourne on 2nd May 1853. He was said to have served with the 12th Regiment of Foot in Australia (see item 1 in the list below i.e. "PRESTIGE, PRIVILEGE AND POLITE SOCIETY: THE ORIGINS OF FENCING IN NEW SOUTH WALES, 1800 to 1939 (pages 7-8)"), but it seems that that regiment didn't arrive in Australia until 1854. He is mentioned in a history of the 12th Regiment, but not as a serving soldier - see pages 160-161 of this document: http://freepages.military.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~twelthregiment/12th_Regt_History.pdf

    (10) Professor Parker set up a fencing academy in Melbourne (at 20 La Trobe Street West) in August 1853, and another in Sydney at 7 King Street West in July 1854, before opening his School of Arms at York Street (initially no. 35, but changed to no. 41 within a few days) in Sydney on 19th April 1855; he also had a cigar shop and smoking room (a Cigar Divan) in Sydney (at 7 King Street West), which started trading in October 1854 and seems to have relocated to his School of Arms in York Street in April 1855; the School of Arms moved to the Willow Tree Hotel in Pitt Street on 6th August 1855, and then to the Prince of Wales Hotel in Castlereagh Street on 26th May 1856. A new School of Arms was opened on 5th May 1858 at 39 York Street, Sydney.

    (11) He probably met Mary Ann "Annie" Beaumont, the popular serio-comic singer and character actress, in January 1863 at Ballarat when they are first mentioned together at the same performance; no details of their marriage have been found yet. News reports subsequent to Professor Parker's death on 15th February 1871 show that that her first performance as a widow was on 17th March 1871 at the Royal Colosseum, Melbourne. The Professor's friends organised a benefit performance for Annie Beaumont in Sydney on 14th July 1871. She was a founding member of the Colonial Combination Company in July 1871, and toured with them for a while; this didn't seem to last long as other reports show her performing as a member of the Adelphi Company, Beaumont and O'Brien's Star Combination Troupe, and the Trilby Speciality Company - it seems that she returned to New Zealand at the end of 1873; these reports have also been added to this list. The 6th Nov 1869 issue of the Riverine Herald mentioned that Annie was a student of the celebrated singer, Sarah Flower (1825-63: http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/flower-sara-elizabeth-12919)

    (12) Timeline (incomplete) - see chronological list of newspaper articles for more details:-
    * Pre-Apr 1851 - Professor Parker left the Life Guards (see below for 20th April 1851 issue of Bell's Life in London)
    * May-Oct 1851 - Professor Parker's swordsmanship feats are exhibited at Savile House, Leicester Square, London
    * 27 Apr 1853 - first mentioned in Australia (at Melbourne)
    * Aug 1853 - Professor Parker's Fencing Academy opened at 20 La Trobe Street West in Melbourne
    * 24 Jun 1854 - first mention of residence in Sydney
    * 24 Jul 1854 - opened Academy for Fencing and Broad-sword Exercise (the School of Arms) at the Royal Hotel in Sydney
    * Oct 1854 - opened Cigar Divan at 7 King Street West in Sydney
    * 13 Nov 1854 - School of Arms relocated from the Royal Hotel to the Masonic Hall Hotel
    * 19 Apr 1855 - School of Arms and Cigar Divan are relocated to York Street, Sydney (initially at no. 35 for a few days, then no. 41)
    * 6 Aug 1855 - School of Arms relocated to the Willow Tree Hotel, Pitt Street, Sydney
    * 26 May 1856 - School of Arms relocated to the Prince of Wales Hotel in Castlereagh Street, Sydney
    * Sep 1856 to Jun 1857 - performing at Rocky River
    * 5 Jun 1857 - arrived in Brisbane
    * Oct 1857 - returned to Sydney
    * 15 Feb 1858 - surrendered to interview at Sydney Insolvent Court; debt £248 14s 2d
    * 5 May 1858 - opened School of Arms at 39 York Street, Sydney
    * 18 May 1858 - discharged from bankruptcy
    * 13 Nov 1858 - Professor Parker wins the Championship of Australia at the Grand Assaut d'Armes that was held at Dawes' Point in Sydney
    * Apr 1859 - returned to Melbourne
    * Jan 1860 - returned to Sydney
    * Mar 1860 to Sep 1860 - touring towns south of Sydney
    * Sep 1860 - returned to Sydney
    * 10 Jan 1863 - first account of Professor Parker and Annie Beaumont performing at the same venue
    * Mar 1863 to Oct 1867 - touring New Zealand with Annie Beaumont
    * Oct 1867 - returned to Sydney
    * Nov-Dec 1867 - opened new School of Arms at 143 Pitt Street, Sydney
    * Feb-Mar 1870 - touring Tasmania with Annie Beaumont
    * Jun 1870 to Jan 1871 - in Melbourne
    * Jan-Feb 1871 - touring Gippsland
    * 15 Feb 1871 - death of Professor Parker at Toongabbie
    * May 1889 - the second "Professor Parker" (George Harford) is mentioned for the first time

