Information about Trove user: beetle

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,742,283
2 noelwoodhouse 3,873,981
3 NeilHamilton 3,414,218
4 DonnaTelfer 3,239,980
5 Rhonda.M 3,050,645
...
5549 salvosam 3,228
5550 icharlie 3,225
5551 kevinobrien 3,223
5552 beetle 3,222
5553 JenCWPearson 3,222
5554 seeker2110 3,222

3,222 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2015 16
July 2015 7
June 2015 4
April 2015 1
December 2014 1
November 2014 11
June 2014 1
April 2014 80
March 2014 40
February 2014 169
January 2014 102
December 2013 3
November 2013 36
October 2013 41
June 2013 4
May 2013 5
December 2012 2
November 2012 1
July 2012 2
June 2012 6
March 2012 28
February 2012 209
January 2012 355
December 2011 89
November 2011 167
October 2011 54
September 2011 14
August 2011 86
July 2011 7
June 2011 324
May 2011 724
April 2011 102
March 2011 50
November 2010 26
October 2010 374
September 2010 81

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,742,099
2 noelwoodhouse 3,873,981
3 NeilHamilton 3,414,089
4 DonnaTelfer 3,239,959
5 Rhonda.M 3,050,632
...
5543 salvosam 3,228
5544 icharlie 3,225
5545 kevinobrien 3,223
5546 beetle 3,222
5547 JenCWPearson 3,222
5548 seeker2110 3,222

3,222 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2015 16
July 2015 7
June 2015 4
April 2015 1
December 2014 1
November 2014 11
June 2014 1
April 2014 80
March 2014 40
February 2014 169
January 2014 102
December 2013 3
November 2013 36
October 2013 41
June 2013 4
May 2013 5
December 2012 2
November 2012 1
July 2012 2
June 2012 6
March 2012 28
February 2012 209
January 2012 355
December 2011 89
November 2011 167
October 2011 54
September 2011 14
August 2011 86
July 2011 7
June 2011 324
May 2011 724
April 2011 102
March 2011 50
November 2010 26
October 2010 374
September 2010 81

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. About BANZARE, ANTARCTICA
    List
    Public



    The Prime Minster of the day in Australia, Lord Stanley Bruce issued two sets of instructions for Sir Douglas Mawson –

    • specific instructions on where they were to go in Sub Antarctic and Antarctic waters and what they were to do there such as hydrographic surveys, meteorological and oceanographic observations, investigating fauna and how this latter task may assist in the future economic exploitation of such fauna, collect specimens, keep written records, and all negatives and photographs made were to be tabled, and on return a full report was to be made of the work in respect of each and all of the objects (objectives) of the Expedition;
    • together with Mawson’s commission from the Crown, which explicitly laid out which lands were to be annexed and ‘proclaimed’ for the Crown. In witness “Our Great Seal” was to be affixed...
    • Both sets of documents clearly explained that territorial acquisition was a chief objective of the BANZARE Expedition. (National Archives of Australia and in the Winning of Australian Antarctica by A Grenfell Price pages 22 and 23. Angus and Robertson, 1962).

    The British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition.
    Known as B.A.N.Z.A.R.E
    by Eric Douglas

    This Expedition was organized by Sir Douglas Mawson and it was really a continuation of his plans of his previous well known Australasian Antarctic Expedition of 1911-1914.

    It was never intended that it should be a survey of the Antarctic Continent carried out by land parties and wintering in this area, but primarily an oceanographical survey carried out by Ship and Aeroplane to chart and scientifically investigate more completely the wide sweep of the Antarctic lying west of the Ross Sea dependency and extending as far as Enderby Land.

    This was to be divided into two cruises extending over the Summer months 1929-1930 and 1930-1931...

    By Eric Douglas on 6th February, 1939.
    A great Antarctic region lying southward of Australia is, by its geographical situation, a heritage for Australians.The coast of this vast continent is seventeen hundred miles south of Melbourne. For more than thirty years, Australians have taken an active interest in these far southern regions, co-operating in several British enterprises.These earlier efforts were centered on the Ross Sea area where there is opportunity for sledging trips towards the pole. To Australians, the most appealing feature of the Antarctic problem is the delineation of Antarctic land adjacent to Australia.

    Added by me in July, 2017.
    I see Sir Douglas Mawson's over-riding goal for himself in the Antarctic on BANZARE was Science and his special interests of Geology and Minerology. Sir Douglas Mawson's passion, expertise, and interest was obviously in Geology and Minerology (just mentioned) and in subjects such as Ornithology, Biology, Pedology (study of soils), Zoology, Botany, Meteorology, Polar Magnetism, Polar Winds, Glaciology, Physics, Hydrology, Oceanography, Marine Life, Bacteriology, Cartography and in Land and in Aerial Surveys. Hence Sir Douglas Mawson took Scientists on the Discovery who were experts in all these fields.

    As a result of having such expertise and skills onboard the Discovery to carry out the task taken on by Sir Douglas Mawson there were very extensive programmes of scientific collections, scientific observations, marine and hydrology and weather balloon stations, plus field trips in the Antarctic and sub-Antarctic. Then there were the seemingly endless tasks of classification, cataloging, preservation (including Taxidermy) and of storing the rich, diverse and abundant items of Scientific importance. The Scientific outcomes were diverse and extensive, studies also having been made over time by other Scientists aproached by Sir Douglas Mawson. As a result BANZARE Antarctic and sub-Antarctic Reports were still being published in the mid 1960's and all BANZARE Scientists received a copy.

    The Aerial Surveys were made the from the Gipsy Moth rigged as a seaplane with floats. Running coastal surveys and discoveries of 'new' parts of the Antarctic Continent was given special attention. Cameras designed for aerial photography were taken up in the Gipsy Moth and charts were sketched from photographic and visual observations.

    Photography itself was given a special place in the expedition and of course that meant to the forefront the unique skills of the Official Photographer, Captain Frank Hurley. Moreover, collectively many photos were taken by all the ship's company - Officers, Crew and the Scientific party and that included Mawson too. A large number of these photographs became part of Sir Douglas Mawson's Official Collection. I have thumbed through some of the prints in this collection which are stored in very impressive, large and heavy photographic albums. I wore special gloves.

    Besides the specialist skills of the individual 'Scientists' and not forgetting the Ship's Company and other crew members, all including Sir Douglas Mawson were involved in ongoing tasks such as moving and shovelling the Cardiff coal or briquettes, taking part in the frequent marine stations, gathering ice for water, taking on other roles such as 'Dentist' (the Doc), 'Barber', or 'Entertainer' in a Discovery production, 'Singer of sea shanties', setting up and fixing Wireless equipment and attending to the Ship's carpentry needs.

    Proclamations and naming Antarctic and sub-Antarctic features for Benefactors, Members of the Discovery Committee, Politicians and fellow explorers etc were probably just necessay interruptions carried out by Sir Douglas Mawson. In true humility he named no features for himself or his family.

    Sally E Douglas

    12 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-07-20
    User data
  2. Air Tractor or Airframe – (AAE) 1911-1914 - Boat Harbour, Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay
    List
    Public

    The Airframe was sitting on the ice near Boat Harbour, Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay when the BANZ Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) of 1929-1931 and Sir Douglas Mawson visited that site on 5th and 6th January 1931.
    This Airframe was rigged as an air tractor when the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) 1911-1914 was based there at the huts (Mawsons Huts) and in 1913-1914 it was stripped of its engine and propeller to become just an airframe, and dragged to the edge of Boat Harbour.
    Sir Douglas Mawson had envisaged aeroplane flight in the Antarctic at the time of the AAE 1911-1914 when he was the leader. The aeroplane bought with the intention of being flown by the AAE was a Vickers REP designed 60HP Monoplane. However, unfortunately it incurred heavy damage in a test flight in Adelaide two months before the ship Aurora departed for the Antarctic. Nevertheless Mawson decided to still take the plane south and use it as an ‘Air Tractor’ as it made good publicity. However the plane was stripped of its wings and the metal sheathing from the fuselage, before it was taken to the Antarctic.
    At Cape Denison, Frank Bickerton of the AAE 1911-1914 expedition spent most of 1912 winter months converting it to a sledge. However use proved that it was not too successful in this role as it was slow, heavy and cumbersome.
    When Eric Douglas viewed and photographed the airframe, and even sat on it, in early January, 1931 it is clear from his notes that he thought that it had been an intact and flyable aircraft for he commented that “they could not fly it because it was too windy”. I suppose that he did not ask Sir Douglas Mawson about its history as he seems to have assumed that if it had been taken to Commonwealth Bay by the AAE then it could potentially fly?
    At some stage the airframe disappeared from its ice perch near Boat Harbour. It was there still in 1976, but had disappeared by 1981. It was a mystery? Did it sink, was it blown some distance and taken away on pack ice or did it did just get blown into the Boat Harbour?
    The Mawsons Huts Foundation and in particular Dr Chris Henderson of Hobart began a research study in about 2008 and part of this study was a careful analysis of all photographs of the airframe sitting in its last known position. This enabled transits to be drawn and a most likely current position to be pin-pointed if the airframe is in fact underneath the ice. There are also rivers under the ice at Cape Denison and so this fact complicates the scenario.
    The Mawsons Huts Foundation has carried out extensive scientifically aided and physical searches for the airframe in recent Antarctic summers. By chance in 2010 a carpenter working on the huts found some rusty pieces when skirting around Boat Harbour and they were identified as part of the airframe. They were “four connecting pieces, about 100 mm in size each, from the last section of the tail, which was cut off before the frame was abandoned”. (Dr Chris Henderson). However the bulk of the airframe has not been located.
    The Mawsons Huts party which went to clear the huts of ice and snow in the Summer of 2015 -2016 had to fly in by helicopter to Cape Denison from the ship l’Astrolabe hove-to some 20 nautical miles away, as what was the usual path to Cape Denison was blocked by the large and very lengthy iceberg B-9B grounded on the western edge of Commonwealth Bay and fast ice had built up inshore of the berg making access by sea impossible.
    However, in January, 2016 it was reported that the iceberg which had been bocking sea access to Mawson Huts had now broken up.

    The Search for Mawsons Air Tractor by Dr Chris Henderson -
    http://www.chrishenderson.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1-THE-SEARCH-FOR-MAWSONS-AIR-TRACTOR-I-2009-Part-1.pdf

    Sally E Douglas

    3 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-25
    User data
  3. ALFRED THOMPSON - District Foreman, Running Inspector, District Inspector - Victorian Railways
    List
    Public

    Alfred Thompson was born 11th September 1836 at St Mary Redcliffe, Bristol, England and baptised on 23rd October 1836 at All Saints, Publow, Somerset. Son of Henry Thompson bap. 6th May, 1810 in Publow, Somerset, a Master Saddler, Harness Maker, Dealer and Chapman (Pedlar), and Ann Garland born 2nd October, 1805, Backwell, Somerset. Alfred appeared on the 1841 Census in the Redcliffe Hill area of Bristol with his parents Henry and Ann; and siblings Priscilla and Frederick.

    A Trade Card of Henry Thompson is in the online collection at the Fitzwilliam Museum at the University of Cambridge. It refers to Henry Thompson before he was a Master Saddler and Harness Maker (that is as a Saddler and Harness Maker) -

    Title:
    Trade card for Henry Thompson, Saddler and Harness Maker, Bristol

    Maker:
    Unknown; printmaker

    Category(s):
    print; trade card

    Name:
    trade card

    Date:
    circa 1830 — 1850

    School/Style:
    British

    Period:
    19th century

    Technique(s):
    engraving
    hand colouring

    Dimension(s):
    height, sheet, 90, mm
    width, sheet, 60, mm

    Acquisition:
    bequeathed; 1923; Perceval, Spencer George

    Inscription(s):
    inscription; plate centre; printed; H. THOMPSON, / Saddler, & Harness / MAKER / 5, Redcliff Hill, / Bristol.
    signature; plate lower centre; printed; Stewart Sc.

    Accession:
    Object Number: P.12842-R
    (Paintings, Drawings and Prints)
    (record id: 185498; input: 2011-09-20; modified: )

    Permanent
    Identifier:
    http://data.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/id/object/185498

    A number of records give Alfred's date of birth as being on 11th September, 1837 but these records are obviously incorrect for he was baptised in October, 1836 and I have a copy of that record. Even his Death record for 19th May, 1920 gives his age as 82 but he was actually 83.

    Alfred Thompson was a descendant of a quite innovative and adventurous Gloucestershire and Somerset family on his paternal side. Before his father Henry, there were two Thomas Thompsons - Thomas 1745 St Marys, Stanton Drew and his son Thomas 1779 Christchurch, Bristol and they both became Burgesses of Bristol - they were Copper Work's owners - they owned Mines and Mills and were hence also Copper Workers - in Somerset based in Publow and Pensford. The family had gradually left the region of the Forest of Dean (Dene) where their Thompson ancestors mined - Redbrook, Upper Redbrook, Newland and Colford/Coleford in Gloucestershire on to Bitton, Gloucestershire and then on to Somerset.

    A couple of generations back further John/Johannes Thompson 1687 of All Saints, Newland, Gloucestershire had married Anna (Anne) Coster 1687 also of All Saints, Newland on 15th June, 1709 in the Gloucester Cathedral in Gloucestershire - John's father John Thompson c1660 was of Redbrook and Anna's father was James/Jacobi Coster 1661 a son of the Copper entrepreneur John Coster c1613 of Whitecleeve, Newland, Gloucestershire. However James/Jacobi was a Potter and this probably set him apart from his high profile brother John born 1647 and John's sons Thomas 1684 - MP for Bristol, John 1694 and Robert c1697 who were all engaged in Copper mining and Brass smelting; and in Thomas's case in running slave trade ships.

    While in his turn Alfred Thompson was a bit different and became a District Foreman - Loco Branch (1882), Running Inspector - Loco Branch (1884) and District Inspector (1889) with the Victorian Railways. He was appointed to the Victorian Railways on 8/1860 (Pro Vic). This record also states that he was married but he did not marry (Fanny Shiels) till 1866. By the way the Victorian Railways absorbed some private companies between 1857 and 1860 - Geelong & Melbourne Railway Co. and the Mt Alexander & Murray River Railway Co. and some even later as in the case of the Melbourne & Hobsons Bay Railway Co. (Ref - a Trove researcher).

    Nevertheless in spite of the record showing a commencement date of August,1860, Alfred may have commenced work in the Victoria Railways sometime between 1858 and 1862 as other references point to a start by him both earlier and later than the August, 1860. Alfred's Death Certificate for 19th May, 1920, states that he was in the Colony of Victoria for 62 years.

    On 20th October, 1862 Alfred Thompson drove the first train engine from Melbourne to Bendigo (Sandhurst) at the opening of that line - from his own reported account. He had just turned 26.

    In about 1882 Alfred Thompson was the District Locomotive Foreman on the Gipps Land [Gippsland] and South Suburban lines which carried both passenger and goods trains. Railway accidents of varying magnitudes eg loss of life, serious injuries and damage to railway engines and carriages were a blight of the railway system being newly established in the state of Victoria; and this must have been distressing obviously for the victims and their families, for the Victorian Railway system chiefs, employees of the railways, railways users and the public in general.

    Regarding a head on train accident between two trains near Hawthorn Station in 1882 an 'Accident Inquiry' was set up in 1883 and Mr Alfred Thompson was mentioned in newspapers as having stated that (April 1883) with regard to arrangements made with him for the Box-hill (Boxhill) special on 2nd December (1882). 'He received the time tables on the afternoon of the 1st inst. and issued them to the driver of the special...He thought that the omission from the timetables of the special of any mention of meeting the ordinary train at Hawthorn, was an important omission, but, notwithstanding, he should have known that the trains were to meet there. He did not call the driver's attention specifically to the omission. Alfred Thompson, locomotive foreman of the south suburban lines stated that (May 1883) "It was his duty to send time tables to the last witness (George Smiles, the shop foreman at Sandridge) but he had only received six copies of the Box hill special time table and these were distributed at the stations along which the train was to run, and he had none left for Mr Smiles. All engines should be run from the one shed. As it was, he was responsible for engines running from the Sandridge shed, although he was generally stationed at the Prince's bridge shed." ' [The first railway line to be opened in Victoria was in September 1854 and it went from Flinders Street to Sandridge ie Port Melbourne].

    The Report of the Board of Inquiry of mid July, 1883 - clause no 7 - "...six copies of the special timetable ...were received by Alfred Thompson, the locomotive foreman....but no copies were sent to Sandridge. Having received them it was the duty of the locomotive foreman to forward one or more of these tables to Sandridge..." - clause no 12 - "...the driver...Kitchen, was appointed to run the special train by Alfred Thompson, the locomotive foreman...Kitchen had very little previous experience with suburban trains..."

    Details of the inquiry into the 'Hawthorn Railway Accident' can be found in the Parliamentary Paper (Victorian Parliament) 1883, second Session No 15 - http://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/vufind/Record/46224.

    1883. VICTORIA.
    HAWTHORN RAILWAY ACCIDENT.

    Report – Clause 7 – “In this case six copies of the special time-table were sent from the Superintendent’s office as usual, and were received by Alfred Thompson, the locomotive foreman, about four or five o’clock in the afternoon of the 1st December, but no copies were sent to Sandridge. Having received them, it was the duty of the locomotive foreman to forward one or more of these tables to Sandridge. Thompson was examined twice, and we consider that he gave his evidence in a very unsatisfactory way. He first of all maintained that it was the duty of Mr Harrowen, the Locomotive Inspector, and not his own, to forward time-tables, but he afterwards contradicted himself, admitting that the duty appertained to him solely. Harrowen’s evidence is to the same effect. Thompson then made the excuse that enough copies were not furnished to him, but he admits having received six, and only accounts for five, so that, according to his own statement, he could have forwarded a copy”…

    Report – Clause 10 – “We must remark that, with Mr Harrowen’s sanction, Thompson is in the habit in some cases (of which he himself seems constituted sole judge), instead of himself delivering special time-tables to the drivers, to whom it is his duty to deliver them, of handing the tables to the coke man, to be by him given to the drivers coming for fuel”…

    Report – Clause 67 – “The evidence exposes a deficiency in organization, absence of effective supervision, and want of discipline which pervades the department, and we think that the cause of the accident lies here.”

    Alfred Thompson was cross – examined twice by the ‘Board Appointed To Inquire Into The Causes Of The Hawthorn Railway Accident (2nd December, 1882).
    In his concluding statement on 10th May, 1883 he said “There was none (time-tables) on the coke-shed that day. We only notify to those men actually running, and if we had had the others, no doubt they would have been posted. But there was a misunderstanding somehow or other at that time. Mr Harrowin told me on December 1st – the night before – that he was going to look after the engine – to couple on to some carriages from Box Hill to Camberwell and from Camberwell to Box Hill, and that he would attend to the Box Hill trains. I told him that I was going to the station on that day, and I thought he was gone, and that took off the responsibility partly, with my thinking he would (not)? look after this one train. There was only one train to look after – this train that would meet the special, because all the others had got their time-tables. These special time-tables are sent to the running foreman. It is the lighter’s duty to see that they issue to all the drivers. If I do not receive them, of course I cannot issue them. I have two offices at Prince’s Bridge – the engineering shed there and the south suburban running – the actual running of the engines. That is about 34 or 35 engines, and the great mistake is, not having all the engines under one shed; because if I get one lot of notices for one shed, I have to come down late at night and go and issue those notices to the south suburban men at Sandridge. Smiles books the engines for the running, but I am responsible for the running. They should all be housed in one shed, for one running foreman to have charge of them. If they are not in one place he should not be held responsible for them.”

    Trove newspapers show that by 1887 Alfred Thompson was both a Foreman and Running Inspector.

    It was reported in the Argus on 22nd October, 1887 that “Thompson, locomotive line inspector, left here (Traralgon) this evening for the purpose of inspecting the line from Maffra to Stratford.”

    On 22nd October, 1888 it was reported - 'that at about 11 o’clock in the morning of 20th October, the 8.45 express train from Warragul to Melbourne ran into the 8.5 milk train from the same place, while it was standing at the Narre Warren Station.The engine driver of the milk train was killed. At 12 o’clock a special train with the casualty van was on its way to the accident - the district traffic superintendent Mr O’Connor, the locomotive inspector, Mr A Thompson and a gang of men left Prince’s-bridge. The scene of the accident was reached in about an hour.’

    In May 1889, Alfred Thompson was on a Board of Inquiry into a railway accident on the Mornington and Crib Point lines.

    In 1889 the Railways Commission appointed three Railways chiefs to conduct a Board of Enquiry into an accident as Spencer Street Station - Mr Woodruff the Lines Branch Manager, Mr Keirwan the District Traffic Inspector and Mr Alfred Thompson the District Locomotive Inspector.

    'On 5th September, 1889 there was a serious accident at the Drouin railway station when the 2.10pm passenger train from Bairnsdale to Melbourne collided with the engine of a goods train - passengers were injured...All the arrangements of clearing the line were "most expeditiously" carried out by Mr Thompson, the locomotive inspector.'

    By January 1890 Alfred Thompson was the District Locomotive Inspector of the Eastern System of the Railways.

    On 3rd January, 1890 Alfred Thompson (under his hat) as the Locomotive Inspector of the South Suburban lines was appointed to a Board of Inquiry "to investigate" the accident on the Sandringham line on Boxing Day 1889.

    It was reported in papers in May 1890 that ' Mr Alfred Thompson the Inspector of Locomotives and Mr Cook the Inspector of Stations, accompanied by a Mr Daglish had visited the new engine shed now nearing completion at Warragul Station; and the coal staiths on the south side of the main line between Melbourne and Sale. In regard to the staiths, supplies can be given from either side of the lines running past them. Lamps will be placed at the eastern extremities on the higher and lower elevations, which when required will enable work to be carried out at night time and will throw light forward over the turn-table from which the engines will proceed into the adjacent shed. On the northern side of the staiths "a house" has been prepared to dry the sand to be used in the engines running on the line to prevent the skidding of the wheels when in motion...The engine shed is a brick building in the shape of a segment of a circle, capable of being enlarged to further encompass the turn-table reserve. A blind wall of galvanised iron has been put on the south-eastern end of the shed and it can be removed at any time...The roof is supported by strong iron girders, and is lined inside with red pine, except in the centre which is glass and "is covered without with slates"...Each engine pit is entered by massive doors from the connecting lines with the turn-table, and in the centre pillar of the building outside, a reflecting lamp of the Dempster patent type will be placed, which will throw a full light on the turn-table...'

    The Argus 13th January, 1891-
    A Goods train from Warragul to Melbourne - 'parted'. Alfred Thompson reported "I attribute the cause of the accident as Driver Pitt's breaking away from the rear portion of his train and it colliding with him..." A departmental inquiry was to be held immediately. It was reported in the papers on 12th January, 1891 that 'this accident (on 10th January) involved almost total destruction of a goods train...' News of the accident ' was telegraphed to Melbourne, and at 2.30 yesterday morning Mr More, traffic superintendent and Inspector Thompson set out from Prince's Bridge station with the casualty van. They reached the scene of the accident about daylight and remained there till all the work of clearing the road was completed' ...' the casualty train, with District Superintendent More and Inspector Thompson, arrived in Melbourne from the scene of the accident shortly before one o'clock this morning...' (Besides the engine) "...The train had consisted of 19 trucks and the guard's van... There were two breaks in the train...five of the trucks were smashed to pieces...Fortunately no one was injured' (12th January, 1891)

    ‘On 6th June, 1892 damage was done to rolling stock on the main Gippsland line at Warragul. When he arrived Inspector Thompson, of the locomotive department set one portion of his men repairing the permanent way and the other portion in assisting in removing the dilapidated carriage.’

    From the Advertiser of 9th August, 1893 - In the Speight (Mr Richard Speight, former Railways Commissioner) Libel action against the Age "Mr Alfred Thompson, the locomotive inspector, mentioned several instances where carriages were destroyed which could have been rebuilt..." In the Argus of 9th August, 1893 it reports on Mr Alfred Thompson who was called as a witness - he said that "he had been 31 years in the department."

    Alarming Railway Accident - Explosion of a Locomotive Boiler at Ringwood, Remarkable Escape of Driver and Fireman – The Argus, 22nd January, 1894, page 5 (Trove) -
    “…The stationmaster telegraphed news of the accident to Prince's-bridge station, and Mr. Alfred Thomson, inspector of the eastern section, left with an engine and casualty van at about 10 o'clock for the scene of the accident. It was found that though the framework of the engine had been forced out of position, and the boiler was of course destroyed, the wheels had not been damaged. All the gear having been disconnected, the engine was brought to Melbourne. No cause for the accident can be assigned so far as inquiries have gone. The engine is No. 297 of the R class. It was manufactured at the Phoenix Foundry, Ballarat, and has been running for 11 years, which is a comparatively short time in the life of an engine, as there are some on the lines now which have been running for 30 years. The boilers are subject to a complete overhaul every five years, when the tubes are drawn and replaced and any defective plates renewed. They are also sent into the shop every twelve months for careful inspection and overhaul. This engine was subjected to a thorough overhaul about four years ago, and underwent a general inspection only a few months since. The edges of the fractured plate reveal no cause for the accident so far as they have been examined, for they are from three eighths to half an inch thick. Steam and water are reported to have been at their proper standard at the time of the occurrence. An inquiry into the cause of the accident will be held..."

    Statement by the Driver, Mr John Shepherd visited at home in Richmond -
    "He states that he is utterly unable to account for the explosion. He was on the engine at the time it occurred, and so, he thinks, was the fireman, William Miles. He heard a terrific sound, and felt something strike him on the forehead, and at the same instant his eyes were filled with dust und steam and smoke. He groped his way on to the platform, where he found the fireman a few yards from the engine, but up to that moment he had not the least idea of what had happened, nor did he realise it till he was told, as he could see nothing for some time. A constable kindly took charge of him, and took him to the stationmaster's room, paying him every attention till the doctor came. The train that day was lighter than usual - only six carriages instead of seven, and they were not well filled. The steam was blowing off slightly at the usual standard of 130lb. to the square inch, and the indicator on the steam-gauge also showed the same pressure. That is the pressure to which the engines are warranted, and as soon as it goes above that amount the valve acts, and the extra steam escapes without any action on the part of the driver, the valve being mechanical in its operation. There was the proper quantity of water in the boiler. He had only driven the engine for three weeks, but has been a driver for 20 years.”

    The Age 26 January, 1894, page 4 [Google newspapers] - The Locomotive Explosion -
    'A board of experts was appointed to ascertain the cause of the explosion of a locomotive boiler that occurred at the Ringwood Railway Station. The evidence was heard at the Spencer Street Railway Station. Among those who gave evidence was Alfred Thompson - he was the Locomotive Inspector of the Eastern Section of the railways and stated "that he had examined the 297 R. The boiler showed no sign of want of water. The plugs were partly melted. He considered that the engine when repaired was in first class working order. He would not have hesitated in regulating 140 lb. pressure in the boiler on the account of general repairs done to it. There was he had found, a fracture in the inside of the plates. His opinion was that the explosion resulted from the inside of the plates being eaten away by corrosion from the use of bad water. The expansion and contraction of the plates in these circumstances would test the strength of the plate, and an explosion would likely take place." '

    The Argus of 6th April, 1894 -
    'At the request of the Minister of Railways a further investigation was made into the cause of the railway locomotive boiler explosion at Ringwood in early January, 1893 (sic 1894). The members of the Board convened to take further evidence "showed an undisguised desire to place responsibility of the accident upon the shoulders of some individual..." Two witness were called - Mr Stinton - Manager of the Newport Workshops (Witness 1) declared that it was Mr Thompson's duty to see that the locomotives under his charge were sent to the Newport shop in due time for a thorough overhaul", and Mr Thompson (Witness 2) "argued that he had no means of ascertaining the internal condition of the boilers, and that the casualty must be attributed to an incomplete system of supervision for the purpose of carrying out repairs..." 'The finding of the Supplementary Board reported in the paper on 13th April, 1894 - "Locomotive Inspector Thompson is blamable for the accident but it points out that there were mitigating circumstances, inasmuch as no instructions had been given in writing as to who should be responsible for boilers being thoroughly examined every five years." '

    On 27th February, 1895 a railway accident occurred on the Gippsland line. The next day a Departmental Inquiry was held at Bunyip and Alfred Thompson was on the Board of Inquiry.

    ‘The Argus reported on 27th February, 1896 that a special train was to start for Korumburra yesterday at 9.45 from Prince’s-bridge station. On board was His Excellency the Governor and Lady Brassey accompanied by the Earl of Shaftsbury, plus members of Parliament and officials…Mr Fitzgerald, the traffic manager (railways) and Mr Thompson, the locomotive superintendent, were also on board…the whistle sounded and the special train stood still. A small crowd gathered, but the locomotive “still jibbed” and was eventually taken away to the engine shed. A second engine was “harnessed up.” All went well until Dandenong was reached, when it was discovered that the “new iron horse” was deficient in staying power, so the engine was “cut loose” and a third locomotive “was impounded.” ‘

    The information that follows emerged because of a report by Milburn a Train Driver at a Coroner's Inquiry in May 1908 - on 26th February, 1896 there was apparently an 'Unrecorded Accident - Lord Brassey's Special' (the Governor's Special to Korumburra) - Reported in the Argus on 30th May, 1908 -
    At the Coronial Inquiry into a disaster at Sunshine in about May, 1908 the driving record of the driver Milburn was subject to scrutiny. Special reference was made that Milburn had run the train (Lord Brassey's Special) on 26th February, 1896 at excessive speed on the return trip from Korumburra and that he had not examined the engine No 100 properly before starting. In response - He (Milburn) stated "... (Re. Lord Brassey's Special) - The accident was never reported in any paper...At the inquest I was exonerated (Eleven people were injured). (Re. Lord Brassey's Special) - The superintendents (Mr O'Connor and Mr Thompson) advised me not to stop off duty - though I suffered pain for weeks afterwards - so that no one would get to know of the accident."

    When Alfred Thompson retired in December, 1897 newspaper reports said that he was a Victorian railway employee for over 37 years. At the complimentary Banquet and Presentation held on Alfred's behalf at the Freemason's Hall in Collins Street, Melbourne, over 200 of his fellow railway employees attended. Mr Woodroffe the Railways Chief Mechanical Engineer was in the Chair for the duration of the event. Speeches were made including by Mr Mathieson the Commissioner of the Railways and Mr Rennick the Engineer in Chief. Songs were sung and recitations made with the event proceeding for two hours.

    A Victorian Railways Report for the quarter ending March 1898 shows that Alfred Thompson commenced work on 8/1860 and retired on 6/2/1898. At the retirement date he was in the Locomotive Branch as a District Locomotive Inspector earning 500 pounds per annum. www.parliament.vic.gov.au/papers/govpub/VPARL1898No13.pdf

    Royal Commission before the Select Committee on Railway Spark Arresters – Minutes of Evidence VPARL1902No26P1-159-1
    http://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/papers/govpub/VPARL1902No26P1-159.pdf
    Evidence by Alfred Thompson (former) district locomotive inspector on
    Thursday 4th October, 1900 (page 86)
    [Some points of interest selected by me].

    By the Chairman – What are you? I was District Locomotive Inspector of the Eastern system for four years. I am pensioned off now – I was in the Railway Department about 40 years. My duties as inspector were the supervision of the running of the engines, and overlooking the Loco. Department.
    Responses to questions on Spark Arresters –
    • Studied Spark Arresters - ‘Yes, those that were fitted on to engines in my district, the Eastern system. I was personally acquainted with Thornton’s, Allibon’s, and the Morris-Smith superheater and spark-extinguisher’...
    • Opinion on Thornton’s –
    • ‘It is not a perfect spark arrester, for the simple reason that the meshes allow sparks to go out – the sparks escape through the armour chain. In the trials that we had with wood it emitted sparks very badly – it did not allow large pieces to go through the mesh. Sparks got out, but they very nearly went out before they landed on the ground’...
    • Why isn’t it a perfect arrester? – ‘You cannot call it perfect unless the sparks are smothered in a wet atmosphere by spray’...
    • Forming a judgement on the arrester – ‘Yes’...
    • ‘No, we did not did not report it was an efficient spark arrester, but that it emitted a large amount of sparks, but not dangerous ones’
    • Any objections to the Thornton’s arrester? – ‘Not particularly. There was one objection, the chain armour wire wore very rapidly by friction of the exhaust, because there was a plate round the blast pipe – it was made of common steel wire, and it rusted and chafed through with the friction and got damaged...
    • No it would not last long. I do not think it would last a twelvemonth without necessary repairs – the holes chafed through which would have to be mended, but the “petticoat” as they called it was always on the move, and that chafed through and the dampness in the chimney corroded it.’
    • Contradiction in the evidence – If there was sufficient friction to make it wear, that would prevent it from rusting? 'In the spark-box it is always inclined to be damp and moist, and the steel wires would always get rusted, and the friction would break it through...’
    • What other arrester had you experience with? –
    ‘Allibon’s is a perfect spark arrester, but the objection was at the trials in New South Wales. Mr Thow said it destroyed the rolling-stock with the smoke – he said that with the balloon-shaped funnel the soot could not get away'...
    • Was the funnel higher than the ordinary funnel here? ‘They run with a high funnel because they have no overhead bridges at Deniliquin. Here you would need to have short funnels and I think that would be detrimental to it’
    • Experience with other spark arresters –
    ‘Morris-Smith’s superheater and water-heater. I think that it is the most perfect spark-arrester I ever saw, because it completely smothers them. It is a spark-extinguisher and an economizer in fuel because it has the superheater round the blast pipe, and the construction of the blast pipe is such that it is bound to put the sparks out’...
    • Liability of it to get out of order – ‘The superheater need to be made properly. They had a lot of trouble with them because they did not braze them, and the soft solder leaked and caused a lot of trouble; they brazed them at the latter end, and that overcame the difficulty, because when it was soft soldered the engine was always leaking, and it had to be laid up’...
    • Experience of any other arresters? –
    • ‘No. There were Tyrer’s and others, but I did not have experience with those’...
    • As Loco. Superintendent, did you have to deal with the coal supplied to the engines? –
    • ‘Yes. Coal is not screened as it used to be, but since they have used Victorian coal, which is of a soft nature, it comes out of the mine and through a skip screen; it then goes on the truck and on to the stage, and that makes a certain amount of slack.’
    • It is not screened on the stages now? – ‘ No, I do not think you would ever get that it is too expensive – in Mirl’s time they did not screen it, but where the coal is run down you top it. There are a great many more engines running now that in Mr Mirl’s time...We never used to screen it on the Eastern side even in Mirl’s time – we could always do with 10 per cent, or 15 per cent of Newcastle coal’...
    • By Mr Sangster. You say that Anderson’s is a better arrester than the departmental one, that Allibon’s is better still, and that Morris’s is the most perfect you ever saw? – ‘Yes...’
    • By Mr Williams. You state that there are three or four spark-arresters better than the one used by the Department – do you hold the opinion that they steam just as well and are also better spark-arresters? – ‘No’.

    Regarding Alfred Thompson's personal life -

    On 5th November, 1866 Alfred Thompson married Fanny Shiels at the Manor at Brunswick, Victoria - at the time of their marriage Albert and Fanny were living at 40 Little Lonsdale Street, Melbourne. Fanny was born 'at sea' in 1849 on the 'Agenoria' on the way to Australia with her Scottish parents William Shiels 7th March 1815 Markinch, Fife and Elizabeth Burrell/Birrell 26th March, 1818 Abbotshall, Fife and her siblings Isabella and William.

    On board the 'Agenoria' too was the sister of Elizabeth Burrell/Birrell - Margaret Birrell and her husband John Greig and their young family - including their daughter Agnes (Greig) Franks who later witnessed the Eureka Rebellion or Stockade in 1854, and wrote about it in text and poetry. Agnes's father had set up a tent city on the Ballarat goldfields in the vicinity of Bakery Hill, Sovereign Hill and Golden Point a bit before the Eureka stockade had gathered momentum.

    Alfred and Fanny Thompson had five children (in Melbourne) - William, Alfred, Henry (Harry), Elizabeth and Fanny. It was their son Henry (Harry) Thompson who won the first Maryborough Gift sprint race in 1891 (Sheffield Handicap of 130 yards).

    Alfred Thompson - 11/9/1836 Bristol, England to 19/5/1920 Middle Brighton, Victoria.

    Fanny (Shiels/Shields) Thompson - 1849 'at sea' on the 'Agenoria' to 15/7/1926 Middle Brighton, Victoria.

    {Thanks to Marsha Stringer of the Thompson site with Bitton on the net and her researchers; and the Forest of Dean site on the net and their researchers}

    [Also information from Trove digital newspapers online; and personal Family History research]

    Please note that this is a list and not a story per se. It is a collection of ideas, observations, research finds and items of interest.

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    Bachelor of Commerce and Diploma of Public Policy (Hons - Arts) - the University of Melbourne; Deakin University Hons Art Subjects under the History of Ideas.

    B Comm - Five Hons in Final Examination Results - First class Honours in Labour Economics exam and this meant equal second place in the exam/unit (Approx 200 students in this 3rd year subject). Also in the top few students in Economic History (Australian) in the exam/subject - 2A Honours in the exam.

    145 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-02-02
    User data
    Tags:
    Rating: r5/5
  4. ANTARCTIC MAPS - which were owned by Eric Douglas
    List
    Public

    ANTARCTIC MAPS/CHARTS

    THE LINCOLN ELLSWORTH RELIEF EXPEDITION 1935/36
    *Ross Sea to South Pole (black and white). With the Australian Antarctic Division Data Centre.
    *Ellsworth Relief Expedition - Track of the RRS Discovery 2 - Melbourne - Dunedin - Bay Of Whales - Melbourne - via Ross Island & Balleny Islands. Property and Survey Branch, Department of Interior, Canberra. (black and white - 2 copies). With the Australian Antarctic Division Data Centre.
    *Ellsworth Relief Expedition - Track of the RRS Discovery 2 - 70 S Bay of Whales - Ross Is - 70 S Property and Survey Branch, Department of Interior, Canberra. (black and white - 2 copies). With the Australian Antarctic Division Data Centre.
    * Map or chart showing the paths of the RRS Discovery 2 and of Ellsworth and Hollick-Kenyon c1936. The paths were sketched in by Eric Douglas over a Banzare prepared map or slide.
    * Ross Sea to South Pole - Proposed Flight Paths for the RAAF Wapiti Seaplane - Lincoln Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935/36. This is likely to be an 'original'. The National Library of Australia - 'Original' Map Collection' experts are keen to view this map and I will take it to Canberra for that purpose (8th July, 2014).

    BANZARE 1929/31
    *Antarctica. AAE 1911-1914 & BA & NZ Expedition 1929-1931. Property and Survey Branch, Department of Interior, Canberra. (coloured). With the Australian Antarctic Division Data Centre.
    *South Polar Region (map is split in half - black and white with some coloured shading - showing Australian Dependency). With the Australian Antarctic Division Data Centre.
    * Royal Geographical Society - Banzare charts 1929 to 1931.
    * Map of the route of the Discovery on both voyages. Prepared by Mawson and published in the Geographical Journal, Aug 1932.

    THE ENDURANCE
    * The Voyage of the Endurance - The subsequent drift in the pack ice and the various relief attempts

    The Maps with the Australian Antarctic Division Data Centre have just been catalogued by the Division and the details are online - 7th July, 2014.

    The maps not listed as being with the Australian Antarctic Division Data Centre are still held privately.

    Sally E Douglas

    17 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-11-05
    User data
  5. ANTARCTIC WEATHER and FLYING IN THE ANTARCTIC - BANZARE
    List
    Public

    ANTARCTIC FLIGHTS, WEATHER AND FLYING EXPERIENCES

    FLIGHTS

    From ‘Alfresco Flight’ – The RAAF Experience by David Wilson –1991 – chapter on Airmen and Explorers –
    “...The organization of the British, Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) gave him [Mawson] the opportunity to prove new techniques in Antarctic exploration. Among the equipment was ‘a light aeroplane for traversing pack-ice and for increasing the range of observation’. He would have preferred two aircraft but space on the Royal Research Discovery [S Y Discovery] precluded carrying more than one. The aircraft selected was a two seat De Havilland DH60G Moth, registered VH-ULD, which was to be the first Australian aircraft to see service over the Antarctic...

    ...Flying Officer S A C Campbell and Pilot Officer G E Douglas were seconded from the RAAF for duty with the expedition [transferred to the Seaplane division of the RAAF]...Both pilots ultimately joined other expedition members aboard the Nestor at Melbourne before voyaging to Cape Town to join the Discovery.The Discovery was Scott’s old ship...Douglas maintained the motor boat engine, a task which was to become one of his extra curricular duties for the duration of the voyage [2 voyages], as well as the Moth...”

    In ‘Moments of Terror’ – the story of Antarctic Aviation – 1994 – by David Burke – he states on page 13 –
    “...Pilots whose names belong to that early polar [ie Arctic and Antarctic] hall of fame [hypothetical] include Eielson, Crosson, Balchen, Hollick-Kenyon, Campbell, Murdoch, Douglas, Schirmacher, Wahr and Riiser-Larsen...”


    ERIC DOUGLAS' WRITINGS ON VOYAGE 1 AND 2 FLIGHTS, ANTARCTIC WEATHER AND FLYING IN THE ANTARCTIC


    VOYAGE 1 FLIGHTS

    BANZARE – Antarctic related flights in 1929 and 1930 (Voyage 1 of 2) where Eric was the Pilot or Pilot/Passenger (from Eric’s Flying Log Record No 2) -
    * On about 14th or 15th October 1929 after arriving in Cape Town Eric Douglas went out to the drome and piloted a Gipsy Moth for 35 minutes over Cape Town. Note: a personal flight.
    * 18/10/1929 - Eric went up in a Gipsy Moth with Mr Blake at Musenberg (Muizenberg), Cape Town, South Africa. Duration 30 minutes. Note: Is a personal flight
    * 31/12/1929 – went up in Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD with F/0 Campbell – Lat. 66.11 S and Long. 65.10 E – M/C (Machine) test and Engine test OK. (Eric was responsible for the ‘running’ of the Gipsy Moth). Observation Flight. 5000’ - 18 degrees F. Sea Level Temp. 32 degrees F. Apparent land to the south – 60M and apparent islands to the SW – 35M
    * 25/1/1930 – went up in Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD with F/0 Campbell. Test M/C and engine OK. Lat. 65.51 Long. 53.07
    * 25/1/1930 – took up Captain Hurley in VH-ULD. Aerial photography – Obliques and Cinema. Height 2000’. Another flight that day also with Captain Hurley as passenger in VH-ULD. Aerial photography – Proclamation Is. 2000’ - Temp. 20 degrees F. Sea level temp. 29 degrees.
    * 26/1/1930 - took up Captain Hurley VH-ULD. Obliques and Cinema. Photographed Enderby Land and the Antarctic Coast and Inland mountain range. Height 4000’ -Temp 15.5F. Sea level temp. 29 degrees.
    * 18/2/1930 – went up in VH-ULD with F/0 Campbell. Test M/C and Engine OK. Jeanne D’Arc, Kerguelen Island. Sea level temp 47 degrees F
    * 18/2/1930 – took up Mr Fletcher VH-ULD. Royal Sound, Kerguelen Island. Height 3500’. Visibility poor. [Mr Harold Fletcher wrote that they taxied down the main arm into a wind swept sea and bobbed about 'like a cork' waiting for a good opportunity to take off heading into the wind. "Doug gave her full throttle and she hit one or two waves and bounced in the air...Doug held her there and away we went..."].
    * 19/2/1930 – went up in VH-ULD with F/0 Campbell. Murray Is. Island Harbour. Observatory Bay. Photography Height 1500’. Visibility very good. Sea level temp 48 degrees F. M/C and Engine OK.

    SY DISCOVERY - Voyage 1 - Eric Douglas
    GIPSY MOTH VH-ULD (Other notes on flights and consumption of aviation petrol and oil)

    31-12-29 ~ Test flight. Lat 66 Long 66.
    Height 5000 feet. Land sighted about 80 miles to south. (apparent land) 1 hour.
    M/C and engine OK
    Petrol Shell Aviation 20 Galls.
    Oil Triple Shell 2 Galls

    2-1-30 ~ 8 Galls petrol & 1 quart oil.

    5-1-30 ~ Sir Douglas Mawson . F/O Campbell. Observation flight. 1.15 hr. Land definitely seen.

    25-1-30 ~ F/O Campbell and Self
    15 min. Test m/c and engine. OK

    25-1-30 ~ Self & Capt Hurley
    1.30. Aerial photos near Proclamation rock.

    25-1-30 ~ F/O Campbell & Sir Douglas
    1.00. Observation flight. Dropped flag.

    26-1-30 ~ Self & Capt Hurley
    1.00 Aerial photos. 4000 ft East of Proclamation rock.

    26-1-30 ~ F/O Campbell & Com Moyes
    1.00 Observation flight.

    25-1-30 ~ 12 Galls of petrol & 3 pts oil.
    (Eric Douglas) Total flying time in Antarctic 4hrs.

    Air Temp sea level 29 degrees F
    Air Temp 4200 feet 15 degrees F

    Sea level 29 F
    1000 26 F
    2000 23 F
    3000 20 F
    4000 15.5 F
    4200 15F

    Oil pressure 40 lbs
    Engine revs 1800
    Max revs 1980
    Stalling speed 48 m/hr

    Machine
    Adjusted Acleron controls for tension and droop.
    14-1-30 Repaired rips in Starb upper main plane (30).
    Trailing edge of two ribs repaired.
    26-1-30 Lower Starb wing tip dented (metal tube) when hoisting outboard.

    Engine
    GIPSY 85-100 HP.
    Covered oil pipes with asbestos string. Covered up air cooling vent in lower cowling. Overhauled impulse magneto. Changed compensating jet from 410 cc to 420 cc. Adjusted slow running and throttle. Greased valve and rockers. Engine. OK
    Engine starts OK when doped with a mixture of 2/3 petrol and 1/3 ether. Generally heated up for one hour by warm air, conveyed in canvas chute from boiler room. Temperature of engine raised from 28 F to 40 F or 45F. Doping then not necessary, also better for oil circulation.

    Improvements
    Oil temperature gauge necessary. Quick fastenings for float u/c. Tecalemit nipple for Acleron return bearing. (Crank arm under fuselage)

    Flying Carried Out At Kerguelen Is
    Air temp 40 degrees F to 50 degrees F. Heating or doping not necessary. Engine ran smoother here than in Antarctic. Oil press 36 lbs, steady. Full revs in air 1980.


    ANTARCTIC WEATHER

    On Board the S.Y. Discovery - left Cape Town Oct 19th 1929 -
    Notes Observed On The Weather -
    October 1929 -
    Winds variable until we reached the 40 th. Parallel of Latitude.
    Winds mainly from the North, North West and West, sometimes gale force and generally increasing at night time.
    We are now Nov 6th (1929) in the 48th Latitude and occasionally have snow, sleet and rain. Rain when the wind is from the north and sleet when it comes from the west.
    The Barometer is an accurate forecast of the weather in these latitudes.
    About one fine day per week and even then it is somewhat cloudy and always wind. The seas have been quite large at times, but no doubt they are moderate seas for this part of the World. The swell generally comes from the west and when the wind comes in from the north hard, a broken confused sea is set up, which makes it somewhat difficult to keep the ship from yawing.
    Mr Simmers (New Zealander) is the meteorologist on board and he is kept busy reading his instruments at definite times.
    When we were anchored off the Crozet Islands the wind came down the valleys form the snow capped mountains in terrific gusts which last for about a minute. These winds are cold. We were anchored on the east side, and of course the west winds meet the abrupt mountains on the west coast causing these winds to rise, they become colder and descend along the valleys with increased velocity. When out to sea these winds become steadier and warmer.
    Kerguelen Island (Nov 12th to Nov 24th 1929) -
    We were here for 12 days (south east end) and the winds were mostly from the S to W. The sky always had clouds, mainly stratus. Very unreliable weather. We never experienced high winds as we were there at the most settled part of the season, but the wind would spring up quickly and snow fall without much change in then barometer.
    December 1929 -
    Latitudes 60 to 67 South
    Longitudes 81 to 65 East
    The steadiest weather was experienced when we were well amongst the pack ice. Light south east winds prevailed, fairly clear sky, clouds forming over the water and generally blue sky over the ice. No very strong winds, no doubt due to us being a hundred miles or more from the Antarctic Continent.
    January 1930 -
    Latitudes 65 to 66 1/2 South
    Longitudes 65 to 40 East
    During this month we experienced three Blizzards. The first one was of short duration (12 hours) the wind reached 65 M/hr in the gusts, average velocity 45 M/hr. The wind came in from the north east, quickly increased in strength, then swung to east, then to south east, remaining in this quarter and increasing in strength until after the Barometer started to rise. The Barometer fell 1” during this blizzard. Thick driving snow for several hours. The other Blizzards were not so violent but of longer duration (three to four days).
    After these blizzards, at least one fine day prevails. Beautiful clear blue sky and light winds from South east. When we were in sight of the Antarctic Coast on these days the visibility was excellent, and objects that appeared a few miles away were actually double the distance that they appeared away (Verified by angles and sights).
    Air temp near the coast remained round about 30F. Lowest Air temp at sea level 20 F.
    Four or five hours before a blizzard starts, mountains etc inland take on a mirage and later on their outlines become hazy, then a few hours later the wind and snow starts to come on.
    Average Barometer reading 29.5”
    Once we had a blow with the barometer steady and it was not until an hour or so later that the barometer started to drop.
    February 1930 -
    We are steaming towards Kerguelen Is. The Air temp is rising about 1 F for every 100 miles we go north. We arrived at Kerguelen Is on Feb 8th after twelve days run from Enderby Land. The weather throughout this run was rather good. For the greater part of the trip a steady west wind prevailed with sky fairly free of clouds.

    FLYING IN THE ANTARCTIC

    Flying was carried out only on fine days, generally the first fine day after a blizzard. Sea conditions generally ideal, sometimes slight ocean swell on, which made it difficult getting off. Air conditions perfect, practically no bumps, although some were felt when flying over the Antarctic coast. Engine ran splendid, developed full power and oil pressure remained steady (38 to 40 lbs/sqin). Machine controls gave no trouble and the machine behaved quite normal in the air ie stalling and climbing speeds. Lowest air temperature experienced was 15 F at 4200 ft. With the usual winter flying clothes on and good woollen underwear the low temperature was hardly noticeable.
    Of course our flights were of short duration, generally about one hour, and it was midsummer.
    Engine
    The engine would start up when doped with a mixture of 2/3 petrol and 1/3 ether. But generally it was heated with warm air (conveyed through canvas flue from the boiler room) for about an hour previous to starting up. Temperature of engine raised to 45 F. Starting then quite easy and doping not necessary. (Crank case in air vent covered up. Oil pipes lagged with asbestos)
    Kerguelen Island
    From Feb 8th to March 2nd 1930
    Air temperature average 40 F. Much less snow about than when we were here in November last. Only the high inland mountains have snow on them, although several days before we left, light snow fell and the surrounding hills were covered lightly. Also the vegetation is much more profuse and green. No trees on this island and the main vegetation is thick moss like growth which practically covers all the small islands and in some places on the mainland. During this stay we only experienced two calm days and clear skys, otherwise very strong south to west winds prevailed. We had a full gale on three occasions, each one lasted for about 24 hours, average velocity 50 miles per hour and over 60 miles per hour in the gusts. Westerlie wind. Barometer fell nearly an inch before each blow, generally from 29.8” to 28.9”.
    Flying was carried out on these calm days, and on one occasion in a fresh north wind. Air moderately bumpy on this day, otherwise free of bumps. Flying mostly over water and sometimes inland near the mountains especially Mt Ross 6500 ft for taking aerial photos. Machine behaved well and engine ran splendid, much easier to start on with the air temp at 40 F, doping not necessary. Engine ran smoother here than when flying in the Antarctic. Air pressure 36 lbs/sqin.
    On the whole few days are suitable for flying. Winds arise quickly and clouds quickly form. Against this is the ideal water ways for a seaplane or flying boat, shelter from any wind, smooth seas and even when flying inland, forced landings could be carried out quite safely on any of the numerous lakes.
    We left Kerguelen Island on March 2nd 1930 and a course was set for Albany (Western Australia). At present March 23rd we have been three weeks out form Kerguelen Is and are now past Albany and in the Great Australian Bight, 850 miles from Adelaide (to where the course is now set).
    The weather during this time has been exceptionally fine and calm. For the first week out of Kerguelen Is fresh west winds were experienced, with the sky fairly clear of clouds. The latter two weeks the winds have been light and variable, the last four days the prevailing wind has been from the east southeast, clear skies every day.

    VOYAGE 2 FLIGHTS

    BANZARE – Antarctic related flights in 1930 and 1931 (Voyage 2 of 2) where Eric was the Pilot or Pilot/Passenger (from Eric’s Flying Log Record No 2) -
    * 7/1/1931 – went up in Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD with F/0 Campbell – Lat. 66.33 Long. 138.45 Test M/C & engine - OK. Adelie land. Sighted new coast extending westward.
    * 16/1/1931 – went up in Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD with Lt. Oom as passenger. Lat. 65.03 Long. 121.27 8000 ft observation flight. Air temp. 8000 ft 16 degrees F. Magnetic Var. 68 degrees West. Ice Plateau 80 miles to the South
    * 27/1/1931 – went up in Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD with Sir Douglas Mawson as passenger. Lat 65.07 Long 107.22 5000 ft - observation flight. Air temp. 5000 ft 12 degrees F. New coast sighted. M/C damaged coming aboard - Heavy swell
    * 6/2/1931 – went up in Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD with F/0 Campbell. Lat 64.47 Long 84.13 Test M/C & engine - OK. Pack ice tending westwards. Heavy Pack.
    * 10/2/1931 – went up in Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD with Lt. Oom as passenger. Lat 67.10 Long 74.24 1500 ft - observation flight. Air temp 10 degrees F. Numerous ice bergs. 40 miles of pack to the south, beyond open water.

