Information about Trove user: bigreddog

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,856,376
2 noelwoodhouse 3,927,775
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,379,356
5 Rhonda.M 3,202,651
...
3295 JudeLH 7,732
3296 kilowhiskeydelta 7,731
3297 libhastings 7,727
3298 bigreddog 7,724
3299 JRSandford 7,710
3300 ronoch 7,696

7,724 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

December 2019 216
November 2019 58
August 2019 173
June 2019 30
May 2019 69
March 2019 126
February 2019 195
January 2019 132
December 2018 5
July 2018 120
June 2018 102
May 2018 37
March 2018 8
February 2018 24
January 2018 15
November 2017 25
September 2017 116
August 2017 32
July 2017 142
May 2017 187
April 2017 227
March 2017 154
February 2017 173
January 2017 107
December 2016 225
November 2016 134
October 2016 322
September 2016 283
August 2016 146
July 2016 81
June 2016 335
May 2016 267
April 2016 5
March 2016 122
February 2016 34
January 2016 17
November 2015 342
October 2015 473
September 2015 515
August 2015 391
July 2015 123
June 2015 300
May 2015 317
April 2015 84
March 2015 17
February 2015 190
January 2015 398
December 2014 117
November 2014 13

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,856,174
2 noelwoodhouse 3,927,775
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,379,335
5 Rhonda.M 3,202,638
...
3289 wirrah 7,735
3290 Wheller 7,734
3291 libhastings 7,727
3292 bigreddog 7,724
3293 kilowhiskeydelta 7,723
3294 JRSandford 7,710

7,724 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

December 2019 216
November 2019 58
August 2019 173
June 2019 30
May 2019 69
March 2019 126
February 2019 195
January 2019 132
December 2018 5
July 2018 120
June 2018 102
May 2018 37
March 2018 8
February 2018 24
January 2018 15
November 2017 25
September 2017 116
August 2017 32
July 2017 142
May 2017 187
April 2017 227
March 2017 154
February 2017 173
January 2017 107
December 2016 225
November 2016 134
October 2016 322
September 2016 283
August 2016 146
July 2016 81
June 2016 335
May 2016 267
April 2016 5
March 2016 122
February 2016 34
January 2016 17
November 2015 342
October 2015 473
September 2015 515
August 2015 391
July 2015 123
June 2015 300
May 2015 317
April 2015 84
March 2015 17
February 2015 190
January 2015 398
December 2014 117
November 2014 13

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
The £200 Grant. TO THE EDITOR OF THE WESTERN [?] (Article), Western Grazier (Wilcannia, NSW : 1896 - 1951), Saturday 14 February 1903 [Issue No.4312] page 2 2019-12-08 23:55 Feb. 13, 1903. -
Feb. 13, 1903.
The £200 Grant. TO THE EDITOR OF THE WESTERN [?] (Article), Western Grazier (Wilcannia, NSW : 1896 - 1951), Saturday 14 February 1903 [Issue No.4312] page 2 2019-12-08 23:50 ? - Tho iSOtt Grnat.
MTBK sriiiok or Tflr/wtTricfX .oaitiZB. j
Sir,— R» tha 1®' ' ». tfnM
crarttpd lir the Ouvormnttit. ? I thuilc th* |
Council »lnuM get to buMn«n witU
thls fnor.eyat once without waiting fi»t»
tho -fortnightly utcetii.g. Thu work i» |
roatly a !K«wry ..n*. and roproduotiro :
as s'wn ns finished, inasmuch as^the ,
ihjoijW are benufited. iftsro sro nom- -
tiers of men seeking empJpymenMa th»
town «ho hs-J little to du through lh«^
dn ught, and if this job is started at ooc«
it nil^give relief to tbtjm,- trniil- other
vork in connection with the railway Un«
ut this ut.d U etsrtvd. I UUt lb# UOerty j
»»f icm-rtj3«ing on the local offlcef tv con- ,
linuotosoleot married men wiih iaioilioe i
firr.t, then the single men who havA,oth»r«
doponding on them. If found suitable
th* whole of the mon to be put on, those j
who have t»»t proviously worked at toad- '
Sofk as well, thus giving two sections of.*
men work and a chance. ' . By the IocaI
uldermen getting ar this job at once, they
would at U'SAt earn tho gratitude of the!