    This list is very much work-in-progress as there are many facts that need to be verified (birth, marriage dates, military career etc), and there are undoubtedly more news articles and records yet to be found.

    N.B. items in this list are placed in chronological (earliest first) order of publication, apart from the first three items - #1 investigates possible locations for Professor Parker's death at Toongabbie, and #2 and #3 were published recently but refer to the earliest events in Professor Parker's career.

    In addition, there are a number of UK newspaper articles that are only available on the http://www.findmypast.co.uk or http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk websites; due to copyright restrictions, the text cannot be reproduced here, but I have provided a summary of articles that are of interest:-

    - The Buckinghamshire Herald, 26th January 1850 (page 8, columns 1 and 2, "Eton College - Assault of Arms"); a report of an entertainment given by the 1st Life Guards, with Corporal Newton carrying out his signature feats of cutting a sheep in two, a bar of lead into pieces, a leg of mutton, and a silk scarf i.e. precisely the same "acts" as demonstrated by Professor Parker. Other members of the 1st Life Guards also successfully attempted the cutting of a silk scarf.
    - Bell's Life in London, 20th April 1851 (page 3, column 1 "Assault of Arms"); an advertisement for Easter Monday entertainment at Savile House, Leicester Square - Professor Parker (as "Mr. Parker") was one of the performers - note that he was said to be an "ex-Life Guardsman", so that indicates he had already left the army by this time.
    - The Era, 27th Apil 1851 (page 1, column 3 "Assault of Arms" at Saville House, Leicester Square); Professor Parker was to perform his Coeur de Lion and Saladin feats; it was also mentioned that he had performed for the Queen at Windsor
    - The Kendal Mercury, 19th July 1851 (page 6, column 1 "The Scottish Gathering...", an account of the 1851 Scottish Fete at Holland Park; column 2 lists the swordsmanship winners)
    - The Standard, 2nd August 1851 (page 1, column 6, "Scottish Society", a private fete at Hanover Park, London, in which Professor Parker took part)
    - Sussex Advertiser, 2nd December 1851 (page 4, column 3, "Grand Assault of Arms" at the Star Hotel, Lewes); also see page 5, column 2 in the same issue for an announcement about the same event.
    - Glasgow Herald, 8th December 1851 (page 1, column 6, "City Hall - a Grand Assault of Arms"); an entertainment featuring Professor Parker, and the Tipton Slasher (William Perry, the famous prize-fighter), amongst others
    - Sussex Advertiser, 9th December 1851 (page 5, column 3, "Grand Assaut d'Armes"); a report of the entertainment held on 2nd December in Lewes; he was hoping to set up a fencing school in Lewes and used this entertainment to showcase his skills
    - Sussex Advertiser, 10th February 1852 (page 4, column 1, "Grand Assault of Arms"); advertising an entertainment to be held on 16th February at the Star Hotel in Lewes
    - Sussex Advertiser, 24th February 1852 (page 5, column 4, "The Rifle Corps"); a report that Professor Parker had been retained to drill the Hastings & St. Leonards Rifle Corps twice a week
    - London Standard, 25th January 1854 (page 2, column 5, "Corporal Newton, 1st Life Guards"); death notice for Corporal Newton, who died on Saturday 21st January 1854, and was buried at Clewer (Berkshire, England) on Tuesday 24th January with military honours; the article mentioned that he was much respected in the regiment.

    853 items
    created by: public:catweazle 2014-07-20
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.