    (Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection).

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    12 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-01-09
    User data
  6. Archibald Douglas - of Morebattle, Cavers, Drumlanrig and Liddesdale - Regent of Scotland in 1333
    List
    Public

    Archibald Douglas - Regent of Scotland or Guardian of the Realm.

    A son of William Douglas, 4th Lord of Douglas (le hardi) with his second wife Alinora (Eleanor/Elianor) Ferrers of Louvaine. Archibald Douglas was born c1296 and died on 19 July, 1333 at the Battle of Halidon Hill at Berwick on the Tweed, Northumberland.

    "Douglas is first heard of in 1320 when he received a charter of land at Morebattle in Roxburghshire and Kirkandrews in Dumfriesshire from King Robert. In 1324, he was recorded as being granted the lands of Rattray and Crimond in Buchan and the lands of Conveth, Kincardineshire, already being possession of Cavers in Roxburghshire, Drumlanrig and Terregles in Dumfriesshire, and the lands of West Calder in Midlothian. By the time of his death, he was also in possession of Liddesdale". (Wikipedia).

    "History then keeps quiet about Douglas except whilst serving under his older brother, James, in the 1327 campaign in Weardale, where his foragers 'auoint curry apoi tot levesche de Doresme'- overran nearly all the Bishopric of Durham". (Wikipedia).

    "The Battle of Annan, known in the sources as the Camisade of Annan took place on 16 December 1332. It took place at Annan, Dumfries and Galloway in Scotland. In it the Bruce loyalist supporters of King David II of Scotland surprised Edward Balliol and his supporters while they were in bed, and completely threw them out of Scotland. The Bruce loyalists were led by Sir Archibald Douglas, supported by John Randolph, 3rd Earl of Moray, the Steward, the future Robert II of Scotland, and Simon Fraser". (Wikipedia).

    "Archibald Douglas, the youngest brother of Sir James, (had) succeeded to the regency of Scotland in the infancy of David II, on the regent Sir Andrew Murray of Bothwell being led into captivity..." (March, 1333)
    (The Scottish Nation - Or the Surnames, Families, Literature, Honours and Biographical History of The People of Scotland - By William Anderson 1863).

    David II was the young son of Robert The Bruce.

    Archibald Douglas was the half brother of Sir James Douglas, Lord of Douglas. Also killed in the Battle of Halidon Hill was William IV, Lord of Douglas, son of Sir James.

    "William of Douglas accompanied his uncle, who had been appointed Guardian of the Realm, to the battlefield of Halidon Hill. There, with his uncle, six belted earls and countless knights and commoners, he was slain. He died unmarried and a minor". Wikipedia.

    Battle of Halidon Hill - www.britannia.com/tours/batnorthumb/halidon.html

    Halidon Hill was a particularly brutal battle where some say the Scots had the numbers but were out manoeuvred by the smaller English force. So many arrows rained down on the Scots that many had to turn their backs and try to flee the inevitable and imminent carnage.

    "... Meanwhile Edward III and the English army moved a short distance to the north and established themselves in a strong position on top of Halidon Hill. Although the English had the better position the Scots had the larger numbers ... Edward divided his army into three divisions - he commanded the centre ... the Scots were also organised into three divisions ... As the Scots advanced across the very marshy ground at the base of the hill, their horses became bogged down, the cavalry troops had to demount and they became sitting targets for the English and Welsh archers. Wave after wave of arrows descended on the slow moving Scottish soldiers and the subsequent English cavalry charge swept them from the field of battle and led to wholesale slaughter. One of the casualties was Douglas himself". (Battlefield Walks ...Brian Conduit. 2005).

    Most of the land where the battle raged is in private farm ownership, although there is apparently a conservation walk and some access to where the English force was positioned.

    Where Archibald Douglas died at Halidon Hill is at a spot where there is a dike, called Douglas dike but it has not been located - Canmore, Scotland.

    Name: Sir Archibald Douglas - Regent of Scotland
    Birth: ABT 1296 in Douglas Castle, Douglas, Lanarkshire, Scotland.
    Death: 19 JUL 1333 in Battle of Halidon Hill, Berwick on Tweed, Northumberland, England

    Father: Sir William - le hardi - 4th Lord of Douglas b: ABT 1244 in Douglas Castle, Douglas, Lanarkshire, Scotland
    Mother: Eleanora\Elianor (Alianora) Ferrers of Louvaine b: AFT 1268 in Biddleton, Suffolk, England

    Marriage 1 Dornagilda Comyn

    Marriage 2 Dame Beatrice (of Crawford) de Lindsay b: 1298 in Crawford, Lanarkshire, Scotland

    Married: 1314 in Douglas, Lanarkshire, Scotland

    Children -
    James Douglas b: ABT 1316
    Eleanor de Bruce (de Douglas) b: ABT 1317 in Douglas, Lanarkshire, Scotland
    John de Douglas - of Westcalder b: ABT 1319 in Douglas Castle, Douglas, Lanarkshire, Scotland
    Sir William de Douglas, 1st Earl of Douglas & Mar b: ABT 1323 in Douglas Castle, Douglas, Lanarkshire, Scotland.

    Sally E Douglas

    Bachelor of Commerce and Diploma of Public Policy (Hons - Arts) - the University of Melbourne; Deakin University Hons Art Subjects under the History of Ideas.

    B Comm - Five Hons in Final Examination Results - First class Honours in Labour Economics exam and this meant equal second place in the exam/unit (Approx 200 students in this 3rd year subject). Also in the top few students in Economic History (Australian) in the exam/subject - 2A Honours in the exam.

    13 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-07-11
    User data
  7. Archibald Douglas of Livingston and Hermiston - 2nd Lord of Douglas
    List
    Public

    Archibald de Douglas - 2nd Lord of Douglas b ABT 1187 in Douglas Castle, Douglas, Lanarkshire, Scotland + Margaret de Crawford b: ABT 1195

    Marriage Margaret de Crawford b: ABT 1195 in Crawford, Lancashire, England
    Married: ABT 1209 (if they married in 1209 then Margaret was probably a Minor).

    [Margaret was the eldest daughter of Sir John (Johannes) Crawford (de Crauford) of Crawford-John and he was buried in Melrose Abbey].

    Children -

    Sir William - long legs - 3rd Lord of Douglas b: ABT 1210 in Douglas Castle, Douglas, Lanarkshire, Scotland
    Sir Andrew (Andreas) Douglas of Hermiston b: ABT 1220 in Hermiston, Midlothian.

    "The first appearance of Archibald...is as a witness to a confirmation by Jocelyn (Jocelin), Bishop of Glasgow of a toft in Glasgow in favour of the monks of Melrose (1179-1199)...He acquired lands of Livingston and Herdmanston (Hermiston) in Lothian (Midlothian), and must have been knighted before 1226..." A History of the House of Douglas ... by Herbert Maxwell. Archibald must have been a Minor at the time. Moreover, research experience tells me that historical records and that includes dates of events, must be evaluated flexibly!

    "Archibald de Douglas appears as a signatory to several royal charters following 1226, and he appears to have spent a considerable time in Moray as episcopal charters of his brother Bricius de Douglas show. He was in the retinue of the King Alexander II, at Selkirk in 1238, when the title Earl of Lennox was regranted to Maol Domhnaich of Lennox. Douglas disappears from historical record after 1239 and it is presumed that he died about this time". (Douglas Archives - but probably also originally from Herbert Maxwell).

    In the University of St Andrews Study of Flemish families in Scotland it states "...Archibald Douglas ... possessed Hailes in Midlothian before 1198. This was close to the Freskyns in Strathbroc in West Lothian..."

    Sally E Douglas

    9 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-07-12
    User data
  8. Arthur Max Stanton, FIRST MATE on BANZARE Voyage 2
    List
    Public

    Arthur Max Stanton (also known as AMax and Max) (1899-1963) was born in London. His father was a German Engineer and Inventor who migrated to England in the 1890’s. The family name was Schneider at the time. However, the family’s name was changed to Stanton soon after WWI, and a distant family member states that shortly after that Stanton migrated to Sydney. However New Zealand Immigration records show that an Arthur Max Stanton migrated from Liverpool to Dunedin, New Zealand in November, 1934 on the ship Port Campbell. His occupation was given as Master Mariner. Besides although known widely as Arthur, to his family and friends he was known as AMax. On BANZARE he was known as Max. Anyway in 1944 he was living in Neutral Bay, New South Wales and in 1946 he visited Melbourne, Victoria.

    Stanton joined the BANZARE Antarctic Voyage 2 in 1930-1931 as the Ship’s Chief Officer, replacing Kenneth Norman MacKenzie who had been promoted to the Master for Voyage 2 in lieu of Captain John King Davis who had decided not to participate in Voyage 2. Sir Douglas Mawson was the organizer and leader of the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition of 1929-1931. Even though he was appointed as the Chief Officer Max Stanton actually had a Master’s Certificate in Seamanship and Navigation.

    From Armed Forces Censuses - Arthur Max Stanton fought in WWI and his Medal Card is at the National Archives of the UK (all information is online).

    The story of the Southern Cross shipwreck in 1932 was something like this – In late October, Max Stanton was the Master of the Southern Cross which struck a reef close to shore at Anietyum Island in the New Hebrides. The ship was a wreck and chaos prevailed. For a time all were reported as missing. It was learnt later that month that Stanton and his crew and passengers went through quite an ordeal. After all being accounted for and saved from drowning, Captain Stanton and the deck officers and an Anietyum boy set out for Vila, New Hebrides in a whaleboat borrowed from one of the Islands two traders. It was heavy going and eventually they landed on a beach at Tanna Island and from there a Frenchman arranged for a launch to take them on to Lenukel nearby for Medical treatment. Then they left Tanna Island by launch for Vila still 125 miles away. In Vila Captain Stanton chartered a local schooner to return to Anietyum Island to pick up his crew and salvage stores. It was said that ‘details of the wreck of the Southern Cross ...make a dramatic story’. The Southern Cross struck a reef, at 3.30 am in pouring rain. There were eight Europeans and 15 Solomon Islanders on board. Only four of the eight whites could swim. It was dark and black. All the deck cargo was swept overboard...one lifeboat was launched but it was smashed. The other could not be launched. An officer swam ashore with a line of about 150 yards in the ... surf over coral... But the coral cut the line and it came away in his hands. One male passenger tried to get ashore along a second line taken in by another officer but it broke too. It was said that captain dived into the water in his pyjamas and dressing gown to rescue the man. This man tried to clutch the captain and the captain responded and knocked the man out and managed to get him ashore. The captain and three officers were in the water for three hours...

    In October, 1933 Arthur Max Stanton sailed with a crew of 12 old public school boys in search of 12,000,000 pounds of treasure reportedly buried at the Cocos Islands in 1824.
    In October, 1946 Max Stanton visited Melbourne and he “pins his faith to good old fashioned methods of locating treasure. He stated that on his retirement he will search for gold of the Incas and plate from Lima Cathedral which he believed buried at Cocos...”

    From the Courier Mail of 18th October, 1952 - in 1952, Stanton commanded a 2,500 ton tanker across the North Pacific. Also it said that he was intending to sail from Brisbane to Rabaul, Papua New Guinea in a 45ft Yacht. The article also said that he began his sea life in sail and was apprenticed with a British overseas shipping line. Moreover, it said that Stanton commanded Navy Corvettes in WWII. As well as that he has commanded 2,500 ton, 3,000 ton and 9,000 ton merchant ships and was the Staff Captain of a 16,000 ton transport troop ship from Marseilles to Saigon. It was in about 1952 that he retired from sea duty.

    Sally Douglas

    4 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-01-23
    User data
  9. BACK to NHILL CELEBRATIONS - RAAF participation in 1929
    List
    Public

    "Back to Nhill Celebrations in 1929"


    At the start of March 1929, Eric Douglas had been instructing student Pilots of the RAAF at Point Cooke (Cook) and Laverton, having qualified as an A1 Flying Instructor in June 1928. He had already passed his A Flying Course at the No 1 Flying Training School at RAAF Point Cooke in December, 1927- having initially learnt to fly in Avro 504K’s – A3-8, A3-9, A3-10, A3-12, A3-29, A3-40, A3-45, A3-48 and A3-52; DH9’s - A6-1 and A6-22; SE5A’s – A2-4, A2-12, A2-16, A2-31 and A2-36; DH9A’s – A1-11 and A1-24. He had come first in flying and third in theory.
    Early in that same month, Eric had carried out solo engine and m/c (machine) tests on DH9A’s – A1-16 and A1-28 as well as instructing RAAF student Pilots. He had earlier also carried out an engine test on A1-16 accompanied by Sergeant Curtain – since 1927 Eric had been a Sergeant Pilot. With AC1 Charters as his student they had practiced forced landings in Avro 504K A3-41 and with LAC Holdsworth as his student in A3-41 they had practiced aerobatics.

    Next was the flight on 18th March,1929 at 0815 from Point Cooke, to Ararat and then Nhill, with LAC Brier as his passenger in DH60 Cirrus Moth A7-6 for the purpose of joining the ‘Back to Nhill Celebrations’. The flight took 2-15 hours from Point Cooke to Ararat and at 1200 they flew from Ararat to Nhill, a flight of 1-15 hours. On that same day Eric flew solo at 1430 at Nhill in A7-6 in the formation and aerobatics for 45 minutes and at 1540 he flew solo in A7-6 in aerobatics for 30 minutes.
    On 19th March, 1929 at 1100 Eric flew solo in A7-6 at Nhill in the formation and aerobatics for 30 minutes. At 1400 accompanied by LAC Brier, Eric flew from Nhill to Ararat in A7-6 (time taken 1-30). At 1615 they left Ararat for Point Cooke (time taken 1-45).
    The next day 20th March, 1929 Eric went up with Flight Lieutenant Charles Eaton m/c testing the Warrigal 1 at Point Cooke.

    There is a gap here with no flying by Eric. This probably means that he was seconded to Head Office to assist with technical matters.

    On 17th April, 1929 Eric left on the search for the ‘Kookaburra’ G-AUKA a Westland Widgeon monoplane lost in the outback with Flight Lieutenant Keith Anderson and his mechanic ‘Bobbie’ or ‘Bobby’ (Henry Smith) Hitchcock, who were searching for their old comrade Sir Charles Kingsford Smith.
    Eric left RAAF Point Cooke at 0845 on 17th with LAC Smith as his passenger, for an engine test and then to join the No 1 Squadron at RAAF Laverton. At 1235 on that same day they left Laverton with the first stop being Mildura, arriving there 4-30 later. Eric was flying DH9A A1-20. This of course is an aviation story that made headlines in 1929. Flight Lieutenant Eaton was in charge of the RAAF search party of 10, all of whom flew in DH9A’s to the outback.
    My father Eric had said more than once over the years that these aircraft were given to the RAAF by England (RAF) as ‘training aircraft’ for around Point Cooke and Laverton. Moreover, that it was never intended that they would undertake such a flight as north across Australia to the area of Wave Hill Station and the Tanami Desert in the Northern Territory. The Tanami Desert was where the ‘Kookaburra’ was located, being first sighted by Captain Lester Brain of Qantas.
    ”... Later that evening (21st April, 1929) when we were with Flight Lt. Eaton and Cpl. Sullivan and enjoying a good meal prepared by the two Telegraph Officers (Mr Woodruff was the main Officer) and assisting in the celebration of Mr Woodruff's birthday, we learned by the telegraph that Mr Brain had located Lt. Anderson's aeroplane at a spot he estimated to be about 80 miles south west of Newcastle Waters. It appeared that Mr Brain had flown about fifty miles to the west of Newcastle Waters into the desert when he saw signs of smoke on the south western horizon about sixty miles away. When about twenty miles from the smoke he saw a large dark brown patch of burnt ground and when close to the patch he located the "Kookaburra". He reported that he saw one man lying near the plane but there was no sign of his companion...” (Eric’s unpublished story of 1958).

    (Eric Douglas Collection).

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    7 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-10-29
    User data
  10. BANZ Antarctic - Voyage or Cruise 1 - short log by Eric Douglas
    List
    Public

    BANZARE 1st Cruise - With the SY Discovery 1929 -1930 - by Eric Douglas


    Expedition first mooted by Australian National Research Council - Sir Douglas Mawson was invited to take command. SY Discovery made available by British Government.

    Name of Expedition - B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. British Australian, New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition. Organization - Organization carried out mainly by Sir Douglas Mawson during the years 1928 &1929. Sir D Mawson, Commander & Leader of Expedition. Ships Company - Captain J.K. Davis, Captain & Master of S.Y. Discovery. Ships Officers & Crew selected in England by Capt J.K. Davis. Mainly drawn from the British Mercantile. Scientific Staff - Australians selected by Discovery Committee. Capt Hurley & Mr Marr joined ship in England. Prof Johnson & Mr Fletcher - Biologists Dr Ingram - Medical Officer & Bacteriologist Commander Moyes R.A.N. - Surveying Officer Mr Howard - Chemist F/Lt Campbell & F/O Douglas R.A.A.F. - Seaplane operations Mr Simmers - Meteorologist - nominated by New Zealand Government Mr Falla - Ornithologist - nominated by New Zealand Government Object of Expedition - 1/ Continuation of Sir D Mawson’s Australasian Antarctic Expedition of 1912 - 1914. Embracing :- 2/ Oceanographical survey of waters south of Australia and South Africa and Antarctic coast 3/ Examination of Sub-Antarctic Islands 4/ Delineation of this sector of Antarctic coastline 5/ Study of Whaling possibilities 6/ Meteorological data, magnetic & cosmic ray survey. Note: Wintering on Antarctic continent never contemplated. Description of Ship - 3 masted Barkquentine. Tonnage approx 1900 tons Length 175 ft Breadth 34ft Draught 18ft Engines Steam triple expanding 400 H.P. Normal speed 5 1/2 Knots. Owned by Falkland Is Government & loaned to British Government for 2 years. Ship first used by the late Capt Scott in years 1900 - 1904. Built specially for Polar work & capable of withstanding enormous pressure when beset in ice. Entirely constructed of wood except engine room. Hull built of three layers of different wood. Sides approx 2ft 6in bottom 3ft. Bows solid for 10ft. Cross beams 10in by 10in oak 7ft apart and three beams in a layer from the keel. Start of Expedition - Ship departed England early in August 1929 & arrived Cape Town S Africa early in October 1929. Scientific party travelled by passenger steamer (TSS Nestor) from Australia to Cape Town. Ship departed Cape Town 19th Oct 1929 & arrived off Possession Is Crozet Group Nov 2nd. Scientific Party ashore for one day. Foreshore thick with Sea Elephants. First view of Penguins. Departed Nov 4th for Kerguelen Is 700 miles away. First snow & becoming colder. Warm clothes issued out. Ship averaging 140 miles per day. Saturday 9th Nov 1929 - Sighted Kerguelen but driven northward by South gale. Eventually arrived off Royal Sound 12th Nov. Steamed 20 miles up winding Fiord to old Whaling station Jeanne D'Arc. Coal left here by a ship going south. Cardiff briquettes 500 tons. This Island belongs to France. Controlled by Governor of Madagascar. Size 80 miles by 40 miles. Wonderfully pretty, inland lakes and Glaciers. Mainland overrun with rabbits, seals scarce, penguins on Islands. Departed 24th Nov 1929 - Ship low in water with heavy cargo of coal. Heading for Heard Is (British). Early on morning of 26th Nov sighted Heard Is. Wonderful sight, rugged coast with huge glaciers running into the sea. Highest peak approx 7000ft. Island about 20 miles long & six across. Scientific party ashore, meaning to stay two days, weather bad. Ship puts to sea to weather out gale. Barometer down to 28.4in. Camped on a peninsular. Studied sea elephant, penguins, skua gulls etc. Shot my first sea leopard, savage creature. Ship arrives back and Party get aboard on 3rd Dec. Heading S.E. - Becoming colder each day, roughly 10 degrees F for every 100 miles south. Dec 7th 1929 - Sighted first ice berg. First honour to Capt Hurley. Dec 9th 1929 - Met first pack ice. Old pack, very broken. More ice bergs of increasing size. 1/4 mile long 150ft out of water, deep blue colour in crevasses. More birds in vicinity. Dec 12th 1929 - Pack more consolidated, ships progress slower. Whales sporting in pack ice pools. Navigating ship by water sky and ice blink. Sun setting about 11PM. Beautiful sunsets especially in calm of evening. Echo soundings. Winds S.E. Dec 17th 1929 - Moth seaplane unpacked & commenced to assemble m/c. Dec 20th 1929 - Heavy going in pack only making 40 miles per day south. Dec 24th to 26th 1929 - Held fast in pack. Waiting for ice to break up. Dec 29th 1929 - On the 80th meridian of east Longitude and near Antarctic Circle (66 1/2 South). Air Temp down to 28 degrees F. Dec 31st 1929 - Carried out first reconnaissance flight. Great assistance to ship. Sighted apparent land 80 miles to south over unbroken pack. Impossible for ship to get through. Jan 2nd 1930 - Ship steaming to westward Jan 4th 1930 - Nunataks (Rocky peaks) sighted from mast head 30 miles east of Kemp's reported land. Jan 5th 1930 - More flying carried out, surveying coastline. Jan 7th 1930 - Aeroplane damaged by ice falling from masts, spars & rigging. Jan 11th 1930 - First sight of killer whales. Land 20 miles away. Jan 13th 1930 - Steaming along coast of Enderby land. Antarctic continent showing up clearly, visibility wonderful. Jan 14th 1930 - Met Norwegian research ship "Norvegia" Capt Riiser Larsen. She was equipped with two seaplanes. Jan 18th to 22nd 1930 - Driven off coast by S.E. blizzard. Unfortunate at this time. Jan 24th 1930 - Off a huge rock we named Proclamation rock. Seaplane flown securing splendid photos. Landing party raises British flag on land and Sir Douglas proclaims this land for the British Empire. MacRobertson Land - East of this rock he named MacRobertson land. Coal reserve becoming low. Jan 27th 1930 - Ship headed away for Kerguelen Is. Last view of Antarctic coast. Mountain peaks showing up clear. Hours of darkness, running through ice berg infested area. Ship making good progress under sail & steam. Feb 7th 1930 - The distant snow covered peaks of Kerguelen Is showing up. Gale coming on from North west but ship makes Royal Sound safely. Feb 8th 1930 - Ship moored to jetty at Jeanne D'Arc. Overhaul of engines & boilers. Coaling ship in readiness to sweep south again towards Queen Mary land on way home. Happy days spent ashore exploring inland parts of this wonderful Island. Aeroplane assembled & floats. More snow around, especially on high ground. Fierce winds from west. Feb 21st 1930 - Farewell to Jeanne D'Arc. Ship steams round 40 miles to Observatory Bay. Visits to Christmas Harbour and Murray Is (Capt Cook anchored here in 1771 on Xmas day) March 2nd 1930 - Departed from Kerguelen Is. Winter too far advanced to go south so course shaped for Albany W. Australia. Mar 23rd 1930 - Getting into warmer regions. Change into better clothes. Longing for a feed of fresh food. Tinned foods are not satisfying over a long period. Eggs still appear on Menu but only in form of curried eggs etc. Meet P&O S.S. Cathay in Bight, fresh food & papers dropped & picked up by us. Very welcome. April 1st 1930 - Arrived at Port Adelaide. Unloaded scientific specimens. Departed Adelaide April 3rd & arrived Port Melbourne 8th April. Finish of 1st Cruise.

    Word processed and loaded onto Trove by Sally E Douglas

    1 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-09
    User data
  11. BANZ Antarctic - Voyage or Cruise 2 - short log by Eric Douglas
    List
    Public

    BANZARE 2nd Cruise - With the SY Discovery 1930 - 1931 - F/O Eric Douglas

    Winter of 1930 - Ship docked and refitted out at Harbour docks Williamstown Melbourne. Nov 1st 1930 - Ship departed Williamstown for Hobart, Tasmania where she duly arrived on Nov 5th. Nov 6th to 22nd 1930 - All stores restowed in their correct groups in the ship's holds. More coal taken on board than 1st Cruise. Fresh food:- eggs 20,000, fruit and live stock 19 sheep. 1000 tons of loading on board (Slight change in personnel) Nov 22nd 1930 - Departed Hobart and slowly steamed outside into ocean swell. Ship rather low in water. Heading for Macquarie Island 900 miles S.E. Dec 1st 1930 - At 1PM this island could be faintly seen and at 4PM the north end showed up clearly. Hills very green, highest past of Island 1500ft. 20 miles long & 3 miles wide. Sea-Elephants & Penguins - Party ashore at 6AM 2nd Dec. Tents erected on shore. Walked along shore to the Nuggets, fine sight, thousands of Royal penguins. Huge rookeries inland. penguins continually coming & going from the sea. Penguins amused us with their surfing. 4th Dec 1930 - All on board & ship steaming down the coast to "Lusitania" Bay. Visit to King Penguin rookerie. 5th Dec 1930 - South of Macquarie Is looking for Bishop & Clarke rocks. Rocks located & photographed. Several growlers or small bergs in sight. Foggy weather. 6th Dec 1930 - Heading south for the head of the Ross Sea where we have to meet the Sir James Clarke Ross (20,000 tons) to pick up 100 tons of coal she has taken down for us. 8th Dec 1930 - Numerous bergs in sight, rough seas had died away. Air temp 29 F. Sheep killed & carcasses hung in rigging. 15th Dec 1930 - Factory ship sighted, loose pack in vicinity. Sight whale chasers. Alongside this ship and coaling commenced. First sight of a modern factory ship in operation, rather gruesome sight, awful stench, blood & bones continually being emptied overboard (Norwegian & English Companies) Whaling Operations - Whales Blue - Normally 100ft long - 100 tons weight Finner - Normally 100ft long - not so heavy Hump back - Normally 50ft long Blue whale yields 90 - 100 barrels of oil. Six barrels to 1 ton and 1 ton of oil - 25.0.0 So whale worth 300 - 400 pounds or even more when in fine condition. Factory ship treats 24 whales per day or over 7000 pounds per 24 hours. (200,000 pounds per month - "Kosmos" - World Record 48 Whales in 24 hours). Ships this particular season expect to earn over 3/4 of a million pounds (six months work). Men work in shifts - 12 hours. Over 300 all told on ship. Chasers - Each ship has from 7 - 9 chasers working. Chasers are powerful small vessels 90 - 100 ft long. 2000 H.P. 15 Knots. Contain a muzzle loading swivelling gun for throwing explosive headed harpoon. Captain or Gunner - Earns 6.10 for every blue or finner whale. Earns 3.10 for a hump whale. Probably earns up to 2000 pounds in seasons work. Ships Complement - Gunner, mate, 2 engineers, 2 firemen, 1 cook & 4 seamen. One man on look out duty. Gunner & mate get little sleep, probably 2 hours per day when whales are numerous. Earns his money. Whale chasing is exciting work. Norwegians expert at killing whales. Terrific strength of whales, known to have towed chasers at 15 Knots for 10 hours. 17th Dec 1930 - Heading for Balleny Is. Much fog & mist. Ship to visit Commonwealth Bay (Adelie land) Queen Mary land & then to chart MacRobertson land etc. 19th Dec 1930 - Large ice bergs in sight, occasionally pushing through heavy pack (25ft thick). Seaplane - m/c shifted on to skid deck & assembling operations commenced. 3PM Ship steaming with wind coming astern, smoke blowing ahead in mist & visibility very bad. 4PM Ship nearly ran into big berg. No hope of seeing Balleny Islands, heavy pack surrounding them. Weather worse than previous year. Xmas Day - In wireless communication with Australia. Xmas dinner excellent. Presents given to all members. Directional wireless picks up signals from "Kosmos". 29th Dec 1930 - Alongside "Kosmos" (22000 tons) & taking in 50 tons of coal. Normally Discovery only holds enough coal for 50 days steaming in Antarctic waters. Cardiff Briquettes - Coal in bunkers used by Discovery. Special steaming coal, made up by special process in Cardiff England. Blocks about 11in square by 9in deep. Weigh 25 lbs, roughly 90 to a ton, easy to stow & handle. Used in previous voyages. 30th Dec 1930 - Making in for Commonwealth Bay - 90 miles away. 31st Dec 1930 - Blizzard coming on from South east. Ist Jan 1931 - Ship in perilous position, surrounded by bergs & heavy tumbling pack, terrific wind - 70 m.p.hr. Spray freezing on decks, all hands helping to set sail and keeping steam up. Ship labours in pack. Ship takes shelter behind berg. Wonderful sight, driving snow and pack. 3rd Jan 1931 - Blizzard now abating. Ship making in to coast. High plateau showing up. No mountain peaks in sight. 4th Jan 1931 - Beautiful day. Party goes ashore, visit to old huts. 6th Jan 1931 - Union Jack hoisted and Proclamation read by Sir Douglas. Use skis and crampons. Small sledges used for transporting ice to motor boat. Cases of old food & fuel collected. Kennedy carries out magnetic dip readings. South magnetic pole has moved 100 miles N West ie nearer to Cape Denison. 8th Jan 1931 - I have touch of snow blindness, very painful. Fine weather continues. 11th Jan 1931 - 200 miles west of Cape Denison, winds very light. 15th & 16th Jan 1931 - Seaplane flown. Land sighted 70 miles south. 16th to 30th Jan 1931 - Dirty weather, constant snow and mist. Ship hove to waiting for chance to get south. Magnetic Compass nearly useless. Var 68 degrees W. Termination ice tongue disappeared since 1919 (50 miles by 20 miles) No chance of getting to Queen Mary land. Heavy pack keeping us 60 miles out. 6th Feb 1931 - More whaling ships in sight. Norwegians told us there are 40 Factory ships and 250 Chasers spread round the Antarctic coast. Sun setting at 10PM. 7th Feb 1931 - In same locality as our furtherest east of last cruise (180 East Long - 40 East Long) 10th Feb 1931 - Motor boat & crew had lucky escape from being towed into heavy pack. Painter cut just in time. 11th Feb 1931 - Land sighted again. Seaplane flies over coast and drops the British flag. Lower temperatures 20F. 13th Feb 1931 - Flag hoisted on MacRobertson land. Fine coastline. Rocky out crops, mountains inland. 15th Feb 1931 - Killer whales pass ship. Another blizzard comes on. 18th Feb 1931 - Party ashore for scientific work. High rocky capes. Ship running short of coal, so we must head north now before bad weather comes on. 19th Feb 1931 - Last view of Antarctic coast (Lat 67 S Long 61 E). 10.30PM Auroral display (Aurora Australis) Moving and radiating bands of light, pinkish in colour. Top Yards - Lower & upper top gallant yards crossed to mast. All gear on deck not wanted stowed below. Ship making fair progress north. Winds NE to NW. 1st March 1931 - Lat 57 S. Winds south west. More auroral displays. 2nd March 1931 - Gale comes on from N.W. Ship headed away before it. 3rd March 1931 - Wind round now to WSW, blowing with terrific force (70 m/h). Huge seas everywhere, ship going fine but needs careful handling. Wonderful sight. Ship under bare poles making 8 Knots. 4th March 1931 - Wind & sea abating. 6th March 1931 - 1880 miles from Melbourne. More birds in vicinity of ship. Albatrosses, Cape Hens, Petrels & Nellies. Ship under sail alone, conserving coal for last part of passage. Plenty of work for all in trimming yards. 14th March 1931 - 700 miles from Hobart our proposed port. Engines going again. 18th March 1931 - South coast of Tasmania in sight, can smell the timber on the land. Lovely view after the weeks of endless ice & snow. 19th March 1931 - Ship steamed up D'Entrecasteaux channel to Hobart, arriving at 3.30PM. Given great welcome by the Navy. Especially Rear Admiral Evans. Left Hobart on 22nd March and arrived Melbourne on 26th 147 days out. Hobart to Hobart - Length of second cruise 10,557 miles. Ship returns to England via Cape Town. Two Cruises - Approx 22,000 miles.

    Word processed and loaded onto Trove by Sally E Douglas

    1 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-09
    User data
  12. BANZARE - Gipsy Moth Seaplane VH-ULD
    List
    Public

    FROM LOG OF (GILBERT) ERIC DOUGLAS

    First Flight in the Antarctic by Gipsy Moth Seaplane VH-ULD -
    Tuesday 31st Dec. 1929 -
    Magnetic Variation 40 West. A beautiful morning, clear sky and a light SE wind. We started to get the machine on her floats, warm the engine and the oil. In the meantime the others were busy running a station. By 2PM we had things OK and we then lowered the machine into the water. Stu and I stopping aboard. By exercising care this manoeuvre is fairly easy. We took the sling off and then I started up the engine. She started up quite easy. After taxying about the locality for ten minutes we headed into the wind and gave her full throttle. After a run of about 200 yards she rose easily and climbed well. We flew around the ship for a while testing the machines rigging, engine and instruments. The rigging was perfect, the engine OK and instruments OK. We felt quite pleased with things. We then climbed at 1700 revs (Engine capable of 2000) to 5000 ft. noting air temperatures every 500 ft, at 5000 ft the air temperature was 18 F but it did not feel so cold. At this height we had a great view of the ice pack. To the south this pack extended for 30 or 40 miles unbroken, then we could see open water which appeared to be about 10 miles across, beyond this again appeared the distant shape of land but it is hard to say definitely. This apparent land extended towards the SW, from the SW to W there was a haze. To the SE and E fairly hazy with some small water ways. To the west the water extended as far as we could see. To the North and North east, very broken thin pack ice, and clouds to the NE. We flew south from the ship at this height for eight miles, but as we were getting over heavy ice we turned. After an hours flight we landed, taxied up to the ship and reported what we saw. The m/c (machine) was then hoisted aboard and the ship started steaming slowly to the west along the ice front. 10PM. No wind, beautiful sky to the west, rainbow effect, certainly one of the best days yet for weather. I only hope we get another good day tomorrow. Wonderful calm air for flying, no signs of bumps or wind gusts. Noon position LAT 66 11 LONG 65 10. Distance run 45 miles. Log kept at the time of the voyage.

    (Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection).

    The official position of the SY Discovery was Latitude 66 10 or 66 10 30 S and Longitude 65 10 E and it is thought that the land sighted was Mac-Robertson Land (named by Sir Douglas Mawson on that 1st of 2 voyages). Ref: The Winning of Australian Antarctica - Grenfell Price - Angus and Robertson - First published in 1962.

    Gipsy Moth Seaplane - note that this was 'Alfresco' or open cockpit or open air flying. Moreover, it was a de Havilland Gipsy Moth manufactured in Britain and provided with a civilian call sign. As to who paid for the aeroplane I am unsure but it was flown by the two RAAF pilots who had been seconded to BANZARE. (The Gipsy Moth was likely paid for out of the BANZARE 'budget' which was funded by the Governments of Britain, Australia and New Zealand and by private Benefactors and companies. The Government of South Africa also provided 'support' when the Discovery was in Cape Town, South Africa).

    ERIC DOUGLAS INTERVIEWED BY JOHN THOMPSON OF THE ABC IN 1963, IN MELBOURNE -

    " ...John Thompson: Was it a seaplane, or could you take off from the ice? Eric Douglas: No. Yes we had the skis in the float, but we envisaged that where possible we would work off the water, because Sir Douglas felt that it would be most unusual for us to get a smooth strip of ice, or if we did get it, it might break up when we were in the air. So we thought the safest was to do it off the float. Well, it so happened that on the 31st December, 1929, we made our first flight. Mind you, we had tried several days before this to make a flight, we had the aeroplane ready, but either the wind came up, or the visibility dropped with snow, blowing snow and fog, or we had insufficient water. We always had something. It was hard to just get what we wanted. Well, anyhow, on this particular afternoon, we started the engine, lowered the aeroplane overboard, Stuart Campbell and I went off for two reasons, one was to test the aeroplane and see how it flew in that type of region, and the other was to make it an ice recco flight so we could help to guide the ship through. But to our amazement when we climbed up to about five thousand feet there to the south-west we could see black peaks, sticking up.

    John Thompson: What excitement ! Eric Douglas: And we almost jumped out of the aeroplane. It was absolutely terrific. Later on Sir Douglas called them the Douglas Islands after Admiral Douglas, and then the Norwegians later on they contested this and said that they didn‟t exist. Of course I badly judged the distance. I said that these black peaks were 45 to 50 miles away, but as a matter fact, from what I know now, they were close to a hundred. But I didn‟t quite appreciate the visibility in the Antarctic when the day was clear, in that there‟s no dust, and what you could normally estimate at, say fifty miles, we found later on we always had to double it. I‟m convinced now that the peaks that I was looking at were actually on the Antarctic coast, and they were part of what is now MacRobertson Land. They were just west of where the Station Mawson is now. And I think I and Campbell were looking at mountain peaks some distance inland from the Antarctic coast. John Thompson: Great big black things? Eric Douglas: Just shaped like a saw tooth, jet black, no sign of any snow or ice, and standing startling clear from the frozen sea. This was probably the first time that human eyes had seen land in that part.

    John Thompson: How did you find the aeroplane behaved ? Quite well in this cold sir? Eric Douglas: Yes, extraordinarily well. We had to make very few modifications. Of course it only had an engine of 110 horse power.

    John Thompson: And a little light old-fashioned aeroplane with a rotary engine, I suppose? Eric Douglas: No, it was a Gipsy Moth. But when we had to put aboard some emergency gear and photographic equipment it was a little underpowered, not so much when you got into it sir, but getting off, and of course one of the things you had to do down there was to get off as soon as possible to avoid any floating ice in the water pool ..."

    (From an ABC recording in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection and backed up by written papers held at the Australian Academy of Science in Canberra).

    More on de Havilland Gipsy Moth DH 60G – VH-ULD -

    De Havilland Gipsy Moth DH 60G was the aeroplane flown on the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition of 1929-1931, under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson.
    On both voyages which made up the expedition the Gipsy Moth was flown by the two RAAF pilots – Stuart Campbell and Eric Douglas.
    In 1929-1930 their ranks were Flying Officer Stuart Campbell and Pilot Officer Eric Douglas and in 1930-1931 they were Flight Lieutenant Stuart Campbell and Flying Officer Eric Douglas. For the purposes of BANZARE Stuart Campbell and Eric Douglas were seconded to the ‘Seaplane Division’ of the RAAF.
    The two RAAF pilots flew together on BANZARE or one of the pilots flew taking up a BANZARE passenger - for example Sir Douglas Mawson, or Frank Hurley who was the official Photographer and Cinematographer. Reconnaissance for the ship’s passage and aerial photography for photographs, whole glass plate negatives, films, and maps and charting purposes were to the forefront.
    The plane was not in fact a seaplane but a moth with floats and skis, the skis were kept inside the floats. The plane was purchased in England from the de Havilland Company and crated on the steam yacht Discovery from London. The Discovery left London on 1st August 1929, for Cape Town. The ship went via Cardiff to stock up with Cardiff briquettes.
    BANZARE started officially in Cape Town, South Africa on 19th October, 1929. It was here that Sir Douglas Mawson boarded the Discovery, although he had earlier been in England. Boarding here too were the RAAF pilots and the ‘Scientific party’ from Australia and New Zealand. It appears that both Frank Hurley and James Marr had boarded the Discovery in London.
    On seeing the Discovery at Cape Town on 14th October 1929, Eric Douglas noted “...Our machine (Gipsy Moth) is packed on the deck in cases…”
    In a letter to his mother Bessie (Elizabeth) from Kerguelen on 17th November, 1929 Eric wrote “…They are leaving one of the lifeboats ashore to make more room for our machine…I know Sir Douglas does not expect us to do much flying. I would like to do plenty of it but conditions are so hard, as this ship is too small for handling a machine properly. Anyhow we will do what we can…”
    On the way south in 1929 on Voyage 1 the plane was unboxed from its crates and assembled by RAAF pilots Campbell and Douglas on the deck of the ship. On the return journey it was the reverse process with the plane being disassembled and stored back in the crates to make way for the lifeboat or whaleboat. It was the same sort of process for Voyage 2.
    The Gipsy Moth was painted a bright lemon yellow by the pilots. Eric Douglas used to say that as far as he was concerned bright yellow and bright orange were the colours which stood out best in the Antarctic.
    The RAAF pilots were continuously concerned for the stowage safety of the Gipsy Moth, especially after it had been assembled. This is one example of what occurred - Voyage 1 – Eric Douglas’ log of 6th January, 1930 “Stu and I were woken at 4.30AM and told that a blizzard had started. When we came on deck, it was blowing hard and the air thick with driving snow and the sea starting to make. It was blowing too hard to take the machine off its floats, so we set to and lashed her securely down as best we could... 10PM Much easier now and our machine is safe from serious damage, although when the temperature rises ice will fall from the masts and rigging on to our planes...” and 7th January, 1930 “... Pieces of ice two or three feet long, by six inches wide and one inch thick are coming off the masts and rigging, and although we have the planes covered with bags, so hard do they hit that there are numerous rips and holes in the fabric of the upper wings. So we will have quite a job repairing the same...” Eric Douglas had made light of the damage. Because of the damage sustained in this episode alone the moth had to be disassembled for repairs and then reassembled. It took ten days of repair work by the pilots with some help from others.

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    256 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  13. BANZARE - Polar Medal awards in 1934
    List
    Public

    British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition
    (BANZARE) 1929-1931

    The Expedition Commander

    Sir Douglas Mawson – Commanding the Expedition, Navigation Officers and crew of the Discovery – 1929-1931. Born in England. From Adelaide. Mawson was a Mining Engineer, Geologist and University Lecturer and Professor. There are a number of Antarctic features and landmarks named for Sir Douglas Mawson, including Mawson Coast and the Australian Antarctic Station of Mawson. However, none of these namings were by Sir Douglas Mawson. Nickname the Dux. I had the privilege of meeting Lady Mawson in the early 1970's.

    The Ship’s Company

    Captain John King Davis chose the Ship's Company before BANZARE Voyage 1 - he was basically interested in men from the Merchant Navy as he felt that their skills and experiences would be more appropriate for Antarctic conditions. Although Arthur J Williams the Wireless Officer was with the Royal Navy and Lieutenant William Robinson Colbeck was from the RNR.

    Captain John King Davis – Master of the Discovery and second in Command 1929-1930. Born at Kew, Surrey, England. Started life at sea as a cabin boy or steward boy, working his way from Cape Town to London. Davis Bay on the Wilkes Coast and Davis Peninsula in Queen Mary Land were named for Captain Davis for the AAE 1911-1914, and Cape Davis in Kemp Land for BANZARE Voyage 1. There is also the Australian Antarctic Station of Davis. Nickname Gloomy.

    Kenneth Norman MacKenzie – First Mate 1929-1930 and Master of the Discovery, and second in Command 1930-1931. Mackenzie Bay on the Amery Ice Shelf is named for Captain MacKenzie. From Scotland. He fought on the Western Front in WW1 and was captured twice and gassed. He took over year to recuperate in hospital and he never recovered to have good health. Prior to BANZARE Kenneth was with the Ellerman City Line. Called Mac by those onboard the Discovery.

    Arthur Max Stanton – First mate 1930-1931. Born in London, England. He went to sea at an early age. He was apprenticed with a British overseas shipping line. Stanton Group - a small group of rocky islands off Falla Bluff, Mac.Robertson Land have been named for Stanton. In 1932 he was the Master of a vessel called the Southern Cross which was shipwrecked in the New Hebrides. He dived overboard in his pyjamas and dressing gown to save a male passenger. In 1933 he sailed with a group of 12 men on a yacht looking for treasure which had supposedly been buried in the Cocos Islands in 1824. Stanton commanded merchant ships of 2,500, 3,000 and 9.000 tons. In 1952 he was intending to sail from Brisbane to Rabaul in a 45ft yacht. Friends of Mawson say online that AMax as he was called by his family and close friends, died in Hong Kong in 1963. Other sites online indicate that he died in 1973. Called Max by those onboard the Discovery.

    Lieutenant William Robinson Colbeck RN Reserve – Special Navigating Officer and Second Mate 1929-1931. Colbeck Archipelago made up of numerous rocky islands, in Mac.Robertson Land is for William Colbeck. William became a Captain RNR. A son of the legendary William Colbeck of the Antarctic. William Robinson Colbeck shows up in the UK Navy List in 1939. W R Colbeck was a 'Cape Horner'.

    John Bonus Child – Third Mate 1929-1931. He came from the P & O Steam Navigation Company. Child Rocks in the Robinson Group have been named for him. John Bonus Child was a temporary Lieutenant Commander in 1941 - UK Navy List of the early 1940's

    Wilfred James Griggs – Chief Engineer 1929-1931. From the Winning of Australia by Grenfell Price in 1962, see page 186 - Griggs Point was for Wilfred Griggs. This name has not featured on Australian Maps since about 1962. He came from the P & O Steam Navigation Company

    Bernard Frank Welch – Second Engineer 1929-1931. Welch Island and Welch Rocks off the Mawson Coast of Mac.Robertson Land have been named for Bernard Welch.

    Arthur J Williams – Petty Officer, Signalling Division RN, Wireless Officer 1929-1931. He was on loan from the British Admiralty. Point Williams off the Lars Christensen Coast has been named for Arthur Williams.

    Scientific and Technical Staff

    Professor (Thomas) Harvey Johnston – Chief Biologist 1929-1931. Born In Balmain, New South Wales. From Adelaide at the time of BANZARE. He was also a Zoologist, Botanist and Parasitologist. Johnston Peak in Enderby land is for Harvey Johnston.

    Harold Oswald Fletcher – Assistant Biologist 1929-1931. He was also a Zoologist and Palaeontologist. Cape Fletcher in Mac.Robertson Land is for Harold Fletcher. From Sydney. Nickname Cherub.

    Robert Alexander Falla – Ornithologist 1929-1931. On BANZARE he was also the specialist in Taxidermy. Falla Bluff in Mac.Robertson Land is for Robert Falla. From New Zealand. Nickname Birdie.

    Ritchie Gibson Simmers – Meteorologist 1929-1931. Simmers Peaks - four rocky peaks near Cape Close, Enderby Land were named for Ritchie Simmers. From New Zealand. Nickname Simmo. The Ritchie G Simmers Collection is at the Canterbury Museum, New Zealand.

    Alfred Howard – Chemist 1929-1931. He was also a Hydrographer. Later he obtained a PhD in Linguistics and was made an Honorary Doctor of Statistics. From Melbourne. Alf lived to be 104. Howard Bay in Mac.Robertson Land is named for Alf Howard. I had the privilege of meeting him.

    William Wilson Ingram – Medical Doctor and Bacteriologist 1929-1931. He also was the Discovery's Dentist. Before and after BANZARE he was a Soldier-Doctor. Ingram was also a Physician and a Pathologist. From the Winning of Australia by Grenfell Price in 1962 - see page 186 - Ingram Bay was for Dr Ingram. This name has not featured on Australian Maps since about 1962. Born in Scotland. From Sydney. Nickname the Doc.

    Morton Henry Moyes – Instructor Commander RAN - Hydrographic Surveyor 1929-1930. On BANZARE he was also a Cartographer. Shortly after leaving Cape Town in October,1929 Moyes also took on the duty of supervising ocean depths with the Echo Sounder, thus relieving Williams and Child from that duty. In the Royal Australian Navy Captain Moyes had taught Mathematics and Navigation. Moyes was on the AAE 1911-1914. Born Koolunga, South Australia. Cape Moyes in Queen Mary Land and Moyes Islands in King George V Land have been named for Moyes for his time with the AAE 1911-1914, and Moyes Peak in Mac.Robertson Land for BANZARE, Voyage 1. I had the privilege of meeting him.

    James William Slessor Marr – Oceanographer 1929-1930. He was also a Zoologist, Marine Biologist and an expert in Krill. Nickname was Babe or Scout. He was on an early Shackleton expedition. Mount Marr is a peak in Enderby Land named for Dr Marr for his participation in BANZARE. At the start of WW II Marr conducted hands-on research in the Antarctic into the feasibility of whale meat for human consumption. Moreover, in 1940 Marr was commissioned by the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve serving in Iceland, the Far East and South Africa. In 1943 he was a Lieutenant Commander. He led ‘Operation Tabarin’ in 1944-1946. It was a British Antarctic Expedition ‘secretly’ set up to establish permanently occupied bases in the Falkland Island Dependencies. Marr Point, Marr Bay (Bahia Marr), Marr Glacier and Marr Ice Piedmont are also named for Dr James Marr. Marr Ice Piedmont - covering half of Anvers Island, Palmer Archipelago, and extending from Cape Bayle in N to Arthur Harbour in S, was presumably sighted by GAE, 1873-74; roughly charted by FAE, 1903-05 and 1908-10; named after Dr James William Slesser Marr (1902-65), British marine biologist; member (as boy scout), Shackleton-Rowett Antarctic Expedition, 1921-22, and (as biologist) British expedition to Svalbard, 1925; member of DI scientific staff, 1927-49, and of National Institute of Oceanography, 1949-65; William Scoresby, 1928-29, and Discovery II, 1931-33 and 1935-37; biologist, BANZARE, 1929-31 (Sir Douglas Mawson), and whale factory ship Terje Viken, 1939-40; Commander (as Lieut. Cdr, RNVR), Operation "Tabarin", and Base Leader, "Port Lockroy"; surveyed in part by FIDS from "Arthur Harbour" in 1955 and photographed from the air by FIDASE, 1956-57.

    Karl Erik (Eric) Oom – Lieutenant RAN – Hydrographic Surveyor 1930-1931. He was also a Cartographer. He was the Captain of Ships when on loan to the Royal Navy and also in the Royal Australian Navy. Born Chatswood, New South Wales. Oom Bay and Oom Island near Cape Bruce, Mac.Robertson Land have been named for Lieutenant Oom.

    Alexander Lorimer Kennedy – Physicist 1930-1931. He was also a Magnetician, Cartographer, Draughtsman, Surveyor and later a Mining Engineer. He was on the AAE 1911-1914. Born in Woodside, South Australia. Cape Kennedy and Kennedy Peak, both in Queen Mary Land have been named for Kennedy for AAE 1911-1914, and Mount Kennedy in Mac.Robertson Land for his time with BANZARE Voyage 2.

    James Francis Hurley – Photographer 1929-1931. He was also a Cinematographer. At the time of BANZARE he was also a capable mechanic and an expert at tin smithing and brasswork. He was a capable carpenter and model boat builder. Hurley's photography of Shackleton's expedition ship the Endurance being crushed in the ice; and explorers of the AAE 1911-1914 expedition facing katabatic winds at Cape Denision are the stuff of legends. Hurley was also a book author and a broadcaster. During BANZARE it was Frank Hurley who wrote the wording for many of the Proclamations made by Sir Douglas Mawson. From Sydney. His photography was sometimes artistic as he wanted to create a reality. During WW1 he was made an Honorary Captain. Cape Hurley near the Mertz Glacier was named for Frank Hurley's participation in the AAE 1911-1914. Mount Hurley a high peak in Enderby Land has been named for Frank Hurley for BANZARE 1929-1931.

    Stuart Alexander Caird Campbell – Flight Lieutenant RAAF 1929-1931. Senior RAAF Pilot. Stuart was obviously an excellent Aerial Navigator. He had a Bachelors Degree in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. After BANZARE he flew Catalinas out of Darwin and was involved in mine laying missions in the South Pacific. He was a leader in the establishment of Australia's Sub Antarctic bases of Heard and Macquarie Islands. He later spoke fluent Thai and became an author of Thai language books. Campbell Head in Mac.Robertson Land and Campbell Peak on Heard Island have been named for Stuart Campbell.

    (Gilbert) Eric Douglas – Flying Officer RAAF 1929-1931. From Melbourne. Nickname Fiskebolle or Doug. His first flight was with Harry Hawker at the age of 11 - a good use of pocket money. At the time of BANZARE Eric was also a Mechanical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Air Mechanic, Aero Fitter and Aero Rigger, RAAF A1 Flying Instructor and Parachute Folding Expert. Plus he was also a Motor mechanic for motor vehicles, motor bikes and marine engines. He was also a capable carpenter and a real and model boat and a model plane builder. Obviously Eric was an excellent Aerial Navigator. On BANZARE although the junior pilot he was responsible for the maintenance of the Gipsy Moth's engine, and for the running and maintenance of the ship's motor boat. Eric was the person who calculated the oil and fuel needed onboard the Discovery for the moth and the motor boat. He physically repainted the motor boat while it was onboard the Discovery. The motor boat's engine was overhauled at the end of voyage 1. Douglas Bay and Douglas Peak in Enderby Land have been named for Eric Douglas. Douglas Lake on Kerguelen was also named for Eric Douglas by Sir Douglas Mawson during BANZARE Voyage 1 - but nothing came of that. I have a sketched map of Kerguelen with the lake sketched in. Nickname Doug or Fiskebolle. The Eric Douglas Collection is listed at the Archives Hub (Scott Polar Institute).

    The Ship’s Crew

    For the Ship’s crew of BANZARE I could not find any AADC names for
    Josiah John Pill – Chief Steward 1930-1931,
    Stanley R Smith – Fireman 1929-1930,
    Joseph Williams – Carpenter 1930-1931,
    W Simpson – Boatswain 1929-1930,
    A Hendrickson – Able Seaman 1930-1931,
    William Franklin Porteous – Able Seaman 1930-1931,
    and Norman C Matear – Able Seaman 1930-1931

    Frank G Dungey – Chief Steward 1929-1930. Mount Dungey in the Tula Mountains, Enderby Land have been named for Frank G Dungey.

    Josiah John Pill – Chief Steward 1930-1931. In 1928 and 1936 he was on the Australian Electoral Roll at Denison, Tasmania.

    F Sones – Cook 1929-1930. Mount Sones one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land is named for him.

    John E Reed – Cook 1930-1931. Mount Reed in the Tula Mountains of Enderby Land have been named for him.