men, and also impress the peopfo thatj
they aro a practical and tnorgetio body; ,
who de«ire lo gi-P immediate relief /to .
tho men i» this dcuught-atrickfrtviAtfa;'
fatnisliing l*nd, where everything it s*
dc«ra.id sjirce, thus cnuiing deproasum ,
nnd tmilile to a deserving diss.
Thanking you in anticipation, —I am, :
Ac., William Hbnry HaVikll,'ou bo.|
b„lf nf»h» UM.onploycd.
The £200 Grant.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE WESTERN GRAZIER
Sir,— Re the £200 just to hand
granted by the Government. I think the
local Council should get to business with
thls money at once without waiting for
the fortnightly meeting. The work is
really a necessary one, and reproductive
as soon as finished, inasmuch as the
people are benefited. There are num
bers of men seeking employment in the
town who had little to do through the
drought, and if this job is started at once
it will give relief to them, until other
work in connection with the railway line
at this started. I take the liberty
of impressing on the local offlce to con,
tinue to select married men with families
first, then the single men who have others
depending on them. If found suitable
the whole of the men to be put on, those
who have not previously worked at road-
work as well, thus giving two sections of
men work and a chance. By the IocaI
aldermen getting at this job at once, they
would at least earn the gratitude of the
men, and also impress the people that
they are a practical and energetic body,
who desire to give immediate relief to
the men in this drought-stricken and
fainishing land, where everything it so
dear and scarce, thus causing depression
and trouble to a deserving class.
Thanking you in anticipation, —I am,
&c., William Henry Haviell, on be
half of the unemployed.
CENTRAL, CRIMINAL COURT.—TUESDAY. (Before his Honor Mr. Justice STEPHEN and juries of 12.) (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 26 February 1896 [Issue No.18,079] page 4 2019-12-04 13:57 Mr. Wade, in opening for the Crowm, stated that
Leslie Gardener and Matilda Curtis, forgery;
juries of 12)
Annie Matilda Trenchard was arraigned on an
Frank Trenchard, her husband, at Guildford, on
15 December 1895. Mr. Mason, instructed by Mr.
Mr. Wade, in opening for the Crown, stated that
as the blow which had caused the death of Trenchard
The jury would have to decide whether he was
asleep when the blow was struck or whether he acted
in self-defence. If the latter was the case she was
entitled to an acquittal. They had been married
many years and had several childre. For some
years they had lived unhappily, and three years ago
they separated. A week before the tragic event,
husband and wife resided there in a cottage on the
main road between Granville and Liverpool. Tren-
chard had been accustomed to lie down after dinner
on Sunday in front of the house in the shade and go
to sleep. On Saturday, 14th December, Trenchard
there till midnight. Both man and wife were addicted
Sunday morning Hickey, a neighbour, heard screams
coming from the direction of Trenchard's house.
The same afternoon he saw her walking towards his
house. Suddenly she returned to her home, and
afterwards he saw her walking in the direction of
been committed. From information given to him
Hickey went to Trenchard's place, and saw the hus-
on Sunday afternoon, and appearances favoured the
theory that he had been murdered in his sleep. Mrs.
she had murdered her husband, and made a state-
that four of her children had died of disease. On
the Sunday afternoon they quarrelled, and her hus-
band attacked her with an axe and a knife. He
it, in her own defence, struck him on the head twice.
had been killed in self-defence. The theory put for-
Evidence in support of the Crown case was called.
A son of the accused, aged 14 years, stated that his
father and mother had a quarrel on the Sunday
morning after Trenchard had returned from Gran-
scream, and saw her run outside in the direction of
Hickey's. He saw his father drag his mother from
Hickey's gate into the house and then into the bed.
Dr. Violette, who made a post-mortem examina-
tion of the body, deposed that its position was such
in sleep. But the position of the hands might also
slighter wound had been inflicted first, that it
the wounds been made when the man was lying
down, it was possible for a bruise to have been made
on the opposite side of the neck. He found no such
much bruised.
ferred to by the Crown Prosecutor in his opening
bad, and he had treated her in such a way, that it
required very little imagination to think that he
the attack on her which she alleged that he had
made.
turned into court with a verdict of not guilty, and
the accused was discharged.
Charles Smith, a nervous-looking young man,
pleaded guilty on arraignment to having attempted
His Honor, in passing sentence, said that prisoner
had not only endangered his own life, but had en-
into a recognisance of £50 to be of good behaviour for
Leslie Gardener and Matilda Curtis, forgery;
THE GUILDFORD TRAGEDY Verdict of Wilful Murder. Against Mrs. Trenchard. Committal for Trial-- New Light on the Case-- The Question of Drink. PARRAMATTA, Tuesday. (Article), The Australian Star (Sydney, NSW : 1887 - 1909), Tuesday 17 December 1895 [Issue No.2456] page 5 2019-12-04 02:48 to the Corouer for the lucid way in which
to the Coroner for the lucid way in which
THE GUILDFORD TRAGEDY Verdict of Wilful Murder. Against Mrs. Trenchard. Committal for Trial-- New Light on the Case-- The Question of Drink. PARRAMATTA, Tuesday. (Article), The Australian Star (Sydney, NSW : 1887 - 1909), Tuesday 17 December 1895 [Issue No.2456] page 5 2019-12-04 02:41 THE GUILBEOED TRAGEDY
Verdict of Wilful Inrder.
Committal fop Trial— Now Light on
tho. Caso— Tho Question of. Drink.
Pahramatta, Tuesday.
The inquest on Frank Tronahard,' who was
fonnd butchered to death at Gnildford on
Sunday, was concluaod at 10 o'clock last
night, when the jury roturnod a verdict oi
wniul murder nguiust Annie Mathildn, wife
The further evideuco taken to that which
appeartd in later editioue yesterday was
that oi ;
Gilbert Henry Trcnohard, 13 J years of
age, sor. of the deceased, who stated ;that
on tintnrday last he went to Granville with
bis father, and the latter had two drinks. His
parents, both of whom were porioctiy sober
ut tho time, had a quarrel before they
started, and thuru was another .row when
thoy returned; but no blows woro'tetruek on
eiriter occasion. He got u bottio oi beer for
his fathor on Saturday about 7 o'clock p.m.,
and his motlisr may havo had soma of it,
but she was not under the influonce of drinlt.
His fatherfs wages were 3(is a week, and
after he had paid iho butcher and baker ho
used to go to Parramatta to buy fruit. Ho
wuh tho cause of a deal of . tho
trouble between ho and bin wife.
She was awuy from home three years
previous to her coming back, and ho used to
took him to whore she lived. He never
knew his fathor to illtreat his mother when
they quarrelled. While hie mother was away
iliustratod papers, but lie had Dover seen the
one produced Bitowing a woodcut of a man
murdering his wife, neither had ho overseen
his mother readiug those papers,
A eevou-year-old daughter of the de
ceased, who could not bo Bworn on account
of her tender years and absoluto igDorance
of tho obligations of an oath, said in answer
to Sub-ittspoctor Latimer that on Sunday
she had seen her father lying in tho yard
with a rowol over his head, and afterwards
Thomas Hickey, tanner, stated that tho
deceased had been in hin employ for
yards oi hint. Deceased was not a parti
cularly aobor man, but hia drinking, which
communced and. ended on Saturdays, never
inioriorod with his work. Mrs. Trenchard
was in the habit of drinking to cxcesi, and
called at his place on Saturday last in n
state of drunkenness. As she wan about
to return homo deceased cahte and carried
for somo nails, saying he wanted
a terrible condition she wouid make a snow
of him. At 2 a.m. on Sunday ho was
awakened by Mtb. Tronchard calling at his
front gate. He uid not answer her, and
to the house," but the noise qoickly subsided'
from the direction of deceased's honse.