    George James Rhodes – Assistant Cook 1930-1931. Mount Rhodes one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land is named for him.

    Allan J Bartlett – Cook’s Mate 1929-1930 and Second Steward 1930-1931. He was presented with his Polar Medal and Bar by the King on the Royal Yacht at Cowes in July, 1934. Mount Bartlett one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land was named for him.

    Clarence H V Sellwood – Assistant Steward 1929-1930. Clarence Henry Victor Sellwood - https://www.spink.com/lot-description.aspx?id=13003000081 Mount Selwood in the Tula Mountains, Enderby Land was named for him. It appears that it should be Mount Sellwood.

    Harry V Gage – Assistant Steward 1929-1930. Gage Ridge in the Tula Mountains, Enderby Land is named for him.

    Ernest Bond – Assistant Steward 1930-1931. Mount Bond in the Tula Mountains of Enderby Land have been named for him. According to Frank Hurley's notes on 'negatives by others' Bond took quite a few which became part of the 'official collection' taken on BANZARE.

    Frank Hurley also attributes a five negatives of deep sea fish taken during BANZARE Voyage 2 to a man with the surname of Brock?

    The Firemen would be the Coal Stokers for the Discovery's 450 HP triple expansion coal fired steam engine. Steam was supplied by two coal-fired Marine boilers. There was no heating as such on the Discovery and the warmest someone could get was to go near the Fiddly or Fiddley (a hatch over the engine or fireroom). Hence the Fiddley Club on the Discovery - about which Harold Fletcher said that a tell tale sign about being there was a burn on the seat of one's pants through sitting on an ash bucket! It has been said that 50 tons of coal had to be retained as the Discovery's ballast.

    Stanley R Smith – Fireman 1929-1930

    James T Kyle – Fireman 1929-1930. Kyle Nunataks - three nunataks in the Tula Mountains, Enderby Land are named for him.

    Richard V Hampson – Fireman 1929-1930. Mount Hampson in the Tula Mountains of Enderby Land is named for Richard V Hampson.

    Frank Best – Fireman 1930-1931. Australia Antarctic Data Centre - Mount Best one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land is named for him.

    Murde Campbell Morrison – Fireman 1930-1931. The Australia Antarctic Data Centre - Mount Morrison one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land is named for him. His name is given as H C Morrison. Obviously his first name was not Murde.

    William Edward Crosby – Fireman 1930-1931. Crosby Nunataks in the Tula Mountains, Enderby Land are named for him.

    John J Miller – Sailmaker 1929-1931. Also referred to as Joe Miller. Mount Miller one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land is named for him.

    C Degerfeldt – Carpenter 1929-1930. Mount Degerfeldt one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land has been named for him.

    Joseph Williams – Carpenter 1930-1931. In the Voyages of the Discovery by Ann Savours it says that he was still shell shocked from WW1.The Dundee Heritage Trust list C Steward as the Carpenter on BANZARE Voyage 2.

    W H Letten – Donkeyman (Auxillary Engineer) 1929-1931. Mount Letten one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land is named for him.

    W Simpson – Boatswain 1929-1930

    James Hamilton Martin – Able Seaman 1929-1930 and Boatswain 1930-1931. Lieutenant James Martin RNVR was lost at sea through enemy action in June 1940 - http://uboat.net/allies/merchants/crews/person/16223.html From the web - '...On 29th June 1940 HMS Edgehill was in the South West approaches of the English Channel when she was hit by a torpedo at 00.12, fired by U-51. Due to her buoyant cargo the ship did not sink whereby the U-boat surfaced and at 01.06 it fired another torpedo that again struck the ship. However, the ship remained afloat and only finally sunk slowly by the stern after a third torpedo fired by U-51 hit the ship at 01.06. Sixty seven men lost their lives in the attack. The following report appears in Berrow’s Worcester Journal, Saturday 21st September 1940: Lieutenant James Martin, who was reported missing and is now presumed killed on active service with the Royal Navy, was the only son of Mrs and the late Mr Hugo Martin, of “Oakwood,” West Malvern – a member of the well-known banking firm of that name. Lieutenant Martin obtained a Commission in the Grenadier Guards on leaving Harrow in 1917, and served with them until 1919. He then went into business for a short period, but found a life of adventure more suited to him, and joined the crew of the windjammer Garthpool – the last of the British four-masted vessels on the Australian route. After further experience, he sailed with Mawson’s expedition to the Antarctic in 1929 on the Discovery, and was eventually promoted boatswain...' Nickname Lofty. The James Martin Collection is listed at the Archives Hub (Scott Polar Institute). Martin Reef off the Mawson Coast in Mac.Robertson Land was named for him in 1931.

    Kenneth McLennan – Able Seaman 1929-1930. Mount McLennan on the Beaver Glacier, Enderby Land was named for him.

    Raymond C Tomlinson - Able Seaman 1929-1930. Mount Tomlinson on the Beaver in Enderby Land has been named for him.

    F Leonard Marsland – Able Seaman 1929-1930. Mount Marsland in Enderby Land was named for Marsland.

    John A Park – Able Seaman 1929-1930. Mount Park on the Beaver Glacier, Enderby Land is named for him.

    Lauri Parviainen - Able Seaman 1930-1931. From Finland. He was never presented with his Polar Medal as his first name was incorrectly spelt as Louis and he could not be traced. It has since been found that he was alive in 1978. His medal was given to the National Museum of Finland. Mount Parviainen one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land is named for him.

    A Hendrickson - Able Seaman 1930-1931

    David Peacock - Able Seaman 1930-1931. Peacock Ridge in the Tula Mountains, Enderby Land was named for him.

    William Franklin Porteous - Able Seaman 1930-1931. William was born in 1901 in Geelong, Victoria. William's Polar Medal was presented to his mother in May, 1934 in Melbourne, as he had died tragically in the Falklands in February, 1932. He was an ANZAC - National Archives of Australia.

    Norman C Matear - Able Seaman 1930-1931

    Fred G Ward - Able Seaman 1930-1931. According to the AADC Ward Rock in the Scott Mountains, Enderby Land was named for Fred J Ward. From Melbourne. Fred kept a diary about BANZARE. His words are backed up with colourful illustrations of the Antarctic.

    William E Howard - Able Seaman 1930-1931. He took a whole series of excellent photographs which are at Flickr, by the University of Newcastle, Australia. In 1951 Howard Lt W E RANR was living at the Railway Club, Tamworth, NSW – listed in the Antarctic Club (British) of 1929 – List of Members – Booklet – the Australian Section commenced in 1940. In 1951 W E Howard was listed in the Australian Section. In the 1949 Booklet he is listed in the British Section and living at 22 Wakefield Street, Kent Town, South Australia. The London Gazette lists him as William E Howard - https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/34046/page/2788/data.pdf The Australian Antarctic Data Centre lists him as W E Howard - Howard Hills on the Beaver Glacier, Enderby Land are named for him. He may have been William Edward Howard who was born in Prahran in 1907 and was AB in 1928. He resigned from the RAN Reserve in 1929 and was back in the Reserve by 1939. The National Australian Archives have two entries on this man. Is this the same W E Howard? https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/096714/ He appears to be the William Edward Howard who was born in Prahran in 1907 and he could be the same man as Able Seaman W E Howard. The father of this William Edward Howard appears to have also been a William E Howard who piloted Japanese Warships up Port Phillip Bay when they came on a goodwill visit in 1925. Able Seaman William E Howard had a sister named Nell.

    George Ayres – Able Seaman 1929-1931. From the web - 'Londoner George Ayres sailed across the Antarctic threshold with the BANZARE; though the 31-year-old Great War merchant navy veteran signed on as Able Seaman, he was elevated to Netman during the expedition...'

    John Matheson - Able Seaman 1929-1931. Born 1893. Nickname Jock. Mount Matheson in the Tula Mountains, Enderby Land was named for him for his participation in BANZARE. Further British Antarctic Territory of Matheson Glacier is named for him - "Flowing E into Lehrke Inlet, Black Coast, was seen from the air and from the ground by USAS in December 1940; surveyed by FIDS RARE from "Stonington Island" in November 1947 and named after John ("Jock") Matheson (b. 1893), Operation "Tabarin" general assistant, "Port Lockroy", 1943-44, and "Hope Bay", 1944-45; previously with Hudson Bay Company, with BANZARE in Discovery, 1929-31, and with DI as Able Seaman in Discovery II, 1931-33, 1933-35 and 1935-37; photographed from the air by USN in 1966 and further surveyed from the ground by BAS from "Stonington Island", 1972-73". The Operation Tabarin site lists Jock Matheson as the Handyman at Deception Island in 1944.

    The Polar medal was bronze and issued to all BANZARE explorers. It has a white ribbon. A bar was also issued for those men who participated in two voyages. It appears that a miniature silver medal was also issued to all. It also had a white ribbon. These miniatures were the medals which could be worn after 6pm at formal dress functions. The bronze medals were also worn eg in the RAAF when other medals roughly the same size were also worn. For the RAAF pilots a white bar could be worn by itself or as a bar also incorporating other appropriate RAAF colours.

    Many times the Bar is referred to as a Clasp - it actually takes the form of a bar and I was told in the 1950's that it should be called a Bar and not a Clasp - the Bar being the correct title and description.

    Many Antarctic landmarks and features were named for the individual men of BANZARE and some for BANZARE - BANZARE Coast, BANZARE Glacier, BANZARE Bank (Bank) and BANZARE Seamount and Seamounts (Bank) and BANZARE Rise (Bank). Also named for the Discovery during BANZARE is DISCOVERY Bank which is a submarine bank on the Kerguelen Plateau.

    Many of the landmarks and features were named by Sir Douglas Mawson during BANZARE but some appear to be as a result of Aerial surveys by ANARE in 1956. I suppose to make sure that the BANZARE Ship's Crew had their individual participation also recognized by Australia and SCAR. https://data.aad.gov.au/

    James Forbes was not on BANZARE but likely on the Discovery in the Falklands a bit earlier http://www.antarctica.gov.au/news/2010/australian-antarctic-glaciers-named The Australian Antarctic Division agrees with me on this but they gave not amended their website.

    Sally Douglas

    121 items
    created by: public:beetle 2016-07-23
    User data
  14. BANZARE - Sea Shanties - RRS Discovery 1 or SY Discovery
    List
    Public

    City of Baltimore

    Oh’ One fine day in the month of May
    When I was out-ward bound,
    I had no tin to buy gin, as I hopped the streets all round
    My coat was out of the elbows, and I was sore in need,
    So I shipped as Able Seaman on the City of Baltimore.

    Chorus
    No more I’ll go to sea, to sail the Western Ocean,
    A-hauling and a-pulling I never will again,
    No more I’ll go to sea, to rove the salty ocean,
    But ever more I’ll stop ashore, I’ll go to sea no more.

    No more I’ll haul on the lee Fore Brace, or by the Royal halyards stand
    No more I’ll cry as aloft I fly with a Tar Pot in my hand
    No more I’ll reef these Top’sls or brail the Spanker in,
    Gaff Top’sl tack I’ll dip no more on the City of Baltimore

    No more I’ll take my first look-out
    No more I’ll take my wheel
    No more I’ll cry as aft I fly to hold the big log reel,
    I’ll stop ahore in comfort, I’ll stop at ease ashore,
    Around the Horn I’ll beat no more on the City of Baltimore


    Susannah

    Oh, we know the lights of Santos
    And the loom of the Azores
    But here we sign in a Coffin Ship
    With condemned Navy Sto-----rea

    Chorus
    Susannah, my Fair Maid
    Way Ho, you London Girls
    Why do’nt you catch the Tow-rope?

    Oh, down we went to the River
    The crimps got our half pay
    With a red faced Mate in that floating crate,
    And Salt-horse on Signing On Day

    Then down into the Channel
    With hazers on the Poop
    Across the Bay like a stack of Hay
    An’ a full wack of Belayin’ Pin Soup,

    And so on down to the Trade Winds,
    Still sailing like a box
    With fifteen men in that hard case Ship
    A’walking round with the Fox.

    Oh, a hundred and fifty to Sydney,
    On Salt Horse all the Day,
    With the Skipper ashore with a Bloody Old Whore,
    And never a Dollar for Pay.

    Now it’s time for us to leave her
    To the Diggings we will go,
    Where there’s Lots of Gold so I’ve been told,
    And the Grub by the Ton to Stow


    The Intrepid Explorer
    (Tune: The Old Tarpaulin Jacket)

    The Intrepid Explorer lay dying
    And as in his cabin he lay
    To the friends who were gathered
    around him
    These last dying words he did say

    Chorus
    Wrap me up in my Whybrows
    and Burberry
    My Jaeger Scarf wound round my mouth
    And with three Cardiff Briquettes
    please bury me
    The day we find land to the south

    The Discovery sailed off in the evening
    She steamed all that night back
    and forth
    But Moyes's first sight in the morning
    Made her 30 more miles to the north
    Chorus Wrap me up...

    They put out the townets for plankton
    And took echo soundings all day
    But though Griggsy threw on some more
    blubber
    They made no more southing that day
    Chorus Wrap me up...

    And once when they thought they were
    winning
    The Spirit of Ice in his wrath
    Blew the Fast pack ice close under their Bowsprit
    And they drifted away to the north
    Chorus Wrap me up...

    To stop drift they put out the big
    dredges
    They buggered nets by the score
    But at dinner J.K. told Sir Douglas
    That they were still further north than
    before
    Chorus Wrap me up...

    The Intrepid explorer still dying
    And wearied of shifting about
    To the other Intrepid Explorers
    These last dying words he did shout

    Final Chorus
    Put me down on the first bit of
    Pack ice
    With Yalumba uncorked near my mouth
    And leave me to die unmolested
    For I see we'll never get south

    The Seadogs Lament
    (Tune: Down in the Canebrake)

    Once I went exploring in the old
    Discovery
    We had one bloody scientist
    and seamen fifty-three
    We didn't have an aeroplane
    or echo sounder then
    We didn't have no long haired
    sheep in a wooden pen

    (Chorus)
    In days gone by just
    forty years
    We sailed away and we had no cheers
    In days gone by and we had no
    cheers

    The sea we sailed like Capt Cooks
    Our stars we knew like a ruddy
    book
    We ate salt horse and we like it
    very well
    In forty years things have gone to hell
    Chorus In days gone by...

    We didn't have Yalumba or Tomango
    squash
    We didn't have hot water and we never had a wash
    We didn't play with Plankton nets
    or shoot the otter trawls
    We didn't dredge with Monegasques
    and make an utter balls
    Chorus In days gone by...

    We didn't have an engine to help
    us on our way
    We didn't let the scientist have
    stations every day
    We didn't count the dust mites or
    let balloons go free
    We only sailed like Capt Cooks
    upon the wide blue sea
    Chorus In days gone by...

    But now those days are over and
    seamen six have we
    Thirteen ruddy scientists who do not
    know the sea
    They say all sorts of stupid things
    which pain me in the head
    So now I think I'll leave the bridge
    and make my way to bed
    Chorus In days gone by...

    On the Discovery - (Tune:Vive la Compagnie).

    Oh, this is the song of the BANZARE
    On the Discovery.
    The Antarctic coastline seems totally fled
    On the Discovery.
    Bay ice and bergs and penguins galore
    But no bloody sign of the mythical shore.
    But it's Christmas today
    So let us all say
    Here's to discovery.
    Sir Douglas, our leader has been down before,
    Making discovery.
    He's taking us now to Enderby's shore,
    On the Discovery.
    His hobby is knocking off big lumps of rock
    And issuing cardigans, singlets and socks,
    Cursing the slow
    But making it go,
    On the Discovery...

    Encore
    We carried an aeroplane down all the way
    On the Discovery.
    And two jolly airmen on Government pay
    On the Discovery.
    They work winches and launches and hammer and screw,
    For the Moth she was stubborn and prospects looked blue,
    But now it's New Year
    They've been in the air
    On the Discovery.

    Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection (Gilbert Eric Douglas).

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    7 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  15. BANZARE - The layout of the SY Discovery or Discovery
    List
    Public

    The Discovery in name, was one of a line of no fewer than six earlier British Polar Exploration ships called the Discovery, commencing in 1602 when William Baffin sailed into the waters of Hudson’s and Baffin Bays. The Discovery of BANZARE was the last of these wooden vessels. It was built along the lines of an Arctic whaler, the type of which was developed in the first three-quarters of the 1800’s. These ships were designed to sail in high seas and push forcefully through loose pack ice.

    This latest Discovery was of an extreme of this type, with an unusual solid hull built to withstand heavy ice pressure – length 198 ft, extreme breadth 34 ft, displacement at the 16 ft water-line of 1600 tons, with a net carrying capacity of about 600 tons of stores and coal. The hull was built as a U-shape in cross-sections. The bows were constructed very solidly. At the stern, the stern post was massive and the propeller post was also massive. Therefore the ship’s capacity for speed was diminished.

    Although heavily dependant on sail, sailing was of little or no value in the Antarctic. For there was with imminent hazard of pack ice and icebergs, together with a lack of suitable winds or hurricane conditions.

    The Discovery had three masts, square rigged on the fore and main and the great expanse of yards and rigging aloft offered much wind resistance, which were potentially disadvantageous in an Antarctic hurricane. In such a situation the only course for the navigator was to steam into the wind and wait it out. So steps were taken to reduce the wind resistance when the Discovery was in Cape Town late in 1929, just before Voyage 1. The yards and square rigging on the main mast were abolished, making the rig barquentine rather than barque.

    The Discovery was launched in March, 1901 in Dundee, Scotland as the Discovery. (It seems fitting that it is now back in Dundee). 'Lloyds Register of Ships' show that it was registered as a sailing ship in 1901. In its later life it was registered as a steamship rather than as a sailing ship, but it was both. Mainly it was a sailing ship but backed up by a Cardiff briquette or coal fuelled steam engine.

    The Discovery was designed by Mr W E Smith who was the chief constructor for the Royal Navy. The ship was built by the Dundee Shipbuilders Co. and its engine was constructed by Messrs Gourlay Brothers Co. of Dundee.

    The Discovery was designed and built for Robert Falcon Scott’s British Naval Antarctic Expedition 1901-1904. It was designed along the lines of the Discovery of the 1875 Arctic Expedition. The keel of the ship was laid in March, 1900 at St Stephen’s Yard in Tay, Dundee. The frame of the vessel is of English oak beams 11 in thick. These beams were held together by two skins of timber, and lined by a third skin. The latter skin was of Riga fir, 4 in thick. The main outer planking is pitch pine or Canadian elm, according to its position, and is covered by an outside sheathing of greenheart 4 in thick. The spaces in between the frames and contained between the inner lining and outer skins were packed with rock salt, which pickles the wood and prevents dry rot. This rock salt would need renewing about every three years.

    The hull was heavily stayed by strong beams, and divided by bulkheads of solid construction. The bows are still stronger, being a network of timber girders and struts bolted together. Some of bolts were 8 ft long. Further protection was afforded by outer armour of steel plates extending several feet on either side of the stem. The stem had much overhang so that when charging an ice floe the bow glides upwards for several feet and with the weight of the vessel it came down with force crushing the ice floe.

    The engine room was situated well aft and housed a triple expansion engine capable of developing 450 hp. Steam was supplied by two coal burning marine boilers of 150 lb maximum water pressure. There was also a steam driven electric generator. Plus a paraffin driven emergency generator set was installed for operation when steam was not available. Either set was capable of lighting the whole vessel. The engine room also contained circulating and feed pumps, an evaporator and a well furnished workshop.

    Navigation was conducted from what was described as ‘a spacious bridge’.

    On the upper deck below the bridge was the main deckhouse, massively constructed of teak. In this building was the chartroom, wireless room, a cabin for the navigating captain, and a large deck laboratory. Further aft was a strongly built steel house for enclosing trawling winches. Forward of the main deck was a smaller one providing entrance to the crew’s quarters and galley, which were on the deck below. Forward below the forecastle head was a steam windlass for dealing with the ship’s cables.

    The main deck was found below the upper deck and it was of Dantzig fir. There was a large room right aft for stowage of sails and scientific equipment. Next was the upper part of the engine and boiler rooms. Further forward the main deck was devoted to living quarters. Firstly there was a wardroom 24ft long by 12ft wide executed in polished mahogany, around which are the cabins of the ship’s officers and the scientific staff. Light for the wardroom was provided by a large skylight for light and air. There were no portholes in the Discovery. Forward of this are the men’s quarters (ship’s crew) and finally the galley store and the galley, which was in the centre of the ship. In this portion of the ship there was also a laboratory for hydrological work, a photographic dark room and a surgery for the use of the Medical officer, who was also the Dentist. Meals on the Discovery were divided into two sittings. Forward of the galley was the forepeak with the cabin lockers and stowage for the ship’s stores.

    There appears to have been 16 accommodation cabins, including the Navigator's cabin on the upper deck and so most of the living quarters had to shared as there were to be 38 persons onboard on Voyage 1. (19 of the Ship's Company and Scientific party and 19 of the Ship's crew). On the main deck there were two relatively larger cabins and in the case of BANZARE I presume for the Expedition Commander and the Ship's Captain. Sir Douglas Mawson's cabin was described as being a small one at the aft end of the wardroom. It contained a bunk, a writing desk, a wardrobe, a washstand and 'shelves of tightly packed books'. For the rest of the Ship's Company and Scientific party there were 6 cabins to be shared and 2 single use or smaller cabins (perhaps the latter 2 were also shared with a top and bottom bunk). In 1929/30 Eric Douglas shared a bunk room with Alf Howard and in 1930/31 with Frank Hurley. It wouldn't have been too comfortable as there was no heating as such for the Discovery and it was a 'wet ship' and many times in stepping out of one's bunk it meant reaching straightaway for gumboots or seaboots. Also Eric Douglas related that to stay in his bunk when the ship was rolling necessitated being strapped in.

    For the Ship's crew there were 5 cabins. On Voyage 2 there were 40 men with the extras being two more of the category Able Seamen. So on Voyage 2 there were 21 Ship's crew sharing 5 cabins.

    Below the main deck, and underneath the galley and men’s quarters were hold spaces subdivided by five watertight bulkheads. The bulk of the expedition stores and equipment were stowed here. Entrance was provided through flush hatches in the main deck floor. Under the ward room was a large stowage area for coal. This was additional to the space provided by the bunkers which flanked the engine room on either side. The total space available in these areas allowed for the carrying of 200 tons of coal. Coal was also stored in other areas of the vessel, and as deck cargo, such was the need for this fuel. Cardiff coal was the ideal product as it was of a very high grade and came in convenient solid rectangular blocks, weighing 23 lbs each. Moreover, some of the coal had be retained as ship's ballast.

    From Discovery Reports, and NLA Newspapers of the day (1929).

    Digital RRS Discovery - http://www.rrsdiscoveryscan.com/images/discovery/gallery/gallery_4.jpg

    S Douglas

    42 items
    created by: public:beetle 2016-08-05
    User data
  16. BANZARE - Types and Descriptions of Icebergs seen on this expedition
    List
    Public

    Adrift from the glaciers of Princess Elizabeth Land - a tilted stump of a tabular iceberg. It was in an advanced stage of disintegration.

    Fields of stranded icebergs off Mac-Robertson Land. Mast high

    Wave worn and decaying iceberg 200 feet in height and 900 miles north of the Antarctic coast.

    Dec 7th 1929 - Sighted first ice berg. First honour to Capt Hurley. Dec 9th 1929 - Met first pack ice. Old pack, very broken. More ice bergs of increasing size. 1/4 mile long 150ft out of water, deep blue colour in crevasses.

    19th Dec 1930 - Large ice bergs in sight, occasionally pushing through heavy pack (25ft thick).

    3rd January, 1931 - grinding bergs

    4th January, 1931 - an immense grounded flat-topped iceberg

    8th January, 1931 - grounded icebergs

    11 February, 1931 - enormous tabular berg

    Cathedral type iceberg

    Black and white iceberg

    Glacier icebergs

    Serried ranks of icebergs

    Turreted icebergs

    Sally Douglas

    30 items
    created by: public:beetle 2016-07-29
    User data
  17. BANZARE - Vicinity of Scullin Monolith and Douglas Bay - By Eric Douglas
    List
    Public

    Friday 13th Feb. 1931
    Hoisting The Flag
    We were awakened by the Dux at 4.30AM and told to be ready to go ashore in half an hour. We had breakfast at 5AM and then waited until the ship steamed a little closer to the first of these Rocky Peaks. The sky was fairly clear with rather a strong cold wind blowing off the ice slopes. At about 6.30AM we pushed off in the motor boat, there being twelve of us on board. We had four hundred yards to reach the rocky shore face and on the way in, sea spray coming aboard was quickly frozen on our clothes and on the floor of the boat. It was impossible to land owing to the rock face rising steeply and to a surge along the water edge. Several other places were not so steep but rocks jutting out kept us off. This rock hill extended about half a mile long and 1000 feet high with heavily crevassed ice at each end. However the Dux read over the Proclamation and taking our opportunity we threw the Flag and sealed proclamation on to some water washed boulders. We then returned to the ship, and the launch was hauled up clear of the water. The ship then steamed westwards towards another Rock hill that was several miles ahead. The wind had eased off greatly and at 10.30AM away we went again towards what appeared a better chance of landing. We cruised slowly along the rock face looking for a reasonable place to land on. After a while we came slowly into a boulder strewn beach and Stu jumped ashore with a line, he made it fast on a rock and by careful manoeuvring and watching the surge, the Dux, Hurley, Falla and Fletcher got ashore without much trouble. They then hoisted the Flag and read over the Proclamation, we cruised up and down for about an hour while those ashore gathered specimen rocks, birds and took photos. We came close in and threw a bag with a line attached ashore, this was filled with rocks and hauled on board. Then watching for a calm spell those ashore scrambled aboard, getting a bit wet in this operation. But we had accomplished the hoisting of the Flag and the Dux was well pleased. We arrived back at the ship at noon.
    The launch was hoisted up and the ship steamed away west along the coast. In the afternoon the wind died right away and it was very pleasant in the sun. About 7.30PM we ran into a shallow area (15 fathoms) several rocks were visible just showing out of the water. Several miles ahead we had a view of a wonderful serrated Glacier. This is caused by shoal water near where the Glacier ice pours out into the sea, this ice becomes grounded and the moving ice from far inland pushes towards with irresistible force, the result is huge blocks of ice ride up and over other fast ice, and for several miles the ice is torn and twisted until its upper surface looks like rows of saw teeth.
    At 11PM the ship was stopped, this being the most prudent thing to do, because of shoal water and an hour or two of darkness. Noon position LAT 67 45 LONG 66 58. Distance run 70 miles.

    Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection (Gilbert Eric Douglas) from the log of the second BANZARE Voyage 1930/31.

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    7 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  18. BANZARE 1929-1931 - SUPPLIES OF FOOD, CLOTHING, FUEL AND EQUIPMENT
    List
    Public

    The Antarctic Expedition of 1929-1931 under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson became known as BANZ of BANZARE and it was also part of the Discovery Investigations. The ship used for this expedition in two lengthy Summer Voyages was the Discovery. It was Captain Scott's famous old ship for the first voyage to the Antarctic under his command. This ship was also known as the RRS Discovery and when the new Discovery came into existence it was also known as the Discovery 1. It was registered with Lloyds both as a vessel of sail and steam. When it was used in the Antarctic by Sir Douglas Mawson it had been registered as a yacht, obviously for Insurance purposes.

    As the ship was 'packed to the gunwales' for both BANZARE Voyages I will try and document what was onboard in terms of 'supplies of food, clothing, fuel and equipment'.
    For the first Voyage the Discovery sailed from London via Cardiff to load the special 'Cardiff briquettes' and then on to Cape Town, South Africa where the Voyage officially commenced. A few of the BANZARE expeditioners known as the 'Scientific team or Scientists' were onboard, but the major component of that group embarked at Cape Town. Of course there was the other component of the worthy personnel already on the ship - the Officers who were mainly British and other necessary members of 'the crew' - Firemen, Cooks, Stewards, a Carpenter, a Sailmaker, a Boatswain, a Donkeyman and Sailors etc. Also onboard from when leaving London was Captain J K Davis. He was the Commander of the ship when Sir Douglas Mawson was not onboard. However, when Mawson was onboard Davis was the second in command. This dictum did lead to some discontent between the two leaders on Voyage 1.

    For both voyages and especially for the first voyage the overwhelming cargo was the amount of Cardiff briquettes on the ship. Briquettes seem to have been stored almost everywhere that was logistically possible. These briquettes were of course essential for steaming in the Antarctic and for ballast of the vessel. The briquettes were 'topped up' by the Discovery to some extent by pre-arranged meetings and purchases from Whaling factory ships operating in the Antarctic in those times and in particular in the region of the Ross Sea. To a lesser extent briquettes were obtained from those factory ships on an 'ad hoc' basis.

    The West Australian of 13th September, 1929 - "MAWSON EXPEDITION - Australian Made Supplies
    The Blue Funnel Line steamer Nestor, which leaves Melbourne on Saturday, will take with it to South Africa members of the Mawson Antarctic expedition as well as a large amount of equipment and food obtained in Melbourne. Sir Douglas Mawson will join the Nestor at Port Adelaide, and at Cape Town the whole party will join the second in command, Captain J K Davis, on board the expedition steamer Discovery.

    The Commonwealth Meteorological Bureau is forwarding by the Nestor for the expedition a special consignment of scientific instruments consisting of a barograph, a thermograph, a self-registering anemometer and a mercurial barometer…

    Other equipment comprises 48 cases of dried fruits from the Australian Dried Fruits Association, 57 cases of butter, 12 cases of powdered milk, 15 cases of sheep tongues, 10 cases of tea, 12 cases of condensed milk, 26 cases of cheese and brawn, 12 cases of sweets, 14 cases of canned vegetables, and 16 cases of plum puddings …"

    The West Australian - 25th September, 1929 - "MAWSON EXPEDITION. Australian Food Supplies.
    Members of the scientific staff of the British, Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition, led by Sir Douglas Mawson, left Fremantle by the Nestor yesterday afternoon for South Africa where they will join the expedition steamer, the Discovery. They expect to remain in Cape Town two or three days before sailing. The Discovery was fitted out in London, a large part of the equipment being obtained from British manufacturers. In some cases special articles had to be obtained outside the Empire. Thus, from Lapland were procured reindeer-skin fur boots, known as finneskoe, and from Norway were brought wolf skin mits, sledges and skis. Certain alpine equipment was purchased from Switzerland.

    Sir Douglas Mawson, interviewed in Perth prior to the departure of the Nestor, stated that, apart from the articles enumerated, everything to be used on the expedition had been provided either in Great Britain or Australia. The Nestor was well laden with a variety of foodstuffs manufactured in the Commonwealth and presented to the explorers by the manufacturers. The preserved meats included a quantity of Rex Pie and canned sausages supplied by Foggitt Jones (Queensland). Bacon and hams and canned beef had been given by the Queensland Meat Company, and Fred Walker and Co. (Melbourne) had provided pork brawn. Also a great deal of soups were to be taken, and were supplied from the Rosella Preserving Company and were chiefly of the vegetable type. Tomato soup was principally favoured, as tomatoes were rich in vitamins and were thus particularly desirable in the conditions under which the members of the expedition were to live. The party was also well supplied with canned vegetables preserved by Laver Bros. (Melbourne), and a new line of mixed vegetable products, marketed by Swallow and Ariell ... The provisions also included large quantities of dried fruits supplied by Australian Dried Fruit, Ltd. Of these, the principal were sultanas. These were of high food value and very healthy ... Most of the biscuits carried by the party contained sultanas...A particularly good type of prune had been made available in large quantities by Robson and Sons (South Australia). The Rosella company had provided a considerable supply of jam which would be helped out by Australian honey, and canned fruit. In the way of milk, the condensed article had been procured from the Federal Milk Company, and there was also on board dried skim milk prepared by the Western Districts Co-operative Society of Victoria. This ... would be mixed with water and some butter and churned up in an electrically driven 'iron cow' (Hercol brand) which was fitted on the ship, and thus would be produced within ten minutes milk indistinguishable from the ordinary fresh article ... Under the cold conditions in which the party would have to live, fat substances were of very great value and consequently the expedition was leaving with two tons of butter specially prepared by the Western Districts Cooperative Society. There were also many pounds of biscuits and cakes and canned puddings supplied by the Rosella company and Swallow and Ariell. Coffee would be taken in the form of essence, which was quicker to prepare and obviated the necessity of carrying dried beans and grounds which eventually had to be thrown away. Their supply came from Faulding and Co. A quantity of Robur tea was also being carried. Not much in the way of spirits was being taken, but a nice consignment of Yalumba port wine for special occasions had been received and for medicinal purposes Seppelt and Sons had provided a little brandy. In the southern waters the party would, rely on seal and penguin for their meat supply and, as these creatures were not quite palatable, the party had accepted from the Rosella company, a collection of pickles and sauces.

    The chief benefactor of the expedition, Mr MacPherson Robertson who had contributed £10,000 in cash to the cost of the trip, had also furnished large quantities of chocolate productions.

    A particularly fine type of ski boot, specially made by Whybrow and Co. (Melbourne), had been secured. Woollen underclothing had been donated by Foy and Gibson (Victoria) and blankets by Collins Bros. (Geelong). For use on the ship the Dunlop Perdriau Co. had provided rubber boots, and oilskins had come from Ellenberg and Zeltner (Melbourne). Tents and canvas and sledge gear had been presented by S. Walder, Ltd. (Sydney). A large part of the drug supply had been procured from Faulding and Co ... "

    The West Australian - 7th October, 1929 "DISCOVERY AT CAPE TOWN. Seals and Penguins as Food.
    CAPE TOWN, Oct. 5 - Flying the Australian Ensign, the Discovery (Sir Douglas Mawson's Antarctic expedition ship), berthed this morning, 40 days after having passed Cape St. Vincent (Portugal). The voyage was uneventful, with fine weather throughout. There was a vision of turtle soup once, but the turtle got out of sight before a boat could be lowered ...

    Tons of preserved food are stored on the Discovery, but once the ice is reached seals and penguins will be caught. According to one member of the crew, 'they go down all right with plenty of pickles'.

    The library is limited to 100 books, the 'Encyclopaedia Britannica' being the final court of appeal to settle arguments. Two seaplanes (sic one seaplane still in crates) and spare parts are lashed to the deck. Coal briquettes are packed into every corner to feed the engines when the ice pack has been reached. Coal will be taken on at Kerguelen Island (from the French Whaling Station) and the Discovery will then head south for Enderby Land."

    The Recorder of 14th December, 1929 - "LIFE ON THE DISCOVERY
    A cargo of coal has been taken on at Kerguelen which will be the final cargo for the Antarctic cruise. Every available space has been used for stowing briquettes. The success of the expedition will depend very largely on the coal available, and as bunker space on the Discovery is very restricted, a large space on the deck has been devoted to coal storage.

    Food provisions for the Discovery's crew include 15 live sheep, which occupy a pen amidships where the dogs are usually carried. Bales of fodder have been packed between the aeroplane cases, and the Shell oil Company was responsible for the scientific stacking of large quantities of paraffin and oil cases at the stern. The entire provision of petroleum products for the expedition was in the hands of the Shell Company.

    Many additional items of equipment from blankets to test tubes for the scientists are stowed away in the strong wooden hull of the Discovery, the most important item to be taken on board being a supply of dynamite. This may have to be used ‘to blast channels through the ice along the coast of Antarctica’ ”.

    From these newspaper articles it can be deduced that detailed and lengthy preparation of supplies, and contact with and the generosity of many companies would have been a time consuming task initiated by Sir Douglas Mawson. This is but part of the logistics which were obviously deemed necessary for the Antarctic Expedition.

    Nearing the end of Voyage 1 RAAF Pilot Eric Douglas, wrote that he was longing for a feed of fresh food and that he felt that tinned food was not satisfying over a long period. He also wrote that eggs still appeared on the menu but they were only in the form of curried eggs.

    Eric Douglas after his Antarctic days talked about eating bully beef (corned beef, camp pie and Foggitt Jones Rex pie etc) and curries in the Antarctic and he was never too keen on tinned food for the rest of his days, with bully beef being completely off the menu. But he could still eat a good stew.

    Voyage 2 of BANZARE commenced in Hobart. The ship Discovery was restowed.

    The Mercury of 17 November, 1930 - “DISCOVERY - Most of the foodstuffs In the stores of the research ship Discovery, which is at Queen's pier preparing for her second B.A.N.Z. Antarctic expedition, have been re-stowed in the vessel from the shed. The clothing and some of the scientific equipment remains, and these will be taken aboard before the ship begins coaling”.

    The Sydney Morning Herald of 24th November, 1930 - "THE DISCOVERY SAILS FOR THE ANTARCTIC
    ... The items loaded at Hobart include 73 tons of coal, making over 450 tons altogether, which is the largest quantity the Discovery has had on any expedition. Perishable goods, including 650 dozen eggs, were taken on board, and 20 sheep were penned on the roof of the winchouse..."

    The Mercury of 24th November, 1930 - “THE DISCOVERY
    Queen’s Pier.
    On her second successive British, Australian, and New Zealand expedition under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson, and after 10 days of preparation alongside Queen's Pier since her arrival from Williamstown, Victoria, the research ship Discovery sailed from Hobart at 2.35 pm on Saturday. Flying ‘the white flag’ of exemption from pilot at the head of her foremast, she was taken out under her own steam by her master and second in command of the expedition (Captain Kenneth Norman MacKenzie)". From notes which I have made on this White Flag which is now at the Royal Maritime Museum at Greenwich - In the case of the SY Discovery flying the White flag - it symbolizes the Antarctic, the snow and the ice. In this case it is not the flag of peace, nor the exemption from the ship requiring a pilot boat. It was a courtesy flag and said to represent a continent having no flag of it's own. White seemed to be the perfect solution to represent Antarctica (Based largely on info from the Greenwich site).

    "... Water and the remainder of the perishable goods were checked on board on Saturday morning. At Hobart, for the expedition - through the agents (Messrs. Frank Hammond Pty. Ltd.) the Discovery, in addition to the stores and fuel she brought with her from Melbourne, took on 73 tons of coal, 1,0361bs of meat, 20 sheep, 650 dozen eggs, six tons of potatoes, a ton of sheep fodder, halt a ton of onions, half a ton of various other vegetables, six cases of lemons, 20 cases of oranges, and 36 cases of apples. Some butter and tinned fruit were also shipped. Fresh water was put into every available bucket and bottle, and in all the cabins the wash basins were filled, so that as much water as possible could be carried. A pipe line from the tap on the wharf filled the water tanks of the Discovery with 30 tons…

    In order to keep them fresh bacons have been hung beneath the steps that lead from the deck to the bridge. The 20 doomed sheep were penned on the roof of the main winchhouse. They seemed contented, and were well protected from the wind. Such conditions were not the happy lot of the sheep that were taken from Cape Town on the expedition last year. They were put on the main deck, but after a week or so in the wet they became unwell and died, useless tor edible purposes. Fresh meat was packed in barrels specially fitted with new wooden tops that could be screwed on. When the barrels are emptied specimens of sections of whale, seal, penguin, or some other animal or bird will be preserved in them…

    Included in the gifts to the expedition was a portable gramophone and records, and on Saturday morning a few members in the ward room studied a catalogue, choosing the music that will entertain them in the South…”

    The Morning Bulletin of 8th December, 1930 - “THE SECOND VOYAGE - Sir Douglas Mawson said … Thus it is that the Discovery equipped and manned for investigation in the Antarctic, once more sets forth from Hobart (this time) on yet another cruise with the expectation of rolling back still further the veil of mystery that surrounds so much of the southern extremity of the Globe. Should all go well, we shall return to Australia in April next, at the end of the summer season, but should the vessel be permanently beset by the ice, provision has been made in the equipment to meet any such emergency as enforced wintering.

    Every space in the vessel is occupied to the fullest extent with coal and equipment, which overflows in great volume on to the decks. Besides scientific instruments, the aeroplane, and ice equipment such as sledges, skis, tents and special woollen and fur clothing, there are food stores to the extent of fully fifty tons weight, and coal amounting to 432 tons. The food stores are contained in 1600 boxes, which together with petrol and other petroleum oils, alcohol, and formalin preservatives and other scientific stores, amount in all to over 2000 cases…”

    Thermometers were even carried on the wing struts of the aeroplane Gipsy Moth VH-ULD and they recorded the temperature of the air up to 5000ft. To measure beyond that height rubber balloons inflated with specially prepared hydrogen were released from the deck of the Discovery and the height and temperature conditions were measured with a theodolite by the Meteorologist Ritchie Simmers. These balloons could reach a height of 53,200ft (nearly 10 miles). Ritchie Simmers wrote that "... An immediately practical use of these flights was the determination of air currents prior to aeroplane flights. In addition to these, a separate series of observations was carried out on the transparency of the air for comparison with that of the populated regions of the earth. By means of a pyroheliometer, an instrument for measuring the heat given out by the sun's rays it was shown that, with the sun at the same height in the sky in the two places, the Antarctic air let through much more heat than that in the Australian Bight ie 50 per cent, more in fact ... "

    For the second voyage the Discovery was again 'packed to the gunwales' but the stong impression is that experience from the first voyage had led to supplies being stored in a more orderly fashion on the Discovery.

    The extracts from the newspapers selected for this list strongly demonstrate that besides the individuals chosen for BANZARE and their specific onboard ship and skill and works needs, together with the supplies required for the two voyages of the Expedition it must have been a logistical nightmare to get it 'all together'.

    Planning, caution, common sense and good luck meant that all personnel returned safely at the completion of each voyage.

    Sally E Douglas

    24 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-06-02
    User data
  19. BANZARE 1929-1931- Photography by Sundry Staff Members
    List
    Public

    The information supplied here appears to relate solely to BANZARE Voyage 2 in 1930-1931.

    In the Official Photographs collection for BANZARE 1929-1931 I believe that there are many thousands of different still images. The majority of the photography would be by Frank Hurley. However there is also photography by “Sundry Members of Staff” which includes Sir Douglas Mawson. This photography totals at least 1196 images. The 1196 images were individually described and listed by Frank Hurley and the list is called BANZARE - General Negatives List - by Sundry Members of Staff – General Catalogue BANZARE - Photographer.

    The staff who as photographers were resposible for these 1196 images are - Sir Douglas Mawson, Falla, Welch, Bond (Assistant Steward), Captain Kenneth Norman MacKenzie, Oom, Child, Colbeck, Alf Howard, Griggs, Simmers, Ingram, Campbell, Douglas, Brock (he took five images of deep sea fish but I have nothing more about him), Williams and Johnston.

    Eric Douglas’ photography in this list is –
    29 – Adelie Penguins amongst pack-ice
    30 – Adelie Penguin – Cape Denison
    31 – Adelie Penguins at Rookery – Cape Denison
    56 – King Penguins – Lusitania Bay, Macquarie Island
    62 – King Penguin Rookery – Lusitania Bay, Macquarie Island
    102 – Sea elephants – south of Buckles Bay, Macquarie Island
    125 – Bull elephants roaring - Macquarie Island
    132 – The Kosmos
    157 – Two whale chasers with which contact established adjacent to Southern Empress
    158 – Whale chaser alongside showing harpoon gun
    159 – Whale chaser alongside when close by Southern Empress
    208 – Flying Officer Douglas on board the Discovery, Antarctica
    209 – Flying Officer Douglas on board the Discovery, Antarctica
    216 – In launch off Scullin Monolith – Ingram, Kennedy, Howard and others
    220 – Aeroplane on skids above boat deck looking forward
    221 – Showing aeroplane on skids assembled ready for flight
    222 – Discovery amongst pack-ice. Showing aeroplane on skids and overhead net protecting wings
    223 – Aeroplane assembled on skids
    224 – Aeroplane on floats in pool amongst pack-ice
    225 – Aeroplane on floats in sea along pack-ice margin
    228 – Aeroplane taxiing on floats
    231 – Aeroplane taking off in lee of berg in neighbourhood of the 78th degree of East Longitude.
    232 – Aeroplane rising above iceberg. Same locality as 231.
    233 – Aeroplane dismantled and towed on skids – return voyage to Australia, 1931.
    235 – Crowd at end of Queen’s Pier at Hobart on departure of Discovery. Nov. 1930
    236 – Hobart from the Discovery when passing outwards down the Derwent. Nov. 1930
    238 – Glimpse of the crowd on the wharf on departure from Hobart. Nov. 1930
    239 – The Discovery at sea
    240 – The Discovery amongst loose pack North of the Ross Sea
    242 – The Discovery alongside the Sir James Clark Ross
    247 – Douglas and Stanton on fo’c’stle head.
    259 – Neighbourhood of the hut – Cape Denison
    260 – View at head of Boat Harbour – Cape Denison
    261 – The AAE Hut – Cape Denison. MacKenzie, Douglas Mawson, Colbeck and Ingram
    276 – West Side of Old Hut – Cape Denison
    280 – Frame work of old air tractor – Cape Dension
    295 – View of Wireless Hill – Macquarie Island – seen from the north-east
    297 – Sealers’ huts from the Spit looking South – Macquarie Island
    305 – The Bishop and Clark Islet – situated South of Macquarie Island
    310 – The Murray Monolith – MacRobertson Land
    313 – The Murray Monolith – MacRobertson Land
    314 – The Murray Monolith – MacRobertson Land
    344 – In pack-ice
    345 – Scattered pack-ice
    347 – Weather-worn pack-ice
    355 – Floe berg with reflection
    358 – Floe berg with freak ice wall
    373 – Tabular berg
    379 – Tabular berg with weathered frieze
    383 – Berg with storm-heaped glacons
    392 – The weathered face of a cavernous berg
    399 – A many-cusped berg
    404 – A many-cusped berg
    410 – Rocks outcropping at sea level below the ice cap – Commonwealth Bay, King George V Land
    419 – The Sir James Clark Ross
    421 – The Kosmos showing stern tunnel
    431 – The Kosmos
    439 – Whaling mother ship – flensing operations
    487 – Camp at Buckles Bay, Macquarie Island.
    496 – Royal Penguins surfing – Nuggets Beach
    500 – Royal Penguins at Nuggets Beach
    501 – Congregation of Royal Penguins – Nuggets Beach
    504 – Royal Penguin Rookery Inland from Nuggets Beach
    505 – Royal Penguin Rookery Inland from Nuggets Beach
    511 – King Penguins, Lusitania Bay – Macquarie Island
    514 – King Penguins and Young - Lusitania Bay – Macquarie Island
    547 – Adelie Penguins disporting themselves at Cape Denison
    548 – Adelie Penguins disporting themselves at Cape Denison
    550 – Adelie Penguins on overhanging ice foot – Cape Denison
    554 – Mickey invades rookery – Cape Denison
    562 – Face of a glacier berg
    569 – Pack-ice
    570 – Pack-ice
    592 – The Murray Monolith – MacRobertson Land
    604 – Penguin population of Scullin Monolith
    607 – Rock formation at Scullin Monolith
    705 – Sheep in pen on Discovery

    I can identify many but not all of these. This list (it is a copy) was given to me by Kevin Bell, Head of the AAD Multi-Media Section many years ago.

    Re. Sundry Staff Members - I think that there are other lists and more images that can be attributed to Sundry Staff Members as this list seems to be on BANZARE, Voyage 2 only. I also have three lists on Frank Hurley's photography and they likely relate to BANZARE Voyage 2 only.

    The Aeroplane was Gipsy Moth VH-ULD rigged as a seaplane with floats. It also carried aeroplane skis inside the floats. It was given the nickname of "Moth in Boots" by the two RAAF pilots on BANZARE.

    The 78th degree of East Longitude is at Princess Elizabeth Land.

    Mac-Robertson Land (now Mac.Robertson - 2017) and Princess Elizabeth Land were both discovered by Sir Douglas Mawson and BANZARE and named by Sir Douglas Mawson.

    Scullin Monolith and Murray Monolith were both in Mac-Robertson Land.

    Sally E Douglas

    11 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-27
    User data
  20. BECKY SHARP - an 1840's & 1850's Racehorse
    List
    Public

    Becky Sharp has been described as 'a bay mare of quality and power'.

    At the Melbourne Spring Races in November, 1855 Becky Sharp a bay mare owned by a Mr Row was 6 years and racing in the colours of green and black. (The Age 6 Nov 1855 - page 5).

    An Advertisement lodged in the daily Melbourne papers a few times in mid December, 1855 must have caught the eyes of the Sevior brothers - John and Robert. "E Row and Co. will submit to the public at their yards, Bourke Street, on Tuesday 18th December ...the following first class racing stock in consequence of the proprietor retiring from the turf, viz...Becky Sharp, 6 years old, by Walrus..." (The Argus of 14 December, 1855 page 2). But the Seviors did not buy Becky Sharp just then.

    Becky Sharp's name itself must have been alluring, a name from Thackery's Vanity Fair. The sparkling heroine of the book with many other words too being used to describe her role play.

    At Emerald Hill in early January, 1856, Becky Sharp was still being ridden in the name of Mr Row. Racing in Melbourne in March, 1856 Becky Sharp was still being ridden with Mr Row as the owner. It was April, 1856 and Becky Sharp was a favourite and racing at Kilmore for Mr Row. In that same month Becky Sharp was at the Geelong races in the name or Mr Row. So what is going on here?

    Maryborough, in May, 1856 and Becky Sharp as Maid of Erin is in the races in the name of Mr Kelly. In June, 1856 at Castlemaine, Maid of Erin raced off in the lead for Mr Kelly.

    Now July 1856 at the North Muckleford races and the Mount Alexander Mail of the 18th July states that Becky Sharp and Hotspur were both owned by the one Mr Sevior - that would be John Sevior as he was the brother who obtained the Crown Grant Allotments at Muckleford. Also he was the brother who took the lead in Horse Racing ventures at this stage in their lives, being the elder of the two I suppose. Although I have found that there was an amicable exchange of horse ownership between the two brothers especially in their 20's.

    By July, 1856 the Seviors were racing the aged Becky Sharp, she had already had one racing career and now was off on another one -

    From the Mount Alexander Mail Vol 1 p 64 (Castlemaine Archives) North Muckleford Races - Result of Ploughman's Purse 22/7/1856 - Drawn "Hotspur" and "Maid of Erin". There was contention (Paper editorial) "...a good deal of dissatisfaction was expressed by the owners of Maid of Erin and Hotspur at the handicap. Now this to the Stewards was most unfair, and if any one was to blame it was decidedly the Messers Seviors themselves. They know they are possessed of two crack horses in any company, Hotspur and Maid of Erin, and they are satisfied with carrying off previous prizes, but must enter each horse as these for the Ploughman's Purse of £13 and the Maid of Erin (better known as Becky Sharp) for a £ Consulation Stake. The stewards as trustees of public money, very properly conceived that if people would persist in entering their crack horses for such trifling stakes, and thereby spoil the sport of a meeting by frightening the owners of second-rate horses from the enterprise, that they must weight their horses accordingly; and the result, it is to be hoped, will teach that class of persons one fact, viz. that the public give the money to be run for, and that they do not give it to A, or B, because he happens to have a first-rate horse. They want fair sport and the stewards fail in their duty if they do not as far as possible promote it..."

    At Tarrangower at the end of October, 1856 - at the Tarrangower Meeting there was discourse as Becky Sharp and Hotspur were said to belong to one person a Mr Sevior or "rather to the brothers Sevior of Muckleford" (so who to hold to account) "...Becky Sharp went away and led certainly by a distance...Hotspur did not go on so fast as was expected...at the run Becky was compelled, if she kept her course to win whether her rider liked it or not...Davy who was riding her... turned her right ...off the course and went right away into the bush, allowing Hotspur to win...". (Mount Alexander Mail of 24 October 1856 - page 4).

    Castlemaine Spring Races - this meeting was held in early November, 1856. It was reported that the Tradesmen's Purse brought out Becky Sharp (and Mardoo) again. "...but the horse athough he led out first, never had a chance, as the mare won with the greatest of ease. A mile and a half is just Becky's distance; and we do not believe there is a mare in the colony that can beat her at that distance". (Mount Alexander Mail of 10 November, 1856 - page 3).

    At the Melbourne Spring Races in late November, 1856, the Spring Stakes and the Balaclave Stakes were won by Mr Sevior's Becky Sharp.

    John and Robert were racing Becky Sharp and Hotspur in 1856 when they were just young men.

    The Victorian Jockey Club races were held in mid February, 1857. In the American Cup Becky Sharp raced in crimson chequered under the name of Robert Sevior. John Sevior was named as the owner of Hotspur who was in the same race in the colours of green and black. Both horses were aged. It was reported as the race of the day and participating were Becky Sharp, Hotspur, Haphazard, Camel, Lady Charlotte, Iris and Rose of May. There had been four heats and Becky Sharp came second in two of the heats. At the start they were neck and neck but in the end it was Camel by several lengths. The winning cup was Silver and it was inscribed - "The first American Cup given by the Americans in Victoria, run for at the first meeting of the Victorian Jockey Club, Feb. 1857". (Melbourne Newspapers the Argus and the Age in February, 1857).

    At the same meeting Becky Sharp came first in the Consolation Handicap, while Hotspur came first in the Forced Handicap.

    At the Castlemaine Annual Races at the end of April, 1857 Becky Sharp was accepted for the Publicans Purse of 80 sovs. "On the word being given Jeanette and Becky raced off for the lead. (Becky Sharp was being ridden by Neep). Hurricane lying behind but on reaching the road Becky was in advance, her head up and going in her old style, Jeanette persevering and sticking well to her. The order was kept past the stand and round the first turn...Hurricane gradually improving his position and catching the other two. On reaching the last turn the three were really abreast, Becky having the inside place, and keeping a lead of a length to the finish. Jeanette beating Hurricane by half a length". (Mount Alexander Mail of 24 April, 1857 - page 5).