Trenchard at his front gato while ho was
lying down, but did not got up, as ho
thought she waa drunk. About five minutes
after he looked out and Baw her and the
little girl, whom Bhe was holding by the
hand, walking towards Parramatta. Sho was
known as a eon tinned drunkard. Deceased
was in the habit of lyine on a patch of
grass at the sonth of hia honso on
Sunday afternoons, and that was. whore ho
hand was resting under tho head and the
loftt crossing over phe breast, the logs boing
drawn up as if he had been asicep when
killed. There was not tho sligittost sign oi
sworC that in his opinion deceased had boon
struck whtlo asleop. Deceased was a sobor
drink. Ho had often seen the deceased on
Mrs. Trono'hnrd was at this stage offered
some tea and bread aud butter by Senior-
constable Davia. She took the tea in a moat
John Harris, an employee at Goodiet and
Smith's pottery works, stated that ho had
Been tho body of tho deceased before tt had
been rentovod, and it looked as if tha man
on Saturday he' had seen Mr:. Trenchard
iying down m a paddock near tho Gnildford'
Station. Sho was drttnk nnd staggered very
muoh when sho tried to walk. Tho blood
from deoeasod'e body wna all in one pool
ceased could havo moved after ha had beon
struck. ,
This closed tho evidence, 'and the Uoroner,
having briefly roviewod it, pointed out' tho
The jury then retirod, and after ovor an
capital offence aud two on tho lessor, thoy
again asked. tho Coroner to give them somo
advice relative to tha gradations of the
crimo ol murder. Mr. Bowdon read and
explained section 0 of the Criminal -Law
Antondmont Act, and anowod clearly the
difference between justifiable homicide aud
,At 10 o'clock the jury agreed to a verdict
of wilful murder against Mrs, Trenchard,
and sho was committed for trial to the
Cetltrol Criminal Court at such time as the
Attornoy-Gsneral may appoint,
Tho woman, who maintained tho most
Bhe wouid mako a statemont, but when cau
The littlo girl is being retained in the
Parramatta lockup and will be sent to somo
some oi the neighbours.
prisoner was removed to tho lockup and the
THE GUILDFORD TRAGEDY
Verdict of Wilful Murder.
Committal for Trial— Now Light on
the Case— The Question of Drink.
Parramatta, Tuesday.
The inquest on Frank Trenchard, who was
found butchered to death at Guildford on
Sunday, was concluded at 10 o'clock last
night, when the jury returned a verdict of
wilful murder against Annie Mathilda, wife
The further evidence taken to that which
appeared in later editions yesterday was
that of
Gilbert Henry Trenchard, 13 ½ years of
age, son of the deceased, who stated that
on Saturday last he went to Granville with
his father, and the latter had two drinks. His
parents, both of whom were perfectly sober
at the time, had a quarrel before they
started, and there was another row when
they returned, but no blows were struck on
either occasion. He got a bottle of beer for
his father on Saturday about 7 o'clock p.m.,
and his mother may have had some of it,
but she was not under the influence of drinlk.
His father's wages were 36s a week, and
after he had paid the butcher and baker he
used to go to Parramatta to buy fruit. He
was the cause of a deal of the
trouble between he and his wife.
She was away from home three years
previous to her coming back, and he used to
took him to where she lived. He never
knew his father to illtreat his mother when
they quarrelled. While his mother was away
illustrated papers, but he had never seen the
one produced showing a woodcut of a man
murdering his wife, neither had he ever seen
his mother reading those papers,
A seven-year-old daughter of the de
ceased, who could not be sworn on account
of her tender years and absolute ignorance
of the obligations of an oath, said in answer
to Sub-inspector Latimer that on Sunday
she had seen her father lying in the yard
with a towel over his head, and afterwards
Thomas Hickey, tanner, stated that the
deceased had been in his employ for
yards of him. Deceased was not a parti
cularly sober man, but his drinking, which
commenced and ended on Saturdays, never
interfered with his work. Mrs. Trenchard
was in the habit of drinking to excess, and
called at his place on Saturday last in a
state of drunkenness. As she was about
to return home deceased came and carried
for some nails, saying he wanted
a terrible condition she wouid make a show
of him. At 2 a.m. on Sunday he was
awakened by Mrs. Trenchard calling at his
front gate. He did not answer her, and
to the house," but the noise quickly subsided
from the direction of deceased's house.
Trenchard at his front gate while he was
lying down, but did not get up, as he
thought she was drunk. About five minutes
after he looked out and saw her and the
little girl, whom she was holding by the
hand, walking towards Parramatta. She was
known as a confirmed drunkard. Deceased
was in the habit of lying on a patch of
grass at the south of his house on
Sunday afternoons, and that was. where he
hand was resting under the head and the
left crossing over the breast, the legs being

killed. There was not the slightest sign of
swore that in his opinion deceased had been
struck while asleep. Deceased was a sobor
drink. He had often seen the deceased on
Mrs. Trenchard was at this stage offered
some tea and bread and butter by Senior-
constable Davis. She took the tea in a most
John Harris, an employee at Goodlet and
Smith's pottery works, stated that he had
seen the body of the deceased before it had
been removed, and it looked as if the man
on Saturday he had seen Mrs. Trenchard
lying down in a paddock near the Guildford
Station. She was drunk and staggered very
much when she tried to walk. The blood
from deceased's body as all in one pool
ceased could have moved after he had been
struck.
This closed the evidence, and the Coroner,
having briefly reviewed it, pointed out the
The jury then retired, and after over an
capital offence and two on the lesser, they
again asked the Coroner to give them some
advice relative to the gradations of the
crime of murder. Mr. Bowdon read and
explained section 9 of the Criminal Law
Amtendment Act, and showed clearly the
difference between justifiable homicide and
At 10 o'clock the jury agreed to a verdict
of wilful murder against Mrs. Trenchard,
and she was committed for trial to the
Central Criminal Court at such time as the
Attorney-General may appoint.
The woman, who maintained the most
she would makd a statement, but when cau
The little girl is being retained in the
Parramatta lockup and will be sent to some
some of the neighbours.
prisoner was removed to the lockup and the
WEDDING MACKIE—WILLIAMSON. (Article), The Cessnock Eagle and South Maitland Recorder (NSW : 1913 - 1954), Tuesday 5 April 1932 [Issue No.1703] page 6 2019-11-05 20:49 V WEDDING
BIACKIE-WILLIAMSON.
ried to Thomas Stenhousc Mackie, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Maclcic, Newcastle,
Isa Mackic and Ivy Balliie. Tho
groomsmen werp Mr. John William
loaned by Mrs. Barringhom, Cessnock.
l-ale blue silk frock, with a beautiful
Miss Baillle wore a lovely pink sill:
georgette frock, with a lovely 5-uuquet
The bride's mother wore a hnndsomr
The wedding breakfast was server
at the residence of the bride's parcn*.
— 'Gowan Brae.' Mr. D. Hedley pro
After the usual- toasts, the guest:
were entertained to some beautifu
songs. Mrs. Ferguson sang 'The O'.i
Arm Chair' and 'The Bonny Whit
Sht'Wng You Earn'; Mrs. Macki.
'?-?.(- Scottish Blue Bells' and 'Call.Ji
O'; Mr. John Dickson, 'The Olc
Quarry Knows' and 'The Nameles
Lassie'; Miss Bli, 'Robin Adair' ant
'Sailing Down tho Clyde'; Mrs. Bis
.sett, 'Molherr Dear' and 'Parody
Old Cowden'; Mrs. Dickson, 'Twi
Loving Hearts'; Mr. George Meek
'The Face on the Bar Room Floor'
and 'Marouelte': Mr. Tom Mackie
comic; Mr. W. Williamson, 'I Pass^i
By Your Window'; Miss Isa Mackie
'The Auld Folks'; Master Mor.tgom
ery, 'The Old Fashioned House':
Cuddle Doon.'