    In the October edition of Bell's Life dated 24 October, 1857 it was reported that Meretrix the Dam of Becky Sharp dropped a coal foal to Joe Danks, named Scapegrace.

    Entries for the Ballarat Races as reported in the Star - Ballarat of 21 November, 1857 - page 2 - Mr John Sevior's Becky Sharpe br. m. aged, weight 9 st 1 lb.

    In the Age of 29 March, 1857 it was reported that Becky Sharp had broken down and needed a rest.

    It was reported in Bell's Life of 3 April, 1858 - page 3, that Becky Sharp had succumbed to a long hard life of racing. "Poor old Becky Sharp, a mare of no inglorious career upon the turf, succumbed at last to the affects of a long life of hard work, not disgraced...her last appearance, for at the moment when her leg gave way she was full of running and would have been very near winning...Becky had ...in her time more work to do, than on the average is done by six of the celebrities in the British turf, several times she ran so remarkably well, that she almost became a Beeswing of this colony...Race horses cannot run forever, and Becky Sharp has at last only paid the penalty of accumulated trials and severe exertions".

    In the 19th Century there was a Champion racehorse in Northern England called Beeswing.

    Becky Sharp was also spelt Becky Sharpe, Beckie Sharp and Beckey Sharp.

    These are only some of the race events which Becky Sharp competed in when she was owned by the Seviors.

    A brave heart Becky Sharp.

    Sally E Douglas

    Bachelor of Commerce and Diploma of Public Policy (Hons - Arts) - the University of Melbourne; Deakin University Hons Art Subjects under the History of Ideas.

    91 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-02-08
    User data
  21. BERNARD FRANK WELCH - BANZARE, ANTARCTICA
    List
    Public

    Bernard Frank Welch was part of the Discovery’s Company in 1929-1931.
    Welch was the Second Engineer on both Voyages of the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition of 1929-1931. This expedition was under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson.
    In addition to images at the Museum of Victoria he is depicted in images at the Dundee Heritage Trust, online.

    Sally Douglas

    6 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-04-25
    User data
  22. BESSIE (ELIZABETH) NEE THOMPSON - DOUGLAS - 1873 - Spencer Street, Melbourne North, Victoria
    List
    Public

    Marriage - "DOUGLAS—THOMPSON.—On the 1st June, at the residence of the bride's parents, by the Rev. P. Murdock, Gilbert Douglas, second son of G. Douglas, Melbourne, to Bessie, eldest daughter of Alfred Thompson, Avonleigh, Burwood-road, Upper Hawthorn, late Victorian Railways". (Gilbert had been christened Gabriel, the story was that he changed his first name by Deed Poll - that information came from my Mother Ella, who was actually very good with dates, people, places and even mental arithmetic etc and she had left school at about 14).

    I am beginning to think that Bessie was born at the James Watt Hotel in Spencer Street, which was still in the ownership of her widowed grandmother Elizabeth (Burrell) Shiels who was now the Publican there after the death of her husband William Shiels in 1868. Bessie is recorded as being born in Spencer Street, Melbourne North.

    Bessie was the only Grandparent I knew, although her former husband Gilbert/Gabriel Douglas was still alive in my early lifetime. There was a 'bitter' Divorce and that was it. I didn't ask I just think that I presumed that my Grandfather was dead.

    If I had met him I would have remembered. Children quickly pick up the importance of family relationships. They did in my days as a child anyway.

    It was when I was about 18 that I had found out that my Grandfather Douglas had indeed married again. It was my mother Ella who told me. She told me too that he had two further children a boy and a girl and that the girl looked a 'bit like your Aunty Merhyl' (the elder father's two sisters, both of whom were younger than him). My mother also said 'that the girl is about your age'.

    Would things be more open these days? I think so. I don't think that I was shocked but I did realize then and I suppose more so over time that it was a missed opportunity not to have known him.

    I have had to get to know Gilbert/Gabriel Douglas and my other Grandparents - John William Sevior and Agnes Elizabeth (Broomfield) Sevior through the few stories which I was told by my mother over the years and of course by doing family history. I was interested in family history from when I was about 25 and after a morning of rapid and probing questions to my parents Eric and Ella, I extracted half a page of 'concrete' information and I still have that page. My father thought that it was the funniest series of questions which I had ever asked and could hardly contain his mirth. I remember that day clearly. Although I am sure that had I been able to relate the Douglas and other family histories to him he would have been more than pleased and perhaps even 'taken aback' by the lives of some of our ancestors.

    Over time mainly through my mother I did hear some stories about all my Grandparents and also my mother dropped 'clues' about them and earlier ancestors and where those ancestors came from. For example that the Seviors had run a hotel where the Arcadia is in Toorak Road, South Yarra and that the family had come from where the Blarney Stone is in Ireland. That person turned out to be Rebecca (Leahy) Sevior my Great Grandmother. Rebecca's parents it turned out were from Kinsale in County Cork. The hotel turned out to be the early South Yarra Club hotel which had sat on the same location as where the Arcadia is now positioned! I don't think that my mother had much contact with Rebecca and so what she could tell me was pretty scant. If she had made a real connection with her Grandmother she would have been able to tell me more.

    My mother also said such things as 'there were seven sets of twins in the Brooks family' [her Grandmother being Susan (Brooks) Broomfield]. When I was about 14 she used to run through all the twins and tell me where they fitted in. She did that more than once hoping I suppose that the information would stick in my mind. I should have written it down. Over time I have remembered six of the seven sets (they all seem to be Fraternal) but I am unsure as to who were in no 7. That will never be solved as it has been found be me and others that there are well more than 7 sets of twins in the Brooks family!

    When at Amberley and when the Duke of Gloucester was the Governor General my parents met with the Gloucesters a few times. My mother spoke to the Duchess of Gloucester about Douglas ancestry and established that the Duchess had Douglas Ancestry. I am not sure who started that conversation, perhaps the Duchess. So more clues anyway. I only heard that story from my mother when I was in my teens or twenties.

    Getting back to Bessie, my first real memories of her are when we visited from Queensland when I was about 5. We had to come to Melbourne from RAAF Amberley where my father was the C/o (Station Commander). I think that it was the time when he was ill and came to Melbourne for treatment. At the time he did carry out some duties at Point Cook and Laverton and a couple of 'Official' RAAF photos at that period show him as gaunt.

    We stayed with my Grandmother Douglas and I had a brief stint at the local State School in Brighton. My main memory of my Grandmother is her perhaps pretending to be cross as we - cousins too - crawled through her front fir hedge making unintentional holes and gaps as we moved through it. I think that she just didn't want to know about that at all. A trick we had which was instigated by my brother Ian was to tie string to her door-knocker and she had to play along and repeatedly come to the front door looking and asking who was there.

    Another memory of that visit is that Bessie had some velvet cushions with very soft covers. They were oblong and one was bright green with fancy work in the base colours. Green was my colour from then, my mother tried to coax me to have red or blue, but I had definitely made up my mind and that remained as my favourite colour. I have decided that children remember the small things, the bigger details are the domain of older people.

    I remember in the packing as we left that I had lots of coloured hair ribbons and some coloured hair clips. We also managed to get some distance away from Brighton in the Chev (1936 chevrolet) on our return to Queensland and had to turn back as something had been left behind. My Auntie Jean, my father's youngest sister was there and my cousin Dorren, as they had been at our 'send off' and they were completely surprised to see us back there.

    The first thing on the journey was to look forward at stopping to see the 'Dog on the Tucker Box' near Gundagai. He was the type of legend of my childhood. Then later the dog was moved and the story of his distance from Gundagai was altered and it never sounded as good!

    After that were headed we Goulburn and stayed in an old pub in Goulburn where there was an old white cockatoo in residence. I remember encountering the cockatoo before, so we must have stayed there too on our way south from Amberley. Seeing the cockatoo again was like encountering an old friend.

    I insisted that we then call in at Sydney. We detoured to Sydney via the Blue Mountains. As we wound around the hills we could hear the dingoes calling and stopped to take it all in. In Sydney we went to Luna Park, where we ate fairy floss and placed balls in the mouths of the rows of turning heads of clowns to try and win a prize. We drove to the Taronga Zoo and walked along steep paths and looked out at some of the Sydney Harbour. We also rode the double decker buses up on the second level. It was all very exciting. The Blue Mountains and Sydney were in my heart from then on, and to this day.

    We drove on to Armidale, New South Wales and stayed once again at an old style country pub. Here we went to the Convent so that my mother could visit one of the Cooney girls who was a Nun (a daughter of Dr Cooney from Ipswich). My mother went inside the rest of us stayed in the car - my father, brother Ian and myself - waiting outside the main gate.

    We looked out for 'Swaggies' and saw a few either sitting or walking along the roadside.

    My father did keep summary notes on the long car journeys. Not so much as to who was onboard. They were about distances covered between say, a and b in a day, petrol and oil used, and when to do the next grease and oil change etc and how the engine was ticking over. So I need to hunt them out to get more exact dates as to when we made those Interstate trips by car.

    We came to Melbourne another time too. That time my father left his Chev behind at his mother's home and we returned to Brisbane by steam train. So it must have been a trip later than 1945. I remember changing trains at Albury and throwing folded up newspapers out of the open windows with my father to gangs of men working the rail lines. I remember the soot and the steam.

    We stayed at South Yarra that time. I remember my Uncle John (my mother's only sibling) running up the steep hill at Airlie Street and coming through the front gate wearing his Cricketing whites. The first memories I have of him is when he came to see us at Amberley, it was about 1943 and he was on his way to Townsville and the Kokoda trail. He was an Army Volunteer. I sat on a step next to him, he was dressed in his khakis and even with his hat on and I looked up at his face and asked him 'Are you my Uncle' ? He must have just arrived. Of course I had no idea then as to why he called in or where he was going.

    My Grandmother Bessie lived till I was 18. We came back to Melbourne a bit after mid 1948 to live. My father 'officially' left the RAAF at the end of June, 1948 as the Commanding Officer at Amberley and although we returned to Melbourne he went back to Amberley till November, 1948 while their was a transition to the new Group Captain. None of that shows up in official records.

    After we came back I fortunately saw a bit if Grandma Bessie then when she came for a meal and sometimes stayed the night. There was one period when my father would go and collect her 'every other Sunday' for lunch, which was probably a roast of some sort. I often rode with him too on the journey which was just a few miles away. We made the trip in his aqua or duck blue 1936 two door chevrolet. On the way back we collected a couple of large blocks of ice, for the ice chest. Even so we did have an early Kelvinator refrigerator but its capacity was obviously not enough for out family's needs.

    Grannie Bessie Douglas had to put up with watching us having a game of backyard cricket or join in on a card game of snap. Just the things that Grannies need to do and of course remain very pleasant and smile a lot. Hey, where is the pocket money?

    However I must admit that even though she was born in Melbourne, Grandma Bessie did talk a lot about going to England as going back home. Had she been alive now I would have been able to tell her that she should have longed for Scotland too. Admittedly her father Alfred Thompson did migrate from Bristol, England in about 8/1860, and the purpose was to specifically join the Victorian Railways. (A mixture of Government run and Privately owned rail companies). By the way I have not found anything of Alfred's journey nor the specific dates, the 8/1860 information being from Railway records. Alfred's mother Ann (Garland) Thompson had died and Alfred left behind in Bristol his father Henry Thompson a Saddle Maker, later to become a Master Saddle and Harness Maker, plus his older sister Priscilla (Precella) and younger brother Frederick (actually baptised as Frederic). He probably never saw them again.

    Nevertheless in talking about origins Bessie's mother Fanny (Shiels) Thompson was in Sydney and then Melbourne by 1849 and what is more, she was a Scot. Fanny must have made life a challenge for her mother Elizabeth (Burrell) Shiels as she was born at sea on a nearly four month sailing journey from London, via Plymouth to Sydney; on a barque called the Agenoria in 1849. Though Fanny was 'Born at Sea' on an English ship made at St Johns, Nova Scotia, Canada her nationality was Scottish as her parents William and Elizabeth Shiels were Scots.

    A few times Bessie spoke to me about God and we joined in a prayer together at night, she was hosted in my bedroom! One such prayer was God Bess this little child so meek and mild! That was a lot to live down. My parents were very amused at the religious goings on instigated by her, as apparently she was not religious at all.

    My mother told me that Bessie loved crowds and would always want to be part of what was going on or wanted to see what was happening. Going to see Houdini was an example.

    Bessie had a pianola at her home in Middle Brighton at one stage. When I got to hear it in action was in about 1949 to 1950. We the extended family all stood around it singing. I for one marvelled as the rolls turned through. We had the top open to have a look. I am not sure if Bessie was musical or not, but her grandmother Elizabeth Shiels had music in her blood. Anyway as far as I was concerned Bessie could take 100 percent credit for being a technically minded and creative person as she knew how to get the best out of a pianola.

    From a later letter from my mother Ella to my father Eric when he was away somewhere for the RAAF - my mother described to him that Bessie has a routine of what she does every day of the week eg washing on Mondays, shopping on Tuesdays, people can visit on Wednesdays and so on ...So she, Ella had to know what day was what and call in on the correct day. Those were the days of 'visiting cards' too. If there was no response when you made a visit, you would leave a card behind to show that you had called in.

    Also Bessie was tidy person who raked the garden pebbles after you had walked on them and she liked to see the silverware polished and cupboards closed. One time in my teenage days or early twenties I went through a 'keep things dusted and tidy phase' and I was told that 'you are just like your Grandmother'. So I soon learnt to keep a middle ground and leave a bit of paraphernalia lying around, and I have done so ever since.

    Bessie came to the beach with us and on picnics. She was at our home when I was 11 and the day when I had started Secondary College which was a train and tram journey away. My mother and grandmother anxiously awaited my return only to be told in tears by me that my hat blew off at the end of the journey and the train had run over the brim. I had it with me so I must have jumped onto the line to retrieve it. That was the end of the hat, next day I had to go hatless to school.

    My mother more than once described my father in looks as being 'the dead spit' of his Mother. That is a funny bit of slang.

    From memory Bessie was about 5ft 2in and fairly slim. I think that her eyes were brown. My father's eyes were light hazel with specs of green. Perhaps Bessie's were like that too?

    Bessie died at just over 86.

    Bessie obviously came to see us and stay at Point Cook as I have a photo of her holding me when I was nearly two (we went to Amberley when I was just two in June, 1942). In the photo it shows that she was tickling my skin and her hands must have been cold as I was complaining loudly.

    My father Eric remained in some sort of contact with his father Gilbert/Gabriel and knew his father's second wife (letter from his father which I only found about 20 years ago). After my father died in August, 1970 I found that he had always carried his father's picture in his wallet. Likewise at the other end a Douglas granddaughter of the new family told me well over 30 year ago that my father's picture had apparently always been displayed at my grandfather's home in Mooroopna.

    There is a lot about Bessie and her life that do not know about -
    When my father Eric was about 25 they went on a steamer cruise together along the East Coast of Australia.
    I have found in Trove newspapers that Bessie once went on a holiday to the Mt Buffalo Chalet in Victoria. I have only visited there once.
    My father wrote a few letters to his mother from Cape Town and out of Cape Town in late 1929 while he was waiting to join Sir Douglas Mawson on the BANZARE Voyages to the Antarctic. The lettters written by him were given with all the mail from the SY Discovery (Discovery I) to a passing steamer coming to the Australian mainland.

    That makes me wonder if Bessie wrote anything down that could turn up one day?

    End of story...nearly.

    Sally E Douglas

    8 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-01-25
    User data
  23. BOCHARA ATHLETIC SPORTS CLUB AND HAMILTON - JOHN SEVIOR - HORSEMAN AND ATHLETE
    List
    Public

    In 1868, 1869 and 1870 John Sevior born 1834 Launceston, was on the Committee of Management of the Bochara Athletic Sports Club.

    John lived in the areas of North Hamilton and Hamilton from 1859 to 1870.

    In 1859 it was reported that John Sevior and his brother Robert Sevior were in the Hamilton region with their imported racehorse High Sheriff - at the time of the Hamilton show in July 1859, newspapers reported that Mr Sevior's High Sheriff was much admired in that the horse had won first prize in 1858 at Hamilton. High Sheriff was considered as one of the finest horses in the district.

    From Bell's Life of 8th October, 1859 one reporter on horses gave his opinion of High Sheriff '...he is an exceedingly showy graceful animal, admirably adapted for a park horse or a review day charger, but although sixteen hands high, he is ... deficient in pace and substance; there is too much daylight under him. In fact he is unfurnished as a colt, but his head and neck are a study for a painting'.

    At one stage High Sheriff was kept at Dooling Dooling a property near Hamilton which was rented by the Sevior brothers. In this regard advertisements in the daily papers said that High Sheriff was at Hamilton in July, 1859.

    In 1861 one of the Seviors probably John, was on the Hamilton Turf Club Committee.

    In 1862 John Sevior was also at the Builders Arms in Portland.

    Besides John being a Wholesale Butcher in Gray Street, Hamilton with his brother Robert in 1861 and 1862, he was also a Publican at the Prince of Wales Hotel in 1863 and 1864, having taken over from his brother Robert in 1863.

    Moreover, John and his brother Robert had hired Red Hill Farm from 1863 to about 1868

    In 1867 John Sevior leased land at Warrabkook Warrabkook, Hamilton.

    The brothers played Cricket and Football for Hamilton.

    From 1865 to 1867 John Sevior was on the Hamilton Cricket Club Committee.

    Both John and Robert Sevior were excellent horsemen.

    The brothers both dabbled in many ventures, most together and some separately but for all that they were essentially horsemen. They made their livelihoods from Breeding and Training Racehorses.

    I have only found John Sevior out of the two brothers to have an interest in athletics. John was a sprinter and set the agenda for being a long distance walker. There were challenges he made to others to test their merits in a sprint against him, or their endurance in a long distance walk. Hence it follows that his interest in athletics obviously led him to joining the Bochara Athletic Sports Club and being on its Committee of Management.

    John Sevior was also a Produce Merchant and Farmer in Hamilton -
    From 1866 to 1867 John Sevior was a Produce Merchant at 106 Gray Street, Hamilton (Brick shop - owners John H Clough and J W Blogg).
    In 1866 to 1868 John Sevior - Crown Grant - Allot 10 Sect 17a, at McIntyre Street, South Hamilton - Produce Merchant (owner of House and Premises).
    In 1868 John Sevior was a Farmer at 112-114 and also 116 Gray Street, Hamilton (Shop & Premises) (executor M P Grant) [112-116 later destroyed by fire].
    In 1870 John Sevior had a business (shop) as a Dealer at 136 Thompson Street, Hamilton (Thomas Finn site owner).

    The Sevior brothers rode in this Kangaroo hunt or chase. I think that it is a classic but to be seen in the view of those times, today I imagine that it would not be seen favourably. "Early Hamilton Sport" - https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/119872739?

    Like Robert did there is some 'evidence' that John played the piano. He owned an Everard Piano which he sold with household and other items a few weeks before he died.

    Robert Sevior was the Trainer of the Melbourne Cup winner Warrior in 1869.

    In January, 1869 John Sevior won the 100 yard footrace at the Sports at Bochara, he was 34.

    This list is only about the 'Hamilton and Bochara Chapter' of the life of John Sevior. There was also Launceston, Portland, Muckleford and Castlemaine, and Melbourne.

    In the 1870's John Sevior made a number of sea trips to Sydney and he was probably going to the Robert Sevior Stables at Randwick. Throughout the 1870's John Sevior still had successes as a Horse Trainer with the evidence being of his race winnings from New South Wales country race meetings at places such as Wagga Wagga, Muruumbidgee and Armidale.

    In the mid 1870's he also made sea voyages from Melbourne to Portland. Those journeys were probably related to horses, such as breeding and training advice to interested people in the industry.

    Addresses for John Sevior - 1883 back to 1870 (only) -

    February and March 1883 Rose Cottage, Flemington Road, Flemington.

    1882 and 1883 - Erskine Street, Hotham (North Melbourne)

    1881 - 100 Leveson Street, Hotham.

    1879 - off Chetwynd Street, Hotham.

    1878 - at 44 Peel Street, Hotham

    1877 - 2 Moores Cottages, Rosslyn Street, West Melbourne.

    1870 - 136 Thompson Street, Hamilton.

    John Sevior was my great grandfather.

    Sally E Douglas

    73 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-02-03
    User data
  24. Bonjedward Lands and Douglas Inheritance
    List
    Public

    Bonjedward (Bonjedworth etc) Lands and Douglas inheritance

    It is the unentailed lands of Bonjedward which are of specific interest in this exercise. I understand that unentailed means in terms of a landed estate, that descent is not predetermined before someone's death. There is no fixed inheritance. There are no restrictions on who can inherit the landed estate.

    The Emerald Charter and ‘the good’ Sir James Douglas -
    The Emrauld or Emerald Charter gave lands to ‘the Good’ Sir James Douglas in 1324, including the Forest of Jedburgh with Bonjedward. Also gifted to Sir James were the - Baronies of Douglas, Batherule, West Calder, Stabilgorthane and Romanok; the Forest of Selkirk; and the Constabularium of Lauderio.

    ‘The first alienation of the whole or any part of it in favour of a Scotch subject occurred in the reign of Robert Bruce, who granted to his companion in arms, ‘the good’ Sir James of Douglas, in about 1321 or 1322, a charter of the forests of Selkirk, Ettrick, and Traquair, in free barony…

    ...in 1325 (sic 1324) he granted to the same Lord James, as part payment of 4000 merks, which, at the request of the King of France, Robert undertook to pay as the ransoms of three French knights, taken prisoner by Douglas at the battle of Biland, a charter of all his lands in the regality – including the forest of Selkirk, of which he is our officiar, giving sasine, it is said, by placing on his finger an emerald ring, from which last circumstance the writ has been termed 'The Douglas Emerald Charter’.

    A Tug of War for the lands of Selkirk and Ettrick -
    But after the death of Robert the Bruce and the accession of his son David II, Edward II of England claimed the dominion of the Forest ‘in virtue of his favour by Edward de Balliol’, and in 1334 appointed Robert de Maners the Sheriff of Selkirk, and keepers of the forests of Selkirk and Ettrick – John de Bourbon, Chamberlain and William de Bevercotes, Chancellor. Moreover, in 1335 he granted William de Montacute the Forest of Selkirk and Ettrick and the Sheriffdom of Selkirk, with their pertinents in feu-ferme to the King’s Exchequer at Berwick on Tweed.

    However in 1342, David II, renewed the grant of the Forest to William of Douglas, the nephew of the Good, Sir James. At the time a charter recited that Hugh, Lord of Douglas (brother and heir to Sir James) had on 26th May,1342, resigned into the King’s hands the lands of Douglasdail and Carmyall and the Forest of Selkirk etc, granting the same to William of Douglas, son and heir of the deceased Archibald of Douglas (brother of Sir James) and his heirs male.

    This William was created the first Earl of Douglas by the King in 1356/1357. William had returned from France during the captivity of David II in England; and leading the men of Douglasdale, Teviotdale and the Forest of Ettrick he defeated the English under John de Coupland, Captain of Roxburgh Castle and restored the district to the allegiance of the Scotch Monarch.

    In “1349/50…Edward III ordered his Chamberlain of Berwick on Tweed to allocate John de Copland (Coupland) 3000 merks from the revenue of Roxburgh, Selkirk, Ettrick (etc) for the custody of the castle for three years. Edward III used Roxburgh Castle as a fortress.

    By a charter of Robert III, the regality of the Forest of Ettrick was again conferred on the Douglases, in the person of Archibald, son of the Earl, who was married to a daughter of the King”.

    It appears that the Douglas referred to was Archibald Douglas, the fourth Earl of Douglas, who married Princess Margaret Stewart, the daughter of King Robert III and his wife Queen Annabella Drummond in about 1390.

    This is all a bit sketchy but gives an overview on the passing back and forth of the ownership of the Forest and the other lands mentioned.

    Until the beginning of the fifteenth century the English frequently claimed the dominion of the forest but it was not a claim that they could effectively assert. In 1492/1493 Henry VI, granted Henry de Percy, Earl of Northumberland, all the lands of Archibald the Earl of Douglas within the forrest of Ettrick and Selkirk. In 1449 to 1451 the Earl William of Douglas, resigned into the King’s hands all and each of the lands of Ettrick and Selkirk, ‘with their pertinents which he possessed by heritage’. “In virtue of this resignation…James renewed the grant of these lands in free regality to the Earl and his heirs…for the payment of one broad headed arrow as blench-ferme to be rendered to the King and his successors, if required, on the festival of nativity of John the Baptist, at the moothill of Selkirk”. However. by 1455 James II had declared the lands forfeited and the lordship of Ettrick was perpetually annexed to the Crown.

    [Origines Parochiales Scotiae – The Antiquities Ecclesiastical and Territorial of the Parishes of Scotland – Publication Issue 97, Volume 1 – MDCCCLL – Edinburgh and Glasgow]

    The Forest of Jedburgh and Bonedward although also subject to the whims of Kings and other vested interests appear to have been in the main passed to Margaret Douglas (of Bonjedward) and her more important brother George, 1st Earl of Angus (Douglas).

    The entailed lands of Bonjedward -
    “Bonjedworth, now Bonjedward, was in 1324 granted by King Robert Bruce to Sir James of Douglas…”In about 1356 Bondjeddeworth formed part of the grant given by the King to Henry Percy and his heirs in exchange for Annandale. King David II, probably in 1358 and 1370, granted to William Pettillck, Herald, the three husbandlands of the town of Bonjedward which had been forfeited by Roger Pringill.

    In 1398 George, Earl of Angus was infeft by James Sandilands in the (entailed) lands of Bonjedworth, and the infeftment was confirmed by King Robert III.

    [Origines Parochiales Scotiae – The Antiquities Ecclesiastical and Territorial of the Parishes of Scotland – Publication Issue 97, Volume 1 – MDCCCLL – Edinburgh and Glasgow].

    The unentailed lands of Bonjedward -
    In 1404 Isabel countess of Mar granted to Thomas the son of John Douglas and Margaret his spouse (her half-sister) all the (unentailed) lands of Bonjedward, which were confirmed to them by the regent Albany”. In fact the grant was to Thomas Johnson/Johnston, the son of John Johnson/Johnston and his wife Margaret Douglas (full natural sister of the Earl of Angus) and then their son John Douglas (they had taken the name of Douglas, rather than Johnson/Johnston).

    “The lands of Timpendean (part of Bonjedward), lying in the territory of Bonjedworth, were in 1479 granted by George Douglas (4th Laird of Bonjedworth) with the consent of James, his son and heir, to his son Andrew, from whom they descended in lineal succession to William Douglas who held them in 1718…” James must have died as a son William became the 5th Laird of Bonjedworth.

    The Lairds of Bonjedworth or Bonjedward can be traced through to John Douglas, the 14th Laird who was born in about 1697, while the Lairds of Timpendean can be traced to Archibald Douglas 1718 who became the 10th Laird of Timpendean and as the male line of the Douglases of Bonjedward had obviously died out he added Bonjedward to his title. Beyond him, either Captain George Douglas c1819 the 12th is the last Laird or his brother Captain Henry Sholto Douglas 1820 the 13th was the last.

    Timpendean went out of the family’s hands completely around the time of the death in April, 1834 of his father Sir William Douglas the 11th of Timpendean. Captain George Douglas 12th of Timpendean sold the final lands to the Marquis of Lothian – it has been reported that he sold it to the Scotts family but it appears that they were tenants rather than owners of Timpendean.

    A descendant of Captain Angus William Sholto Douglas a son of Captain Henry Sholto Douglas was said to hold the original grant deed for Timpendean – dated 1479.

    Some citing of Bonjedward and Timpendean Lairds -
    Judicial Proceedings in 1476
    • William Douglas, bruder to George Dowglas of Bonegedworth. [Parliament of Scotland]
    Granter’s Seal – Lands of Rowcastell 1491
    • Mentions George Douglas of Bonjedworth
    Percept to Walter Ker of Cesfurde dated 5th July 1499
    • George Douglas of Bunjedworth gets a mention
    A Respite at Dumfries dated 28th August 1504
    • George Douglas of Bonjedward, John Douglas his brother, Andrew Douglas in Tympandene and Robert Douglas his brother
    Inquest – Andrew Kerr of Ferniehirst on 7th November 1525
    • George Douglas of Bonjedward was present
    Indenture of March 1529/1530
    • A witness was George Douglas of Bonjedward
    Linlithgow in 1545 - Mustering of Troops
    • William Douglas, Laird of Bonjedward [Parliament of Scotland]
    In the time of King Edwarde the sixthe (lived 1537 to 1553)
    • The Larde of Boniedworth
    Instrument of Possession in 1581
    • Instrument of possession given to Sir Thomas Ker of Pharnihirst in some lands in Ulston, wrongfully occupied by William Douglas of Bonjedward
    Land Proprietors in 1590
    • Included William Douglas of Bonjedburgh and Douglas of Tympenden
    Barons and Lairds in Roxburgh in 1597
    • Douglas of Tymperden
    Marriage contract of 1612
    • Grizel Rutherford married Adam Kirktoun of Stuartfield in April 1612. They had a charter on their marriage contract of the lands of Bonjedburgh on 10th October,1616; which was confirmed under the Great Seal on 26th December, 1616.
    ‘Act in favour of Sir John Auchmuty of Gosford’ in 1633
    • William Douglas of Bonjedward. [Parliament of Scotland].
    1643 Legislation [Parliament of Scotland].
    • Mr George Douglas of Bonjedward.
    'Act renewing the Commission for Plantationof Kirks and Valuation of Teinds on 24th March 1647’
    • Mr George Douglas of Bonjedburgh. [Parliament of Scotland]
    ‘Act for raising a supply offered to their majesties on 7th June, 1690’
    • The Laird of Bonjedward. [Parliament of Scotland]
    At the time of an ‘Act for six months’s supply upon the Land Rent on 20th June,1695’
    • The Laird of Bonjedburgh and the Laird of Timpendean. [Parliament of Scotland]
    ‘Act Anent the supply of eighteen months’ cess upon the Land Rent in 1696’
    • Shire of Roxburgh – Douglas of Bonjedward [Parliament of Scotland]

    Some Owners, Occupiers and Visitors of Bonjedward since the early 1700’s (estates now likely carved up) -
    • At the time of an ‘Act Anent Supply’ on 5th August 1704 – Douglas of Bonjedburgh and Douglas of Timpendean [Parliament of Scotland]
    • It has been said that Thomas Rutherford/Rutherfurd acquired (part of) Bonjedward in about 1710 to 1715 – Susan/Susanna Riddell of Minto was his wife.
    • The William Douglas was the 9th Laird of Timpendean in 1726 – he was noisy at the old Black Bull Inn at Jedburgh
    • Thomas Calderwood of Poulton inherited considerable wealth from his father and in March 1735 married Margaret, the eldest daughter of Sir James Stewart of Goodtrees. The Calderwoods returned to London from the Low Countries in the Spring of 1757 and in the following year Mr Calderwood devolved upon his wife the entire management of his estates and family affairs. Mrs Calderwood with her husband’s consent sold his property of Bonjedward and applied the price to the purchase of Linhouse.
    • Horse Farm Tax in 1797-98 – John Riddell of Timpandean, William Turbull of Bonjedward, Andrew Caverhill of Bonjedward and Thomas Caverhill of Bonjedward. (Archibald Jerdon mentioned below - of Bonjedward, was the son of Thomas Caverhill and Jane Jerdon and he gave his daughter who married the Rev Peter Young of Jedburgh, the farm of Bonjedward Townhead and built a suitable house for her as a residence – as ‘a marriage portion’. Susan died there in February 1780 aged 30 years).
    • On 17th September, 1809 Mr James Tait married Susan the 5th daughter of Thomas Caverhill at or of Bonjedward
    • Members of the Jedforest Club from1810 onwards – Archibald Jerdon of Bonjedward and Major Forbes of Bonjedward
    • In a Roll of Freeholders in 1811, Archibald Jerdon was listed at Bonjedward
    • In 1828 Archibald Jerdon was ‘of Bonjedward’.
    • Timpendean and Bonjedward were both listed in the 1841, 1851 and 1861 Censuses
    • In 1842 both Mr and Mrs Jerdon died, within a short time of each other
    • In 1845 (more like 1843) the Marquis of Lothian bought Bonjedward and now possesses the whole estate (1899)
    • In 1847 Major Forbes was a tenant of the Marquis of Lothian
    • In 1849 Bonjedward House was the seat of the Hon Mr Talbot
    • It appears that Bonjedward House was owned by Mr Pringle in 1856
    • In a Survey of 1858 Mr Jerdon held the estate of Bonjedward
    • On 19th February, 1867 the infant son of Vice-Admiral the Hon Charles Elliot died at Bonjedward
    • In 1870 William Penney, the Hon Lord Kinloch and Judge of the Court of Session, Scotland was living in Bonjedward House
    • In 1876 Miss Jane Hall was residing at Bonjedward Cottage
    • In 1877 Bonjedward House, was the house of the Dowager Marchioness of Lothian
    • In 1879 Bonjedward and Timpindean were listed in Burke’s Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland
    • In 1882 the Marquis of Lothian owned Bonjedward House
    • Richard Swan may have been the owner of Bonjedward House in 1979 when he married Jean Agnew
    • Sometime soon after December 1999 Mrs Maxine Anne Day or Willson acquired Bonjedward House
    • In about 2011 Bonjedward House estate was a large commercial holding with agricultural landholdings, asscociated buildings and other facilities. Bonjedburgh House is on an estate 2.2 miles from Jedburgh’s centre.

    Bonjedward and Timpendean – Judgement by the Court of Lord Lyon
    Regarding the question of Bonjedward and Timpendean the Court of Lord Lyon found in 1952 (as a result of a petition by Major Henry James Sholto Douglas the son of Henry Mitchell Sholto Douglas, in turn the son of Captain Henry Sholto Douglas - Timpendean) that “…the petitioner is entitled to matriculate arms on ancient user before 1672 and with a different congruent to descent through Margaret Douglas of Bonjedward from William, Earl of Douglas, and Margaret, Countess of Angus…The petitioner is the great great grandson of Archibald Douglas of Timpendean, who was the eldest son of William Douglas of Timpendean, an estate the family possessed in uninterrupted descent from Andrew Douglas of Timpendean, third son of George Douglas of Bonjedward who, by charter, dated 1st July 1479, received from his father the Timpendean portion of the Bonjedward estate. I am not told when or how Archibald came to possess Bonjedward, or satisfied as to how the senior line of Bonjedward descending from the eldest laird of 1478 has proved to be extinct…”

    The Gift of the Mains of Bonjedward by Lady Isabella Douglas, the Contess of Mar and Garioch –
    Margaret Douglas received the Mains of Bonjedward from her half-sister Lady Isabella, the Countess of Mar and Garioch. These lands were said to be the unentailed lands of Bonjedward. (Charter of 1404 signed at Kildrummy).

    “Surviving documentation from the years following Isabella’s receipt of Mar upon the death of her mother c.1391 depicts a clear attempt to consolidate her authority in the earldom, bartering her inherited Douglas lands to piece Mar back together and divert Angus and Douglas attention away from her northern estates. According to a charter by James of Sandilands, Lord of Caldor to George Douglas earl of Angus between April and May 1397, Isabella’s territorial gains in the wake of her brother’s death (if it is James then he died in 1388) had been substantial. Sandilands’ charter, a resignation of any future claims to Isabella’s unentailed estates should she die without an heir, lists them thus: the barony of Cavers, the sheriffship of Roxburgh with custody of the castle, and all fees pertaining to the said office, with the pertinents; the whole lordship of the town, castle and forest of Jedworth (now Jedburgh), with the lands of Bonjedward… Isabella’s grant of her demesne lands of Bonjedward to Thomas Johnson and his wife (Isabella’s ‘sister’) Margaret in 1404 could suggest that Isabella was slowly regaining control of her chancery…”
    [Decline and Fall – the earls and the earldom of Mar – c1281 to 1513. Kay S Jack – PhD Thesis – University of Stirling – December,2016].

    About the Unentailed Lands of Bonegewort/Bonjedward (translated from Latin) –
    Carta Isabelle comitisse de Marre de Bonegedwort AD 1404 “...of our own free will gave our faithful Thomas son of John and our beloved sister Margaret of Douglas his wife all our demesne land of Bunegedwort with appurtenances with 20 (marcates) marked ...lands of earth lying next to our demesne land of Bunegedwort. Beginning the east part of the aforesaid husbandry land and thus extending to the west part until the aforesaid 20 marcates of land with appurtenances shall be satisfied in full. Belonging by inheritance to us in the forest of Jedwort within the viscountcy of Roxburgh for homage and service of the said Thomas and Margaret his wife our sister and whichever lives longer and after the death of the said Thomas and Margaret our nephew John of Douglas son of the aforesaid Thomas and Margaret and heirs of the said John of Douglas lawfully begotten of his body...In proof in which case our seal is appended to our charter at Kyndromy 12 Nov in the year of Our Lord 1404 with noblemen as witnesses...”

    I would like to know what were the entailed lands if any and what were the unentailed lands of Bonjedward? Also where were the (early) Earls of Angus positioned in all of this?

    This is the main text of my document which is at the Douglas Archives and which I wrote in 2013. Naturally I am unable to include any images here.

    Sally E Douglas

    3 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-11-05
    User data
  25. CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA - October, 1929
    List
    Public

    South Africa – October 1929
    “...The Discovery is 198 ft long and 34 ft beam and 16 ft draught, she is fairly small, but very strong, and neatly built, her engines are 400 HP and drive her at 6 knots, she uses about 7 tons of coal per day. They took the yards off the center or main mast, to stop her rolling and to stop windage. She is square rigged or the fore mast with trysails in between the other masts and a mizzen sail aft. . .She has loaded an enormous amount of gear aboard here. We are issued with warm Geelong blankets, a pair of trousers, a lumber jacket, books and an Antarctic Cap. We will get other clothes later on. They have plenty of tobacco, books and food etc. ..I brought some tools as they have very few for my job...We are taking 800 gallons of petrol, enough for 160 hours flying. I expect we will only do about 70 hours. The wireless set for our machine is a sending and receiving set, which should work OK up to 100 miles away from the ship. It is also fixed that in case of a forced landing we can send and receive messages. We will have all sorts of recording instruments attached to the machine so I suppose we will have our work cut out getting it off the water at times.” By Eric Douglas

    Before the Discovery left Cape Town in October, 1929 - Things Seen To-day (Newspaper report) - "Flying Officer Douglas of the Antarctic expedition, keenly in training by sprinting up and down Fish Hoek beach at dawn (Fish Hoek being a coastal town near Cape Town)...Several cases of Australian manufactured blankets consigned from Geelong 'to SY Discovery, Table Bay Docks'...Wry faces by Sir Douglas Mawson's band of explorers when they heard there was to be 'an Official Inspection'...Captain Hurley, in a grimy white sweater, photographing Vice-Admiral R M Burmester (Rudolph M Burmester of the Royal Navy) in Naval frock-coat on board the Discovery - a seafaring contrast".

    (Eric Douglas Collection)

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    43 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-11-01
    User data
  26. CAPTAIN Alexander Lorimer Kennedy - BANZARE, ANTARCTICA
    List
    Public

    Alexander Lorimer Kennedy (1889-1972) was a born at Woodside, South Australia. He became a Draughtsman, Surveyor, Magnetician and Cartographer. He had studied Science at the University of Adelaide and was in the Militia there. In 1915 Kennedy completed a Bachelor of Engineering Degree at the University of Adelaide. He later obtained a Diploma in Mining and became a Fellowship member of the Australian School of Mines.

    In 1930-1931 Kennedy was on Voyage 2 of the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition of 1929-1931. Sir Douglas Mawson was the organizer and leader of the expedition and the ship was the Discovery. Like all the explorers on BANZARE Kennedy undertook a variety of tasks and all were expected to participate and that included such activities as Marine stations, Hydrogen balloon tests to measure the upper atmosphere with a theodolite, gathering specimens from the Sub Antarctic and Antarctic lands, photography, landings from the motor boat or dinghy, shovelling Cardiff briquettes, and even the ship’s carpentry and taking part in night-time entertainment such as dressing up and singing and dancing. Plus as the sails were furled sea shanties by the ship’s crew accompanied the task.

    So it is no surprise that Kennedy wrote the copperplate script on rag paper for Sir Douglas Mawson’s Antarctic Proclamation of 5th January, 1931 at Anemometer Hill, Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. Frank Hurley had written the wording for him to copy. The proclamation was signed by Sir Douglas Mawson and stored in a canister made from three cocoa tins soldered together. The soldering was carried out by Frank Hurley and Eric Douglas. They soldered canisters for the many proclamations. The original proclamation can be found online at the National Museum of Australia, and is now replaced by a replica plaque at Commonwealth Bay.

    During the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) of 1911-1914 Kennedy was in the party which set up the Western base in 1912. On this expedition Kennedy was a Magnetician and Cartographer and much of his work was night observation work. He also had to establish his equipment in an igloo to avoid contact with anything metallic as it would influence his magnetic readings. The Western base was on the ice shelf in Queen Mary Land. Dr Douglas Mawson was the leader of the expedition and the ship was the Aurora. During this Western base experience Kennedy was involved in several sledging surveying parties and as a Cartographer he accompanied Frank Wild on a sledging journey mapping a vast area of the Queen Mary Land's coast.

    On returning from the Antarctic in 1914 Kennedy was appointed as Magnetic Observer at the Carnegie Institute in Washington, District of Columbia.

    During 1916-1918 he was in the AIF Australian Tunnelling Corps and served in France for two years in WWI. From 1921 Kennedy worked at the University of Adelaide for four years and was the Chief Assistant at the Adelaide Observatory. In 1924 he spent two years at Mt Stromlo Observatory in the ACT where he was Assistant. By 1928 Kennedy was a Mining Engineer in Western Australia. During WW II he enlisted in the Australian Army at Woodside, South Australia in April, 1943. He gave his next of kin as Melba Kennedy.

    It is noticed that in September, 2007 Kennedy’s ‘referee’ field hockey stick was up for sale at Christie’s, London. It had been taken by him to the Antarctic at the time of AAE 1911-1914 and later given to a neighbour by his family. It made $3,035. While in November, 2014 Captain Alexander Lorimer Kennedy’s medals plus two sets of fibre dog tags were up for sale at the Noble Numismatics Company.

    See - http://www.eoas.info/biogs/P002232b.htm

    Eric Douglas did comment in his notes that soldering tins together to be used as canisters did become a bit tedious. He preferred to do some carpentry around the ship.

    Sally Douglas

    9 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-01-20
    User data
  27. CAPTAIN John King Davis - BANZARE, ANTARCTICA
    List
    Public

    John King Davis (1888-1967) was born at Kew, Surrey, England. His family had early connections with Australia. Davis’ father James Green Davis had taught at Sydney Grammar School and Henry Edward King of Queensland was his uncle.

    Captain John King Davis became a Seaman, a Ship’s Mate, Master of Troop carrying vessels and Antarctic exploration ships and a Ship’s Navigator. He was Australia’s Director of Navigation for nearly 30 years.

    Davis went to School in London and then Oxfordshire. In 1900 he and his father left London for Cape Town, South Africa. On arriving at Cape Town Davis junior joined the crew of the mail-steamer Carisbrooke Castle as a steward boy working his way to London. On reaching London he signed up for four years on the sailing ship Celtic Chef and visited Australia for the first time. He then completed his apprenticeship as a seaman and in July, 1905 passed the certificate of 2nd Officer (or 2nd Mate).

    In July, 1907 at the age of about twenty Davis was chosen by Ernest Shackleton as Chief Officer on the steam sailing ship Nimrod which was to head south to the Antarctic. On board as well but a few years older than Davis was the young Douglas Mawson who was participating as a Geologist.

    On completion of this expedition in 1909 Davis took command of the Nimrod and until March 1911 Davis assisted Sir Ernest Shackleton in winding up the affairs of this expedition.

    Captain Davis was then appointed Master of the ship Aurora by Dr Douglas Mawson for the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) of 1911 – 1914. Being involved in this expedition meant that three Antarctic Voyages were made by Davis as Master of the ship Aurora - December, 1911 to March, 1912; December 1912 to March 1913 and November, 1913 to February, 1914.

    At the start of WW I Davis volunteered for duty and became attached to military embarkation staff in Sydney and he subsequently commanded the transport ship Boonah conveying troops and horses to Egypt and England.

    In October 1916 again with Shackleton as leader, he commanded the Ross Sea Relief Expedition endeavouring to rescue a shore party of ten set up by Shackleton at Cape Evans in McMurdo Sound on the Ross Sea. This was a logistics support party which was the second part of a two part Antarctic adventure by Sir Ernest Shackleton under the heading of the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-1917. This party of ten had become stranded when the Aurora which was previously used for the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) 1911-1914 broke away from its mooring in a gale a McMurdo Sound in May, 1915. The ordeal for the men on the ship was to last for 312 days of aimless drifting while the men on shore were stranded with meagre rations.

    The Aurora was caught in extremely heavy pack ice and it was carried into the Ross Sea and Southern Ocean but unable to get through the pack, it was locked in. The 312 day drift took the ship and crew on an unwanted journey of 1600 nautical miles. In February, 1916 as the pack ice broke up the Aurora was finally able to break free but it took till March, 1916 to get completely out of the pack and reach Port Chalmers, New Zealand.

    The Aurora had to have major repairs and finally in January, 1917 it headed to McMurdo Sound with Captain Davis as Master to collect the stranded men. In that interval however three of the ten men had perished.

    From April 1917 Davis supervised the erection of a mechanical coal–handling plant at Port Pirie.

    He also became a Lieutenant Commander in the Royal Australian Navy reserve and was appointed as the Naval Transport Officer in London and dealt with the repatriation of the Australian Imperial Force.

    In 1920 he became the Commonwealth Director of Navigation and he remained in this position until his retirement in February 1949. It was a position which he had really sought and at last the position was his.

    Nevertheless, Davis took leave from his position as Director of Navigation in 1929-1930 to join Voyage 1 of the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition with Sir Douglas Mawson as leader. Davis was appointed by Mawson as the Master of the ship Discovery but the understanding (by Mawson anyway) was that if Mawson was onboard then Davis was second in command and he was only in command if Mawson was not on the ship. This led to ongoing but civilized conflict between Mawson and Davis and this conflict is documented in diaries by these two men and by other crew members. Davis did not join Voyage 2 of the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition in 1930-1931.

    From 1947 to 1962 Davis was a member of the Australian Government’s Planning Committee on Australian Antarctic Policy. Davis received many awards and in common with his fellow BANZARE Antarctic explorers he received the Polar Medal, bestowed by the King in 1934. All members of BANZARE expedition received the Polar Medal and if the two voyages were made a bar or clasp was also awarded. A miniature medal was also part of the award.

    Features in the Antarctic were also named for Captain Davis by Mawson as were features named by Mawson for members of what he called the ‘Scientific party’ and also the ‘Ship’s Company’. Importantly features were also named by Mawson for members of the Government both British and Australian eg Scullin Monolith after the Australia’s Prime Minister and Financial Benefactors eg Mac-Robertson Land after Sir Macpherson Robertson. In Australia’s case for these features to remain on Australian maps they had to, or have to ultimately be gazetted by the Australian Government.

    Davis wrote about the Antarctic in "With the Aurora in Antarctica" 1911-1914 (published in 1919) and "High Latitude" (1964). As well his Antarctic journals have been published as "Trial By Ice - The Antarctic Journals of John King Davis" - edited by Louise Crossley - Erskine Press 1997.

    The State Library of Victoria website shows that they have papers by Davis and many of his images are online there.

    The Australian Antarctic Division at Kingston, Tasmania holds a box of lantern slides by Captain Davis.

    Captain John King Davis was recognized by his contemporaries as a skilled navigator of Antarctic seas and oceans. Davis knew the geography of the Antarctic and the associated maps and charts were his forte. He depended on barometer readings and variation charts to keep the Discovery on track. But there were times during BANZARE when Davis had incomplete information and had no idea what was in store and he wrote about these concerns in his Journal, even if briefly. “...It is difficult to know what to do for the best...As it is, we are blindly groping about in a maze of ice...” December 26th, 1929.

    Davis’ was known to be impatient with Scientists and laymen, hence his nickname ‘Gloomy’. He was determined to stay in command of the ship and he placed the safety of the ship and its crew as paramount.

    Sally Douglas

    4 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-03-14
    User data
  28. Captain Kenneth Norman MacKenzie - BANZARE
    List
    Public



    Kenneth Norman MacKenzie (1897-1951) was born in Oban, Argyllshire, Scotland.

    Before he joined BANZARE MacKenzie was working with the Ellerman City Line in London.

    He was appointed as the Chief Officer of the Discovery on BANZARE Voyage 1 in 1929-1930 and was the Master of the Discovery on BANZARE Voyage 2 in 1930-1931 after Captain John King Davis had resigned. When BANZARE finished in 1931 MacKenzie sailed the ship Discovery back to London via New Zealand and Cape Horn.

    Kenneth Norman MacKenzie had joined up for WWI at the age of about 16 but when his correct age was identified he was kept under training for two years. In WWI he eventually fought on the Western Front. He was captured twice and was gassed and he had over a year in hospital recuperating.

    After the War he joined the Merchant Fleet as a radio officer. Soon after that, with his Marconi certificate in hand he was sailing to the Far East as the Chief Radio Officer in the Blue Funnel liner, Titan. However, with his career stalling MacKenzie resigned and was then employed with the Union Castle Line as a Seaman, and was later promoted to Bosun.

    Subsequently he passed his certificates as a Watch Officer and a Master with the Ellerman City Line. After returning to England from BANZARE in 1931 MacKenzie returned to the Ellermman City Line. In 1933 he made another move and was gazetted into the Egyptian Navy with the rank of Commander. He made continuous voyages of research from Alexandria to the Indian Ocean till May, 1934. On returning to London MacKenzie became the Assistant Marine Superintendent of the Ellerman City Line. Soon after he joined the British Railways as Assistant Marine Superintendent of the railway’s fleet of cross channel steamers.

    His health was never really good after his WWI experiences. He had a heart attack in 1938 and he worked under increasing strain till he died in 1951.

    Captain MacKenzie’s logs of BANZARE are at the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich. They are under Collections, then search BANZARE – “Typescript transcript of Captain Mackenzie's two volume diary kept as mate and then master of the DISCOVERY during the B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. Antarctic Expedition of 1929-1931”.

    Images of Captain Kenneth Norman MacKenzie can be found at the Dundee Heritage Trust site, online. There are also some written artefacts which show MacKenzie’s signature.

    Sally Douglas

    3 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-03-27
    User data
  29. CAPTAIN TICKELL - and the Hotchkiss Shells or Shot. Hotchkiss 37mm Steel Projectiles
    List
    Public

    A letter from Mr Thomas to Eric Douglas - likely in the early 1920's - "Mr Douglas - As I think these shells may be of interest to you. Would you accept them from me for your past kindness. They were given to My Mother in law years ago from Capt. Tickell. I think at that time he was C.O. of the old turret ship H.M.A.S. Cerberus. It was at the finish of the Boxer rebellion in China the Boer War was at the same time if I am not mistaken. It is peculiar that he gave them, he had not noticed that they were live shells and after returning to Melbourne, he sent a telegram saying do not handle the shells until I see you again. They are harmless now so all is well. R these guns are out of date now? Yours Mr Thomas"
    These shells (or more correctly shots I was told) were donated, along with the letter from Mr Thomas; to John Rogers, President of the Cerberus in December, 2012. http://www.cerberus.com.au/hotchkiss_1pounder_slideshow.html
    John advised me almost immediately that they were not Pom Pom shells as the Australian War Memorial had advised me in good faith but were Hotchkiss Shells (Shots) from the 1st Class Torpedo Boat Childers. What is more one of the shells still had its fuse and gun powder and the other had traces of gunpowder - so not so safe at all. In my time I had always handled these shells with great care 'just in case they were live'! It was not till I re-visited that letter in 2012 that I connected that it was about the shells which I knew nothing about in terms of their history.
    The letter and shells were destined for the Geelong Maritime Museum.
    I think that Mr Thomas may have been a resident of Brighton or Middle Brighton, Victoria at the time that he wrote the letter.

    (Eric Douglas Collection).

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    21 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-01-15
    User data
  30. Commander Morton Henry Moyes - BANZARE, Voyage 1
    List
    Public

    Morton Henry Moyes (1886-1981) was born at Koolunga, South Australia.
    Moyes was on the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition Voyage 1 in 1929-30. This Expedition was under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson. He was the Cartographer and Survey Officer on this Voyage. He contributed substantially to the Meteorological volumes of the BANZARE Reports.
    Moyes attended St Peter College in Adelaide. In 1906-1909 Moyes was both the high and broad jump champion of South Australia. In 1910 he graduated from the University of Adelaide with a Bachelor of Science Degree. His Geology Lecturer was Dr Douglas Mawson. Moyes represented the University in football and athletics.
    One of Moyes’ two brothers was the Cricketer Alban ‘Johnny’ Moyes who was also a Cricket commentator and a Journalist. His other brother who was actually called John became an Anglican Bishop.
    Moyes was the Meteorologist for Frank Wild of the Western base as part of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) in 1911-1914. The leader of this expedition was Dr Douglas Mawson. Before this work in meteorology Moyes had only received a few days instruction in meteorology in Hobart during November, 1911.
    In 1912 Moyes spent nine weeks in solitude at the Western base while the other members were out on a sledging trip led by Frank Wild. He returned from the Antarctic in 1913.
    In 1913 Moyes became Headmaster of the University Coaching College in Sydney. In February, 1914 he was recruited as an RAN Naval Instructor at the RAN Naval College. He first taught Mathematics and then Navigation.
    In 1915 he spent some months on the HMAS Encounter. In January, 1916 he was a Senior Naval Instructor and was appointed as the Senior Navigating Officer on the Aurora, commanded by Captain John King Davis when it headed south to the Ross Sea, Antarctica to rescue marooned members of the Shackleton Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914-1917).
    Captain Moyes resigned from the Navy in October, 1918 but rejoined in January, 1919. In December, 1919 he was an Instructor Lieutenant. In 1920 he was promoted to Instructor Lieutenant Commander and in 1924 to the rank of Commander.
    After BANZARE ended Moyes resumed his Royal Australian Naval Career and spent nearly six years on HMAS Australia as the Fleet Instructor Officer. In 1935 he was awarded an OBE. From 1933 -1935 Moyes was the President of the Geographical Society of New South Wales. In June 1941 he became the first Instructor Captain (acting). In November, 1943 he was appointed as Director of Education Training at Navy Office. His Naval career ended in 1946. In 1951 Moyes was the Chief Rehabilitation Officer for the Commonwealth Government.
    In his later years Moyes suffered from poor eyesight which he attributed to snow-blindness in the Antarctic. (Told to me in person).
    In 1977 Captain Morton Moyes was interviewed by freelance journalist Ros Bowden and the interview can be found at the State Library of New South Wales online site, under ‘Archive’. This interview can be downloaded as a MP3. In 2014 Monica Moyes, niece of Morton Moyes had published “the Aura of the Antarctic -Antarctic Collections of Captain Morton Moyes”. Printing was by Peacock Design and Print.

    Sally Douglas

    7 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-04-25
    User data
  31. CONSTITUTIONAL CLUB, MELBOURNE - address by Eric Douglas in 1936
    List
    Public

    Ellsworth Expedition - the Polar Star and the Wyatt Earp - Discovery 2 at the Bay of Whales in 1936

    ...possibly this...

    "The trip South in the Discovery 2

    I was asked to come to-day to give you gentlemen a brief resume of our trip south in the Discovery 2; to attempt the rescue of the American explorer, Mr Lincoln Ellsworth, and his pilot Mr Hollick Kenyon.

    After hurried preparations we left Melbourne on December 23rd for the Bay of Whales via Dunedin.

    Xmas day was one to be remembered. We ran into heavy weather. The ship was rolling and pitching and you can imagine that some of us did not do justice to our Xmas dinner.

    At Dunedin we took aboard our final fuel supplies and headed South.

    For the next five days the ship made rapid progress in fine weather, we were very busy preparing emergency gear to be carried by the Wapiti Seaplane.

    This embraced a sledge, tent, sleeping bags and sufficient food and fuel for 2 men to last 30 days. This is necessary as in the advent of a forced landing on the ice plateau we were prepared to sledge back to our base.

    By this time isolated bergs were sighted and shortly afterwards we met up with pack ice.

    After 120 miles in open pack it became heavier and closed together and our rapid progress was brought practically to a standstill. This pack is approximately 25 feet thick with only 4 to 6 feet showing above the surface of the water.

    The following day we broke into a small pool of water which enabled F/O Murdoch and myself to take our first flight in the moth seaplane. As the air temperature was now at freezing point the engine had to be pre-heated before starting, this taking approximately, 25 minutes. We were then lowered from the ship into the water, we taxied for some minutes to ensure that our run-way was free from submerged ice before the take off.

    We climbed to 2000 feet and flew several miles to observe the conditions to the south.

    The following day we made another flight which was of great assistance to the Captain of the ship because we observed impenetrable ice to the east with good conditions to the south west.

    Next morning we came to the open sea and were only 300 miles from the Bay of Whales. In all we had broken through approx 400 miles of pack ice.

    On the morning of Jan 15th, the ice glare of the Ross Barrier was visible over the horizon. This appears as a bright white land in the sky.

    Soon afterwards the barrier face came into view. The barrier extends over 500 miles in an east west direction, with a sea face of approximately 100 feet high. At the Bay of Whales it extends towards the Pole for 480 miles.
    At about 8PM we entered this bay and steamed towards the edge of the frozen sea. The mouth of the bay would be about 8 miles across.

    Twenty minutes later the ships Officers reported that they could see two orange coloured flags fluttering in the breeze alongside what appeared to be a tent. We knew that Ellsworth carried signal strips of this colour and our hopes were raised that he and Kenyon might be at Little America.

    The ship then fired off half a dozen maroon rockets which exploded with tremendous noise.

    As no movement was observed on the Barrier, Murdoch and myself made ready for a flight to Little America.

    It was a difficult take off, the sea spray froze on our wings and floats due to the low temperature. We flew over their tent and observing no sign of life set a course to Little America which is 6 miles further South. As we progressed, flying conditions became very difficult. We were now experiencing the snow blind light which Admiral Byrd describes as “Flying in a bowl of cream”.

    The conditions became clearer and we saw what appeared to be cracks in the ice, but on approaching closer these changed shape into wireless masts and poles. We knew then that we were over Little America.

    After circling for some minutes, to our amazement a figure of a man appeared as if he had emerged from a burrow. He casually waved his arms and did not seem concerned at our arrival.

    We dropped a small parachute containing food and a letter from the Captain of Discovery 2 asking him if they were fit to begin walking towards the coast. We were more than delighted to know that at last one of the fliers was safe.

    We then flew back to the ship, alighted alongside and shouted the glad tidings to the anxiously awaiting Captain and crew.

    The news was immediately wirelessed to the outside world who were also waiting. A little late a rapidly moving figure could be seen on the sky line. A party from the ship met him some distance away and it proved to be Kenyon.

    Kenyon greeted our people by saying casually “Its jolly good of you chaps to drop in on us like this”. We learnt that Ellsworth was suffering from minor frost bitten feet and would attempt the walk next day. A party made the journey to Little America and safely returned with him.

    On later investigation we found that the huts were completely snowed over and a ramp had been cut through the snow to the door of the hut in which they had lived for a month. Mr Ellsworth was glad to be on board the Discovery and was amazed at the preparation made on his behalf by the Australian Government.

    Knowing a little of the flying conditions in the Antarctic I consider that their Trans-Antarctic Flight was a magnificent achievement. This, to my mind, is only possible of accomplishment with due attention to three main factors, namely:-
    A suitable aeroplane
    Camping and sledging equipment and
    A trained and competent crew.

    Mr Hollick Kenyon the pilot of the “Polar Star” was formerly a pilot in the Canadian Airways. The experience gained in flying in Canadian winters adapted him for Antarctic flying.

    Our venture having a successful termination we look back with gratitude to the people responsible for the organizing and equipping of the expedition.

    It is fitting for me to close by saying that we on board the Discovery 2 heard with deep sorrow of the death of his Majesty King George the 5th. Our ceremony at the Bay of Whales was simple. We lowered the flag to half-mast and observed two minutes silence.

    Thank you Gentlemen."

    (Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection)

    Press cuttings on the search for Ellsworth and the deck log for the RRS Discovery II are held at the National Oceanography Centre at the University of Southampton. A press cutting example - http://viewer.soton.ac.uk/nol/image/2253/282/#head

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    37 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  32. Cunzierton, Oxnam (Cheviot Hills)
    List
    Public

    Cunzierton - It was once assocated with the Douglases of Bonjedward, Jedburgh.

    Cunzierton (1540), Cunzeirton, Cunziertoun, Cunyertoun, Cungiertoun, Cunzearton, Cunzeartoune (c1537), Cundrestine, or Cuniardon (1468) refers to a place or an area in the Cheviot Hills at Oxnam in Roxburghshire (Scotlands Borders).

    The following Cunzierton localities can be found on maps or in texts – Cunzierton Farm, Cunzierton Burn, Cunzierton Hill and Cunzierton Fort.

    The great Roman Road ‘after skirting Cunzierton and passing to the south of Shibden Hill, continues its course in the same direction, and now in a perfectly straight line, past Cappuck, where it crosses Oxnam Water to Bonjedward…’

    It is thought that the name denotes an animal and came from Old French conniniere meaning ‘rabbit warren’. [Place names and the Scots language… M R Scott – University of Saltford, Manchester 2007].

    James Hardy described Cunzierton Hill in 1885 – “is a steep bare green dry porphyritic hill, slightly craggy on the upper part, and having a rocky and grassy top spread out into a considerable area, which is encircled by a moderately elevated single camp ring, with its accompanying outer and inner trenches and entered by a road on the NW side. There is on the south border, an oblong walled compartment such as is usually reckoned to be a cattle fold, that may be more modern than the camp, and one or two shallow depressions like the floor of hut-circles…It is extremely cold up here and fully exposed to the wind. About 50 yards lower where the ascent is easiest, an additional mound of defence is apparent. Many other of the truncated hill tops around here have their crowns ringed with entrenchments. The fort ‘occupying the height southward of Bloodylaws is the most conspicuous…’ We looked down on Cunzierton steading, which consists of only a few houses: there were some trees marking an older place in a lower position. The name Cunzierton may signify the King’s garth (Cunnings-garth): or the Coney-garth or warren…” [History of the Berwickshire Naturalists’ Club – Volume 11].

    “On the hill at Cunzierton…the outlines of a strongly fortified British Station may be clearly traced. It consists of a large rampart, with double trenches surrounding the level area on the summit; and about fifty yards lower, where the ascent is easier, an additional mound of defence is likewise apparent. Besides, there is the remains of a Roman encampment most distinctly visible upon a somewhat commanding eminence called Pennymuir…” [The New Statistical Account – Scotland: Roxburgh, Peebles, Selkirk – 1845].

    From Scotlands Places (1858-1860) – Cunzierton Fort – a British Station. “An oblong Entrenchment on the Sumit (summit) of Cunzierton Hill. Supposed to be the remains of one of those Ancient places of fortification used by the British. It is generally supposed to be the remains of a Roman Camp”.

    Canmore - https://canmore.org.uk/site/58009/cunzierton-hill

    There are conflicting interpretations as to whether the camp was British or Roman. I think that it appears that it was initially a Roman Camp.

    Two ancient axes have been found at Cunzierton. One of the axes was made of green aventurine. [Scotland in Pagan Times:The Bronze and Stone Ages].

    A jadeite axe from Cunzierton farm is in the National Museum of Antiquities in Scotland. It is curved and has a very highly polished surface.

    Two polished jade axes from Cunzierton Farm are in the NMAS. One was ploughed up about 1882 and was donated by A Stavert in 1908…The other was found in 1899 and is on loan from the Royal Scottish Academy - https://canmore.org.uk/site/58015/cunzierton-farm

    Cunzierton was once a stronghold of the Douglases -

    • In 1540 Cunzierton was associated with William Douglas of Bonjedward.

    • There is said to be no trace of William’s 1540 home at Cunzierton in the Cheviot Hills – “There is now no trace of William Douglas of Bonjedward’s house at Cunzeirton in the Cheviot Hills, but of its razing and the theft of his cattle in 1540 (cited in Armstrong, 1883, LI, App. XXXIV) we have the following record: ‘Thai come apon the XXI day of November last bypast, to his house of Cunzertoun, with ledderis, spadis, schobs, gavelockis and axis, cruellie assegit, brak and undirmyndit the said place, to have wynnyn the samyn, and tuik his cornis, and caist to the yettis, and brynt thairin VIIJ ky and oxin, and spulyeit and tuik away with thaime XXVJ ky and oxin, an horss…’” (Zeune 1992)

    • “Zeune mistakenly ascribes Cunzeirton to Dumfriesshire with the suffix ‘DF’ each time it is mentioned, however, the grid reference provided in the index (NT 741 180) is correct and the house would have been up in the Cheviots with a direct route from Douglas’s seat in Bonjedward (near Jedburgh) along Dere Street.

    • Zeune (1992) supposes that Cunzeirton must have been a pele-house or bastle with livestock kept in the ground floor otherwise eight cattle and oxen ‘therein’ would not have been lost. In general, however, the livestock may have been kept on the property or ‘place’ rather than in the house itself. Given that this record is an official complaint lodged by Douglas against English reivers, it may have been exaggerated in the hope of compensation for 34 animals rather than the 26 that may be recovered…” [The Laird’s Houses of Scotland …1560-1770. PhD by Research – Sabina R Strachan – University of Edinburgh 2008].

    • In 1537 “Andrew and John Hall were denounced as rebels for not underlying the law of art? and of the inbringing of certain Englishmen to the place of William Douglas of Cunzeartoune, and Percy Hall and others found caution to answer for the burning of Cunzeartoune. Although it is in the parish of Oxnam, Cunzeartoune seems latterly to have been in the barony of Hounam (Hounum/Hownam)…” [History of the Berwickshire Naturalists’ Club, Volume 11].

    • This is relevant to the paragraph above –
    In 1510 Robert Hall a notorious villain from Heavyside appeared in the Jedburgh Court accused of a long list of crimes. One such crime was stealing a cow and 11 hogs from the Laird of Bon-Jedward. In 1537 sheep were stolen from William Douglas. “Andrew Hall, called ‘Fat Cow’ and William Hall ‘Wanton Pintle’ were denounced rebels for stealing sheep from William Douglas of Bon Jedward and his neighbours…” They also stole corn from Douglases’ place at Cunzierton. Another Hall rebel was John Hall and he was called ‘Wide Hose’ from ‘the amplitude of his breeches’. It appears that the raid where the sheep were stolen ‘ended in serious reprisals’ for all these men ‘were slain later by the Douglases’.

    • It also appears that in 1537 Andrew and John Hall stole from William’s farm at Cunzierton rather than at Bonjedward. If there were reprisals by the Douglases it seems that it was for theft by the Halls and for the Halls leading others to the home of William Douglas at Cunzierton which resulted in its razing and wanton destruction. Plus, as a reprisal for the theft of cattle and oxen which William Douglas claimed as 34 in number.

    “In 1605 James Stewart who served as heir to his brother Sir William Stewart of Traquair, in one half of the lands and barony of Hounan, commonly called Fillogar (Philogar) and Cunzearton. …” [History of the Berwickshire Naturalists’ Club, Volume 11].

    In September,1696 William Douglas of Cunzierton represented Roxburgh as did Douglas of Bonjeward (they were separate individuals). It was about legislation ‘Act anent the supply of eighteen month’s cess upon land rent’. (Parliamentary Register – Edinburgh).

    In another entry in 1696 along with ‘Douglafs of Bonjedburgh’, ‘William Douglafs of Cungiartoun’ was listed for Roxburgh. [‘Acta Parliamentorum Gulielmi’].

    ‘William Douglas of Cunyertoun’ was on the Roxburghshire Land Tax Roll between 1645 and 1831. (Scotlands Places).

    In 1691 to 1695, four persons paid Hearth Tax at Cunyertoun. (Scotlands Places).

    In the reign of George III (1760 onwards) there was a ‘Reverend James Douglas of Cunzierton’. [Anno Regni Georgii III. Regis…]. It has been found that he was the Reverend Dr James Douglas, son of Archibald Douglas of Cavers.

    Around 1770 there was a ‘Dr Douglas of Cunzierton’ [A Directory of Landownership in Scotland – Loretta R Timperley 1976]. He is likely to have been the Rev. Dr James Douglas, as in the above entry.

    In the mid to late 1880’s Archibald Stavert was at Cunzierton. [NLS Directories - online].

    Cunzierton Hill – “A Considerable height on the Cunzierton farm the property of Mr Stavert (Scotlands Places – 1858-1860). This implies that Cunzierton farm extended to the Cunzierton Hill.

    In 1992 John Henderson stated that ‘Cunzierton Farm is owned by the Misses Douglas who live at Swinside Hall’.

    Deeds relating to the lands of Cunziertoun –
    Box 5, Bundle 1 – 1632, 1633, 1647, 1671, 1672, 1690, 1691, 1693, 1694, 1711, 1713
    Box 5, Bundle 2 – 1718, 1721, 1723, 1727, 1730, 1731, 1739, 1748, 1750

    1694 – Hugh Scott of Gala and Christian (Douglas) sister of William Douglas of Cunziertoun.

    Inventories of Writs – Cunziertoun 1713

    [National Library of Scotland – Inventory Acc.6803 – Douglas of Cavers Papers].

    Sally E Douglas

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-11-05
    User data
  33. De Havilland Gipsy Moth DH60X – RAAF Serial No – A7-55
    List
    Public

    De Havilland Gipsy Moth DH60X – RAAF Serial No – A7-55 – Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935-1936.

    The de Havilland Gipsy Moth A7-55 was unusual at the time in that it was built at Cockatoo Island Dockyard and Engineering Company and would have been built under the watchful eye of Sir Lawrence Wackett, who became known as the father of the Australian Aircraft Industry. Eric Douglas knew and admired Lawrence Wackett, and he was Eric’s boss at Point Cook in 1925.
    This Gipsy Moth was delivered to the RAAF on 4th April, 1933. A de Havilland Aircraft production record online has it listed as a DH60G but Eric Douglas wrote that it was a DH60X. On 22nd April, 1937 it was listed as ‘deteriorated as beyond repair’.
    There were two RAAF seaplanes loaded aboard the Discovery II at Williamstown in December, 1935 as part of the preparation for the search for Lincoln Ellsworth and his flying companion Herbert Hollick–Kenyon, known from the search party’s point of view as the Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935-1936.
    One aircraft was a Westland Wapiti Mark 1A with a Jupiter V111F Engine – RAAF Serial Number A5-37 and the other was the de Havilland Gipsy Moth DH60X – RAAF Serial No A7-55.
    The Gipsy Moth was housed on the roof of the Discovery II’s hospital. While the Wapiti was stowed at the stern of the ship with its wings removed. The Wapiti did not fly in the Antarctic. It was a back up plane and taken if flights into the hinterland were to be made, but this did prove to be necessary.
    The de Havilland Gipsy Moth DH60X was rigged as a float seaplane for this search. A land under-carriage and skis were carried to convert the moth if necessary for ice and snow operations, but that did not prove to be the case.
    The aircraft was fitted with an extra fuel tank of 12 gallons capacity, which together with its normal tankage of 19 gallons would have provided 4 ½ hours safe of duration cruising at a speed of 80 miles per hour (Eric Douglas' notes).
    When the Gipsy Moth was in the air there was no communication between it and the ship. So the plan for the aircraft was that it was to be primarily employed in local reconnaissance flights and to not proceed beyond the visibility distance of the ship. The flying operations for the Gipsy Moth were in the vicinity of pack ice and in short reconnaissance flights in the Bay of Whales.
    The running of the Gipsy engine, a guide from previous experiences - If the air temperature was to fall below 34 F it would be necessary to pre-heat the engine and lubricating oil prior to starting the engine. In this regard, benzoline which is a low volatile spirit is excellent for priming the cylinders. Before attempting a take off the engine must be thoroughly warmed up by steady taxying at medium revs (Eric Douglas' notes).
    The slinging of the seaplane ("out" and "in" board) and taking off, a guide from previous experiences - The most suitable derrick boom is one of sufficient length which enables the aircraft to be hoisted out board nose first with its engine running. For the take off, the best position of the ship is one where sufficient up wind distance, at least 400 yards exists with the aircraft lowered over on the lee side with the ship practically stationary. It is advisable to have a motor boat party standing by during the flying operations.(Eric Douglas' notes).
    By Eric Douglas from a short version of the locating of Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon who proved to be safe at ‘Little America’ –
    “…We were now about 400 miles from the barrier face of the famous Ross Ice Barrier. Except for isolated ice bergs we were now in a glorious blue sea and able to continue at full speed. Early on the morning of 15th January we saw the ice glare of the barrier which was observed as a bright white glare over the southern horizon.
    At about 3PM the barrier face came into view and by 4PM we were close to the ice cliffs and steaming parallel to them to the east towards the Bay of Whales. At this time there was a terrific glare over the ice barrier, the height of which appeared to be about 100 feet, it was a weird sight.
    The air temperature had dropped from freezing to 18 degrees Fahrenheit due to the cold outflow of air from the barrier. This was also noticeable by the formation of sea smoke over the sea caused by the cold air striking the relatively warm water. At 8PM we reached the Bay of Whales and steamed south until we arrived at the edge of the frozen bay ice. The width of the bay appeared to be about 8 miles.
    At 8.20PM the Ships Officers reported that they could see two orange coloured flags fluttering in the breeze on top of the barrier face to the east. I had a look through the binoculars and agreed with the observation made. We knew that Ellsworth carried orange coloured signal strips in his plane, several signal rockets were then fired from the ship. They exploded with tremendous noise at a height of about 1000 feet over the ship.
    As no movement was seen on the barrier ice it was presumed that the missing aviators were either dead or possibly at ‘Little America’ 6 miles due south of the flags. Despite the lateness of the evening it was decided to carry out a reconnaissance flight in over the barrier ice as far as ‘Little America’ to see whether there was any indication of life before commencing the search with our Wapiti aeroplane.
    At about 7PM Flying Officer Murdoch and myself were lowered overboard in the Moth and towed clear of the ship. Due to the low temperature (8 F) the sea spray when flying froze on the floats and undersurfaces of the lower wing and it was obvious that we must get off quickly to stop the icing up otherwise the aeroplane would have to be hoisted onboard to clear the ice with hot water. After a long run I managed to get the plane into the air and then climbed slowly to 1000 feet. When we levelled out it was surmised that water in the floats had run aft in the climb and then frozen. I turned towards the barrier and set a course for the locality of ‘Little America’ which we knew would be distinguishable by several tall masts or poles rising out of the snow and ice.
    As we progressed in over the barrier the flying conditions became extremely bad and it was all I could do to keep a steady course. This was due to the snow blind light which we were now experiencing, no horizon to the south was visible due to the extreme glare from the barrier ice merging with the reflected glare from a layer of light clouds and we could see nothing ahead of us except a yellowish glare.
    Some minutes later Murdoch observed what appeared to be black cracks in the ice below and to our surprise as we both looked the cracks appeared to ‘stand up’, we then realised they were poles running out of the snow and ice and that we were over ‘Little America’. I carefully circled the area and we then noticed orange coloured strips near the poles.
    Suddenly we saw the figure of a man appear out of a hole and he started to wave his arms. This caused great excitement between us as we realised it must be either Ellsworth or Kenyon. I continued to circle and after a few minutes we threw overboard a small bag attached to a letter from the Captain of the Discovery II congratulating Ellsworth and Kenyon on their achievement and asking them that if they were well enough, to start out on the six mile hike to the barrier face where they would be met by a land party from the Discovery II…
    I then headed away to the Ross Sea and steered towards an arc of water sky which appeared black against the glare of the barrier and in a few minutes we could pick out the ship. We turned along the barrier face looking for a suitable place for a land party to climb to the barrier from the frozen sea.
    I then flew back to the ship and made an alighting close by. We shut off our engine and shouted out the startling news to the anxiously awaiting Captain and all other members who down to the ships cook had gathered on the poop.
    After the plane was hoisted onboard congratulations were passed all round and all hands joined in the toast to the happy occasion. Within ten minutes after our arrival the news was flashed to Australia…”
    From Eric Douglas’ notes and report on the Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935-1936.

    Sally Douglas

    21 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-01-30
    User data
  34. DISCOVERY - Motor Boat or Launch 'the BANZARE'. Built by Mr E A Jack of Launceston
    List
    Public

    Captain John King Davis of the RRS Discovery (SY Discovery) commissioned Mr Jack of Launceston to build a Motor Boat or Launch for the Ship. (Constructed entirely of Huon pine, 24 ft in length, 7 ft beam, fitted with an 8 horse power engine, two-cylinder marine engine, fitted with a special cabin top and painted navy grey). The boat carried up to 12 persons, had an inboard engine and a removable cabin type of cover. The boat often towed the phram or dingy when trips were made ashore to Sub-Antarctic or Antarctic Islands or the Antarctic mainland. Sometimes the Motor Boat was anchored close to the shore and the final section was made in the phram or dinghy.

    In Antarctic Days with Mawson, the author Dr Harold Fletcher of BANZARE said on page 57 (Voyage 1 - out from Cape Town) "Our motor boat engine was checked by Eric Douglas and found to be in perfect condition. About 5.5 metres in length, the boat had a small wooden cabin forward which could be detatched. It was specifically constructed by a Tasmanian boat builder who had provided similar types for use in the Australian light house service. It was shipped to Cape Town and housed together with the Moth seaplane (initially still in crates) in a grating above deck, in a space usually occupied by the ship's two lifeboats which were left behind..." The motor boat also had oars.

    There was also a collapsible canoe onboard (Mark Pharaoh - Senior Collections Manager of the Mawson Centre).

    It appears that full contingent of boats onboard were the motor boat, the dinghy, and two lifeboats or whale boats and a collapsible canoe. Out of this number a lifeboat or whale boat was left behind at Kerguelen when the ship was there. An image of the Discovery in December, 1929 (after the visit to Kerguelen) shows three boats onboard - perhaps one was the motor boat, another the dinghy and the third was a lifeboat or whaleboat

    Eric Douglas was responsible for the running, fuelling, safety, maintenance and repair of the motor boat during the period of the two BANZARE voyages in the Discovery. Eric Douglas said in a letter dated 8th November, 1929 that the motor boat had an 8HP twin Regal engine. "...The boat was about 20 ft in length and does 7 knots".

    Departing from and boarding the Discovery for and from other boats or ships during BANZARE was by means of rope ladders.This method applied too when visiting other ships such as Whaling ships.

    MOTOR BOAT TRIPS - DURING B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. - 1929/30 & 1930/31. (From Eric Douglas' Motor Boat log)
    __________________________________________________________

    Voyage 1 on the S.Y. Discovery
    24-10-29 Adjusted clutch and magneto. Cleaned carb. Adjusted tappets.
    1-11-29 Motor Boat to Crozet Islands
    2-11-29 Motor Boat run for 30 minutes - O.K.
    3-11-29 Run for 1 1/2 hours. Clutch slipping. Oil leaking at telltale glass. Adjusted clutch. Fitted new Bosch conflux starter magneto. Fitted brass tube in place of telltale glass.
    5-11-29 Kerguelen Island. Engine run - O.K.
    12-11-29 1/2 hour - O.K.
    13-11-29 1/2 hour - O.K.
    16-11-29 1 1/2 hours. From Jeanne d'Arc to Island - 4 miles down sound & back - O.K.
    18-11-29 Advanced up magneto slightly (5 degrees).
    19 -11-29 3 1/2 hours. From Jeanne d'Arc up sound. 15 miles. &
    20 -11-29 3 1/ hours. Stopped overnight and return - OK.
    21-11-29 1/2 hour. Towed whale boat ashore. O.K.
    22-11-29 1 1/2 hours. Trawling work at second anchorage. OK.
    23-11-29 Trawling. 2 1/2 hours.
    26-11-29 Heard Island. Running from ship to Atlas Cove. 5 hours. to
    2-12-29 OK.
    3-12-99 2 1/2 hours. Engine cut out. Water in petrol.
    5-12-29 Cleaned engine down & inspected engine.
    23-12-29 1 hour. Around ship in pack ice. O.K.
    13-1-30 1 hour. To Proclamation Is & return. Engine giving trouble. Water in petrol.
    14-1-30 Cleaned & dryed tank. Oiled engine.
    10-2-30 2 hrs. Dredging etc in Royal Sound, Kerguelen Is.
    11-2-30 2 hrs. Soundings and trip in Royal Sound.
    13 &14-2-30 6 hrs. Trip down Buenos Aires Sound, Royal Sound Channel and Bras Bolinder Sound. O.K.
    15-2-30 5 hrs. Trip around Observatory Bay & return.
    16-2-30 Drained sump. New oil. Inspected magneto. Plugs. Carb. Adjusted reverse gear. Engine O.K.
    18-2-30 1 hour. Around vicinity of ship - Jeanne d'Arc. (Flying operations).
    19-2-30 To Observatory Bay via long route.
    20-2-30. Running around Observatory Bay.
    21-2-30 To ship at Observatory Bay.
    22-2-30 4 hours. Hog Island to Murray Is. About 20 miles.
    23-2-30 1 1/2 hours. To Murray Is and return.
    25-2-30 1 1/2 hours. To Sukur Is and return.
    27-2-30 1 hour. To Long Is. Soundings etc.
    28-2-30 1/2 hour. Soundings in vicinity of anchorage. Engine unsatisfactory. Leaky valves.
    1-3-30 1 hour. To mainland and return. Engine O.K
    5-3-30 Engine painted up.
    20-3-30 Valves ground in. Magneto adjusted. New oil packings fitted. Engine O.K.
    (Boat painted inside and out)

    Totals - Voyage 1.
    44 Gallons of Petrol
    14 1/2 Pts of Oil
    51 Hours of Running in the Motor Boat.

    October 1930 Motor Boat engine overhauled at Williamstown. Valves ground in. Cylinders decarbonised. New gaskets fitted. Carburettor cleaned. New petrol pipe fitted. Petrol filter attached. New oil. Box water pump made up and fitted to launch.

    Voyage 2 on the S.Y. Discovery
    2-12-30 1 hour. Motor Boat run from ship to shore etc. Macquarie Is.
    3-12-30 1 hour. Motor Boat from ship to shore etc. Northeast Bay.
    4-12-30 1 hour. From ship to shore etc. Lusitania Bay.
    29-12-30 30 minutes. From ship to Kosmos & return. (Factory ship).
    5-1-31 3 1/2 hours. From ship to boat harbour. Commonwealth Bay.
    6-1-31 4 hours. To Mackellar Islets. Engine O.K.
    6-2-31 30 minutes. Across to Norwegian ship “Falk” & return.
    10-2-31 45 minutes. Across to English ship "New Sevilla" & return.
    13-2-31 2 hours. From ship to Rocky coast & return. MacRobertson Land. Long 66.

    Totals - Voyage 2.
    11 Gallons of Petrol
    4 pts of Oil
    13 1/4 hours of Running in the Motor Boat.

    Totals - Voyages 1 and 2.
    55 Gallons of Petrol
    18 1/2 pts of Oil
    64 1/4 hours of Running in the Motor Boat.
    (Approx 7 pints petrol per hour of running).

    HEARD ISLAND - VOYAGE 1 (As related by Eric Douglas to John Thompson of the ABC in the early 1960's) -

    Sir Douglas said the it wasn't much good getting down to the Antarctic before December - otherwise we'd have the pack ice too far north - so after calling at Kerguelen he elected to go across to Heard Island and spend a few days exploring.

    We did that, and about eight of us went ashore in the motor-launch. Luckily we found a small hexagonal hut that had been built by sealers, and after we'd kicked out the sea elephants and titivated it up a bit it was quite habitable. Sir Douglas didn't mean to stay more than two or three days, but while we were there a gale came on and we saw the ship up-anchor and disappear in the snow and mist. Sir Douglas said, "Righto, you chaps, we'll have to kill a few seals and get a bit of food stored." So we did that, and three or four days went by.

    Then one morning we saw the ship come in, and we spoke to them by semaphore, and they said that the glass was falling and that we'd better come off. Well, we went to the motor-launch, and Sir Douglas said that as the seas were still a bit high only three or four of us should go off, so three or four of us set off with him, and we eventually got to the ship quite safely. But it was then blowing up and we couldn't return, so we stayed aboard the ship that night, and in the morning Sir Douglas said he'd run off and pick up the rest of the party, and for myself to go with him.

    We set off together, and after running about a mile from the ship we had to clear a rocky headland, and Sir Douglas said, "The engine of the motor-boat hasn’t been giving any trouble, has it? "and I said, "No, it's been running very well." And with those words it misfired and stopped.

    We weren't in a very good position because we were fairly close up to the high cliffs and there was a reef about two hundred yards on the lee of us, and the boat was too big for us to row. I said I'd have to get the engine going, and Sir Douglas went up forward and threw out the heavy anchor, but after the rope had run out, I think about a hundred and fifty feet of it, it just dangled on the rope. The water was very deep.

    I'd always had an idea that if the engine did cut, it would be due to water coming out of the fuel-tank through condensation, and going down the fuel line and freezing into ice. That was just what happened. I kept a piece of piano wire on board, and poked this wire up the pipe to break the ice, and the petrol rushed out, and I coupled up, started the engine, and put the clutch in half a head. Then we tried to pull the anchor up. Well, we were both up forward and I remember we pulled and pulled until the both of us were exhausted. We fell into the bottom of the boat, and Sir Douglas said to me after a while, "Well, shall we give it another go?" I said, "Yes Sir," and with that, we tackled it again and eventually got it aboard.

    Then we got round and picked up the other party, but in the meantime the weather had deteriorated quite a bit. We pushed out to sea, and snow squalls started to come down and blot out the land. We had a compass, we'd taken some bearings, so we were able to keep a reasonable course, but the sea was quite dangerous.

    I noticed that Sir Douglas, who was holding the tiller, had to prop one of his eyes open by holding the lids with his fingers; the other eye was frozen shut. I asked him several times if I could take the tiller, but he refused, and in the end I just sat down and pushed him to one side, and I thought he would reprimand me, but he just said, "All right". I took the tiller and steered the boat out to sea for another half-mile, and then, with the compass bearings I'd had before, I put the boat before the sea, and later on we could hear the bell on the "Discovery" tolling. The drill then was to run down and try to hit the ship straight ahead. This was more or less what we did.

    Suddenly the ship loomed up out of the murk, heaving and plunging, and we rounded up on the lee side, and there was pandemonium getting to the lifelines, every man for himself.

    About a whale boat onboard - BANZARE Voyage 1 -

    In 'The Voyages of the Discovery' by Ann Savours, it states on page 231 that at Cape Town "...A new motor boat was shipped and a whaler landed in place on a specially constructed platform..." This platform was to house the Gipsy Moth Seaplane when the Discovery reached the Kerguelen Islands, for here this whaleboat was towed ashore by the motor boat skippered by Eric Douglas. It was taken ashore and left at those Islands to make way for the Gipsy Moth which was to be assembled on the deck of the Discovery by the two RAAF pilots - Campbell and Douglas. On the return journey the Moth was taken apart and the whaleboat collected from Kerguelen.

    By Sir Douglas Mawson "...21st Nov 1929 at Kerguelen...A whale boat was taken ashore to slip at whaling station and drawn up and berthed ashore with idea of picking it up on return to the island from the south. This was done in order to clear skids for aeroplane when assembled in Antarctica..."

    Dr Harold Fletcher says on page 80 of his book (Voyage 1 - At Kerguelen) "While the Discovery was berthed at the wharf the ship's sole remaining lifeboat was taken ashore and stored at the Whaling Station until our return the following year. Its space on the ship was needed to stow the seaplane when assembled on the voyage".

    In Trials by Ice - The Antarctic Journals of John King Davis (Kerguelen-21st November, 1929) Davis said "Sent launch ashore with starboard lifeboat, which we are leaving here until we return, to facilitate with getting the Moth aeroplane out and in...(19th December, 1929)...The aeroplane is now out of its case and on top of the skids. It looks very big to me and I do not think it will be much good after we have had a gale. It should have had proper cover. It is painted a bright lemon colour...(Kerguelen - 20th February, 1930)...The aeroplane was taken to pieces this morning and we have been able to replace our lifeboat, which was left behind in November, in its place on the skids".

    In the recent book of published Antarctic related stories by Captain Morton Moyes entitled 'Aura of the Antarctic' Captain Moyes says that the first landing at the Crozets was by whale boat (early November, 1929). While in relation to landings at Heard Island, Captain Moyes said "...the motor boat had a large cabin along half its length and when Sir Douglas had come ashore, Captain Davis thought that the cabin made the boat top-heavy and had it taken down..."

    In a photo at the University of Newcastle (online) the Motor boat is shown off Macquarie Island on 2nd December, 1930 (and obviously towing the dinghy). The motor boat has it's cabin cover on. In another image in that same collection at the University of Newcastle (online) it shows the Discovery off Queen Mary Land on 1st February, 1931. On the right on the deck is the Motor boat or launch complete with it's cabin in place. These photos are by William E Howard who was an Able Seaman on the Discovery, and they are excellent.

    Sally E Douglas

    44 items
    created by: public:beetle 2016-01-20
    User data
  35. DISCOVERY and CARDIFF coal or briquettes, and general provisions
    List
    Public

    The first Banzare Voyage -

    The RRS Discovery 1 or SY Discovery (also called Discovery and Discovery 1) was a 'steam yacht'. The ship was registered as a SY for the purposes of the Banzare Antarctic Voyages - although the words RRS Discovery were embedded across her stern for the those voyages.

    Prior to the 1st Voyage of Banzare in 1929 Sir Douglas Mawson had said in August 1929 "...The arrangement agreed was for the Discovery to load coal at Cardiff. She will be there for some days. We are shipping a special coal in briquette form for easy stowing. The Discovery will probably take 250 to 300 tons at Cardiff. Sir Douglas added that the expedition is now engaged dealing with the food provisions, and various Australian firms were assisting. Australian grown products would be taken, including meats and canned and dried fruits".

    Crews' Wardrobe - 22nd June, 1929 "...Captain Davis, commander of the Discovery has selected 1500? garments with which to clothe the 24 members of Sir Douglas Mawson's expedition...The Discovery's wardrobe is intriguing, comprising hundred of socks, shirts, mitts, blankets, helmets etc..."

    In July 1929, two hundred privileged Australians had inspected the Discovery at East India Dock in London. "...For the benefit of the guests a deck shed was laid out with an amazing array of food stuffs, samples of cosy sleeping bags, suits, skis and sledges, but the chief interest was the stout little ship, flying the Australian flag...Over the deckhouse amidships seaplanes (one seaplane only) are stowed in huge cases. Indeed, the Discovery is a lesson of using every inch of space to advantage...(In fact it proved necessary to repack most items on the SY Discovery in Hobart prior to the second voyage, commencing at the end of 1930). The Discovery goes to Cardiff...to bunker coal and special briquettes. She will sail for Capetown on August 10th."

    Another report on this event states the suits as being 'ice suits' whatever that means. It is likely that this is reference to the 'Burberry' clothing of jackets, pants, gloves and blizzard protective 'helmets' or headgear. This Burberry fabric was a fairly thin and light weight and that was a advantage. Nevertheless, there may have been limitations as to how effective this ice suit was in very cold, windy and wet blizzard conditions but it was the very best available for those days of Antarctic exploration and adventure. Antarctic clothing and gear had not changed much since the heroic days of the early 1900's. The explorers also had oilskin jackets and these may have provided better protection against the wet and cold when onboard the ship, with the Burberrys being more suitable for use when on the land?

    On 6th September, 1929, it was reported "...With only 80 tons of coal on board, the Discovery, which is expected at Capetown at the end of October, sailed for Cardiff and St Vincent. She will again replenish bunkers at Capetown, the reason for the frequent bunkering being that there is no spare room on the ship for anything except what is absolutely necessary. Commander Moyes (of the Discovery) said...from Capetown the Discovery would sail to Kerguelen Island, where more coal would be taken on board at the French whaling station..."

    Report of 16th September, 1929 '...Christmas boxes for the 40 members of the expedition (have been prepared by the wives of members of the the Royal Geographic Society of South Australia)...Great secrecy is being maintained regarding the contents...for the parcels will not be opened until Christmas Day, and will contain only serviceable material.

    SY Discovery -
    (1) Report of 7th September, 1929 'It is in order to guard against the possibility of being frozen (in) that 12 months' supplies of food are being taken'.
    (2) Report of 7th October, 1929 'Tons of preserved food are stored on the Discovery, but once the ice is reached seals and penguins will be caught. (Birds and their eggs were also eaten and this included penguins' eggs). According to one member of the crew "they go down all right with plenty of pickles". The library is limited to 100 books, the Encyclopaedia Britannica being the the final court of appeal to settle arguments. Two (one) aeroplanes and spare parts (but no spare airframe parts) are lashed on the deck. (On the second voyage the two RAAF pilots had to resort to using wood from the aeroplane's packing cases to make repairs to the airframe of the gipsy moth seaplane VH-ULD!) Coal briquettes are packed into every corner to feed the engines when the ice-pack has been reached. Coal will be taken on at Kerguelen Island (made up of numerous islands) and the Discovery will then head south for Enderby Island (sic Land)'. (Trove)

    From Eric Douglas's log in October, 1929 "...She has loaded an enormous amount of gear aboard here. We are issued with warm Geelong blankets, a pair of trousers, a lumber jacket, books and an Antarctic Cap. We will get other clothes later on. They have plenty of tobacco, books and food etc. ..I brought some tools as they have very few for my job...We are taking 800 gallons of petrol, enough for 160 hours flying. I expect we will only do about 70 hours. The wireless set for our machine is a sending and receiving set, which should work OK up to 100 miles away from the ship. It is also fixed that in case of a forced landing we can send and receive messages. We will have all sorts of recording instruments attached to the machine so I suppose we will have our work cut out getting it off the water at times.”

    From the Queenslander of 24th October, 1929 '...The Discovery carries a more complete equipment from seaplane to X-ray than any other previous expedition...'

    A newspaper report of 2nd November, 1929 included a short description of the ship's engine room 'The engine-room, which is situated well aft, houses triple expansion engines capable of developing 450 h.p. Steam is supplied by two coal-burning marine boilers of 1501b. maximum working pressure. There is also a steam-driven electric generator of about 15 K.W. at full power. A paraffin-driven emergency generating set is also installed for operation when steam is not available. Either set is capable of lighting the whole vessel, as well as supplying power for the searchlight and wireless installations. The engine-room also contains circulating and feed pumps, an evaporator, and a well-furnished workshop, with high-grade screw-cutting lathes'.

    The 5th November, 1929 and it was reported "...the net carrying capacity in the matter of stores and coal is about in, the neighbourhood of 600 tons".

    The engines - 3rd December, 1929 It was related that these 'are only auxiliary to sail, upon which more dependence is placed (going to and from the sub-Antarctic and Antarctic). The use of sail whenever feasible, permits saving of fuel, and even when all the fuel has been consumed, allows the safe return of the vessel to civilization (providing the ship is not for example in the pack ice or in the midst of a blizzard). Economy in fuel consumption is always a matter of serious consideration for vessels engaged in ice-laden seas, for the possibilities of navigation within such waters are measured in terms of steaming hours available; sail has little power or value in pack-ice'.

    In spite of what appears to have been a preoccupation with coal/briquettes and the large quantities 'bunkered' on the SY Discovery, the dependence wholly on steam in Antarctic waters and the 'weighing down' of the ship did obviously place limitations on the exploration that could be undertaken by Sir Douglas Mawson and his band of Explorers.

    '...the Discovery is furnished with three masts, square-rigged in the fore and main. This provision of sail gives her considerable sailing powers'. (Trove).The SY Discovery was a barque rig on leaving London and Cardiff, but to make her more efficient as a sailing yacht or ship, when at Cape Town (Capetown) she was converted to a barquentine rig. Eric Douglas likened the Discovery to 'sturdy hollow log' and said 'that she was probably the strongest wooden ship ever made'.

    Eric Douglas reported in a personal letter of 8th November, 1929 that "...They issued us out with sea boots, oilskin, singlets, socks, pullovers, cardigan, scarf, cap, underpants and a special pair of Ski boots (Whybrow Melbourne make). All the clothes are of wool and special thickness and make ('Jaegar' English make), so you can see that we have any amount to choose from...I haven't shaved since leaving Cape Town and of course had no bath because water is scarce and the bathroom won't work, and anyhow it is filled up with gear...I bought more tools in Cape Town and just as well I brought some from home because they have very few on board. There is a lathe in the engine room but the Engineers (2 of them) keep it to themselves, no oxey plant onboard. (I am sure that this situation would have been made easier by the fact that Eric Douglas and William Colbeck one of the ship's Engineers on both Banzare Voyages became firm friends). In fact tools seem to be the only thing that they did not bring..."

    Eric Douglas's short log of about 24th November, 1929 'Coal left here by a ship going south.' (Kerguelen) & 'Cardiff briquettes 500 tons'. 'Departed 24th Nov 1929 - Ship low in water with heavy cargo of coal'.

    Newspaper reports of early January, 1930 "...Sir Douglas Mawson has finished coaling at Kerguelen and has set his compass for the Pole...A cargo of coal has been taken on at Kerguelen which will be the final cargo for the Antarctic cruise. Every available space has been used for storing briquettes. The success of the expedition will depend very largely on the coal available, and as bunker space on the Discovery is very restricted a large space on the deck has been devoted to coal storage. Some time has been spent in making the cargo secure in the event of the expedition running into rough weather...the Discovery is carrying a more complete scientific equipment than any previous expedition, into polar seas. There is even an X-ray plant on board...Food provisions for the Discovery's crew include 15 sheep, which occupy a pen amidships...Bales of fodder have been packed between the aeroplane cases, and the Shell Oil Company was responsible for the scientific stacking of large quantities of paraffin and oil cases in the stern...Many additional items of equipment from blankets to test-tubes for the scientists are stowed away in the strong wooden hull of the Discovery, the most important item to be taken on board being a supply of dynamite. This may have to be used to blast channels through the ice along the coasts of Antarctica..."

    It was reported in the newspapers on 26th February, 1930 that ' Four hundred tons of coal were shipped from Cardiff to Kerguelen for the expedition'.

    Eric Douglas's short log around 8th February, 1930 'Coaling ship in readiness to sweep south again towards Queen Mary land on way home.'

    From Eric Douglas's short log of Mar 23rd 1930 'Getting into warmer regions. Change into better clothes. Longing for a feed of fresh food. Tinned foods are not satisfying over a long period. Eggs still appear on Menu but only in form of curried eggs etc. Meet P&O S.S. Cathay in Bight, fresh food & papers dropped & picked up by us. Very welcome.'

    Towards the end of March, 1930 when on her way home from the Antarctic and direct from Kerguelen (having called there both on the way to and on leaving the Antarctic) the SY Discovery 'under sail' (the SY Discovery sailing wherever possible and practical) met the steamship Cathay in the Australian Bight, 520 miles from Adelaide and greetings were exchanged and according to custom when a steamer met a sailing ship in mid-ocean it was traditional to drop overboard a cask of fresh provisions and literature, and offer a 'hook, or tow, into port,' and the occasion warranted the revival of the old ceremony, so Captain Niven of the Cathay dropped a cask overboard with a flare attached, to make it more plainly visible. 'The cask floated in our wake' (SY Discovery) and was picked up by members of the Discovery's crew in a small boat. It was laden with good things that the crew had not seen for many months. Immediately the Discovery ran the 'Thank you' signal flags to the mast, and Sir Douglas Mawson sent the following telegram to Capt. Niven 'All on board greatly value congratulations from Cathay and very much appreciate your kind action in passing on barrel of good cheer.' The contents of the barrel included six frozen chickens, fresh New Zealand butter, fresh green vegetables, such as lettuce and cabbages, fresh fruit and tomatoes, and all the latest magazines and papers that could be obtained...(Trove)

    On the second Banzare voyage heavy reliance was also placed on the use of coal or briquettes for steaming along and the situation of a scarcity placed stress on the expedition outcomes, for there is evidence that coal shortages prevailed.

    (Eric Douglas's writings and Trove papers)

    Sally E Douglas

    183 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-07-15
    User data
  36. DOUGLAS - CLOCK AND WATCHMAKERS - Victoria, Australia and Scotland
    List
    Public

    It appears that the art of Clock and Watch making evolved from the skills of the Metal Workers or Hammermen/Hammersmiths who were part of the system of Medieval Guilds (Gilds). In the case of the commencement of this line of Douglas Watchmakers in Jedburgh, Roxburghshire where John Douglas was born in 1759, it was a town or village where the Guild system had made its mark. John's likely grandfather James Douglass born c1669 (possibly September - father John) was a man of note in Jedburgh as he was a Councillor and Burgess of the town as well as being a Gardener (Gardiner) and in his time alignments in local elections closely followed occupations and hence Guilds. James's son George Douglas 1720 Jedburgh a tenant of Howden and a Gardener was the father of John Douglas 1759. However even though John followed two generations of Gardeners, local Hammermen were part of a Guild which had been influential and it seems feasible that John Douglas learnt the art of Clock and Watch making from them.

    I have noticed that maps of the Jedburgh area, show two places called 'Howden' near Jedburgh - one close to Jedburgh and to the south east, while the second one is to the north west near Bonjedward.

    As a further point of interest James Douglass c1669 and his son George Douglas 1720 are buried in the Jedburgh Abbey Graveyard, and buried with James are three of the infant children of his son George. See - http://haygenealogy.com/hay/scotland/jedburghcemetery.html George Douglas is at no 113 with other members of his immediate family and James Douglass is no 126. I also have an image of the tombstone of James Douglass c1669. William Douglas has kindly displayed it here - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/Places/Churches&Abbeys/jedburgh_abbey.htm

    James Douglas c1669 was made a Burgess of Jedburgh likely sometime well before 1734 (Petitions - Royal Burghs of Scotland - the House of Commons - 15 February, 1738) "...at Jedburgh, the prefiding Burgh of that Diftrift, on Saturday the 18th May, 1734...James Douglas...was duly elected Delegate for the faid Burgh of Jedburgh, not being prefent at the Election of a Burgefs for the faid Diftrift..." Douglas Scott author of the 'Hawick Word Book' advised me on this "There were lots of Burgesses in a town the size of Jedburgh. All tradesmen, merchants etc. - basically the middle class - were usually Burgesses. They ran the town, set rules (so that non-Burgesses have a hard time trading), elected the Council and all the rest. It seems that the 1738 (sic 1734) record is of the Burgh of Jedburgh selecting a *particular* Burgess to serve as a "delegate". And then the delegates from a collection of burghs chose one among their number to be Member of Parliament for this "District of Burghs". It was perhaps a historical peculiarity, but nevertheless a fact that these joint towns elected an M.P., separate from the M.Ps. elected in the counties where each of them was located. Your James Douglas must have been a prominent man in Jedburgh to have been their delegate".

    With reference to the above and my thoughts that James Douglas was likely made a Burgess of Jedburgh, well prior to 1734, it appears that assessment may need some slight adjustment? For an article in the Glasgow Herald dated Mar 3 1930 just discovered by me (Google newspapers online) states under 'Freedom of Jedburgh for Councillors' - "At the monthly meeting of the Jedburgh Town Council yesterday the practice of enrolling members of the Council as Burgesses, allowed to lapse for the past three years, was resumed...The present roll dates from 1736, when a James Douglas had the honour of the first entry..." There is a good chance that it could have been referring to James Douglas c1669. From this site - http://db.poms.ac.uk/record/factoid/78003/
    see Ragman Roll - it shows that there were Burgesses of Jedburgh at least by 1296. So James Douglas may have been a Burgess well prior to 1734 and the commencement of a (signed) roll in 1736 was a new type of record on the Burgesses. In regard to the types of Burgesses, Douglas Scott of the 'Hawick Word Book' has advised about the roll set up in 1736 "... it may be that the roll of burgesses...was the list of Honorary Burgesses). Hawick's list starts in 1734, and so that's probably not a coincidence. These were people appointed to express the town's gratitude, and who had the formal rights without having to pay. Certainly the later people mentioned in the Glasgow Herald article would be 'honorary' ." Robert Burns 1787 likely being one of the honorary Burgesses.

    James Douglas also gets a mention in the House of Lords entries in 1737/38 - he was involved in a Petition and Appeal taken to the House of Lords concerning the Council of Jedburgh - An Appeal by 'William, Marquis of Lothian & al V Haswell & al'. The fight was over who was the Provost of Jedburgh and the Councillors and the from the point of view of the Marquis, the opposing forces were 'Interlocutors'. James Douglas, Gardener is mentioned on the side of the Marquis, and along with all others involved his name is preserved on a parchment scroll. I have a digital copy of that scroll, obtained from the House of Lords - Archives in London, England.

    In the 1737/38 Appellant's Case those of influence in the affairs of the Town Council included - the Council Dean, the Bailiff, the Deacon of the Guilds, Burgesses (including James Douglass or Douglas c1669) and the Deacons of the Guilds of Merchants, Glovers, Wrights, Taylors (likely my ancestor Gabriel Newton), Fleshers, Shoemakers, Weavers, Masons, Sadlers, Smiths and Hammermen, plus some individuals who acted for themselves such as a Tobacconist and a Writer.

    The Appeal case from the Marquis was - "That the said Interlocutors, so far as they are in the Appeal recited, may be reversed, varied, or amended; and that the Appellants may obtain such Relief as this House shall find just. As also upon the joint and several Answer of the said John Haswell and the Persons last named put in to the said Appeal, and due Consideration had of what was offered on either Side in this Cause."

    Judgement (by the House of Lords). It is Ordered and Adjudged, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Interlocutor of the Lords of Session, of the 19th of January last, whereby the Elections of the Appellants were reduced at the Suit of the Respondents, be affirmed. And it is Declared, That the Elections of Counsellors and Magistrates for the Borough of Jedburgh, insisted on by the Respondents, were irregular and void. And it is therefore further Ordered and Adjudged. That the same be reduced, and that so much of the other Interlocutors complained of, whereby the Court of Session decerned in the Declarator, at the Instance of the Respondents, and assoilzied from the Reduction at the Instance of the Appellants, with regard to all the Elections thereby quarrelled (excepting those of Robert Winterup and George Scougald), be reversed.

    The Jedburgh Abbey Graveyard image of the tombstone of George Douglas 1720 Jedburgh, his wife Annie Oliver 1726 Hawick, their daughter in law Jean Oliver and perhaps their son James Douglas who was Jean's husband - http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Douglas&GSiman=1&GScid=2379229&GRid=77355254&

    For Douglas as Gardiners or Gardeners (mostly my research and text) in Jedburgh (they are direct ancestors of this Douglas family which is mine). So see - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/Lists/jedburgh_gardeners.htm

    Some examples of early Clocks and Watches in Scotland -
    * The Kockmakers (Clockmakers) of Dundee, Angus - By 1650 there were a number of Knockmakers in Dundee as a branch of the Locksmiths' trade and 'this allowed them to become Hammermen' (as well). James Douglas 1794 of Dundee was one such Knockmaker - John Smith (1850).
    * The Hammermen of Brechin, Angus - Early Clocks and Clockmaking - In the 17th Century there was a steeple clock in Brechin and in 1736 a new tolbooth clock was acquired. In 1741 William Lawson entered the Brechin Hammermen's Incorporation as a 'free master clocksmith and hammerman', the only Clockmaker in the book (1741 - 1744) - Brechin Hammermen 1600 - 1762... by David G Adams (2000).
    * From Cassell's - Old and New Edinburgh, Vol IV (1880's) - Hammermen - 'the first knockmaker appears in 1647, but his business is so limited that he added thereto the making of locks'.
    * From the Memorials of Edinburgh by Sir Daniel Wilson in 1816, recording about the area of Bow - 'In 1675, it appears from records of the Corporation of Hammermen (Edinburgh), a watch was, for the first time added to the Knockmaker's essay (attempt or trial), previous to that date it is probable that watches were entirely imported'.
    * The Hammermen of Edinburgh - It is recorded that in 1689 under the Clockmakers/Knockmakers essay, 'a house clock, with a watch larum (alarm), and locks upon the doors' and in 1701 'a pendulum clock, with a long and short swing, and a lock to the door, with a key, and in 1712, the movement of a watch' - Society of Antiquities, Vol 1 of 1792.