Dancing w.?s afterwards indulgei
in, music lor which \vas supplied I15
Miss Dora Sarroff, Mr. 11. Arnott, aiu'
Mrs. Ferguson (Kurri Kurri), blaci
silk dress; Mrs. Sarroff (Ccssnock)
red silk, covered with black silk lac
Miss' Dora Sarroff (Ccssnock), pa!i
green silk and lace; Miss Rene Ma;
!tie (Newcastle), crepe satin, dark
castle), white silk; Mrs. Hoss (Bell
bird), green spotted silk; Mrs. Amott
Finney (Weston), royal blue milanese:
Miss Ina McKenzie (Cessnock), greer.
Price (Cessnock), brown milancsr
?silk; Mrs. Bissctt (Kurri Kurri), nav;
(Kurri Kurri), black silk morocam:
Mrs. Adamson (Cessnock), block an;.':
white voile; Miss Annie Baillio (Cess
nock), figured voile; Miss Madg'
Woodbury (Cesssnock), brown crept
After a most enjoyable evening tlir
company joined in singing 'Aul-.
Lang Syne,' after which they wer-
The bridal couple left with the £
WEDDING
MACKIE-WILLIAMSON.
ried to Thomas Stenhouse Mackie, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Mackie, Newcastle,
Isa Mackie and Ivy Balliie. The
groomsmen were Mr. John William
loaned by Mrs. Barringham, Cessnock.
pale blue silk frock, with a beautiful
Miss Baillie wore a lovely pink silk
georgette frock, with a lovely bouquet
The bride's mother wore a handsome
The wedding breakfast was served
at the residence of the bride's parents
— "Gowan Brae." Mr. D. Hedley pre
After the usual toasts, the guests
were entertained to some beautiful
songs. Mrs. Ferguson sang "The Old
Arm Chair" and "The Bonny White
Shilling You Earn"; Mrs. Mackie
"The Scottish Blue Bells" and "Called
O"; Mr. John Dickson, "The Old
Quarry Knows" and "The Nameless
Lassie"; Miss Bli, "Robin Adair" and
'Sailing Down the Clyde'; Mrs. Bis
sett, "Motherr Dear' and "Parody
Old Cowden"; Mrs. Dickson, "Two
Loving Hearts"; Mr. George Meek
"The Face on the Bar Room Floor"
and "Marquette" ; Mr. Tom Mackie
comic; Mr. W. Williamson, "I Passed
By Your Window"; Miss Isa Mackie
"The Auld Folks"; Master Montgom
ery, "The Old Fashioned House":
Cuddle Doon."
Dancing was afterwards indulged
in, music for which was supplied by
Miss Dora Sarroff, Mr. R. Arnott, and
Mrs. Ferguson (Kurri Kurri), black
silk dress; Mrs. Sarroff (Cessnock)
red silk, covered with black silk lace
Miss Dora Sarroff (Cessnock), pale
green silk and lace; Miss Rene Mac
kie (Newcastle), crepe satin, dark
castle), white silk; Mrs. Ross (Bell
bird), green spotted silk; Mrs. Arnott
Finney (Weston), royal blue milanese;
Miss Ina McKenzie (Cessnock), green
Price (Cessnock), brown milanese
silk; Mrs. Bissett (Kurri Kurri), navy
(Kurri Kurri), black silk morocain;
Mrs. Adamson (Cessnock), block and
white voile; Miss Annie Baillie (Cess
nock), figured voile; Miss Madge
Woodbury (Cessnock), brown crept
After a most enjoyable evening the
company joined in singing "Aul-
Lang Syne," after which they were
The bridal couple left with the 9

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.