    For an excellent site on Clockmakers go to the Guildhall Library in London now merged with the London Metropolitan Archives at - http://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/things-to-do/visiting-the-city/archives-and-city-history/london-metropolitan-archives/Pages/default.aspx Also follow their link to the Worshipful Clockmakers of London.

    For some Douglas history on clocks (on Scotland and Australia my research and text) go to - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/Businesses/clock_and_watch_makers.htm The entries down the bottom of that page in white and red are my contributions, plus the section which relates to John Douglas 1759 Jedburgh, a Master Clock and Watchmaker - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/john_douglas3.htm

    For more on John Douglas 1759 Jedburgh see - http://loudounkirk.wikifoundry.com/page/Douglas%2C+John+%281759%29 where I submitted a story on John some time ago (It was called Wet Paint then). Also see the tombstone of John Douglas 1759 which was kindly photographed for me - without asking - by Agnes Wilson ot the Wet Paint site - http://douglashistory.ning.com/profiles/blogs/seeking-ancestors-through John Douglas died in about 1833 in Galston.

    John Douglas 1759 and his wife Mary Newton/Nuton c1762 had 3 sons - Gabriel 1784, Walter 1786 and John 1794 and 2 or 3 daughters - Jean 1786, Jean 1788 and Christian 1789 - the latter then being a girl's name. Records do not make it clear as to whether there were one or two daughters named Jean. The three sons became Watchmakers although Gabriel Douglas 1784 also became an Inn Keeper and Vintner. Mary Newton died in January, 1803 and was buried at Loudoun Kirk, Ayrshire. I have an image of the tombstone of Mary Nuton that William Douglas has kindly displayed, see the Gravestone Inscription down this page - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/Businesses/clock_and_watch_makers.htm

    In October 1808, John Douglas 1759 married Agnes Allan in Galston, Ayrshire and they had 2 sons - George and James; and 4 daughters - Mary, Isabella/Isobel, Margaret Mason and Maria, the last two being twins. James Douglas appears to have died young (and is buried with Mary Newton c1762) but George Douglas and his son George were Watchmakers. The other son of the first George was a John Douglas and he became a Ship's Engineer - in 1861 he was a Shop Boy at 129 High Street, Bonhill, Dunbartonshire; in 1871 he was an Engineer boarding at 16 Crescent Street, Greenock East and in 1901 he was a Ship's Engineer living at 5 Bishop Street, Holy Trinity, Portsea, Portsmouth, Hampshire.

    For Australia see my Immigration Bridge entry for Gabriel Douglas 1822 of Muirkirk - http://immigrationplace.com.au/story/gabriel-douglas/

    So far I have found about 24 Watchmakers within this Douglas family - five of them are women - daughters of Thomas Napier Douglas 1830 Dumbarton, Dunbartonshire (brother of James Douglas 1827 Dumbarton, Dunbartonshire); and one had Lamont as a surname. To clarify, these five daughters of Thomas Napier Douglas namely - Miss Mary McLiver Douglas, Miss Grace Buchanan Douglas, Mrs Lily Campbell (Douglas) Tough, Mrs Agnes Lamont (Douglas) Macara and Miss Ellen Douglas may or may not have been Watchmakers but they carried on the Business 'Douglas & Son, Watchmakers and Jewellers' at 9 Hamilton Street, Greenock, Renfrewshire after their father had died in 1903. From the end of 1913 the Business was continued by Miss Mary McLiver Douglas and Miss Ellen Douglas as Limited Partners, with Peter Boag Neill as the General Partner. (Edinburgh Gazette of August 14, 1914).

    Some were Jewellers and Engravers as well, and in the case of Thomas Napier Douglas a Goldsmith. Another strong skill for this Douglas family was snuff box painting, picture restoring and picture painting. Portrait painting and other art such as the painting of animals, scenes and genre, was carried by the Douglases in the 1800's, and then the next step for some was studio photography, including carte de visite. For more on Douglas photographers and artists visit http://www.edinphoto.org.uk/PP_D/pp_douglas_th_photographers_and_artists.htm Also at Douglas History on Edwin James Douglas 1848 Edinburgh (mostly my research and text as it is too for some of the other artists, painters and photographers at this site). So see - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/templates/edwinouglas.htm#.UODcWnwaySM

    The following information on Thomas Harigad Douglas 1836 St Cuthberts, Edinburgh (a Douglas of the Moreton line) is my research and text - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/thomas_douglas.htm#.UONvZnwaySM Though Thomas Harigad Douglas was not related closely to my Douglas family he obviously worked with John Douglas 1813 of Dollar, Clackmannan and his sons who were Painters and Photographers, as a carte de visite Photographer in Glasgow. Thomas was also involved with his own Photographic studios in Edinburgh and Leith and he was also a Writer and Searcher of Public Records - following in the footsteps of his father Major James Torry Douglas 1751 Craufordmuir, Peebles who was also Searcher of Public records. While John Douglas 1813 and his sons also had a studio at Helensburgh, Dunbartonshire. John Douglas 1813 and his wife Mary Lorimer had 6 sons and it appears that 5 of them were Artists, Photographic Artists and Photographers - Walter, John, Robert, William and Arthur Lorimer. They strongly identified as being Artists and Photographic Artists. It is thought likely too that two of the sons of John Douglas - John and Robert - also had a Photographic studio in partnership in Edinburgh as 'J and R Douglas'. It appears highly probable that Thomas Harigad Douglas also worked in closely with this Douglas family in Edinburgh. The other son of John Douglas and Mary Lorimer - Thomas Lorimer Douglas became an Accountant and Insurance Agent.

    These finds on Douglas baptisms from Jedburgh films, are also my research and text - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/Lists/jedburgh_baptisms.htm

    This subject also relates to Douglas of Timpendean - http://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=21722 This Douglas family is of the line of Bonjedward and then a branch of it which was Timpendean - both domains were close to Jedburgh in the Scottish Shire of Roxburghshire (ancient Teviotdale). The Timpendean line of these Douglas Watchmakers may have branched off at about the 5th Laird or Lord of Timpendean - Stephen Douglas born about 1567. Stephen Douglas married Jean Haliburton/Halyburton daughter of Andrew Haliburton of Muirhouselaw, Berwickshire - two likely sons have been found - John Douglas c1608 who became the next Laird and Andrew (Andro) Douglas c1612 who had died by September, 1656.

    The ancient ancestors of these Douglases were possibly Sir William de Douglas, 1st Earl of Douglas born c1321 at Douglas Castle, Douglas, Lanarkshire and his mistress Margaret Stewart, 3rd Countess of Angus (Stewart line) born c1349 (her husband Thomas of Mar c1332 was the brother of William's wife Margaret, 10th Countess of Mar ie Mormaer. Sir William de Douglas and Margaret Stewart supposedly had two 'natural' children - Margaret/Margarete Douglas c1376 and George Douglas c1378 (commencement of the Red Douglas line). Margaret Douglas c1376 married Thomas Johnstone/Johnson and they took the name of Douglas and Margaret Douglas commenced the line of the Lairds or Lords of Bonjedward. I accept that there are different theories but there is some substance to this supposition. Margaret Douglas, the 3rd Countess of Angus passed her Angus title (from her father Thomas 2nd Earl of Angus) to her son George Douglas, who became the 1st Earl of Angus (Douglas line, as opposed to Stewart).

    Sir William de Douglas had two of three legitimate children with Margaret of Mar - James (Jamie) Douglas c1358 2nd Earl of Douglas, Isobel/Isabella Countess of Mar and Garioch c1360 (and perhaps Christian who married Sir Edward Keith?)

    Margaret Stewart was a direct descendant of Walter FitzAlan the 1st High Steward of Scotland c1106 Oswestry, Shropshire, England and before that back to Flad de Dol c1005 Dol, Ille-et-Villaine, St Malo, Bretagne (Britanny) France.

    While the Douglas ancestry of Sir William de Douglas the 1st Earl of Douglas can be traced back at least to William de Douglas 1st Lord of Douglas, c1165 Douglas Castle, Douglas, Lanarkshire who married Margaret Kerdal de Moray - sister of Freskin/Friskin de Kerdal of the Lairds of Moray - from paradox.poms - see below. The Kerdals were of Flemish descent. William and Margaret de Douglas had six sons - Freskin, Brice (Bricus), Henry, Hugh (Hugone), Archibald and Alexander; and a daughter Margaret. There may have even been another child. There is an interesting database at http://paradox.poms.ac.uk/ This William de Douglas was a Knight and a witness to a charter of Jocelin/Jocelyn who was the Bishop of Glasgow by 1174 - the charter itself was witnessed between 1174 and 1199. William also attended the Court of 'William the Lion' and witnessed many charters of that Monarch. Moreover when William married Margaret de Kerdel he was an Abbot of Melrose Abbey (The order at Melrose Abbey at the time was linked to the White Friars or Monks who originally came from Citeaux near Dijon in eastern France - Jocelin himself had been a Monk and an Abbot of Melrose before moving to Glasgow).

    A History of the House of Douglas Vol 1" by Sir Herbert Maxwell – Freemantle 1902 p8 “...The earliest known mention of the water and lands of Douglas occurs in charters granted prior to 1160, of aqua de Douglas and territorium de Douglas adjacent thereto, in the county of Lanark, and again they are mentioned by Walter the Steward, before 1177, as one of the boundaries of the Forest of Mauchline...the sudden appearance between 1174 and 1199 of William de Douglas, bearing the territorial name, would be quite consistent with his being one of the native chiefs of Clydesdale, who had recently received a charter of his hereditary lands...(but there is also) a strong possibility...that the houses of Moray and Douglas were derived from a common Flemish or Frisian stock...” Some authorities say that there is a close ancient 'tribal' link between the Douglases of Douglasdale and the Kerdals of Moray.

    Douglas descendants of John Douglas 1759 (Master Clock and Watchmaker) and his wife Mary Newton c1762 whom I have traced as being in Victoria, Australia (but I have not found their migration records) were -
    * Gabriel Douglas (Watchmaker) 1822 Muirkirk, Ayrshire - son of Walter Douglas (Master Watchmaker) - 1786 Jedburgh, Roxburghshire.
    * Gabriel's first cousin James Douglas (Watchmaker) - 1827 Dumbarton, Dunbartonshire - son of John Douglas (Master Watchmaker) 1794 Jedburgh, Roxburghshire.
    * Plus I have very good reason to believe that Gabriel's brother George Douglas (Watchmaker) born 1820 in Old Cumnock, Ayrshire also migrated to Victoria as a George Douglas (Watchmaker) appears on location indexes (1864 onwards) as working with and near Gabriel Douglas 1822 Muirkirk, Ayrshire and it was far too early for George Douglas (Watchmaker) 1862 Daylesford to be working with his father Gabriel 1822. He would have only been an infant!

    Gabriel Douglas 1822 and James Douglas 1827 appear in newspapers on Trove. Gabriel Douglas was in Ballarat, Daylesford, Melbourne - Flinders Lane East, Little Collins Street East, Little Lonsdale Street East, Swanston Street, Russell Street and Latrobe Street, South Melbourne, Port Albert, Richmond, Port Melbourne, Williamstown, Footscray and Fitzroy. Whereas James Douglas was in Mortlake and Colac.

    George Douglas the eldest of the three Watchmaking sons of Gabriel Douglas 1822 Muirkirk, besides pursuing the traditional skills of being a Watchmaker and Jeweller he fixed music boxes and even pierced the ears of the 'Fair Sex'. Actually the three Watchmaking sons of Gabriel's - George Douglas 1862, Gabriel (Gilbert) Douglas 1869 and Robert William Arthur Douglas 1881 were the only 3 sons to reach adulthood.

    (Trove and Family history research).

    Sally E Douglas

    Bachelor of Commerce and Diploma of Public Policy (Hons - Arts) - the University of Melbourne; Deakin University Hons Art Subjects under the History of Ideas.

    284 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-11-30
    User data
  37. DOUGLAS - of Timpendean, Roxburghshire, Scotland
    List
    Public

    Part 1

    Douglas of Timpendean

    Timpendean – had a few variations such as Tympynden 1499, 1500, and in 1590, Tympanedene 1506, Timpendein 1516,1654 and 1680, Tympenden 1529, 1540, 1590, 1603 and 1604,1810 and in 1883, Timpindine 1551, Timpandean 1567, 1633, 1655, 1728, 1740 and in 1761, Timpenden 1592 to 1599, 1685, and in 1695, Tymperden 1597, Tempindene 1600, Tympiden 1611, Tumpendeane 1617, Timpintine 1666 and in 1739, Tempendean 1688, Timpinden 1691 to 1695, Timpingdean 1714, Tympyndean 1740, Timpintoun 1748, Timperdean 1828, 1836 and in 1853 and Typpanedenne; but the choices were not as prolific as for Bonjedward.

    The basic information on Timpendean is from ‘A System of Heraldry’ by Alexander Nisbet. Also useful was the Heraldry of the Douglases by G Harvey Johnston.

    “ ‘Dean’ apparently defines the small valley or ravine to the east of the tower…The early available forms of the first component are Timpin, Timpen, Tympen, and occasionally Tempin, Tempen, and Tempan…” In Jedburgh vernacular the place was named ‘Timp’. [The Annals of a Border Club (the Jedforest): and biographical notices of the families connected therewith – George Tancred – Jedburgh, T S Small – 1899].

    All the Lairds of this line were from father to son. Except for the 12th to the 13th who were brothers.

    1st Andrew (Andro) Douglas c1466 Timpendean to c1527. Timpendean was granted to Andrew on 1/7/1479. Andrew Douglas had presumably died by 7 February,1527.

    Andrew’s father George Douglas 4th Bonjedward gave Andrew the lands of Timpendean 1st July,1479 with the consent of his eldest brother James who was to inherit Bonjedward. James must have died as Bonjedward went to another brother William.

    25 May,1492 – ‘Charter by Walter Turnbull of Gargunnock, and his son, to Andrew Douglas of the lands of Hassendeanbank’. (Manuscripts Division - Minto Charters at the National Library of Scotland).

    26 May,1492 – ‘Precept of Sasine by Walter Turnbull, and his son, William, for enfeoffing Andrew Douglas for the lands of Hassendeanbank’. (Manuscripts Division - Minto Charters at the National Library of Scotland).

    26 May,1492 – ‘Instrument of Sasine in favour of Andrew Douglas of the lands of Hassendeanbank’. (Manuscripts Division - Minto Charters at the National Library of Scotland).

    Instrument of sasine proceeding on precept following on...directed to Andrew McDouell of Makcariston, Andrew Douglas of Tympynden, George Ormston and Archibald Hereot ... Witnesses: James Quhitlaw, esquire, Sir Robert Stewart, chaplain, John Anderson, John Cunyngham, John Wynterhop and William Spens. Notary - Richard Gibson, Glasgow. Date 9 Mar 1499-1500.

    Thomas Rutherfurd was slaughtered in Jedburgh Abbey in about 1504. In this exploit George Douglas the Laird of Bonjedward was accompanied by his brother John and by a younger generation – his son Andrew Douglas the Laird of Timpendean and another son Robert. (Robert was probably the father of the Rev John Douglas c1494 to 1500 who was the Archbishop and Chancellor of the University of St Andrews from 1572 to 1574. He was one of the six Johns who wrote the Scots Confession of 1560).

    There were others as well, involved in the slaughter of Thomas Rutherford.

    28 August,1504. “Specialle Respuyt in favor of the ‘men, kin, tenentis, factouris and servants’ of Robert Archbishop of Glasgow; and especially for the slaughter of umquhile Thomas Ruthirfurde within the Abbay of Jedworthe.” Among those listed in the ‘Respite’ were – George Douglace of Bone-Jedworthe, Andro Douglas, Johne Douglas, Robert Douglas, William Douglas, Master Stevin Douglas, Johne Douglase in Jedworthe and David Douglace in Jedworthe. ‘Dumfreis’.

    Master Stevin Douglas was likely to have been the young son of Andro (Andrew) Douglas of Timpendean.

    Slaughter of Thomas Rutherford by George Douglas of Bonjedburgh and Andrew Douglas of Timpendean and others (c1504) - Remission by King James the 4th to John Forman of Dalvane, Baldred Blacater, Knights, John Tweedy of Drumelzear, Adam Stewart, Robert Blacater, son and appearent heir of Andrew Blacater of that ilk, Adam Blacater, Charles Blacater, John Heryoth, Adam Turnbull of Phillophauch, William Turnbull, his son and apparent heir, George Douglas of Bonjedburgh, John Douglas, his brother, Andrew Douglas in Tympanedene (Timpendean), Robert Douglas, his brother, and others for the slaughter of the late Thomas Rutherfurd within the Abby of Jedworth. Dated at Edinburgh 28 Febuary 1506.

    Andrew’s spouse is unknown.

    Andrew’s children were Archibald Douglas c1495 Timpendean and (Master) Stevin Douglas c1497.

    Andrew Douglas must have died in 1527 as his son Archibald was infefted with the lands of Hassendeanbank (owned by Andrew Douglas). Minto Charters - Percept of Clar/Clare Constat for lands at Hassendeanbank – 24 December,1527. (A Percept of Clar/Clare Constat relates to heir of a deceased vassal).

    The Instrument of Sasine in favour of Archibald Douglas of Timpendean was dated 7 February,1527. (Minto Charters).

    2nd Archibald Douglas c1495 Timpendean to c1537 & Ann Marshall c1499 Lanton m 15 June 1517 at Lanton, Roxburghshire.

    Ann Marshall was the daughter of Peter Marshall of Lanton.

    On account of his marriage Archibald got some lands presumably at Lanton (Precept of sasine dated 15 June,1517). [The Annals of a Border Club (the Jedforest): and biographical notices of the families connected therewith – George Tancred – Jedburgh, T S Small – 1899].

    Archibald is mentioned in the Great Seal Register of 1527 and in 1527 he had a gift of lands in Lanton.

    Archibald and Ann Douglas had Andrew Douglas c1519 Timpendean.

    Archibald c1495 Douglas died after 1537.

    3rd Andrew Douglas c1519 Timpendean & Katherine Gladstanes/Gledstains c1520 Lanton m c1537.

    Katherine was the daughter and co-heiress of William Gladstanes/Gledstains of Lanton.

    In ‘A British Frontier? – Lairds and Gentlemen of the Eastern Borders 1540 to 1603 by Maureen M Meikle 2004 – it says that Andrew Douglas was a minor when he married but he was free to choose his own bride. It is not clear whether it was this Andrew or his son Andrew, but most probably it was this Andrew.

    On 26 March,1551, “the ‘auld band of Roxburgh’ was drawn up and signed at Jedburgh. ‘Andro Douglas of Timpindine’ was one of the numerous Border lairds who thus pledged allegiance to the young Queen Mary”. [The Annals of a Border Club (the Jedforest): and biographical notices of the families connected therewith – George Tancred – Jedburgh, T S Small – 1899].

    Andrew and Katherine Douglas had Andrew Douglas c1538 Timpendean and Patrick (Patie) Douglas c1558 Timpendean.

    4th Andrew Douglas c1538 Timpendean died c1601 (perhaps up to 1610) & Margaret Turnbull c1540 Ancrum Mill, Roxburghshire m 10 December 1562.

    Margaret Turnbull was the daughter of Gavin Turnbull of Ancrum Mill, Roxburghshire.

    Andrew was sometimes known as Dand Douglas.

    Andrew Douglas is mentioned in the Great Seal Register of 1574 to 1575.

    Andrew Douglas is also mentioned in the Privy Council Register of 1576, 1585, 1591 and 1592.

    ‘Andree (Andrew) Dowglas, nune (nowadays?) de Tympynden’ was mentioned on 9 March, 1580-1594 in regard to a Sasine. [Scotland. Court of Exchequer].

    In 1585 he is mentioned in the Privy Council Register as being the brother of Patie.

    On 10 December,1585, “ ‘Andro Douglas of Tympendean (alias Dand)’ was charged to appear with others before the Privy Council because of suspected disaffection, but nominally concerning their obedience to the king and ‘the quieting of the countrie’. [The Annals of a Border Club (the Jedforest): and biographical notices of the families connected therewith – George Tancred – Jedburgh, T S Small – 1899].

    In 1590 it appears to be Andrew Douglas on the ‘Roll of Clans’.

    Landed Proprietors in 1590 "...roll of the names of the landed proprietors over the whole of Scotland in 1590..." Landit Men. Roxburgh and Selkirk Included - William Douglas of Bonejedburgh, Tympenden (Douglas) http://www.electricscotland.com/history/borders/riding1.htm

    The Names of the Barons, Lairds and chiefe Gentlemen in every Sherifdome. As they were Anno domini, 1597. Roxburgh - L. of Cesfurde, Ker. L. of Litleclane, Ker. L. of Greynhede, Ker. L. of Corbet, Ker. Gradon, Ker. Ker of Gaitschaw. Mow [flow or Molle] (of that Ilk). Haddon [Murray]. Sheriff of Teviotdaill, Dowglasse. Tymperden, Douglas. Hundeley [Rutherford]. Hunthill [Rutherford]. Edzarstoun [Rutherford]. Bedreull, Turnebull. Mynto [Stewart]. [In 1329 the lands of Mynto belonged to Walter Turnbull, but in the time of Robert III (1390-1406) they were divided between the Turnbulls and the Stewarts, who both possessed them until about 1622, when they again changed hands.] Wawchop [Turnbull]. William Turnebull of Barn-hills. George Turnebull of Halreull. Hector Lorane of Harwood. Grinyslaw of little Norton. Mader of Langton. Mungo Bennet of Chestis. Overtoun, Frasier. Riddale of that Ilk. L. Makkayrstoun (Makdowgal ). Andrew Ker of Fadounsyde. L. of Bakeleuch, Scot. Raph Haliburton of Mourhouslaw. "Thomas Ker of Cavers. Howpasloth, Scott. Baron Gledstanes [Gladstone]. Langlands [Lang-lands]. William Eliot of Torslyhill. Scott of Sintoun. Scott of Eydschaw. Walter Vaitch of Northsintoun. Scott of Gloeke. L. of Chesholme of that Ilk. L. of Cranstoun (Cranstown). Kirktoun of Stewartfield. L. of Linton, Ker. Ker of Ancrum. Carncors of Colmislie. http://www.electricscotland.com/history/borders/riding1.htm

    In about 1600 Andrew Douglas is recorded as being part of an Inquest for lands in Rulewater.

    Retour of Inquest on William Ker of Cessford on 14/5/1600 done at the Tolbooth of Jedburgh on 3/6/1600 - present Andrew Douglas of Tempindene.

    Andrew and Margaret Douglas had Stephen (Stevin) Douglas c1567.

    5th Stephen (Stevin) Douglas c1567, said to be of Timpandean & Jean/Jane Halyburton/Haliburton c1573 Muirhouselaw, Roxburghshire m 20 May 1595.

    Jean Halyburton/Haliburton was the daughter of Andrew Halyburton of Muirhouselaw.

    Halyburton/Haliburton
    [From Genealogical Memoirs of the family of Sir Walter Scott, Bart of Abbotsford by Charles Rogers – 1877].
    I have extracted a bit of a scanty picture on Halyburton/Haliburton but the idea is to connect Andrew Halyburton/Haliburton of Muirhouselaw and his daughter Jean to the Timpendean line of Douglas.
    ‘The name Burton is derived from the Norse bur, a storehouse, and dun, pronounced toon, a fort or castle. At one end of two Burton farms (in Berwickshire) was erected a chapel…the locality was known as Haly (Holy) Burton. Walter, son of David, under the designation of Walterus de Halyburton, confirmed a gift made by his father in 1176, of the church of Halyburton to the Abbey of Kelso…
    Henry Haliburton, descended from the Lords Halyburton received from Archibald (the Grim) Earl of Douglas in August,1407, the lands of Muirhouselaw in Berwickshire. One of his sons married Isabel de Mertoun, heiress of Mertoun, and their son William Haliburton, succeeded to the maternal estate of Mertoun…
    William Haliburton was the father of four sons, Walter, David, George and William. Walter, the eldest, succeeded him in the lands of Mertoun…
    On 16th December,1584 a Henry Haliburton obtained service as heir to Mark Haliburton of Mertoun, his father, in the lands of Mertoun. He was succeeded in these lands by his son, John Haliburton, on 29th April,1601…
    The second or third son of William Haliburton of Mertoun was George Haliburton, who received the lands of Muirhouselaw…
    John Haliburton of Muirhouselaw had a daughter Agnes, who married George Haliburton of Dryburgh and Newmains. He died in 1606…
    Andrew Halyburton/Haliburton of Muirhouselaw, living in 1573, had a daughter Jean (or Jane) who married Stephen Douglas, son of Andrew Douglas of Tympendean on 29th May,1595’.

    In about 1611 ‘Stevin Douglas of Tympiden’ was cautioned. (Privy Council Register).

    1617 – Register of the Privy Council of Scotland (Renewed Band by a number of the Border lairds for the good conduct of their men, servants and tenants). There were many who signed up including ‘Williame Douglas of Bonjedburgh’ and ‘Stevin Douglas of Tumpendeane’.

    Stephen and Jean Douglas had John Douglas c1608 Timpendean, and Andrew (Andro) Douglas c1612.

    Andrew Douglas c1612 the second son may have been an indweller in Edinburgh in the 1650’s.

    Andrew Douglas c1612 and his wife had – Issobell bap 28 July,1639 in Jedburgh, John c1640 (An Apprentice cordiner in Edinburgh in 1656 with Alexander Burrellwell), Stephen c1641 (An Apprentice to William Cunningham ‘younger’ Merchant in Edinburgh on 3/9/1656), Thomas bap 19 Nov. 1648 in Jedburgh and Jenet bap 14 Dec. 1650 in Jedburgh.

    Andrew Douglas c1612 had died by September,1656.

    Stephen Douglas c1567 is mentioned in 1633 in regard to the marriage of his son John Douglas.

    6th John Douglas c1608 Timpendean & Mary Douglas c1610 of Bonjedward m 4 April 1632.

    John Douglas and Mary Douglas (of Bonjedward) had William Douglas c1633 Timpendean.

    John Douglas is mentioned in the Great Seal Register in 1633.

    In 1661 there was – ‘Information for the laird of Bonjedburgh and his curators, anent (concerning) settlement to be made for his only sister, to provide for her necessary ailment and such a provision for advanceing hir (her) to a condition of marriage with a gentleman of hir (her) awin (own) qualitie’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    This concerns George’s sister Mary Douglas who had married John Douglas 6th of Timpendean. John Douglas had died by 1643 as the lands of Timpendean were life-rented by his widow. (Land Tax Rolls for Roxburghshire).

    7th William Douglas c1633 Timpendean to 1688 Timpendean & Alison Turnbull c1635 Minto, Roxburghshire m 27 July 1655 at Minto, Roxburghshire.

    Alison Turnbull was the daughter of John Turnbull of Barnhills, Minto and Elizabeth Elliot of Stubs/Stabs.

    “Alison was the grand-daughter of Sir Gilbert Elliot of Stobs…” [The Annals of a Border Club (the Jedforest): and biographical notices of the families connected therewith – George Tancred – Jedburgh, T S Small – 1899].

    It was said in the Heraldry of the Douglases that William Douglas was retoured to his father (John) on 29th May,1655.

    William Douglas was retoured to his father John Douglas “in certain lands in ‘the toune and territories of Langtoune’ (Lanton) on 29 May, 1655…” [The Annals of a Border Club (the Jedforest): and biographical notices of the families connected therewith – George Tancred – Jedburgh, T S Small – 1899].

    William and Alison Douglas had 7 children all born in Jedburgh – John 1656 Jedburgh, Elisabeth 1657 Jedburgh, Andrew (Andro) 1658 Jedburgh, William 1658 Jedburgh (twins), Robert Johnne 1660 Jedburgh, George 1661 Jedburgh and Alisone 1663 Jedburgh.

    Andrew Douglas 1658 married Helen Scott on 21 Jul. 1691 in Jedburgh and they had – Andrew (Andro) 1602 Hownan, John 1694 Hownan and James 1696 Hownan, Roxburghshire.

    George Douglas 1661 married an unknown spouse and they had the following children in Hownan – William 1691, Margaret 1893, James (1) 1694, James (2) 1696 (Married Bessie Broun in 1718 in Jedburgh), Isobell 1689, Agnes 1702 and Janet 1704.

    8th John Douglas bap 25 July 1656 Jedburgh & Eupham/Euphame Turnbull c1659 Bowden, Roxburghshire m 6 December 1679 at Jedburgh.

    Euphame’s parents were – William Turnbull of Sharpelaw and Christian Ker – daughter of William Ker of Newton and Ann Douglas from Cavers.

    “Eupham was a descendant of Sir Archibald Douglas of Cavers…” [The Annals of a Border Club (the Jedforest): and biographical notices of the families connected therewith – George Tancred – Jedburgh, T S Small – 1899].

    John and Euphame Douglas had 9 children – Christian (1) (was a female name then) 1680 Jedburgh, William 1684 Timpendean, Alisone 1686 Jedburgh, John 1691 Jedburgh, Euphan 1693 Jedburgh, Mary 1695 Jedburgh, Christian (2) 1696 Jedburgh, George 1696 Jedburgh (twins), and Archibald 1699 Jedburgh.

    Euphan Douglas 1693 married William Grey.

    Christian (2) Douglas 1696 married William Smeall/Smeal on 27 November,1717 in Jedburgh, Roxburghshire.

    Archibald Douglas 1699 was an Apprentice Skinner on 8/12/1714 in Edinburgh with Bernard Ross, Burgess and Skinner.

    In November,1684 Eupham Turnbull, spouse to John Douglas of Timpendean was fined “… for ‘with-drawing’ from the Parish Kirks and ‘other irregularities’ by the Sheriff of Roxburghshire”. She was fined …pounds and “the said John was fined 1288 pounds…” It was part of the Sufferings. (by Robert Wodrow).

    “This Eupham was a lady of independent mind and refused to attend the Anglicised services of the church in the troublous times of Charles II. For this insubordination and other irregularities, her husband and she were summoned to appear with other Borderers before the Privy Council in 1684, and the laird of Sharplaw had to give a bond of caution for 1405 pounds Scots for his daughter and son-in-law”. [The Annals of a Border Club (the Jedforest): and biographical notices of the families connected therewith – George Tancred – Jedburgh, T S Small – 1899].

    John Douglas was Retoured to his father William on 17 January,1688.

    Hearth Tax at Scotlands Places for 1691-1695, there were 3 hearths listed for John Douglas of Timpinden.

    In 1694 John Douglas had lands at Langtown, Roxburghshire.

    William II: Translation 20 June 1695 –
    Act for six months' supply upon the land rent … the laird of Bonjedburgh, the laird of Timpendean, John Scott of Weems, William Turnbull of … (Parliament of Scotland).

    Anne: Translation 5 August 1704 –
    Act anent supply … Douglas of Bonjedburgh, Douglas of Timpendean, William Ainslie of Blackhill, Thomas Rutherford … (Parliament of Scotland).

    John Douglas 1656 died c1718.

    9th William Douglas 18 July 1684 Timpendean - died 1730 & Jean/Jane Rutherford 12 February 1684 Edgerston, Roxburghshire died 8 February, 1748 (Edinburgh Testaments) m 22 February 1718.

    Jean/Jane was the daughter of Thomas Rutherford/Rutherfurd of (Rutherford or) Wells, Edgerston, Hunthill and that ilk. It was said that he acquired Bonjedward in about 1710 to 1715, and that Susan/Susanna Riddell of Minto was his wife.

    By 1707 a large proportion of the lands of Bonjedward appear to have been sold to the Laird of Wells who was Thomas Rutherford/Rutherfurd. Half these lands were sold to Wells with the Lairds of Bonjedward and Wells effectively having half shares each (of disjoined areas) – Bonjedward mains, Ploughstilt, farm-acres, mill and teinds. Besides, the Laird of Bonjedward had half shares of lands at Mounthooly (Admiral Elliot) and lands at Woodend, Roundhaugh and Newmill. The Laird of Bonjedward was rated at 1533, with 200 additionally being for Timpendean and Langtoun.

    The Laird of Bonjedward also owned some of Bonjedward Mains on his own, rated at 909.

    The Bonjedward Laird had also liferented (and this was taken into account in the Roxburghshire land rate calculations above) – East end of Bonjedward Mains, Westmains of Bonjedward, Ashiebank and Cray’s Park, Pastureground, West Huntknow, Parktown and Sheeprig, Horsepark at Place and Sunnybraepark. Haugh now belonged to Sir John Scott of Ancrum and some grounds into Simpson’s Yetts was now owned by John Reid.

    It is a complex picture as it lacks detail and thus certainty.

    In 1707 William Douglas of Timpendean was charged 866 pounds.

    It was made up of 567 pounds on land belonging to the Douglases. That 567 was composed of Six Husband lands of Timpendean 158, Lands of Timpendean liferented in 1643 at 260, lands in Langtoun acquired between 1678 and 1707 at 149.

    Plus, lands in Langtoun acquired from Capt. (Captain) Scott 299. (Scotlands Places).

    20 July 1715 - Extract act of the baron court of Nisbitt narrating qualification by William Douglas of Timpindean as bailie thereof (National Archives of Scotland).

    William Douglas or Timpendean as he was referred to, was said to be ‘very noysie' at the old Black Bull Inn, Jedburgh, in 1726. The sword murder of Colonel Stewart of Stewartfield (Hartrigge) occurred at the event held there. http://www.mainlesson.com/display.php?author=langjohn&book=border&story=murder

    In 1728 William Douglas is mentioned – ‘Selkirk Town,complains William Douglas of Timpendean upon John Fairgrieve late Deacon of Hammermmen in Selkirk’. (Archives Hub at Hawick).

    See Part 2 - https://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=125568

    Sally E Douglas

    30 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-03-04
    User data
  38. DOUGLAS FAMILY - snow or alpine skiers
    List
    Public

    The Douglas brothers - Cliff, Eric (Gilbert Eric) and Gill (Leslie Gilbert) were keen recreational snow or alpine skiers. Cliff and Eric were especially keen on this sport - both were downhill as well as Langlauf or cross country skiers. They were early members of the Ski Club of Victoria with Eric joining in 1927 and continuing through as a member till 1931. However he was still skiing in 1936 and on the other side of 1927 he likely commenced skiing in about 1925 at the age of 22. In the Ski Club of Victoria Membership list of 1929 both Cliff and Eric are listed and in the 1933 list of course only Cliff is listed. Copies of the relevant pages showing 'Douglas' of these two lists were personally obtained by me at the Ski Club of Victoria lodge 'The Whitt' (Ivor Whittaker) at Mount Buller in recent years.
    In 1925 through the initiatives of the Ski Club of Victoria a slide was cut at Mt Donna Buang and the erection of a chalet at Mt Feathertop was proposed. In 1927 the ski resorts in Victoria included - Mount Nelson, Mount Cope, Mount Jim, Dibbin's Hut, Mount St Bernard Hospice and Mount Hotham. While in 1930 the Victorian ski resorts included - Mt Donna Buang, Mt Bogong, the High Plains, Bon Accord Spur, Cope Hut, Feather Top, Hotham Heights and Mount Buller.
    Eric was the most 'experienced' skier, out of his family and friends, and told a story that when on the downhill approach to Mt Hotham all the luggage was strapped to him. It didn't take long for him to end in a heap!
    Both the wives of Cliff - Doris Watson - and Eric - Ella Sevior - were also early skiers in the Victorian Alps, obviously having been introduced to the sport by their husbands. Doris and Ella skied at Mt Buffalo and Mt Buller in 1935.
    While skiing in the Bogong High Plains in September, 1937 Arthur Downer a friend of Cliff's, and a member of a skiing party which included Cliff was injured when he fell heavily into soft snow near the Cleve Cole Memorial Hut. He was taken to the hut and two of his party members - Cliff Douglas and Tom Fisher - left at 8pm to ski to Bright for assistance. They travelled all night and crossed the Mountain creek eight times before reaching Bright at 4am. They saw a local doctor for advice on first aid and the best means of over snow transport. The result was that they obtained a stretcher and with the assistance of a Mr Maddison took it to the hut which they reached at 1am the next morning.
    Then the ski party members made a makeshift sledge out of a ladder and two pairs of skis and they placed Arthur Downer on an improvised matress on the sledge and left on a 10 to 12 mile journey to the snowline near Tawonga. The sledge was pulled by eighteen members of the skiing party over the 10 to 12 miles of snow. Part of the journey was made along a slope of 45 degrees were a slip would have meant a drop of 500 ft.
    One version of the story indicates that from the snowline to the car park where one of the members had left his car, the stretcher was placed on a pack horse and taken down a cattle track to the car park near a downhill section of the Mountain creek.
    Cliff Douglas then went with the driver of the car and they drove overnight to Melbourne where Arthur Downer was admitted to the Alfred Hospital at 8am the next day. (Trove newspapers for this story).
    I consider myself fortunate to have met the legendary Mick Hull in the late 1960's when I wandered into the lodge where he was staying at Mount Hotham. In happened to be in the midst of a blizzard when I lost the rest of my ski walking party when we walked in from the car park on the southern side of Hotham, along the Great Alpine Road. The carpark was somewhere close to what is now the village of Dinner Plain. I bent down to readjust my backpack for a minute or so and the party of about fourteen were quickly out of sight in the heavy mist as they rounded the bend in the road that wound back towards Hotham village, some distance from Hotham Heights. I was not too perturbed and I considered my best bet was to follow the flatness of the partly now snow covered road and I could soon see lodges and huts in the distance and I made my way to an accessible hut and inside were Mick Hull and other skiers. (Mick being one of the other two skiers with Cleve Cole when he lost his life at Mt Bogong in August, 1936. The other skier was Howard Michell).
    It was so blizzardy that day that a few of the skiers had even decided to make their way back to Melbourne rather than face a walk of about 7 miles laden with our skis which we were wearing and our back packs with clothes and some food provisions for a week - luckily much of the dried food and basic provisions were already at the Melbourne University Ski Club (USC) where we were to stay, having been taken in by summer working parties. We had good leaders in our skiing party and they would not let us rest on the way in other than a short stop for a bent up and frosted but welcome sandwich, and I imagine a drink of water. If you stop in such a situation you get cold and what is more important in a way you can loose the mental attitude to move on. It could all become too difficult. The elements must be respected. What is more I remember non essential provisions being left off the side of the road on the way in to Mount Hotham and these provisions included our cardboard wine casks, known as 'Chateau cardboard' in some circles!
    Eric Douglas had a great admiration for the skiing abilities of Helmut Koffler who he knew and watched ski at Mt Buller - he said that Koffler's ski jumps over a ramp were absolutely amazing.

    Sally E Douglas

    85 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-11-16
    User data
  39. DOUGLAS ISLANDS - ANTARCTICA
    List
    Public

    The 'Douglas Islands' off the coast of Mawson base are named and gazetted by Australia and these islands are also called Douglas Islands by Russia and the United States of America. They were named for Rear (sic Vice) Admiral Sir Henry Percy Douglas CMG, Hydrographer of the Royal Navy. They are 'two small islands, with rocky outliers, about 33 km north east of Mawson' (Antarctic Gazetter). On 31st December, 1929 - RAAF Pilots, Flying Officer Stuart Campbell and Pilot Officer Eric Douglas made an historic flight in the RAAF Gipsy Moth Seaplane VH-ULD which was taken south onboard the SY Discovery (RRS Discovery 1). Stuart and Eric were the two pilots seconded to 'the Seaplane Division' of the RAAF for the purpose of joining Sir Douglas Mawson's Banzare (Antarctic Voyages) of 1929/30 and 1930/31 and on that day in December, 1929, 'a group of islands was reported...' (The Winning of Australian Antarctica by A Grenfell Price - 1962 - the Mawson Institute) although Eric Douglas said in his log that it was uncertain what they had seen in the distance from a height of 5,000 feet. However the islands were named by Sir Douglas Mawson for the famed British Hydrographer, with the surname of Douglas.

    The observations by Eric Douglas as in his log were "...beyond this again appeared the distant shape of land but it is hard to say definitely. This apparent land extended towards the SW, from the SW to the W there was a haze. To the SE and E fairly hazy with some small waterways. To the West the water extended as far as we could see. To the North and North east, very broken thin pack ice, and cloudy to the NE..."

    By the way, the moth was taken onboard at Cape Town, South Africa for the first Banzare Voyage and as for both voyages it was packed in cases and the bulk of it stored on the deck of the Discovery. While viewing cargo being loaded onto the Discovery at Cape Town, in October, 1929 Eric Douglas readily recognized the moth in boxes and for him it was a great excitement. On the way to the Antarctic and nearer to their flying destinations the fragile and mainly wooden 'alfresco' seaplane with floats (the floats being made at RAAF Point Cook) was assembled by the two versatile and talented pilots. Eric was responsible for the accurate assembly and the running of the moth, for prior to becoming a Pilot and Flying Instructor he had qualified as a Motor Mechanic, Air Mechanic and Fitter and Rigger. He was also responsible for the maintenance and running of the ship's motor boat.

    Little did Eric Douglas envisage when he saw the moth in it's packing cases that there would be a time after a raging blizzard in the Antarctic, when the plane's wings and fabric was to be badly damaged and that he and Stuart Campell, with other helping hands on Banzare would have to set to work patching up the plane; even being forced to resort to using some of the packing case wood on the seaplane itself!

    When Banzare revisited that region in 1931 again in the Discovery, the islands in question were found to be situated in a slightly different locality off the Antarctic coast. However it wasn't till 1947 under ANARE (Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition) that the 'Douglas Islands' were finally gazetted by Australia; but it took until 1956 for their locality to be accurately established and that information was provided because of an ANARE sledge party led by Peter Crohn. The islands were not found in the locality as pinpointed in the 1931 Banzare visit, but two unchartered islands slightly further south were defined as the 'Douglas Islands'.

    The Norwegians at the time of Banzare and with their expedition at more or less the same time, apparently had some doubts about the existence of these islands. The competition between Riiser-Larsen on the 'Norvegia' for Norway and Sir Douglas Mawson for Britain and the Commonwealth on the 'Discovery' in matters of discovery of new lands in Antarctica was keen but cordial, and there was generous co-operation. Obviously the two Antarctic exploration leaders had the utmost respect for each other. When they met up in their respective ships in the Antarctic it was a friendly occasion. Moreover, Sir Douglas Mawson and Riiser-Larsen remained firm friends well after their days of Antarctic Adventure.

    Banzare was the idea of the leader Sir Douglas Mawson and he put in a great deal of time and effort raising funds both privately and from Governments for the forthcoming Antarctic voyages. These funds were raised especially in Britain and Australia and part of the understanding was that he would acknowledge the generous contributions by naming newly discovered Antarctic features and lands, for those persons on the 'Discovery Committee', or whom the Committee wished to honour, as well as for benefactors such as Macpherson Robertson, politicans such as the Australian Prime Minister James Henry Scullin and for members of the Banzare expedition such as the members the Discovery 'Ship's Company' and the 'Scientists'. It is a telling fact about Sir Douglas Mawson that he named no features for his own name or names on either of the Banzare Voyages.

    The Douglas Islands can be located on the LIMA - NASA satellite site (LIMA being short for Lansat Mosaic Images of Antarctica) and can be captured and saved and/or printed out in a choice of natural and/or digitally enhanced formats. There are at least three different starting points for a search at the site - http://lima.usgs.gov/ and http://lima.usgs.gov/view_lima.php and http://lima.nasa.gov/

    Also see the Australian Antarctic Data Centre, Gazetter - https://data.aad.gov.au/aadc/gaz/display_name.cfm?gaz_id=872 & http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Islands.

    See the Geographica Names site - NASA image http://www.geographic.org/geographic_names/antname.php?uni=4025&fid=antgeo_107

    Weather forecast for the Douglas Islands, Antarctica - http://www.yr.no/place/Antarctica/Other/Douglas_Islands/

    Photographs of Sir Henry Percy Douglas at the National Portrait Gallery in London - http://www.npgprints.com/search/keywords/sir%20henry%20percy%20douglas

    Sir Henry Percy Douglas at Douglas History - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/henrypercydouglas.htm#.UOtN53waySM

    Sir Henry Percy Douglas (Captain) devised the Douglas Sea Scale which classifies Sea Swell, Wind, and Wave length and height. It is wide use today - http://www.eurometeo.com/english/read/doc_douglas & http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Sea_Scale. There are other sea scales in use such as the Beaufort Wind Scale which was used by Sir Douglas Mawson on his Banzare Voyages to the Antarctic in 1929/30 and 1930/31. The Douglas Sea Scale and the Beaufort Wind Scale are complimentary measurement navigational scales

    The Beaufort Wind Scale was also used on the MV Orion when I ventured south to Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay in 2007. For just after leaving Macquarie Island and heading south we hit a storm of many hours duration, which at it's height registered force 11 (violent storm). In this storm I was thrown from my bed into a large chair some feet away and got a gash in my leg which I had to leave bleeding as it was too rough to attend to it. In the main sitting and entertainment room I saw chairs come unhooked and slide across to the other side of the ship with passengers smartly removed sideways or upwards. In the dining room at breakfast time food ready for about ninety passengers crashed to the floor along with plates, cups, glasses and cutlery. Needless to say our breakfast that morning was far more modest than the lavish choice that we were becoming accustomed to. I heard stories about people somersaulting out of their beds and being covered in bruises. I saw some of those bruises. The ship's lift was closed and the outside doors of the ship were locked for safety reasons. The essence was to try and 'stay put' and 'hang on' and not venture around unnecessarily. At one point I was forced to order some food that was manageable, and it happened to be a couple of bananas. As the ship lent towards me two of the crew came through the cabin door with the bananas and when the ship lent the other way they went out backwards. Naturally we all had a laugh! My brother who had been leader of the ANARE base Davis in 1960 wished me 'a b. good blizzard' and I got one!

    A further innovation by Sir Henry Percy Douglas (when he was a Captain) was the Douglas Navigation Protractor. It is a square 360 degrees protractor for plotting courses and bearings - http://www.starpath.com/catalog/accessories/1852.htm This protractor has proved to be an ideal navigational guide since it was invented and its use suits the present digital age. Tellingly its widespread application is illustrated by the multitude of sites (using a search engine) which display it in many variations. Nowadays it is made from a choice of materials and is used for example for shipping and ocean yacht racing and also air navigation. I image that it is also used for land navigation and remote exploration too; and that there digital versions. I wonder if there are apps for ipad and android use?

    One more nautical invention by Sir Henry Percy Douglas was the joint invention of the 'Douglas-Applyard Arcless Sextant' - for use in surveys and aerial navigation.

    Eric Douglas had an affinity here as he was always fascinated by air and sea navigational instruments, and he used and needed guiding instruments, maps and charts; as a pilot, flying instructor and competitive yachtsman. At one stage he had a large desk compass, which was balanced by mercury and a smaller pocket sized compass which he often 'read' and his alignment was always with the geomagnetic south pole.

    Even with just a small knowledge of these contributions by Sir Henry Percy to Hydrography, there is reinforcement that the naming the 'Douglas Islands' in his honour by Sir Douglas Mawson, is a fitting tribute to some of his obviously excellent work in sea navigation, mapping and charting.

    From 1928 to 1932 Sir Henry Percy Douglas was on the London based 'Discovery Committee', so Sir Douglas Mawson and Sir Henry Percy Douglas would have known each other quite well.

    Two other Antarctic features named for Sir Henry Percy Douglas (but not by Sir Douglas Mawson) are the Douglas Range and Douglas Strait.

    (Some knowledge of the Antarctic by the writer and from writings by Eric Douglas].

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    Bachelor of Commerce and Diploma of Public Policy (Hons - Arts) - the University of Melbourne; Deakin University Hons Art Subjects under the History of Ideas.

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-12-17
    User data
  40. Douglas of Bonjedward - Part 2
    List
    Public

    From Part 1. https://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=123379

    This was probably another son of John c1519 and brother of George Douglas – Archibald Douglas.

    Archibald Douglas also seems to have been a Priest too.

    Archibald Douglas was the son of John Douglas, Burgess in Edinburgh. He was pres. (Preservation of James VI?) by James VI on 30 July,1574, when Linton and Newlands were under his care. He was removed to West Linton before July,1576, but returned in about 1585. He was refused Collation to Skirling on 20 June,1592. Archibald Douglas died by 19 April,1616.

    It appears that Archibald was at Kirkurd in 1574 – ie in Linton and Newlands. He was a student at St Andrews University from 1571 to 1572.

    John Douglas c1519 was possibly a Brewer and Burgess in Edinburgh in 1556 and attended a mass in Paris in 1574 – the question has been raised - was it his son George’s ordination? It seems so.

    There is a connection of the father of George and Archibald Douglas ie John Douglas c1519 as having been a servant of the William Douglas Laird of Whittingham in Edinburgh. This John Douglas was ‘arrainged’ before the Edinburgh Kirk Session in 1574 for attending mass while in France. It seems that it was at his son’s ordination.

    In January 1540 - Hobbe (Robert) Douglas of Bunjedward was mentioned as one of 'Scottesmen rebels resete within England’.

    It was said that in 1540 Hobb Douglas was hiding in England with some other riders from West Teviotdale.

    In January,1540 Hobbe Douglas (under the heading of Scotch and English Rebels) – Coldstream, 22 Jan. ‘delivered Hobbe Douglas (of Bunjedward) and John Broun, delivered by Sir Will Eure, warden of the East Marches of England’. [British History online]. Did Hobbe survive after this?

    Willie c1513 and Hugh c1515 were said to have matriculated. [Lairds and Gentlemen: A study of the landed families of the Eastern Anglo-Scottish Borders c1540 -1603. PhD – Maureen M Meikle – University of Edinburgh 1988].

    7th William known as Willie Douglas c1513. Willie Douglas died after 22 May,1582.

    In 1544 Sir Ralph Eure (Evre) burned Bonjedworth.

    ‘Sir Raff Evre’s Lettres, 26 October,1544 – Mr Norton, Mr Nesfield, &c, rode to a Town of the Lord of Bonjedworth and burnt it, and brought away 10 Prifoners, 100 Nolt (Cattle), 200 Shepe’. [A Collection of State Papers relating to Affairs in the Reigns of…1532 – 1570].

    January,1544. In the time of Henry VIII – “The King has seen his several letters and writings therewith. Where it appears that George Douglas has desired the laird of Bonjedwourth to sue for safeconduct for ambassadors from the Governor and lords of Scotland, he is to be answered that the King has lately made proclamations upon the frontiers for the entry of prisioners, and unless they enter and relieve their pledges the King intends to grant no such safeconduct. If, however, they do enter, he will grant safeconduct to ambassadors (authorized by the Queen and Governor). To come to the earl of Shrewsbury and declares their charge. Bonjedworth and others who have promised service are to be assured that if such ambassadors come the King will in the treaty have respect to their safeguard…”1. (The Privy Council to Shrewesbury – Hamilton Papers). 2. (British History online).

    The King to the Earl of Shrewesberie – February,1544, “he is not to press the Warden of the Middle Marches to take other hostages of Bonjedworth and Grenehede than he has taken, unless there be more against them than appears…”

    Dareton, 8 Feb.1544 Shewsbury, Tunstall and Sadler to the Council. ‘Enclose letters and writings from Lenoux and from the Warden of the West and Middle Marches. Where it appears by the letters of the Warden of the Middle Marches, and of George Douglas, that the said George eftsoons make means to speak with him, and have written to him to make an appointment for the purpose and to answer the said George’s late message by the laird of Bonjedwoorth, touching ambassadors, as directed by the Council letters of 12 Jan. Signed’. [Letters & Papers, Foreign and Domestic, the Reign of Henry VIII Vol 10 by John Sherren Brewer].

    On 28 October,1544 – Sir Ralph Evre wrote that he had ‘burnt a town of the lord of Bonjedworth’. [British History online].

    7 November,1544 – Shrewsbury and Others to Henry VIII. ‘Have received the Council's letters of 2 Nov. declaring his pleasure for the stirring of the Scots who have lately entered into bond to do exploits and for the bestowing of their pledges, and that 5,000l. is sent to pay the garrisons and the men of Berwick. Shrewsbury has sent for five of the best of the pledges, viz., of the lairds of Fernyherst, Cesford, Hundelee, Boundjedwourth and the sheriff of Tevydale, intending to bestow them with gentlemen of Nottingham and Derby shires; and will also put the rest in honest custody. Enclose letters from the Wardens of the East and Middle Marches of their exploits in Scotland. Darneton, 7 Nov. Signed by Shrewsbury, Tunstall and Sadler’. [British History online].

    1545 “...About that very time Sir George Douglas sent his friend, the laird of Bonjedward, with a message to the Earl of Shrewsbury at Darlington, to represent that the lords of Scotland really desired peace with England, and to request that the King would send a safe-conduct for ambassadors authorised by the Queen and Governor. The Privy Council, on this, wrote to Shrewsbury to inform Sir George in reply that the King had lately made proclamation on the frontiers for the entry of his prisoners, and, unless they returned into captivity and relieved their pledges, he would grant no such safe-conduct; but if they did this he was willing to give one to such ambassadors to come to the Earl of Shrewsbury. Bonjedward and others who had promised service might be assured that if such ambassadors came the King would have respect to their safeguard. The Earl of Cassillis, it appeared, was willing to make his entry, for he had written to say so...” (Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 20 Part 1: January-July 1545 (1905), pp. I-LXII.)

    1544 – 1545. “…That Lairds Bonjedworth, Hunthill, Greehead, Hundalee, Linton, the Sheriff of Tividale, and others, had entered into enemies’ pay, and assisted to plant English garrisons in Scotland…” (Miscellany of the Maitland Club …Hamilton Papers).

    “…Pledges -Patrick Rotherforde for the laird of Hundalee, Willie Douglas for Bounjedworthe…Davie Douglas for Davie Douglasse…” [Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 20 Part 1: 1st March 1545 (1905) – page 131]

    William Douglas was the Sheriff of Roxburgh in 1545. In was in part a Commission by Queen Mary. In 1545 “Commission by Mary Queen of Scots appointing Rothsay Herald, William Douglas of Boneiedburgh, and Adam Ruthifurd, burgess of Jedburgh, her sheriffs of Roxburgh…Given under the quarter seal at Linlithgow, 2 October 1545”. (Historical Manuscripts Commission 7th Report – Appendix to 7th Report no 34 pages 730 and 731).

    During 1545 – “Extract retour of special service before William Douglas of Bone Jedburgh, sheriff of Roxburgh in that part by commission for the Queen…Expede in the Tolbooth of Jedburgh, 27 October 1545”. (Historical Manuscripts Commission 7th Report – Appendix to 7th Report no 34 page 731).

    In 1545 the Battle of Ancrum Moor took place in the vicinity of Jedburgh Bonjedward and Timpendean. It was part of a campaign by Henry VIII known as the ‘Rough Wooing’. The English Army consisted of 3,000 mainly German mercenaries, 1,500 English Borderers and 700-800 Scottish ‘assured men’. They had been at Melrose and were on their way back to Jedburgh. The army turned to pursue a small Scottish Cavalry. The English appear to have been divided into two battle lines. The Vanguard was led by Sir Brian Layton and consisted of 2,000 spearmen, hagbutters (men carrying portable long barreled guns), and archers. The Second battle was led by Sir Ralph Eure and consisted of 3,000 men. Both battles had spears in the center and one wing of archers, the other wing of hagbutters. They did not know that the Scots comprised a force of 2,500 men, including Fife lancers and Borders Reivers, accompanied by cannon power. The English army attacked uphill and the main Scot’s army came over the brow of the hill, pushing the Vanguard back into the rest of the English army. The ‘assured men’ ripped off the red crosses that marked them out and attacked the English as well. The English army collapsed as a force and a rout began. Both Layton and Eure were killed along with up to 800 of their army, and prisoners numbered about 1,000.

    See Part 3 - https://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=124124

    Sally E Douglas

    4 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-10-16
    User data
  41. Douglas of Bonjedward - Part 3
    List
    Public

    From Part 2. https://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=123695

    Archibald Douglas the 6th Earl of Angus was in the Battle. The Kelley research paper of 1973 said that the Laird of Bonjedburgh fought on the opposite side to Angus. It probably means that he was one of the 'assured Scots' who ripped off their crosses and changed sides, then consequently fighting for Scotland.

    In 1545 ‘William Douglas of Bunjeduard’ had his dwelling house, his town and the two towers of Bune Jedworth destroyed by the English in the expedition of the Earl of Hertford.

    1545 – On the River of Tiviot ‘…Bune Jedworth, the two Towres of Bune Jedworth raced, the Lard of Bune Jedworth’s Dwelling-house…’ [A Collection of State Papers…King Henry VIII by William Cecil (Lord Burghley)].

    1545 - The Earl of Hertford wrote to Henry VIII about burning towns and corn near Jedburgh, and also the burning of Jedburgh Abbey. The (Douglas) Laird of Bonjedward gets a mention asking for corn to be spared. (British History online).

    In 1545 Willyam Douglass off Bunjeduard, with others, signed a bond to provide 1000 horsemen.

    The Calendar of State Papers relating to Scotland and Mary, Queen of Scots 1547-1603 Vol 1 (1898) by Joseph Bain - mentions William Douglas of Bonjedworth 1547-1548.

    Calendar of state papers relating to Scotland and Mary, Queen of Scots, 1547-1606...Vol 7 Edinburgh HM General Register House 1913 Reign of Elizabeth - Jan 31, 1583-4 - Robert Bowes to Walsingham “...Applegarth, lately escaped out of the Castle of Edinburgh, has for his relief accused Angus and [the Laird of] Bonjedworth of having conspired the surprise of the King’s person, and it is said that he has thereby obtained a respite for five years...”

    Feb 22, 1547 – 1548. William Douglas of Bonjedworth wrote to Wharton (on behalf of Angus) – “I have ben in hand with my lorde of Angus twyching the performance of his purpose quhairintall I commonit with your lordschipis; quhair he hes vritin ane answere rafarring sum part of credeit to Thomas Carlton, quhilk I can no vayis dryf hym to no uther purpois that he hes vritin. Thairfor pleis it your lordschipis to the sam for ane sufficient answere. I wald knaw your mynd in that mater, owther be vriting or uthervayis as ye think expedient, that I may schaw the sam to my lorde lewtennande; and forder, gyf it pleis yowr lordschipis command me with ony uther service, I am on purpois to rapair to my lord lewtennande the morne, and shall ramane heir quhill xij howris apon yowr besines gyf it lykis yow to send ony with me; for I knaw he is desyrus to knaw of your weill fair and gud jurnay…Praying to know your further pleasure ‘the morne’ Drumlangrik, this Weddinsday at nycht”. Signed ‘William Douglas off Bunjeduard’.

    1547 – 1563 Calendar of State Papers, Scotland – The Laird of Bonjedworth is described as ‘that crafty Scot’… who escaped with Angus. [British History online].

    William Douglas of Bon Jedworth is mentioned in the Calendar of State Papers in February,1548, in relation to Drumlanrig.

    Drumlanrig Feb. 22, 1548. William Douglas of Bunjeduard (Bon Jedworth) to Wharton ‘In behalf of Angus. Begs his Lordship to be satisfied with his answers. Offers his own services. Will send copies of two letters to Angus from the Governor and Queen’. [Calendar of State Papers – Scotland. Great Britain Public Record Office].

    1547-1548 – 300 men were to be placed at Bonjedworth under Sir Oswald Wylstrop as Captain, in the time of William Douglas of Bonjedworth. [Calendar of State Papers relating to Scotland and Mary, Queen of Scots 1547- 1603].

    ‘Bunjedworth’ is mentioned in 1548-1549. [Hamilton Papers].

    7 November,1549 – Westminster. The Lords of the Council to the Earl of Rutland. ‘We have received letters from Sir Francis Leek purporting that whereas he sent the Lord of Bonjedward (Boniedworth), Andrew Ker (Carre)…and has detained them for special purpose in a good space…We therefore require you to signify to us what sorts of men they may be, and whether it would “conserve to the service of his Majestie” to let them go or to keep them somewhat longer…’ (Bonjedward and five other men were detained). [The Manuscripts of His Grace the Duke of Rutland. Great Britain – Royal Commission of Historical Manuscripts – 1888].

    ‘William Dowglas of Bonjedburgh’ was present in Edinburgh on 3rd December,1549 in regard to “ ‘Letters of Diligence’ by the Lords of the Council against Witnesses and Havers, at the instance of William Scott of Branxholm, Knycht, against Walter Ker of Cesfurd, John Ker of Phairniehirst and others”. . [Details in Latin]. {From the Scotts of Buccleuch – The Buccleuch Muniments}. (Muniments are title deeds or other documents proving a person’s title to land).

    William Douglas of Bonjedburgh was acting Deputy Warden of the Middle Marches from February,1553 to September,1553.

    In 1555 Andrew Ker of Cessford and William Douglas of Bonjedward brawled over two stolen horses at a day of truce. [Lairds and Gentlemen: A study of the landed families of the Eastern Anglo-Scottish Borders c1540 -1603. PhD – Maureen M Meikle – University of Edinburgh 1988].

    In 1560 William Douglas of Bonjedward was one of the “Eastern Border lairds’ who supported the ideal of Reformation. [Lairds and Gentlemen: A study of the landed families of the Eastern Anglo-Scottish Borders c1540 -1603. PhD – Maureen M Meikle – University of Edinburgh 1988].

    William Douglas was a witness to ‘a retour of service expede’ in Jedworth in 1564 or 1565.

    Willie Douglas is referred to as ‘the younger’ in 1566.

    Lothian papers, Volume IX. Fernieherst - 1505-1597 Sir John Forster, Sir John Forrester (Forster or Foster), Warden of the Middle March of England, to the Lairds of Fernihirst, Bedrewle, Hunthill, Bounegedworth and Edgerton. 22 May 1567. (National Archives of Scotland).

    In 1568 William is mentioned regarding ‘a cousin’ John Mow of that ilk. This John Mow was in Bonjedburgh in about 1536.

    On 15 May,1568 William Douglas of Bonjedwart wrote to John Mow ‘On Thursday the 13th was a battle between the Queen and the Regent with great slaughter, 2000 slain on the Queen’s side and 1,000 on the Regent’s, to whom was given victory. The Queen is said to be in Dumbarton. (The Letter) gives names of some of the slain and hurt. The Regent has a great spoil of the Queen’s munition and other great riches left in the field – Bonjedwart – Saturday – Signed’. [British History online]. Was William Douglas there?

    At Langside it was said that there were only a few thousand strong – ‘Moray’s three or four thousand, Mary’s five to six thousand. She had some artillery, presumably supplied by the Hamiltons, ten brass pieces being captured by Moray. Battle seems to have commenced with the foring of artillery. Douglas of Bonjedwart says there was “ane provyddit battail of artyle” and the Hamilton’s master gunner was slain…There is no mention of what effect Moray’s guns had if any…’ [Guns In Scotland – The manufacture and use of duns and their influence on warfare from the fourteenth century to c1625 – David H Caldwell. University of Edinburgh PhD 1981]. I wonder if William Douglas of Bonjedward was at the Battle of Langside?

    This is obviously about the ‘Battle of Langside’. The full contents of this letter is locked behind a British History online pay wall.

    The Battle of Langside https://www.theglasgowstory.com/image/?inum=TGSA05234he
    There is a large discrepancy in the numbers given by Bonjedwart in contrast to other accounts on the web.

    William Douglas was mentioned in the Buccleuch Muminents in 1569. (Muniments are title deeds or other documents proving a person’s title to land).

    In 1569-1579 William appeared in the Privy Council Register.

    In 1570 William Douglas was the Deputy Warden of Teviotdale (Roxburghshire).

    ‘William Douglas of Bonjedburgh’ was part of a Band made at Jedburgh in February,1572. [The Middle March of the Scottish Borders – 1573 to 1625, Vol. II. Presumably by Anna Groundwater].

    ‘William Douglas of Bonjedburgh’ was a subscriber to the Band of Roxburgh made at Jedburgh in August,1573. [The Middle March of the Scottish Borders – 1573 to 1625, Vol. II. Presumably by Anna Groundwater].

    Willie was Deputy Warden of the Middle Marches in 1576. James Douglas, the Earl of Morton and Regent, in the late 1570's to the period 1578 split the Middle March into two Wardens making William Douglas the 'bewest the strete' (Dere Sreet) Western Warden. Morton wanted to contain the power of the encumbent Warden William Ker of Cessford.

    In 1576 Angus reappointed ‘Douglas of Bonjedburgh’ to the west of Dere Street. [The Middle March of the Scottish Borders – 1573 to 1625, Vol. II. Presumably by Anna Groundwater].

    ‘Douglas of Bonjedward’ – allied in the Middle March with the Earl of Angus, Douglas of Cavers, Kirkton of Stewartfield and Turnbull of Bedrule. [The Middle March of the Scottish Borders – 1573 to 1625, Vol. II. Presumably by Anna Groundwater].

    Sir Cuthbert Collingwood complained to the Earl of Angus in about 1576. He wrote from Eslington – ‘…bitter complaints about the lawless proceedings of Douglas of Bonjedworth…I have provyded a huntsman for your lordship, that can blaw a horn excellent well, a yong man…’ [Herbert Maxwell]

    William Douglas is mentioned in letters in 1576.
    • Alnwick, 21st February,1576 – “Sir John Forster to William Douglas of Bonjedburgh, Deputy Warden for West Teviotdale, in the Middle Marches, acknowledging a letter from the latter with rolls enumerating divers disorders to be redressed; stating, with regard to two bills therein referred to, that he would file at the same meeting…”
    • Alnwick, 22nd February,1576 – “Sir John Foster to Archibald, eight Earl of Angus, referring to the refusal of the Laird of Bonjedworth to answer for Liddesdale or East Teviotdale, the inhabitants of which districts were daily making great spoil within the office of the Middle Marches, regarding which he had before written to his Lordship, but had received no answer…”
    • Hexham, 29th May,1576 – “Sir John Foster to William Douglas of Bonjedward, Deputy Warden of the Middle Marches of Scotland, informing him that a number of persons of the name of Crosier went to Tynedale, with the intention of slaying Archibald Robsone, Stonehouse’s son, and that he being gone to the Queen’s Court at Waewick, they met a young child, Henry Robson, son to Jeffrey Robson of Stonehouse and cruelly murdered him; and demanding that speedy punishment should be inflicted on the murderers”.
    • Hexham, 29th May,1586 – another letter on the same matter. Addressed to ‘the worshipfull and my verie loveng freinde, the Lard Abundgedwoorde’ and Signed off as ‘Your lovenge amd leifull freind John Foster’.

    In 1578 William is mentioned regarding information about the Kirk of Scotland.

    In August,1581 – ‘Instrument upon repossession given to Sir Thomas Ker of Pharnihirst in some lands in Ulstoun, wrongfully occupied by William Douglas of Bonjedward’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    Willie’s children were George Douglas c1540, Patrick c1544, Donald c1546, James c1548, John c1550, Archibald c1552, Andrew c1556, Robert c1558 and Elizabeth c1562 (Married Alexander Acheson/Achesoun c1574 of Gosford in c1584).

    Is Patrick c1544 the Patrick Douglas who was the Scottish Priest, Composer and Musician? It was thought that Patrick may have been related to George Douglas the Martyr. “He may have been related to the musician, Patrick Douglas, also from Edinburgh, who sought refuge in England, in the first days of Reformation, wrote church music there, was studying theology in Paris around 1584, and later lector in philosophy to the Scots monks at Regensburg (Ratisbon), who died there on 10 May,1597”.
    A Post-Reformation miscellany - Edinburgh University Press
    https://www.euppublishing.com/doi/pdfplus/10.3366/inr.2002.53.1.108
    by J Durkan - ‎2002)

    Robert Douglas c1558 son of ‘William Dowglas in Bonjedward’ was a Witness in May,1582.

    See Part 4 - https://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=125480

    Sally E Douglas

    4 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-10-30
    User data
  42. Douglas of Bonjedward - Part 4
    List
    Public

    From Part 3 https://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=124124

    8th George Douglas c1540. He died in 1614.

    In 1613 ‘a commission was issued by William Douglas of Cavers, to try George Douglas of cattle theft’. This could be about George Douglas of Bonjedward? In 1614 ‘George Douglas of Cavers was excommunicated for the slaughter of Mr George Douglas of Tympenden in 1614. However, it must refer to George Douglas of Bonjedwardand not Timpendean.
    (Thesis ‘Law and Order on the Anglo-Scottish Border 1603 – 1707 by Catherine M F Ferguson – University of St Andrews in 1981).

    George Douglas was supposedly murdered in 1614 but…15 July,1615. (Could the year be 1613 and not 1614?) Douglas against Cheeslie. “In an action pursued by George Douglas of Bonjedburgh contra Marion Cheeslie, the Lords repelled the exception founded upon the act of Parliament 1567, anent sasines to be given within the burgh by the town clerk, in respect of the reply, that it was offered to be proven that Mr George Douglas was repute and holden to be town clerk, and in use to give sasines; and that, notwithstanding, they offered them to prove, that there was another town clerk”. [The Decision of the Court of Session:From Its Institution… Volumes 7 – 8]. So work that out!

    27 Sep. 1559 – ‘Act of cautionary by William Scott of Harden, kt., and William Ker of Newtoun, two of the curators nominated by George Douglas of Bonjedbrughe, minor’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    Privy Council of Scotland 1562 - Edinburgh. ‘The quhilk day in presence of the saidis Lordis, comperit George Dowglas younger and fear of Bonjedburch, and becomes cautioun and souirtie for George Turnbull of Barnhils, that he sal enter his persone in ward within the castell of Dunbar within …hours nixt eftir this houre, quhilk is foure eftir none, under the pane of ane thousand markis’. (In the time of Queen Mary).

    George Douglas was the subject of a Contact of Marriage in 1566. (The Scotts Peerage: founded on Wood’s Edition of Sir Robert Douglas’s Peerage of Scotland).

    In 1566 Douglas of Bonjedward, was the owner of the church in South Dean (Southdean), Roxburghshire as ‘From 1566 the fruits of the rectory (were) held by Douglas of Bonjedburgh’. (Durham University – The church and religion in the Anglo-Saxon border counties 1634 to 1572 – e theses – S M Keeling (1975)

    It has also been said that William Douglas the younger of Bonjedward held the fruits of the parish in 1566. While his son George Douglas of Bonjedward held the fruits of this parish from 1568 to 1572. (Scottish Record Publication). Another account states on the “Person and Vicarage of Suddoun (Southdean) – William Douglas, younger of Bonjedburgh 1566 (&) George Douglas of Bonjedburgh 1568 to 1572. (Accounts of Collectors).

    Moreover, the parson and vicar at this South Dean church is said ‘with certainty’ as being George Douglas who became the Martyr in 1587. But if so the dates of that certainty are unclear to me.

    George the priest, studied at St Andrews in 1552-1555. He went to Rutland and kept a Latin School at North Luffenham in 1568. He claimed to have been ordained at Notre Dame Cathedral Paris in about 1574. He then went to Flanders, teaching and studying for some years before returning home.

    In 1571 the French King had made George Douglas, the parson and vicar a gentleman of his chamber for his dutiful attitude to Queen Mary.

    George the priest, returned to Rutland from Flanders in 1584 and was re-examined. He was freed and proceeded north to Ripon in Yorkshire where he was imprisoned for ‘making critical remarks’ about Protestant clergy, he was imprisoned for about a year before he was taken to York castle for about a year before his Martyrdrom in the very year (1587) Mary Queen of the Scots was put to death.

    Between 1566 and 1577 this George Douglas of Bonjedward was sometimes referred to as ‘the younger’. (Register of the Privy Council of Scotland).

    In January,1573 ‘George Douglas of Bonjedburgh’ was a cautioner. [The Middle March of the Scottish Borders – 1573 to 1625, Vol. II. Presumably by Anna Groundwater].

    On 25th December, 1574 George Dowglas of Bonjedworth was a witness to the ‘Bond of Manrent by Andrew Rutherford of Huntley, and others of his surname, to Archibald, eighth Earl of Angus…’ [Douglas book – Charters].

    In 1576 ‘George Douglas of Bonjedburgh’ was a cautioner. [The Middle March of the Scottish Borders – 1573 to 1625, Vol. II. Presumably by Anna Groundwater].

    In 1577 there was a complaint by Adam of Belchies and his son Hector against ‘Bonjedburgh’ as a cautioner and this was upheld -1,000 pounds. [The Middle March of the Scottish Borders – 1573 to 1625, Vol. II. Presumably by Anna Groundwater].

    In November,1577 it is written that ‘Douglas of Bonjedburgh, George – younger – becomes surety’. (Surety – a guarantor or sponsor for a debt).

    In 1572-1610 George Douglas was mentioned in the Privy Council Register.

    31 March,1575 Dalkeith. “Gift to William Kirktoun, burgess of Jedburgh, of the nonentry of three husbandlands in the town and lands of Bonjedburgh and sheriffdom of Roxburgh, pertaining to the deceased William Kirktoun of Stewartfield”. [Register of the Privy Seal of Scotland].

    This George Douglas was in the Battle of Carter Bar in July 1575. It was said that he was there with a ‘large force from Jedwater’. This battle was also called the Raid of the Redeswire. (Fray of Reidswire or Raid of the Red Swire).

    Regarding this Fray, the Earl of Surrey in a letter to Henry VIII wrote that “I found the Scots at this time the boldest men and he hottest that ever I saw in any nation…in all parts of the army, they kept up with such continued skirmishes, that I never beheld the like…” [The Topographical, Statatistical and Historical Gazetter of Scotland -1843].

    November,1576 and ‘George Douglas of Bonjedward, younger’ is mentioned. [The Middle March of the Scottish Borders – 1573 to 1625, Vol. II. Presumably by Anna Groundwater].

    In 1576 George appeared as a Witness with his father. (Douglas Book - Sir William Fraser – Edinburgh 1885)

    It was said regarding literacy, that ‘Douglas of Bonjedward’ was one laird who ‘did not sign his name’. [Lairds and Gentlemen: A study of the landed families of the Eastern Anglo-Scottish Borders c1540 -1603. PhD – Maureen M Meikle – University of Edinburgh 1988]. I am attributing this to George Douglas as his father William Douglas was a keen and prolific letter writer and did sign his name.

    George Douglas participated in the Middle Marches in 1584-1585 with Sir Thomas Kerr of Fernihurst.

    6 Jan. 1584-1585 – ‘Will of George Dowglas, son and heir to William Douglas of Bunjedbroche, appointing William Ker, son and heir of Robert Ker of Woodhead, as tutor testamentary’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    The Laird of Jedburct (Bonjedburgh) ‘signs bond against Bothwell’. [Calendar of State Papers of Scotland, Volume 10, 1589-1593. British History online].

    Acts and Proceedings: 1590, March – Parliament of Scotland. Included is George Douglas of Bonjedburgh (British History online).

    George Douglas of Bonjedward is listed in the Scottish 'Calendar of State Papers' in 1593-1595 (British History online).

    In 1594 Douglas of Bonjedward was a sole Commissioner for West Teviotdale. [Lairds and Gentlemen: A study of the landed families of the Eastern Anglo-Scottish Borders c1540 -1603. PhD – Maureen M Meikle – University of Edinburgh 1988].

    In May,1594, Bonjedburgh and it was George, was one of the Nobles etc called to the Parliament of Scotland. It was for the 30th. It was also fulfilling ‘Lords of the Articles, chosen at the Parliament. Bonjedburgh was listed under the heading ‘Barons’. [British History online].

    In 1598 George Douglas is listed on a roll to uphold the law and the religion of the Church of Scotland.

    In October,1602 James VI was in Jedburgh and a band of the clans including George Douglas and William of Bonjedburgh (father and son) and were with James VI and they signed ‘to give up all friendship, kindness, oversight, maintenance or assurance … with common thieves and broken clans … answerable to His Highnesses Laws’. (He became also James I of England in March,1603).

    In 1607–1608 – (Sir Nicol) Rutherford of Hundale and Douglas of Bonjedworth were appointed by Parliament to meet twice a year in the burgh of Jedburgh and fix the price of shoes. They were ‘Commissioners’, to take trial of the prices of rough hides and barked hides, and fix reasonable prices of boots and shoes, with penalties upon the shoemaker who should take a higher price.

    They were to meet the Bailies of Jedburgh ‘twice or thrice’ a year ‘to fix the price of leather and, prevent the extortionate charges of the shoemakers…’

    In 1610 ‘George Douglas of Bonjedburgh’ was a Commissioner of the Peace for Roxburghshire. [The Middle March of the Scottish Borders – 1573 to 1625, Vol. II. Presumably by Anna Groundwater].

    15 April,1612, Wowlie “Grizel (Rutherford), eldest daughter to Adam Kirktoun of Stuartfield. They had a charter on their marriage-contract of the lands of Bonjedburgh on 10 October,1616, which was confirmed under the Great Seal 26 December 1616”. [The Scots peerage… James Balfour Paul]. Probably about husbandlands?

    In 1614 there were – ‘Heritable securities (3) over the lands of Williescruik, part of the husbandlands of Bonjedward’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    George’s children were William Douglas c1570 Bonjedward (with Isobel Ker/Kerr c1542) and Robert c1574 and Elizabeth c1576 (with Margaret Stewart 1540).

    Isabel Ker was the daughter of Robert Ker of Woodend and Ancrum and Isobel Home of Wedderburn.

    Margaret Stewart was the daughter of William Stewart 2nd of Traquair and Christian Hay daughter of John Hay of Snaid, 2nd Earl of Yester.

    9th William Douglas c1570. William died after 1637.

    ‘Discharge by Robert Dowglas, Collector-General to William Dowglas younger of Bonejedbrugh for the teinds of the kirk of Sowden, Sherrifdom of Selkirk, 30 Sept. 1590’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    Land Proprietors in 1590- Included William Douglas of Bonjedburgh and Douglas of Tympenden

    In 1596-1597 it was noted by English officials that certain lairds like William Douglas of Bonjedward and Lord Home were ‘good and peaceable neighbours to England’. [Lairds and Gentlemen: A study of the landed families of the Eastern Anglo-Scottish Borders c1540 -1603. PhD – Maureen M Meikle – University of Edinburgh 1988].

    In December,1597 ‘Williame Douglas of Boun Jedward, younger’ was a witness to a ‘Bond of Union”.

    August,1598. “Copies of the Kingis lettre to the Quein of Ingland, anent the taking of young Bonjedwart, and slaying sum vtheris at the hunting, 7 August,1598”. [Report from Commissioners, Volume 47. By Great Britain, Parliament, House of Commons]. William Douglas seems to have survived!

    In 1597,1602, 1610 and in 1615 he was referred to as the ‘Fiar of Bonjedward’. (Fair – inheriting while his father is still alive)

    In 1602-1610 and 1615-1637 William Douglas was to be found in the Privy Council Register.

    In the period 1613-1616 William Douglas was ‘schireff principall of Roxburgh’ and he was a ‘witnes’. [Scotland Privy Council].

    1617 – ‘The Register of the (Privy) Council shows that cautions were frequently taken whereby parties engaged themselves to fulfill certain obligations, such as to appear in court or to refrain from certain activities. The General Band was such an obligation, whereby Border landlords undertook caution for the good behavior of their tenants…’ In September,1617 such bands were undertaken by the lairds of Bonjedburgh, Cavers, Wamphray and Dinwoodle. (Thesis ‘Law and Order on the Anglo-Scottish Border 1603 – 1707 by Catherine M F Ferguson – University of St Andrews in 1981).

    1617 – Register of the Privy Council of Scotland (Renewed Band by a number of the Border lairds for the good conduct of their men, servants and tenants). There were many who signed up including ‘Williame Douglas of Bonjedburgh’ and ‘Stevin Douglas of Tumpendene’.

    In the period 1616 – 1619 (Another Baillie for the Earl of Angus). “The Lordis ordains that the laird of Bonjedburgh, one other of the Eril of Angus baillies of Jedburgh Forest…” This was ‘joint-band' with Douglas of Cavers.

    In the period 1619 to 1622 ‘Bonjedworth’ was ‘to have jurisdiction of within the Jedburgh forest’. He was also ‘summoned to advise for suppression of theft on the Borders’.

    In April,1618 he was referred to as ‘Douglas apparent of Bonjedburgh’. [The Middle March of the Scottish Borders – 1573 to 1625, Vol. II. Presumably by Anna Groundwater].

    In about November,1622 – “Caution for William Douglas of Bonjedward and Mr John Rutherford, provost of Jedburgh…Caution by Robert Ridderfurd of Edgerston, 1000 pounds for William Douglas of Bonjedwart, and in 500 merks for Mr John Rutherford, provost of Jedburgh, that they shall not reset nor intercommune with Sir John Ker of Jedburgh, and John Ker of Langnewtoun, his son, while they remain at the horn at the instance of Robert, Earl of Lothian – signed ‘Robert Rutherfud’ ”. [Privy Council of Scotland].

    Wil Douglas of Bonjedward and his son Master George Douglas ‘junior’ of Bonjedward were both mentioned in 1622. [Privy Council of Scotland].

    Near the end of 1624 William was referred to a ‘Wil Douglas of Bonjedburgh’.

    Commission of 1624 to 1630 –
    • ‘Commission under the signet to Douglas of Bonjedburgh’. John Gowdie and his son James Gowdie to be tried for the murder of John Halyday. [Privy Council of Scotland].
    • 1627 – ‘Commission under the signet to William, Erle of Angus, as justice, to try “Thomas Johnstoun, a commoun and notorious theefe and fugitive, for thift”, who has lately been apprehended by Wiliam Dowglas of Bonjedburgh, and by him delivered to William Dowglas of Cavers, sheriff of Teviotdaill, who has committed him to ward in the tollbooth of Jedburgh. Charge is given to the said sheriff, and to the provost and bailies of Jedburgh, and any other custodians of the said Thomas Johnstoun, to deliver him to the said Earl of Angus – Signed by the Chancellor, Mortoun, Nithisdaill, Linlithgow, Roxburgh, Melrose, Pa. B. of Rousse, and Melvill’. Reign of Charles I. [Privy Council of Scotland].

    In April,1625 Bonjedburgh (Bonjedward was said to be made up of 21 husbandlands). [National Archives of Scotland].

    In 1626 William Douglas had lands at Toftilaw, Padopuill and Spittlestains. The first two were also referred to as Toftilands and Paddapoole, and Toftylaws and Padohugh, and Toftylands and Paddobuyll.

    1627 – “Letter of Council to Bonjedward and William Ker, commanding the speedy execution of their Commission against Robert Rutherford for the murder of George Rutherford…” (George Rutherford of Edzestoun). [Privy Council of Scotland].

    In 1628 he is mentioned as ‘William Douglas of Boon Jedburgh’.

    At Jedburgh in August,1628 ‘William Douglas of Boon Jedburgh’ was described as the ‘lait Justice conueiner’. (Convener of the Justices of Peace).

    In 1629 in the time of Charles I “The Lords, with consent of Ragwell Bennet of Chesters, appoint the Laird of Bonjedburgh and Sir James Ker of Crailing to hear and determine upon the difference between Bennet and Barbara Buckholme, wife of Thomas Browne, and William Rutherfurds, her son, in reference to a decree of removing the lands of Ryknow and Abbotismeadow, recovered against them by the said Ragwell Bennet, and any other differences – the said Ragwell obliging himself to abide in their decision…”

    1629 – Williame Douglas of Bonjedburgh, was the ‘conveener of the justices of the peace within the bounds of East Teviotdaill…’ [Privy Council of Scotland].

    In 1629 it was charged to Bonjedburgh ‘as convener of the justices of the peace of East Teviotdale to provide carriage for the King’s baggage’.

    From an index of Charters drawn up in about 1629.
    ‘to William Pettillok, herauld, the three husband lands of the town of Bonjedward, by forfaultry of Roger Pringill…de Roxburgh, with the reft of his forfaultrie’.

    In 1630 to 1632 William Douglas of Bonjedburgh was a Convenor of the Subcommissioners of the Presbytery of Jedburgh and ‘he was to be put to the horn’. (Privy Council of Scotland).

    Horning was a method of publicly declaring a person a rebel. It could be by letter or three blasts of a horn.

    26 July,1632 – Witchcraft – “Issobell Hall, indweller in Jedburgh ‘long tyme bygane suspect and delate’ depositions seen and considered by the Bishop of Caithness. Commission to the sheriff of Roxburgh and his deputes William Douglas of Bonjedburgh and the provost and baillies of Jedburgh or any three of them the sheriff being one to put her to assize…”

    William Douglas of Bonjedward gets a mention in the ‘Act in favour of Sir John Auchmuty of Gosford’ in June,1633 (Records of the Parliaments of Scotland to 1707).

    1633-1635. “Williame Dowglas of Bonjedburgh” is mentioned in Scotland Privy Council papers.

    In about the mid 1630’s – “Anent the teinds of Langnewton…On the supplication of Sir Robert Ker of Ancrum bearing that the teinds of Langnewton are in dispute between him and Mr William Jamesoun, minister of Langnewton, that they have sequestrated for several years past, and that there is a like necessity for sequestrating those of the present crop, the Lords appoint the Lairds of Bonjedburgh and Riddell, younger, to ingather the same, and stack them in some neutral place, discharging both the disputants from meddling therein.” William Douglas of Bonjedburgh and Andrew Riddill (Riddell) then both made their own (join) complaint against Mr William Jamesoun…(Privy Council of Scotland).

    In November,1636 a man by the surname of Runsiman was Servitor to William Douglas of Bonjedburgh.

    In 1637 William is mentioned in the Privy Council Register.

    Deeds of Bonjedward – 1626, 1642, 1643
    [National Library of Scotland – Inventory Acc.6803 – Douglas of Cavers Papers].

    William’s children with Rebekah/Rebecca Drummond c1588 were George Douglas c1606, Mary c1610 (Married John Douglas c1608, 6th of Timpendean), Rev John Douglas c1616 MA, (Appointed to Yetholm in 1639-1661 and Crailing in 1661. John died in 1671 aged c56), Thomas Douglas c1623, Rev James Douglas c1625 (MA) University of Edinburgh and William Douglas c1630.

    Rebekah’s father was John Drummond of Hawthornden, and she was the sister of William Drummond, the poet.

    William Douglas c1570 later married Elizabeth Drummond c1590 (sister of Rebekah/Rebecca). I have found no evidence of any issue.

    ‘William Douglas of Bongedward’ is mentioned in ‘The genealogy of the Most Noble and Ancient House of Drummond – David Laing 1887’.

    Thomas Douglas c1623 was mentioned in the Register of Deeds in 1672. It appears to be a Grantee tack dated 23 October. Thomas is referred to as ‘son of William (Douglas) of Boonjedwart’.

    More about the Rev John Douglas c1616 – he was laureated at the University of Edinburgh on 23rd July,1635. He got a testimonial from the Presbytery of Jedburgh on 22nd August,1638. John was presented by Francis, Earl of Buccleuch and his tutors in February,1639, and by William, Earl of Lothian in the same month. He was ordained on 23rd April following and installed soon afterwards. He was a member of the Commission of Assembly in 1649.

    More on the Rev James Douglas c1625. He took his degree MA from the University of Edinburgh in August 1645. He was installed on 15th December,1652. He was a Minister at Hobkirk and he was buried ‘In Cowdies Knowe a mound in a graveyard says “Here lys Maister James Douglas sone of the Laird of Bonjedward, Minister of Hopkirk (Hobkirk) who died upon 29th May,1665, his age 40.” James had married Jean Martin who survived him. He was a son of William Douglas of Bonjedward.

    See Part 5 - https://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=125481

    Sally E Douglas

    4 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-12-18
    User data
  43. Douglas of Bonjedward - Part 5
    List
    Public

    From Part 4 - https://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=125480

    The Rev James Douglas had two sons – William c1652 of Plewlands and Newhall in 1681 and Robert c1654. Robert Douglas was apprenticed to James Brown, apothecary, Edinburgh, 1st January 1679.

    10th George Douglas c1606. George died before 15 June,1682. His Retour was dated 15 June,1682.

    It was said by G Harvey Johnston that “George was also retoured to his grandfather William at the same date”?

    In 1631 it is mentioned that “George Douglas” was the sheriff of Teviotdale. (Calendar of the House of Lords Manuscripts).

    1631, Sept.6. “Another commission stamped, sealed and signed as before, adding the name of Johne Maxwell of Cogan, deputy of George Douglas, appearand of Bonjedburgh, sheriff of Teviotdale”.

    On 6 September,1631 at Holyroodhouse – the Privy Council ordered ‘under the sign manual (stamp) and signet’. That George Douglas, the younger, of Bonjedward and others…“jointly and severally to convent the King’s lieges in arms, and search for and take the said Thomas Irving, and bring him to justice…” [Privy Council of Scotland].

    In 1632 George made a discharge of 20,000 merks to Sir Patrick Murray of Elinbank. He had married Patrick’s daughter Christian Murray c1609 in 1631. Her mother was Margaret Hamilton.

    In 1632 George’s sister Mary Douglas married John Douglas 6th of Timpendean.

    Maister George Douglas of Bonjedwart was mentioned in about 1633. [The Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland]. He seems a bit too old be a Master, but it depends on his actual Birth date.

    In 1636 – ‘Tack by Thomas, Lord Binning, to Mr George Douglas younger of Bonjedburgh of the three corn mills of Jedburgh possessed by Mr John Rutherfurde and Alexander Kirktoun’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    Geo. Douglas de Bon-Judworth gets a mention in 1638.

    In 1638 ‘Geo (George) Douglas of Bunjedward’ was one of many noblemen, barons, gentlemen, burgesses, ministers and others who subscribed to and signed the Scottish Church ‘Confession of Faith’ originally drawn up and signed in Glasgow in 1580, then signed by others in 1581 and subscribed to and signed by others in 1590. (Fasti ecclesiea scoticanae).

    A copy of this document was preserved in Cavers House. (Transactions of the Hawick Archeaological Society). I wonder where it is now?

    The Confession of Faith – “Subscribed at first by the King’s Majesty, and his Household, in the year 1580; thereafter by persons of all ranks in the year 1581, by ordinance of the Lords of secret council, and acts of the General Assembly; subscribed again by all sorts of persons in the year 1590, by a new ordinance of council, at the desire of the General Assembly: with a general bond for the maintaining of the true Christian religion, and the King’s person; and, together with a resolution and promise, for the causes after expressed, to maintain the true religion, and the King’s Majesty, according to the foresaid Confession and acts of Parliament, subscribed by Barons, Nobles, Gentlemen, Burgesses, Ministers, and Commons, in the year 1638: approven by the General Assembly 1638 and 1639; and subscribed again by persons of all ranks and qualities in the year 1639, by an ordinance of council, upon the supplication of the General Assembly, and act of the General Assembly, ratified by an act of Parliament 1640: and subscribed by King Charles II. at Spey, June 23, 1650, and Scoon, January 1. 1651”.

    George Douglas was a Commissioner of Public Affairs for the Kirk in 1643. The Scottish Kirk, it appears was the religious body trying to bring Protestantism to Scotland.

    During 1641 and 1642, George Douglas of Bonjedburgh was listed on 41 Committees of the ‘Register of the Committees of Common Borders and the Committee for Receiving the Brotherly Assistance’ – for the Scottish Parliament’. [The Scottish Parliament 1639-1661 – J R Young – PhD thesis – University of Glasgow]. Father or son George Douglas of Bonjedburgh?

    The Records of the Parliaments of Scotland to 1707 - Charles I: Translation - 1641, 17 August, Edinburgh, Parliament- Parliamentary Register - 15 November 1641 - Procedure: commission - Commission for receiving of the brotherly assistance from the parliament of England…Master George Douglas of Bonjedburgh. Father or son George Douglas of Bonjedburgh?

    15 August 1643 Legislation … of that ilk, Mr George Douglas of Bonjedward, John Kerr of Lochtour, Robert Pringle of … (Parliament of Scotland).

    26 August 1643 Legislation … Kerr of Linton, Mr George Douglas of Bonjedward, Archibald Douglas, fiar of Cavers, William … (Parliament of Scotland).

    1643 - Act for the committees of war in the shires - In the sheriffdom of Roxburgh, Sir Andrew Kerr of Greenhead, Sir Walter Riddell of that ilk, Sir Thomas Kerr of Cavers, John Rutherford of Hunthill, Andrew Kerr of Linton, Mr George Douglas of Bonjedward, Archibald Douglas, fiar of Cavers, William Elliott of Stobs, John Kerr of Lochtour, Henry Cranston, brother to [John Cranston], lord Cranston, Robert Pringle of Stichill, John Scott of Gorrenberry, William Kerr of Newton, Robert Langlands of that ilk, Mr Gilbert Elliott of Craigend, Walter Scott of Goldielands, John Rutherford of Edgerston, John Beirhope of that ilk, John wells for Jedburgh, Gideon Scott in Harden and the said Archibald Douglas of Cavers (or in his absence, Bonjedward) to be convener. (Parliament of Scotland).

    In 1643 George Douglas was rated at 4,000 pounds for his lands and teynds at Bonjedr (Bonjedbrugh) from Roxburghshire land rates. At the same time the rates for Timpendean were 260 pounds liferented by the widow of John Douglas of Timpendean.

    The rating of Bonjedburgh in 1643 also included lands at Stewartfield and lands at Timpendean and Langtoun. The latter two may have been liferented to George Douglas?

    In 1678 the same lands of Bonjedward as in 1643 were rated at 5078 pounds.

    However, by 1707 circumstances had changed in that Bonjedward’s landholdings and tiends had been downsized. With the rated value being 2642 pounds. Besides in 1707, the Laird of Bonjedward was William Douglas 12th.

    A large proportion of the lands appear to have been sold to the Laird of Wells. This Laird was likely to have been Thomas Rutherford/Rutherfurd. Half of these lands were sold to Wells with the Lairds of Bonjedward and Wells effectively having half shares each (of disjoined areas) – Bonjedward mains, Ploughstilt, farm-acres, mill and teinds. Besides, the Laird of Bonjedward had half shares of lands at Mounthooly (Admiral Elliot) and lands at Woodend, Roundhaugh and Newmill. The Laird of Bonjedward was rated at 1533, with 200 additionally being for Timpendean and Langtoun.

    The Laird of Bonjedward also owned some of Bonjedward Mains on his own, rated at 909.

    The Bonjedward Laird had also liferented (and this was taken into account in the Roxburghshire land rate calculations above) – East end of Bonjedward Mains, Westmains of Bonjedward, Ashiebank and Cray’s Park, Pastureground, West Huntknow, Parktown and Sheeprig, Horsepark at Place and Sunnybraepark. Haugh now belonged to Sir John Scott of Ancrum and some grounds into Simpson’s Yetts was now owned by John Reid.

    It is a complex picture and it lacks detail.

    Oct.1644 – ‘Order by the Committee of Estates as to ‘pest’ and infection brought by certain persons from England to Nisbitt and Bonjedburgh’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    In March,1647 Mr George Douglas of Bonjedburgh is mentioned in the ‘Act renewing the commission for plantation of kirks and valuation of teinds’. (Parliament of Scotland).

    1660-1665 – ‘Account book for the debursements for the laird of Bonjedburgh’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    In 1661 there was – ‘Information for the laird of Bonjedburgh and his curators, anent (concerning) settlement to be made for his only sister, to provide for her necessary ailment and such a provision for advanceing hir (her) to a condition of marriage with a gentleman of hir (her) awin (own) qualitie’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    This concerns George’s sister Mary Douglas who had married John Douglas 6th of Timpendean. John Douglas had died by 1643 as the lands of Timpendean were life-rented by his widow. (Land Tax Rolls for Roxburghshire)

    In July,1665 regarding Bonjedburgh (Bonjedward) – ‘Titles (3) to the teinds of the lands of Bonjedward or Bonjedburgh, disponed (disposed) by the Earl of Lothian to George Douglas of Bonjedburgh…’ (National Archives of Scotland). A teind was a tithe.

    George is mentioned in Border Deeds in 1665, 1672, 1673 and 1682.

    From the 1673 Register of Deeds George Douglas of Bonjedburgh had Granter Bonds on 16 January, 19 February and 8 April and a Grantee Bond on 14 May.

    The Lady Bonjedburgh is mentioned in 1641.It was to do with a market place “Adam Brown the Bailie ‘his stairfoot upwards to the Lady Bonjedburgh her stairfoot on both sides’”. It was probably about the Jedburgh market.

    Anna Shields (Shiells) servitrix to the Lady Bonjedburgh was prosecuted for riot in the period 1676 to 1678.

    The children of George Douglas c1606 with the Hon Christian/Crystane Murray were George c1632, John c1633, Master Alexander c1634 and Henry (Harry) c1635.

    Master George Douglas of Bonjedburgh is mentioned in 1638. [Records of the Kirk of Scotland…]

    Master George Douglas of Bonjedburgh gets a mention in the ‘Commission for receiving of the brotherly assistance from the Parliament of England’ in August,1641. (Edinburgh Parliament – Charles I).

    In 1641 there is mention of Maister George Douglas and Maister Johne Douglas of Bonjedburgh and in 1643 Maister Alexander Douglas of Bonjedburgh was mentioned in the Acts of General Assemblies.

    Harry ie Hendrie (Henrie) Douglas was the subject of an ‘Act and percept in favors of Hendrie Dowglas’ on 23 May,1649 at Edinburgh. (Parliament of Scotland).

    In 1658 the Douglases of Bonjedward had Tutors.

    February,1671 – Court of Session – Mark Cass against Douglas and Others – An act against some of the Laird of Bonjedburgh’s Tutors, the pupil being Henry Douglas.

    11th George Douglas c1632. He died before 7 May,1695.

    1678. “…Douglas of Bonjedburgh fined 27,500 merks for irregularities…” (The Decisions of the Lords of Council and Session, June 6th).

    About 1682-1683 “Douglas of Bonjedburgh was fined by the Laird of Meldrum, as the council’s sheriff of Teviotdale, twenty-seven thousand merks for his own and his lady’s irregularities, in being absent from the church and private baptisms…”. See 1678 above. [Annals of the persecution in Scotland from the restoration to the revolution. By James Aikman 1779-1860].

    George Douglas was fined 6,000 pounds Scots in 1680. I think that the fine was for not attending church.

    George inherited the Bonjedward title in 1682. He was retoured to his father George in 1682.

    It appears that George Douglas of Bonjedburgh inherited Toftilands and Paddapoole in Ulston from his father William Douglas of Bonjedburgh in June,1682 [Inquisition Ad Capellam Domini Regis Retornatarvm…Vol 2…in the Reign of King George III – March,1831].

    George Douglas of Bonjedburgh was mentioned in 1683. (Gentlemen and others imprisoned).

    George was sent to prison at the time of 'the Sufferings' in 1683 and again in 1685. In 1685 he was reported ‘having now lien in prison three months, being sickly…’

    In 1685 – 1686 George Douglas of Bonjedburgh remitted a petition. The petitioner ‘has lyen in the toolboth of Edinburgh, these three months bygaine…and the supplicant by his imprisonment is become verry sickly and tender in this season of the year…’ He was to be ‘set at Liberty’. [Register of the Privy Council of Scotland].

    This was punishment for refusing to attend the parish church and he was also fined 40,500 pounds for the first offence. For the second offence for ‘himself and his lady’ he was fined 1,500 pounds and for the third offence he was fined 1,750 pounds.

    For a similar offence of not attending church the Lady of Timpendean was fined 1,405 pounds.

    Mr George Douglas of Bonjedburgh. [Parliament of Scotland] - ‘Act for raising a supply offered to their majesties on 7th June,1690.’

    The date of George’s Testament was 7th May,1695. George Douglas of Boonjedburgh’. (Peebles).

    George’s child was William Douglas c1652. However, he may even have been baptized as early as 18th October,1647 at Jedburgh, Roxburghshire – Family Search has such a record.

    12th William Douglas c1652 Bonjedward. William died after 29 November,1709.

    William Douglas of Bonjedward was mentioned in 1685. [The Laws and Acts of Parliament made by King James the First…].

    In 1695 he was mentioned as the ‘Laird of Boon-Jedburgh’.

    The Laird of Bonjedward. [Parliament of Scotland] - At the time of an ‘Act for six months’s supply upon the Land Rent on 20th June,1695’. [Records of the Parliament of Scotland to 1707].

    ‘Act Anent the supply of eighteen months’ cess upon the Land Rent in 1696’. Shire of Roxburgh – Douglas of Bonjedward [Parliament of Scotland]

    In 1696 ‘Douglas of Bonjedburgh’ was one of the representatives for the Shire of Roxburgh, in an act of the Parliament of Scotland. It ‘Followes the Commissioners of Supply given in by Noblemen and Commissioners for the several Shyres as was ordered in Parliament’. It was the ‘Acta Parliamentorum Gulielmi’.

    In September,1696 William Douglas of Cunzierton represented Roxburgh as did Douglas of Bonjeward (they were separate individuals). It was about legislation ‘Act anent the supply of eighteen month’s cess upon land rent’. (Parliamentary Register – Edinburgh).

    In another entry in 1696 along with ‘Douglafs of Bonjedburgh’, ‘William Douglafs of Cungiartoun’ was listed for Roxburgh. [‘Acta Parliamentorum Gulielmi’].

    ‘William Douglas of Cunyertoun’ was on the Roxburghshire Land Tax Roll between 1645 and 1831. (Scotlands Places).

    In 1691 to 1695, four persons paid Hearth Tax at Cunyertoun. (Scotlands Places).

    William Douglas c1652 was mentioned on the Parliamentary Register in July,1704.

    In November,1709 – ‘Extract commission by William, Marquess of Lothian, to William Douglas of Bonjedward as baillie of the lordship, bailiary and barony of Jedburgh and all others within the sheriffdom of Roxburgh’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    William Douglas married Margaret Scott c1652 on 12 October,1670 at Jedburgh, Roxburghshire. William’s children with Margaret Scott were - George Douglas c1671, - Rev Walter Douglas Jan 1674 (Minister of Linton, Kelso who died in 1727).

    Rev Walter Douglas had three children probably with Jane Weir - Elizabeth c1701, Isobel/lsabel c1702 (Married the Rev Charles Douglas, Minister of Cavers) and Wilhelmina c1705 (Married Dr John Tait, Physician, Dalkeith).

    - Isobell Douglas c1677, possibly Sir Charles Douglas c1679 and likely Marion Douglas c1683 and John c1685 (An Apprentice Pirriewigmaker in September,1699 in Edinburgh).

    The Rev Charles Douglas was Minister at Cavers in 1738.

    The Rev Charles Douglas and Isobel/lsabel c1702 had the following children – Andrew Douglas 1735, Walter Douglas 1737, Archibald Douglas 1739, Isabella Douglas born 1740 (Married James Newbigging, Writer in Edinburgh); William Douglas 1742 and Charles Douglas 1744 (Graden Estate Papers).

    There was possibly another son of William Douglas and Margaret Scott. I am talking about a Richard Douglas born c1673? It is stated in the thesis below that “…Criminals of greater stature, such as Richard Douglas, son of the laird of Bonjedburgh, were banished from the realm of Scotland”. The banishment could have taken place under the Peebles Court in 1699? However, there could be incorrect identification as to which Douglas family Richard Douglas belonged to?
    (Thesis ‘Law and Order on the Anglo-Scottish Border 1603 – 1707 by Catherine M F Ferguson – University of St Andrews in 1981).

    Richard Douglas may have been banished to Ireland or to the American plantations? Or he may have been encouraged to leave and serve as a mercenary in one of the continental armies in Europe?

    William Douglas married a second time to Beatrix Scott c1678 in October,1699 at Askirk, Roxburghshire. (Clan MacFarlane genealogy). However, Family Search shows Jedburgh as their marriage location (advice from Douglas Scott of the Hawick Word Book).

    Family Search also shows that Beatrice Scott and William ‘Duglass’ had Isobella Douglas born 3rd June,1703 at Hawick, Roxburghshire.

    Douglas Scott also advised that he found John Douglas born 1705 to William Douglas and Beatrice Scott in the Hawick baptisms. A Witness was Walter Scott who added that he was ‘old Watt’. Old Watt was probably the father of Beatrice or Beatrix Scott. It appears that old Watt may have been of a Scott family of Hawick.

    The second witness to the baptism was Andrew Riddell in Goldiland.

    From Clan MacFarlane genealogy - ‘Wat Wudspurs’ Walter Scott was 1st of Raeburn and his wife was Anne Isabel MacDougall. They are listed as the parents Beatrice or Beatrix Scott who married William Douglas of Bonjedward. Wat Wudspurs' father was Sir William Scott, 3rd of Harden, Sheriff of Selkirk and his mother was Agnes Murray.

    However, it appears that ‘old Watt’ was a Walter Scott of Hawick and was not the same person as ‘Wat Wudspurs’ Walter Scott of Raeburn.

    13th George Douglas c1671. He died in about 1750. George’s Retour was in 1754.

    In the Scottish Convenanter Genealogical Index this George Douglas is estimated as being born in Bonjedward (Bonjedburgh) around 1650 to 1655.

    However, George’s parents William Douglas and Margaret Scott did not marry until 12 October,1670 in Jedburgh, Roxburghshire.

    On 13 May,1711 ‘Douglas of Bonjedward’ was a Witness to the marriage of Andrew Douglas, Baillie and Jean More in Melrose. [Scottish Record Society – Melrose Parish Register 1642 – 1820].

    In about 1713 ‘George Douglas of Bonjedburgh’ was on a roll call of prominent local lairds.

    In 1739 George Douglas was granted a heritable bond over his lands of Bonjedburgh to Lord Cranston “for infefting Lord Cranston in an annual rent of L120, and for infefting him in the property of the lands themselves for payment to him of the sum of L2400. Infeftment followed”. Soon after, Lord Cranston and George Douglas granted a heritable bond to James Bogle for L2000 Sterling and for his further security, Lord Cranston in the same bond, disposed to him his heritable bond in the lands of Bonjedburgh.

    “…And the whole includes with this provision, that this present right and disposition, annualrents, lands and others above disposed in security, shall be redeemable by payment, making to James Bogle the principal sum of L2000 Sterling. Annualrents thereof that shall become due, and liquidate penalties engaged therefor, and that thereupon our said former right and infeftments shall revert to us, as if his present right and disposition had never been made: Infeftment followed. Bogle’s debt coming into the person of Lord Cassilis, he, in the year 1747 adjudged from Lord Cranston this heritable security upon the estate of Bonjedburgh.” These transactions were made under the Court of Session.

    The Earls of Cassilis were Kennedys. Perhaps James Bogle was indebted to Lord Cassilis?

    ‘Infeftments in security’ were those in which land was pledged or burdened but not transferred. These infeftments were as a security for a loan or of a cautioner or security for his engagement.

    It was stated that “…the vaults at Abbotshall (which was within the Abbacy and Barony of Ulston) had been removed in 1748 by the Laird of Bonjedward, to whom they had been sold…” (Jedburgh Abbey by J Watson). (these stones could be used for building purposes).

    A reference to George in 1772 was Geo. Douglas ‘juniore de Bonjedburgh’.

    Children of George Douglas, possibly with Margaret Gilry/Gilray were John Douglas c1697, George (1) c1699, William c1701, Christian in c1702, George (2) 1704, Thomas c1710, Margaret c1712, James c1715, Jennet c1717 and Hellin c1718.

    In the 18th Century – ‘Petition to the Barons of Exchequer by Christian Douglas, daughter of deceased George Douglas of Boon-Jedburgh, for inclusion in the Charity Roll’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    14th John Douglas c1697. He died after 1761.

    John was retoured to grandfather William in 1754? (G Harvey Johnston).

    In 1748 John Douglas of Bonjedburgh paid tax on 14 windows. (Scotlands Places).

    At the same time Archibald Douglas of Timpendean paid tax on 28 windows – ‘Arch, Douglas Timpintoun’. (Scotlands Places).

    There were 4 other householders who paid window tax at ‘Timpintoun’ in 1748.

    John Douglas c1697 may have had a son Andrew Douglas c1718 who was a factor on the Lothian Estates of Bonjedward in 1733. (National Archives of Scotland).

    George Douglas having died in about 1750 his Bonjedward estate was sold by his apparent heir (John Douglas) to Archibald Jardine in March,1751.

    However, it took many years for the sale of Bonjedward to be completed due to the complications of tenancies, rent, infeftments, fragmented ownership of Bonjedward (many titles covering small and large titles, and there were also numerous owners), and the Bonjedward estate being not only at Bonjedward but scattered over many localities in the vicinity of Jedburgh.

    In January,1754 regarding Bonjedburgh (Bonjedward) – ‘Titles (15) to the lands of Bonjedburgh or Bonjedward, disponed (disposed) by John Douglass of Bonjedward to Archibald Jardine, factor for Colonel William Elliot of Wells…following on decreets of sale and ranking’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    In December,1757 regarding Bonjedburgh (Bonjedward) – ‘Titles (33) to the lands of Williescrook, part of the 21 husbandlands of Bonjedburgh or Bonjedward, disponed (disposed) by John Ainslie, merchant in Bellingham, to Alexander Jerdan linen draper in Newcastle’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    In 1761 John Douglas of Boonjedburgh was a Commissioner for Land Tax in Great Britain representing Roxburghshire. It was at the time of the Reign of George III. This indicates that John Douglas was still regarded as the Laird. Archibald Douglas of Timpendean also represented Roxburghshire in 1761.

    In September,1767 regarding Bonjedward – ‘Titles (13) to the Waulk-Mill and Mains of Bonjedward, disponed (disposed) by Mr Thomas Caderwood of Polton, advocate, to Archibald Jerdon of Boonjedward (Bonjedward)’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    By 1779 Land Tax records show an Archibald Jardine at Bonjedward -
    Archibald Jardine Esqr of Bonjedward
    East end of Bonjedward Mains and others £406.1.1
    West Mains of Bonjedward Mains and others £407.18.9
    Bonjedward farm Mill. Mill lands & others £407.7.2
    Ashibank Craigs park and others £406.5.8
    Pasture Ground to the west of Huntknow park Town Sheeprig & others £403.16.0
    Horse park of Bonjedward place Sunnybrae park & others £406.8.8 (Scotlands Places)

    In 1797 – John Riddell of Timpadean (Timpendean) had 11 farm horses. While William Turnbull of Bonjedward had 8, Andrew Caverhill of Bonjedward had 2 and Thomas Caverhill of Bonjedward had 3. Henry Christy of Bonjedward 1. (Scotlands Places).

    Between 1780 and 1833 – ‘Titles vesting the whole lands and estate of Bonjedward or Bonjedburgh in the person of Archibald Jerdon of Bonjedward, grandson of the first Archibald Jerdon thereof, and related papers’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    This grandson was originally Jerdon Caverhill but he made a name change to Archibald Jerdon.

    Between 1814 and 1839 – ‘Titles (18) to parts of the lands and estate of Bonjedward, disponed (disposed) by Archibald Jerdon of Bonjedward’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    In 1845 – ‘Titles (21) to the superiority of the lands of Bonjedward, acquired by the Hon John Chetwynd Talbot of the Middle Temple, London’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    During November,1845 – ‘Titles (17) to parts and portions of the lands and estate of Bonjedward, disponed (disposed) by the trustees of deceased Archibald Jerdon of Bonjedward to the Hon John Chetwynd Talbot of the Middle Temple, London’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    This Douglas line of Bonjedward seems to have petered out sometime in the mid 1700’s. Some of the lands being sold off as early as the 1600’s. It seems that the Douglas line of Bonjedward finished as there was no substantial property left, rather than there being a lack of a male heir?

    The National Archives of Scotland has numerous references to the history of ownership of Bonjedward when the lands were changing hands from 1625 onwards (bearing in mind that it was the unentailed lands of Bonjedward which were granted to ‘Douglas of Bonjedburgh’ – these records make no obvious distinction between the entailed and unentailed lands).

    1844 - Colourful sketch (from plan surveyed by William Crawford, junior, surveyor, Edinburgh, 1821) of the estate of Bonjedward in the parish of Jedburgh, Roxburghshire: the property of the trustees of the late Archibald Jerdon. (National Archives of Scotland).

    Heraldry of the Douglases by Harvey Johnston lists the Bonjedward Lairds as –
    1 Margaret Douglas and Thomas Johnson
    2 John of Bonjedward
    3 George
    4 George
    5 William (split to Andrew of Timpendean)
    6 George
    7 William
    8 George
    9 George
    10 William
    11 George
    12 John

    An old family tree of Douglas crests (sent to me by William Douglas of the Douglas Archives) I think shows –
    3. George
    4. George (or John)
    5. William
    6. William
    7. John
    8. William – and Cunzierton?
    9. William

    I list them as –
    1 Margaret Douglas and Thomas Johnson
    2 John
    3 George
    4 George
    5 William (split to Andrew of Timpendean)
    6 George
    7 Willie (William)
    8 George
    9 William (an additional Laird found by me)
    10 George
    11 George (an additional Laird found by me)
    12 William
    13 George
    14 John

    Lord Lyon – 1952

    Major Henry James Sholto Douglas, representative of Douglas of Timpendean presented a petition to the Lord Lyon praying for matriculation in his name of the Arms appropriate to him as representative of the family of Douglas of Timpendean.

    On 2nd January 1952, the Lord Lyon King of Arms, found in fact:
    1. That the petitioner's descent through Andrew Douglas, 1st of Timpendean, younger son of George Douglas of Bonjedward, is satisfactorily established from Margaret Douglas, 1st of Bonjedward, natural daughter of William, Earl of Douglas, by Margaret, Countess of Angus, in favour of whose natural son, George Douglas, the said Countess resigned the Earldom of Angus.
    2. That the issue of the said Margaret Douglas, 1st of Bonjedward, by her husband, Thomas Johnson, bore the name and arms of Douglas of Bonjedward.
    3. That John Douglas of Bonjedward, in 1450, bore arms differenced by a label of three points charged with as many mullets, on what ground is not known.
    4. That in a painted armorial pedigree seen by Alexander Nisbet (System of Heraldry, Vol. I, p. 79) the descent of Douglas of Bonjedward was incorrectly deduced from a third son of the Earl of Angus, which may have been induced by the difference in the seal of 1450.
    His Lordship found in law:

    “That the petitioner is entitled to matriculate arms on ancient user before 1672 and with a difference congruent to descent illegitimately through Margaret Douglas of Bonjedward from William, Earl of Douglas, and Margaret, Countess of Angus.

    Grants warrant to the Lyon Clerk to matriculate in the Public Register of All Arms and Bearings in Scotland in name of the petitioner, Major Henry James Sholto Douglas, representative of Douglas of Timpendean, the following ensigns armorial, videlicet, argent, a man's heart gules on a chief azure three mullets of the field, debruised of a riband sinister wavy sable charged with three round buckles or, alternatively, with as many mullets of the field, all within a bordure of the second; above the shield is placed an helmet befitting his degree with a mantling azure doubled argent, and on a wreath of the liveries is set for crest a dexter hand holding a scimitar, both proper, between two ostrich feathers, one on either side, argent, and in an escrol over the same this motto Honor et Amor, and decerns”.

    The Lord Lyon, King of Arms (Innes of Learney) stated that.

    “The petitioner is the great-grandson and representative of Major-General William Douglas of Bonjedward and Timpendean in the County of Roxburgh. The Major-General was the son of Archibald Douglas of Bonjedward and Timpendean, and this Archibald was the eldest son of William Douglas of Timpendean, an estate which the family had possessed in uninterrupted descent from Andrew Douglas of Timpendean, third son of George Douglas of Bonjedward who, by charter, dated 1st July 1479, received from his father the Timpendean portion of the Bonjedward estate. I am not told when or how Archibald came to possess Bonjedward,or satisfied as to how the senior line of Bonjedward descending from the eldest son of the laird of 1479 has been proved to be extinct. It was, of course, a laudable and proper act of Timpendean to acquire Bonjedward, if he did so by purchase upon its loss by the heirs of the senior line, or indeed if he had an opportunity to reacquire it. But in the circumstances, and without further proof of the conditions under which Bonjedward was recovered, I think the historic title of Timpendean is the appropriate one to be borne by the petitioner and his successors as the representers of the House of Timpendean, no proof having been offered that the main line of Bonjedward is extinct.

    Reverting to Andrew Douglas, 1st of Timpendean, third son of George Douglas of Bonjedward, in 1479, the pedigree of this House of Bonjedward is carried back to Margaret Douglas, illegitimate daughter of William Douglas, Earl of Douglas, by Margaret Stewart, Countess of Angus, eldest daughter and heiress of Thomas Stewart, Earl of Angus. By a Countess of Angus the Earl of Douglas had also an illegitimate son, George, upon whom the Countess settled, by due feudal procedure, the dignity and estates of the Earldom of Angus, which have since descended in the line of that George, who duly became Earl of Angus, which line, following the events of 1455 and a grant of the forfeited duthus, Douglasdale, was taken to have become chief by settlement and came to be recognised, and bore arms, as chief of the name of Douglas.

    The position of Margaret Douglas, the Earl of Douglas's illegitimate daughter by Margaret, Countess of Angus, is different, because no step was taken, as in the case of her brother, George, to bring her in as an heir of tailzie even to the Angus succession, and accordingly she remains in the status of the Earl's natural daughter, but her children took or bore the name of Douglas and, as we see, have done so for five and a half centuries. Her husband appears as Thomas filio Johannis, and by this person Margaret Douglas was mother of John Douglas of Bonjedward, ancestor of the Bonjedward and Timpendean line above mentioned. There is nothing to say who Thomas and his father, John, were. They may have been Douglasses, early cadets of the main line of Douglas, but on the other hand, the presence of a saltire (a diagonal cross – by me) in chief in the arms in one seal of Douglas of Bonjedward and Timpendean suggests that Filio Johannis was a latinisation of Johnston.

    Anyway, I do not consider it necessary to investigate the origins of Margaret's husband further, since there is no doubt about the foundation of the house originating in Margaret herself and her grant of the lands of Bonjedward in 1404. There is evidence of use of the arms by members of the family prior to 1672, first in the person of John Douglas of Bonjedward, 1450, who bore the paternal coat of arms with a label of three points gules charged with three mullets argent for difference. This suggests to me that Margaret and John sought to hold themselves out as the next line in “remainder” to the Angus inheritance after issue of her father, Earl George (cf. also Nisbet's System of Heraldry, p. 79). (Margaret's father was Earl William - by me). The painting of the genealogical tree of the House of Douglas to which he refers shows that an effort was there made to deduce Bonjedward legitimately from a third son of Angus. In the light of modern knowledge this is evidently incorrect, and it probably just shows the result of the self-assumed label difference on the painter of the pedigree. That is what correct differencing by the Lord Lyon is to guard against…”

    Any theories that Margaret Douglas and the Bonjedward line commenced from any of the Earls of Angus are incorrect suppositions. (by me).

    Note that (on many versions of) the Johnston coat of arms it is decorated at the bottom with a large saltire or diagonal cross. A saltire is also called Saint Andrew’s Cross or the crux decussata. Another variant is the Cross of Burgundy (Flanders).

    I am wondering whether this cross as used by John Douglas of Bonjedward was to also reinforce the Flemish ancestry of the early Douglases.

    About the Unentailed Lands of Bonegedwort/Bonjedward (translated from Latin) –
    Carta Isabelle comitisse de Marre de Bonegedwort AD 1404 “...of our own free will gave our faithful Thomas son of John and our beloved sister Margaret of Douglas his wife all our demesne land of Bunegedwort with appurtenances with 20 (marcates) marked ...lands of earth lying next to our demesne land of Bunegedwort. Beginning the east part of the aforesaid husbandry land and thus extending to the west part until the aforesaid 20 marcates of land with appurtenances shall be satisfied in full. Belonging by inheritance to us in the forest of Jedwort within the viscountcy of Roxburgh for homage and service of the said Thomas and Margaret his wife our sister and whichever lives longer and after the death of the said Thomas and Margaret our nephew John of Douglas son of the aforesaid Thomas and Margaret and heirs of the said John of Douglas lawfully begotten of his body...In proof in which case our seal is appended to our charter at Kyndromy 12 Nov in the year of Our Lord 1404 with noblemen as witnesses...”

    Also see Timpendean - https://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=21722

    Sally E Douglas

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-12-18
    User data
  44. Douglas of Bonjedward, Jedburgh, Roxburghshire (Teviotdale)
    List
    Public

    Part 1

    Douglas of Bonjedward

    Bonjedward spelling variations –

    • Over a long period of time a wide variety of spellings have arisen for Bonjedward, with Bonjedworth 1321, 1324 and 1397, Bonjedburgh in 1549 and Bonjedwart appearing to be the most interchangeable aliases which appear today.

    • Other spellings included Bonjedburght 1324, Bonndiedde ford 1339, Boniedworth in 1342 and 1549, Bonjeddeworth 1356, Bunejedwort 1397,1464-1465, Bond Jedworthe 1397, Bonegedwort 1404, Bunegedwort 1404, Bonjudworth between 1424 to 1513, Boun Jedvort 1458, Bune-Jedworth 1458-1459, Bonjedworthe 1458, Bonejudworth 1471, Bongedward 1475 and 1488, Bonegedworth 1476 and 1483, Bunjedworth 1482, 1492 and 1548-1549, Bon-Judworth 1485-1486, Bone-Jedworth, Bone-Jedworthe and Bun Jedward in 1504, Bonjedworch 1508, lard abone Jedworth 1517, Bunjedward 1523, Boonjedward 1529, Bonne-Jedburgh and Bone-Jedburgh in 1536, Bongeworthe and Bune Gedworthe in 1543, Boundjedwourth and Bonjedwoorth in 1544, Boniedburgh, Bune Jedworth, Bonjedwourth and Bonejedburcht in 1545, Bunjeduard in 1545 and 1548, Bouniedworth 1547, Bon Jedworth 1548, Bunjedworth in 1548-1549, Bonejedburgh 1551, Bonejedburch 1553, Bonjedburch 1562, Bunjedburcht 1564, Bonejedburgh 1565, 1572-1573 and 1578-1579, Bounegedworth 1567, Banejedward 1568, Bone Jedburght 1569, Bane Jedburgh 1575, Abundgedwoorde 1576, Bonjedbruch in about 1618, Boon Jedburgh in 1628, 1748 and 1761, Bonjedbrugh 1642, Beansedbrugh 1699, Bonjedard in the late 1600’s, Bonjedbrucht 1642, Bonjedart 1676, Beanjeddart – used by Sir Walter Scott, Bungedwort and Boneydward and so on.

    • However, it seems that Bonjedworth was used (in 1321 and) in 1324 when the lands (husbandlands) of were granted by King Robert Bruce to Sir James of Douglas under the Emerald Charter. Bonjedburgh was also used frequently but Bonjedward is now the common term.

    Preamble

    Both the George Douglas 1st Earl of Angus (Douglas line) and his sister Margaret Douglas were ‘natural’ children of William Douglas 1st Earl of Douglas and the Earl of Mar (title ‘inherited from his wife Margaret of Mar) and his mistress Lady Margaret Stewart, Countess of Angus (title inherited from her father Sir John Stewart, and Mar from her husband Thomas of Mar). Margaret of Mar and Thomas of Mar were siblings.

    George Douglas 1st Earl of Angus (Douglas line) and his descendants commenced their line as the Earls of Angus. The Angus title was gifted to George by his mother Margaret Stewart.

    While the Bonjedward line of Margaret Douglas, George’s sister, commenced with Margaret Douglas and her husband Thomas Johnson/Johnston and their son John Douglas being gifted with the (unentailed) lands of the Mains of Bonjedward by Isabel/Isabella Douglas, Countess of Mar and Garioch and the half-sister of George and Margaret Douglas. Margaret Douglas and Thomas Johnson/Johnston and their son John took the surname of Douglas to inherit these lands.

    The Mains of Bonjedward had been in the ownership of George Douglas 1st Earl of Angus who died in 1403. Before that they were owned by his father William Douglas, 1st Earl of Douglas and Mar.

    Occasionally historians and researchers have incorrectly referred to an Earl of Angus (Douglas line) or a descendant of an Earl of Angus (Douglas line) as being of Bonjedward.

    The lands of Bonjedward and Jedforest had originally been gifted by King Robert Bruce as part of the lands gifted to Sir James Douglas, ‘the good’ or ‘the black’ in about 1324 as part of the Douglas Emerald Charter.

    Another William Douglas was known as the ‘Knight of Liddesdale’ and ‘Flower of Chivalry’. He was a distant cousin and uncle of William Douglas, 1st Earl of Douglas and Mar and was also his godfather.

    In 1354 William Douglas 1st Earl inherited the substantial estates of his father Archibald Douglas, Regent of Scotland and of the ‘Knight of Liddesdale’ who he had slain in the Ettrick Forest. The Mains of Bonjedward were part of that inheritance.

    Bonjedward.

    The basic information on Bonjedward and the Lairds or Lords in this paper are from the Heraldry of the Douglases by G Harvey Johnston –

    1st Margaret (Marguerite) Douglas c1376. Margaret and her spouse Thomas Johnson/Johnston c1366 took the name of Douglas to inherit.

    It was surmised by Lord Lyon in 1952 that the intention of Margaret Douglas was also to keep the Douglas connection with her father William Douglas 1st Earl of Douglas and Mar and to stay connected to her full brother George Douglas 1st Earl of Angus (Douglas line), as a lesser Angus.

    Margaret Douglas received the Mains of Bonjedward from her half-sister Lady Isabella, the Countess of Mar and Garioch. These lands were said to be the unentailed lands of Bonjedward. (Charter of 1404 signed at Kildrummy).

    It is the unentailed lands of Bonjedward which are of specific interest in this exercise. I understand that unentailed means in terms of a landed estate, that descent is not predetermined before someone's death. There is no fixed inheritance. There are no restrictions on who can inherit the landed estate.

    “Surviving documentation from the years following Isabella’s receipt of Mar upon the death of her mother c.1391 depicts a clear attempt to consolidate her authority in the earldom, bartering her inherited Douglas lands to piece Mar back together and divert Angus and Douglas attention away from her northern estates. According to a charter by James of Sandilands, Lord of Caldor to George Douglas earl of Angus between April and May 1397, Isabella’s territorial gains in the wake of her brother’s death (if it is James then he died in 1388) had been substantial. Sandilands’ charter, a resignation of any future claims to Isabella’s unentailed estates should she die without an heir, lists them thus: the barony of Cavers, the sheriffship of Roxburgh with custody of the castle, and all fees pertaining to the said office, with the pertinents; the whole lordship of the town, castle and forest of Jedworth (now Jedburgh), with the lands of Bonjedward… Isabella’s grant of her demesne lands of Bonjedward to Thomas Johnson and his wife (Isabella’s ‘sister’) Margaret in 1404 could suggest that Isabella was slowly regaining control of her chancery…” [Decline and Fall – the earls and the earldom of Mar – c1281 to 1513. Kay S Jack – PhD Thesis – University of Stirling – December,2016].

    The child of Margaret Douglas and Thomas Johnson/Johnston was John Douglas of Bonjedward c1392. John Douglas also took the name of Douglas and he was mentioned in the Grant of 1404.

    2nd John Douglas c1392. The subject of a Retour in July 1439 (it meant that he had died). He died 15 June 1438.

    His child was George Douglas c1419.

    3rd George Douglas c1419. The subject of a Retour in 1452 (it meant that he had died). He died in about 1452.

    In 1437 (sic 1438) – “James Douglas (Angus) must have been about eleven years old when he succeeded his father in the earldom…The young Earl of Angus presiding as Lord of Jedburgh Forest in an inquest held at “Richermuderake” within that forest for the retour of “Jeorgius” Douglas as heir to his father of Bonjedward, imposed upon the said George a vassal’s fee of one silver penny, to be paid annually, si petatur, on St John’s day (the anniversary of Bannockburn) at the Earl’s Tower of Lintalee…and the Black and the Red were on the eve of mortal feud…”

    However, they are both Red.

    George’s children were George Douglas c1441, William c1445 and John c1450.

    4th George Douglas c1441 Bonjedward. He died after 1515.

    A ‘George Douglase de Bonejudworth’ was around between 1424 and 1513. [Register of the Great Seal of Scotland].

    A ‘George Douglas of Bongedward’ was mentioned in 1488. [Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts – 1894].

    George was Retoured to his father George in 1452.

    Renunciation by George Dowglas of Bonjedworthe in favour of the abbot and convent of the monastery of Jedworth of all right or claim to 6 acres of arable land lying near the town of Jedworth [in the Fissaidd] on the west side thereof Date 9 Nov.,1458. (National Archives of Scotland).

    Notarially executed notification (in Scots) by William, Lord Abirnethi in Rothimay, and William, Lord Borthwic, justices on south half of Forth...narrating compearance before them on justice ayre held at Jedwort of William Douglas of Drumlangrig, by his forespeaker, Mr David Guthre of Kincaldron, who presented a rolment of court of last justice ayre anent process on brieve of mortancestry purchased by said William in respect of lands called Kyrktonemanys, with mill of same, and lands of the Flekkis, in barony of Hawic, sheriffdom of Roxburgh, against Alexander Gledstanys, and requested that brieve should now proceed to the recognition of an assize; also compearance of said Alexander and his forespeaker, Sir Thomas Cranstone of that ilk, who alleged that brieve ought not so to proceed, as Alexander had alleged the king to be his warrant, who being under age could not be convened to make warrandice, and offered to find a `borgh' in the sheriff's hand; whereupon the justices had both parties removed from the court, took advice with the barons and freeholders, and, on return of the parties, decreed that the proferred `borowis' should not be received and that the brieve should proceed to recognition of an assize, which was chosen as follows: Sir Walter Scot of Kirkurd, knight., Andrew Ker of Altonburne, James Ruthirforde of that ilk, Sir Robert Colvil of Oxinname, knight., Andrew Ker, younger, James Tuedy of Drummelior, Dungal Makdowel of Malkerston, Walter Tuedy, Andrew Ormstone of that ilk, Quintine Riddale of that ilk, Robert Ruthirdorde of Chatto, George Douglas of Buniedwort, Thom Ker, George Tayt of the Pren, Archibald Douglas, Walter Scot, Hector Lauedyr, Wil Pringil, Robin Scot of the Haynig, John Ruthirforde of Hundwellee, Adam Scot, Archibald Neuton of that ilk, John Turnbule of Ernhuyth, George Abirnethi and Thomas Grymislaw, which assize gave deliverance in writing by their forespeaker, Andrew Ker, that deceased Sir William Douglas of Drumlangrig, grandfather of Sir William Douglas of Drumlangrig, died seised of said lands, that said William is his lawful and nearest heir, that said Alexander had wrongfully held said lands and that said William ought to have sasine of same; whereupon doom was given accordingly by the mouth of John Stodart, suitor of Halden, and justices gave said William sasine "be state ryal" and commanded the sheriff or his mair of fee to pass to the "chemys" of said lands and there give him corporeal sasine of said lands. Witnesses: Archibald Douglas, sheriff of Roxburgh, David Scot of Whitchester, David Pringil of Smalehame, Thomas Riklyntone of that ilk, William Hacate of Belsyis, clerk of justiciary, Alexander Scot, notary, William Sheuil. Notary: Alexander Foulis, clerk, St Andrews diocese. [On tag, seal of office of justiciary south of Forth, entire]. 22 Jan 1464/1465. (National Archives of Scotland).

    George Douglas was one of the witnesses to a Notarial Instrument in the monastery of Dryburgh in June 1468. (The Manuscripts of the Duke of Athole, K.T., and of the Earl of Home (1891) - no 114). Notarial Instrument setting forth that Sir Alexander Home of that Ilk, knight, Alexander Home his grandson and apparent heir, James Rutherford of that Ilk, Andrew Ker and Walter Ker his son, and Thomas Home of Tenningham have agreed among themselves as to the division of the undernamed lands as follows; that Sir Alexander and Alexander Home shall have the lands of Crailing with mains and mill; James Rutherford shall have-the lands of Fulogy (?) Cuniardon and 20 merks of the lands of Swynside; Andrew Ker and his son shall have Samieston, Ranaldston, Hounam, Cuthbershope and five nobles in Berehope; and Thomas Home shall have Caphope-town with mains and mill and three husband-lands in Swynside which Patrick Douglas and William Douglas presently occupy in farm, and Caylschelfield. Done in the monastery of Dryburgh on 21 June 1468, in presence of Walter Abbot of Dryburgh, George Home of Blook, Alexander Cockburn of Langton, Adam Nisbet, of that ilk, Andrew Ormiston of that ilk, David Dunbar, David Purves, Robert Lauder of Whitslade, George Cranston, James Haig of Bemerside, John Trotter, Archibald Manderston, Thomas Edington of that ilk, Adam Purves, John Anysley of Dolphinston, George Douglas of Bonjedworth, Messrs. Philip Yle and James Newton rector of Bedrule, George Dauison, William Pringle, Robert Rutherford of Chatto, Robert Hall, Adam Hardy and Alexander Hatley. [Another copy of this instrument states that Andrew and Walter Ker were procurators for and acting in name of Henry Wardlaw of Torry].

    In 1471, 1486 and 1489 George Douglas was mentioned in the Great Seal Register.

    In 1475 -1476 George was mentioned in the Exchequer Rolls along with his brother William.

    In July,1476 George Douglas of Bonjedward is mentioned in the ‘Judicial proceedings: acts of the lords auditors of causes and complaints’. (Parliament of Scotland).

    Judicial Proceedings in 1476 – mention of William Douglas, bruder to George Dowglas of Bonegedworth. [Parliament of Scotland]

    In 1476 and 1479 George Douglas was the Laird of Bonjedworth.

    Tack by Archibald, earl of Angus, to David Scott, son and apparent heir of David Scott of Branxhame, of 18 husbandlands in lordship of Selkirk, sheriffdom of the same, with East Mill and West Mains of Selkirk, and lands of Philiphalch, with yearly annual rent owed to granter from the East Mains of that ilk, with capons of the Caponlands, for 9 years following date of outquitting said lands, annual rents and mill, by granter or his heirs after tenor of reversion made to him by said David Scott of Branxhame, to whom he had wadset the same. Witnesses: dean Robert Turnbull, abbot of Jedworth, George of Douglas of Bune Jedworth, Mr James Newtoun, dean of Tevadale, James Riddale of that ilk, William of Kirktoun, William Dowglas, Patrick Moscrop, Patrick Walch, Laurence Pile and Mr Patrick Atkinsoun, notary. Seal damaged. June 9, 1478. (A tack was a lease or tenancy).

    George was mentioned in the Buccleuch papers of 1482, 1492 and 1508.

    1508. ‘Georgium Douglas de Bonjedworch’ was present at the ‘Retour of Adam Hebborne, Earl of Bothwell, as heir to his father Patrick Earl of Bothwell, in the lordship of Liddesdale, the Hermitage etc – 7 November,1508’. [Details in Latin]. {From the Scotts of Buccleuch – The Buccleuch Muniments}. (Muniments are title deeds or other documents proving a person’s title to land).

    In October,1491 George Douglas of Bonjedworth was listed along with others to a ‘Procuratory of resignation by Thomas Dikisoun of Ormestoun…’ (National Archives of Scotland).

    A Granter’s Seal of 1491 is relevant. It concerns renouncing the lands of Rowcastle into the hands of the Abbot of Jedworth – Granter’s Seal – Lands of Rowcastell - Procuratory of resignation by Thomas Dikisoun of Ormestoun to Ralph Ker of Prymsideloch, Andrew Ker of Cralyn, George Douglas of Bonjedworth, David Pringil and William Pringil, to resign the lands of Rowcastell into hands of the abbot of Jedworth. Witnesses: sir Alexander Scot, parson of Wigton, John Murray of Tulchadam, John Lermonth, Sir John Wedderburne, John Nesbet and Patrick Cant. Date 22/10/1491. (National Archives of Scotland).

    In 1493 George Douglas was mentioned in the Privy Council Register.

    Sheriff of Dumfries in that part: Walter Ker of Cesfurde. Precept addressed to Walter Ker of Cesfurde, Ralph [Radulphus] Ker, his brother, William Carmychell, John Carmychell, his son, John Boil, John Yettam and John Sym, sheriffs in that part of Edinburgh, Lanark, Selkirk, Roxburgh and Dumfries. Witnesses: William Dowglas of Caverismilne, John Lyndesay of Wawchop, John Rutherfurde of Hundle, Robert Scot of Quhittheff, George Dowglas of Bunjedworth and John Grame. July 5, 1499.

    There was a conviction in the year 1502 relating to brothers of George Douglas 4th of Bonjedward – “John Douglas, brother to the Laird of Bon-Jedworthe, William his brother, James Douglas in Swynside, John, Adam, and John? his brothers there,' James Douglas in Onstoune, George Douglas in Swynside," John Davidsone in Bank, William and George, sons of the said John, Cristopher Davidsone, John Riddale, junior, of that Ilk, James Davidsone, son of Richard, convicted of art and part of Oppressioun and Convocation of the lieges, and coming upon Sir William Colvile of Uchiltre, knight', at his lands of Hardane-hede”. (Ancient Criminal Trials by Robert Pitcairn – Vol 1, Edinburgh – Jedworthe 1502)
    [In Jedworthe 1502 – “…Adam Douglas, and Robert, Henry, Symone and George D, in Swynside, his brothers]

    George Douglas, the Laird of Bonjedward may seem to be too old to be involved in such (violent) activity in 1502, but it seems that he was involved with the next generation even in 1504.

    Thomas Rutherfurd was slaughtered in Jedburgh Abbey in about 1504. In this exploit George Douglas the Laird of Bonjedward was accompanied by his brother John and by a younger generation – his son Andrew Douglas the Laird of Timpendean and another son Robert. (Robert was probably the father of the Rev John Douglas c1494 to 1500 who was the Archbishop and Chancellor of the University of St Andrews from 1572 to 1574. He was one of the six Johns who wrote the Scots Confession of 1560).

    There were others as well, involved in the slaughter of Thomas Rutherford.

    28 August,1504. “Specialle Respuyt in favor of the ‘men, kin, tenentis, factouris and servants’ of Robert Archbishop of Glasgow; and especially for the slaughter of umquhile Thomas Ruthirfurde within the Abbay of Jedworthe.” Among those listed in the ‘Respite’ were – George Douglace of Bone-Jedworthe, Andro Douglas, Johne Douglas, Robert Douglas, William Douglas, Master Stevin Douglas, Johne Douglase in Jedworthe and David Douglace in Jedworthe. ‘Dumfreis’.

    Master Stevin Douglas was likely to have been the young son of Andro (Andrew) Douglas of Timpendean.

    Slaughter of Thomas Rutherford by George Douglas of Bonjedburgh and Andrew Douglas of Timpendean and others (c1504) - Remission by King James the 4th to John Forman of Dalvane, Baldred Blacater, Knights, John Tweedy of Drumelzear, Adam Stewart, Robert Blacater, son and appearent heir of Andrew Blacater of that ilk, Adam Blacater, Charles Blacater, John Heryoth, Adam Turnbull of Phillophauch, William Turnbull, his son and apparent heir, George Douglas of Bonjedburgh, John Douglas, his brother, Andrew Douglas in Tympanedene (Timpendean), Robert Douglas, his brother, and others for the slaughter of the late Thomas Rutherfurd within the Abby of Jedworth. Dated at Edinburgh 28 Febuary 1506.

    On 11 October,1503 George Douglas of Bonjedworth was among those present at the dedication of the alter to St Ninian at Jedburgh Abbey.

    George Douglas appeared as a witness in 1503-1504. (Douglas Book – Sir William Fraser – Edinburgh 1885)

    George Douglas was the Sheriff of Roxburgh in 1508 -1509.

    In 1509 George was a witness to a retour of James Douglas as heir to his father William Douglas of Cavers.

    I have no information of the involvement or otherwise of the Lairds of Bonjedward and/or Timpendean at Flodden in 1513. It is said that the ‘Bonjedward papers’ have not survived. Who knows, papers by other families may be enlightening?

    This George Douglas was also involved in the Skirmish at Sclaterford (Bridge) in 1513. The skirmish was with a large army from England. George Douglas was one of the leaders for the Scots army. The Sclaterford Bridge was at Fodderlee Burn in the Rule Valley near Jedburgh.

    George Douglas was the Sheriff of Roxburgh in 1514.

    When Queen Margaret (Margaret Tudor who had married the 6th Earl of Angus, Archibald Douglas) fled Scotland for England in about 1515 she had left the keepership of (her) Newark Castle in the Ettrick Forest to the Laird of Bonjedburgh (Bonjedward) George Douglas.

    George’s children were James Douglas c1463, William c1467 (Inherited Bonjedward), Andrew (Andro) c1468 (Inherited Timpendean), Robert c1469, likely David c1470 and likely Johne c1472.

    5th William Douglas c1467. William Douglas probably died around 1543.

    William inherited Bonjedward. It was to go to his brother James who must have died.

    In July,1479 George Douglas, 4th of Bonjedward, with the agreement of his older son, James, had made Timpendean over to Andrew, his younger son.

    Timpendean Tower was originally part of the estate of the Douglas Lairds of Bonjedward.

    In the period 1522 to 1527 William Douglas was ‘Laird of Bonjedworth’. [State Papers – King Henry the Eighth].

    In 1537 “Andrew and John Hall were denounced as rebels for not underlying the law of art? and of the inbringing of certain Englishmen to the place of William Douglas (of Bonjedward) and of Cunzeartoune, and Percy Hall and others found caution to answer for the burning of Cunzeartoune. Although it is in the parish of Oxnam, Cunzeartoune seems latterly to have been in the barony of Hounam…” [History of the Berwickshire Naturalists’ Club, Volume 11].

    This is relevant to the paragraph above –
    In 1510 Robert Hall a notorious villain from Heavyside appeared in the Jedburgh Court accused of a long list of crimes. One such crime was stealing a cow and 11 hogs from the Laird of Bon-Jedward. In 1537 sheep were stolen from William Douglas. “Andrew Hall, called ‘Fat Cow’ and William Hall ‘Wanton Pintle’ were denounced rebels for stealing sheep from William Douglas of Bon Jedward and his neighbours…” They also stole corn from Douglases’ place at Cunzierton. Another Hall rebel was John Hall and he was called ‘Wide Hose’ from ‘the amplitude of his breeches’. It appears that the raid where the sheep were stolen ‘ended in serious reprisals’ for all these men ‘were slain later by the Douglases’.

    It also appears that in 1537 Andrew and John Hall stole from William’s farm at Cunzierton rather than at Bonjedward. If there were reprisals by the Douglases it seems that it was for theft by the Halls and for the Halls leading others to the home of William Douglas at Cunzierton which resulted in its razing and wanton destruction. Plus, as a reprisal for the theft of cattle and oxen which William Douglas claimed as 34 in number.

    In May,1536, John Molle of that Ilk, William Douglas of Bonne-Jedburgh (Bonjedward), Thomas MacDougall of Maccaristoune (Makerstoun) found caution to the extent of 1000 merks, to underlye the law at the next justicaire of Jedburgh for oppression and hamesucken (assaulting a person in their own home) done to the dean of Murray.

    William Douglas was cautioned at the Criminal Trial in May,1536 and again in 1537.

    In the 1531-1538 Accounts of Lord High Treasurer of Scotland, William Douglas of Bone-Jedburgh gets a mention.

    From ‘The Earls of Angus…Vol II – Chapter VIII – Angus in Exile by Michael Garhart Kelley – University of Edinburgh – 1973 – “…His son, William (the son of George) does not emerge from obscurity until March,1536-1537 when he was summoned to compear (appear) before the king. In 1538 the laird of Bonjedburgh received a complete remission for ‘certain crimes’ upon payment of 500 pounds. What these crimes where is unknown but he enjoyed the king’s favour by July,1540 when he was granted the lands of Wanles-Terras alias Makbrancheis-landis in the burgh of Jedburgh which he held from the former earl of Angus. In the following month the king granted to William Douglas his paternal estates of Bonjedburgh and Tympenden, which his father George Douglas had held in chief from the Earl of Angus. As a mark of special favour the king erected these lands into the free barony of Bonjedburgh. The Laird of Bonjedburgh continued to enjoy James’s favour until the end of the reign as in September,1542 he received royal confirmation of the gift which the abbot of Jedburgh had made to him a tack of the lands of Toftylands and Paddobuyll for nineteen years…”

    In 1540 William Dowglas, 5th of Bonjedward, was granted a charter from James V which included "… the manorial lands of Bonjedward with the tower and woodland thereof, the estate and fields of B[onjedward], 21 agricultural fields and four adjacent fields and appurtenances, with corn and fulling mills, the lands of Timpendean, with tenants etc., in the regality and demesne of Jedforest…" [Border Archaeology]. ‘Fulling’ was a step in the process of woolen clothmaking.

    In 1540 this king (James V) “for good service’, granted to William Douglas of Bonjedburgh, his heirs and assigns, the lands of Bonjedburgh with the tower and the grove, and the Lands of ‘Tynpendean; incorporating them in the free barony of ‘Bonjedburgh’, the holders rendering yearly a red rose ‘in the name of blanchferm’…” [The Annals of a Border Club (the Jedforest): and biographical notices of the families connected therewith – George Tancred – Jedburgh, T S Small – 1899]. Blanchferm being a small or nominal rent, and in this case a red rose.

    “In 1540 after Angus’s forfeiture, barony was granted to Douglas of Bonjedburgh…” [The Middle March of the Scottish Borders – 1573 to 1625, Vol. II. Presumably by Anna Groundwater].

    There is said to be no trace of William’s 1540 home at Cunzierton in the Cheviot Hills – “There is now no trace of William Douglas of Bonjedward’s house at Cunzeirton in the Cheviot Hills, but of its razing and the theft of his cattle in 1540 (cited in Armstrong, 1883, LI, App. XXXIV) we have the following record: ‘Thai come apon the XXI day of November last bypast, to his house of Cunzertoun, with ledderis, spadis, schobs, gavelockis and axis, cruellie assegit, brak and undirmyndit the said place, to have wynnyn the samyn, and tuik his cornis, and caist to the yettis, and brynt thairin VIIJ ky and oxin, and spulyeit and tuik away with thaime XXVJ ky and oxin, an horss…’” (Zeune 1992)

    “Zeune mistakenly ascribes Cunzeirton to Dumfriesshire with the suffix ‘DF’ each time it is mentioned, however, the grid reference provided in the index (NT 741 180) is correct and the house would have been up in the Cheviots with a direct route from Douglas’s seat in Bonjedward (near Jedburgh) along Dere Street.

    Zeune (1992) supposes that Cunzeirton must have been a pele-house or bastle with livestock kept in the ground floor otherwise eight cattle and oxen ‘therein’ would not have been lost. In general, however, the livestock may have been kept on the property or ‘place’ rather than in the house itself. Given that this record is an official complaint lodged by Douglas against English reivers, it may have been exaggerated in the hope of compensation for 34 animals rather than the 26 that may be recovered…” [The Laird’s Houses of Scotland …1560-1770. PhD by Research – Sabina R Strachan – University of Edinburgh 2008].

    Cunzierton Hill in the Cheviot Hills –
    https://www.themountainguide.co.uk/scotland/cunzierton-hill.htm

    At Canmore - https://canmore.org.uk/site/58009/cunzierton-hill

    Cunzierton Hill - https://osmaps.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/55.45399,-2.41040,15

    In about 1541 William Douglas contributed to the reparation of Jedburgh Abbey (such as it was). The Abbot and the Abbey responded by giving him feu-farms in land in Toftylaws and Padohugh in Ulston. It was said that he already had this land for 19 years. (Presumably meaning that he had already farmed the land, with perhaps paying tenure to the Abbey).

    William Douglas was mentioned in the Great Seal Register in 1540-1542 as a son of George Douglas.

    After this period there are sheriffs and military activities involving a William Douglas, Laird of Bonjedward and I have attributed those dates and activities to the next William as this one was a bit too old for such activities!

    William’s children were George Douglas c1488, Jane Douglas c1492 (Married Sir Archibald Rutherford – he was a Rev. Archibald and his wife had three sons William, John and Thomas Rutherford), John c1494, William c1496 and Hugh c1499.

    About John and Thomas Rutherford –
    Re: John Rutherford (c1524 to Dec 1577 – son of a Canon of Jedburgh) and the household of Michel de Montaigne… ”Another Scots tutor …John Rutherford (Latinised Rhetorfortis), later regent in St Mary’s college and finally provost of St Salvator’s college in the University of St Andrews...Son of a canon of an Augustinian house at Jedburgh and a Douglas of Bonjedward, he must have first met Montaigne when both were students in Bordeaux under Nicolas de Grouchy at the College de Guyenne, before Grouchy’s departure to the new college of arts founded by John 3 at Coimbra in Portugal, to which in 1547 Rutherford accompanied him. Later, in 1555, Rutherford is found in the chateau at Montaigne as tutor to his brother, Thomas, aged 21, a year younger then Michel; we do not know Rutherford’s date of birth, but it seems likely that he was somewhat older than either. The Scots tutor’s philosophical attitudes met with the approval of Pierre de Montaigne, their father, and may also be important…in the formation of Montaigne’s complex intellectual outlook…” http://www.jstor.org/pss/20676006

    The Rev John Rutherford married Christian Forsyth and they had a son John Rutherford. This son John married Janet Inglis daughter of David Inglis of Ardit and they had David Rutherford; and the Rev John Rutherford. This last John Rutherford married Barbara Sandilands and they had John Rutherford; who married Isobel or Margaret Auchmouttie/Auchmutie of Drumdeldie; William Rutherford of Wrightsland and Quarryholes who married Gelis Stewart daughter of James Stewart the 6th Lord of Traquhair; and Christian, Janet and Elizabeth Rutherford.

    Rutherford – Ministers in this immediate family –
    The Rev John Rutherford – of the University of St Andrews and later Minister of Cults, who married Christian Forsyth. Their son the Rev John Rutherford – of the University of St Andrews, who married Janet Inglis. In turn their son the Rev John Rutherford – Minister of Monifieth Parish Church from 1626 to 1632, who married Barbara Sandilands. In turn their son the Rev John Rutherford – Minister of Kirkdean, who married Isobel or Margaret Auchmouttie/Auchmutie of Drumdeldie. (Scotland: Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae).

    6th George Douglas c1488. George had died by February,1533 according to a remark below. But I am working on a premise that he died after 1547.

    George Douglas of Bonjedburgh was described in May,1517 as ‘lard abone Jedworth’ and ‘Bonjedward’.

    Inquest: Andrew Kerr of Ferniehirst, John Cranstoun of that ilk, George Rutherford of Hundalee, David Pringle of Smailholm, George Douglas of Bonjedward, William Kirkton of Stewartfield, William Kerr, George Pringle, James Pringle, George Turnbull, Archibald Spottiswood, William Ainslie, Patrick Donaldson, Thomas Rutherford and John Wallace.6 seals, one detached, including seals of George Rutherford... Andrew Kerr of Ferniehirst... George Douglas of Bonjedward. Date 7 Nov 1525. (National Archives of Scotland).

    George Douglas was at a Retour of Inquest in 1523 on the death of John Hume at Flodden in 1513.

    1523 – ‘Retour of Inquest made in the presence of James Douglas of Cavers, sheriff of Roxburgh, by the following jurors Andrew Ker of Farnyhirst, George Douglas of Bunjedward, James Murray of Fawlayhill, George Rutherford, son and apparent heir of John Rutherford of Hundolee, George Turnbull of Bedrule, William Halden of that Ilk, William Ker, William Kyrktoun, Lanslet Ker, George Turnbull of Bedrule, Thomas Leirmonth, James Douglas, Richard Alanson, George Fawlay of Wellis, and Robert Richardson, who declared on oath that the late John Hume, uncle of John Hume bearer of the present writ, died at the king’s peace, possessed of the lands of Syndlaws in the sheriffdom of Roxburgh; that John Hume is the lawful and nearest heir of his late uncle, and is of lawful age by a royal dispensation in virtue of a royal act passed at Twizelhauch in Northumberland, before the conflict of Flodden, because the late John Hume died fighting under the king’s banner at Flodden against the English; that the lands of Syndlaws are valued at 10l. Scots and in time of peace, and are held of the king for ward and relief; and that they have been in the hands of the Crown since the death of John Hume at Flodden on 9th September 1513. Dated at the Courthouse of Jedburgh, 28th July 1523’. [Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts – 1891].

    In 1529 ‘George Douglas of Boonjedward’ was a witness to a Bond of Alliance or Feud Staunching between the Scotts and Kers.

    Indenture between Walter Ker of Cessford, Andrew Ker of Ferniehurst and other Kers, on the one side, and Walter Scot of Branxholm, knight, and other Scots, on the other side - Whereby, for the staunching of discord between them, the said Walter Scot undertakes to go or to cause to go to the four head pilgrimages of Scotland, - to wit, Scone, Dundee, Paislaw and Melrose, - and say a mass for the soul of the late Andrew Ker of Cessford and those who were slain with him at the field of Melrose, and shall cause a priest say a mass daily for their souls for five years: and Mark Ker of Dolphinston and Andrew Ker of Graden shall do likewise for the souls of the late James Scot of Eskirk and other Scots slain with him at the above field of Melrose: and the said Walter Scot shall marry his son and heir upon one of the sisters of the said Walter Ker: and they agree to accept the decreet of 6 chosen arbitrators anent all other matters in debate: and they oblige themselves in a bond of mutual support. Ancrum. Witnesses, Mr. George Durie, Abbot of Melrose, George Douglas of Bonjedward and others. Date 16 March 1529-1530. (National Archives of Scotland).

    A Seal dated 16th May,1530 was used by George Douglas of Bonjedburgh.

    In 1530 George Douglas of Bone-Jedworth was one of the Barons and Lairds of Roxburghshire and Berwickshire that this applies to – May 18, “The following persons surety to enter, when required, before the Justice, to underly the law for all crimes imputed to them: And for which they submitted themselves to the King’s Will: And also, for not doing their utmost diligence to fulfil their Bond’s etc…” (Records of the Supreme Court).

    It is said that the levy of a large army under the command of the King (James the King of the Scots) was for the sole purpose of suppressing a handful of Border thieves. But the Borders were actually so ‘lawless’ and the Chiefs so ‘refractory and turbulent’ that nothing short of the strongest coercive measures could restore a better state of society. Those who did not ‘come forward’ were the most severely punished.

    1537 – 1553. The Larde of Boniedworth was mentioned in the time of ‘King Edwarde the fixthe’. [Holinshed Project – Holinshed’s Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland - 1808]. Which Laird is this?

    George Douglas of Bonjedward is mentioned in Calendar of the State Papers relating to Scotland and Mary, Queen of Scots, 1547-1605.

    Register of the Council 1553. ‘Item, to mak wardane deputis of cuntremen, ansuer to this the Lardis of Hundoley and Bonejedburch’.

    From ‘The Earls of Angus…Vol II – Chapter VIII – Angus in Exile by Michael Garhart Kelley – University of Edinburgh – 1973 – “…George Douglas of Bonjedburgh, unlike his distant kinsman of Cavers, appears to have had personal contact and enjoyed the favour of his former superior, Angus. Before February 1518-1519, he had been given a tack of lands of Farnis in Berwickshire by the earl of Angus but, as those lands belonged to the priory of Coldingham, Bonjedburgh was involved in a long and unsuccessful contest with Mr Patrick Blackadder of Tulliallan. Bonjedburgh appears to have had no involvement with Angus in the latter’s rebellion and was dead before February, 1532-1533…”

    George’s children were Isobelle Douglas c1512 (Married John Scott c1505 of Roberton, Roxburghshire), William (Willie) c1513, Hugh c1515, Hobbie (Robert) c1517 and John c1519 (John was probably the father of Saint George Douglas c1541 Edinburgh. He was a Martyr arrested in York and hanged there in 1587).
    Degree of Martyrdrom of George Douglas the Priest –
    Venerated – 10 November,1986 by Pope John Paul II
    Beatified – 22 November 1987 by Pope John Paul II

    See Part 2 – https://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=123695

    Sally E Douglas

    5 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-10-06
    User data
  45. Douglas of Timpendean - Part 2
    List
    Public

    From Part 1- https://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=21722

    William’s testament is listed as an Edinburgh Testament ‘William Douglas of Timpandean – See Jean Rutherford’. (No date given).

    William Douglas was “given as the ninth of the line by Nisbet and the heraldist, who recorded about this time that the family arms were those of Douglas ‘quartered with these of Gladstones’. These arms, featuring a heart surrounded by a crown…” [The Annals of a Border Club (the Jedforest): and biographical notices of the families connected therewith – George Tancred – Jedburgh, T S Small – 1899].

    William and Jean/Jane Douglas had 5 children – Archibald 1718 Jedburgh, Susanna 1718 Jedburgh (twins), John 1720 Jedburgh, Euphan/Euphemia 1721 Jedburgh and William 1727 Jedburgh.

    Susanna Douglas 1718 married Robert Clerk and Euphan/Euphemia Douglas married George Balderston. Robert Clerk’s father was John Clerk.

    Susanna Douglas daughter of the late ‘William Douglas of Timpandean’ was mentioned on 7 August, 1740 – it said Mrs Susanna Douglas.

    10th Archibald Douglas Esq. 1718 Jedburgh – he was baptized in September,1725 in Jedburgh.

    In 1748 Archibald Douglas paid tax on 28 windows – ‘Arch, Douglas Timpintoun’. (Scotlands Places).

    I wonder if they were buildings of masonry skills and stones/stonework, woodwork or thatched cottages? Or made with a combination of these materials?

    There were 4 other householders who paid window tax at ‘Timpintoun’ in 1748.

    Archibald Douglas married Helen Bennet 1738 Ancrum, Roxburghshire on 1 September,1765 in Edinburgh, Midlothian.

    Helen Bennet was the daughter of Andrew Bennet of Chesters, Ancrum and Ann Turnbull. Andrew and Ann married in 1737. They had Ann 1739, Isobel 1741 who married Archibald Hope, Convenor of Excise; John 1743 and Robert 1744 -1794.

    Ann Turnbull was the daughter of Robert Turnbull of Standhill.

    Andrew Bennet had already had a first wife Dorothy Collingwood – they married in December,1719 at Ancrum and had a son Archibald, who must have died young, then Barbara, Alexander, Jean, Thomas, Ann and Raguel.

    Barbara Bennet married James Murray of Ewes and they migrated to the USA. The latter were 3 great grandparents of Franklin D Rooseveldt.

    Archibald and Helen Douglas had -
    • (Major, Sir) William Douglas 1770 Jedburgh
    • (Dr) Andrew Douglas 1772 Jedburgh (Died 4 May,1852 in Ancrum Mill – he had married Jane Buckham c1780 who died on 22 June,1850). They had Margaret Douglas c1807 who died 22 December,1822; Helen Douglas 25 October,1813; Janet (Jessie) Douglas 11 October,1816 in Ancrum. Jessie died on 7, November,1888. She had married George Cranston 25 February,1810 Jedburgh on 15 August,1840 in Jedburgh. George died on 4 August,1859. George’s father was Thomas Cranston and his mother was Elizabeth Oliver. Andrew and Jane Douglas also had – Christian Douglas 15 February,1819 Ancrum and William Douglas 12 November,1821 Ancrum. William married Annie Binnie c1824 in c1847. William died on 19 January,1875 in Cleikiminn and Annie died on 7 July,1884.
    There is a question about Andrew Douglas (above). Blackwood’s Magazine of 1827 states on ‘the death of Dr Andrew Douglas in London in 1827 that he was a physician to the forces, and the youngest son of the late Archibald Douglas of Timpendean’. So if Andrew Douglas died in London in 1827 which Andrew Douglas died at Ancrum Mill in 1852? Perhaps there were two Andrew Douglases and the one at Ancrum Mill was not a Dr? Nor was he the son of Archibald Douglas of Timpendean.
    • Robert Douglas 1774 Jedburgh and
    • Archibald Douglas 1778 Jedburgh.

    All four sons of Archibald and Helen Douglas were involved with the armed services.

    In 1800 ‘Bond by Gilbert, Lord Minto and Admiral John Elliot to Mrs Helen Douglas, Mrs Isabel Hope (sister of Mrs Helen Douglas) and Miss Agnes Bennet (sister of Mrs Helen Douglas) re land at Ancrum’. (Manuscripts Division - Minto Charters at the National Library of Scotland).

    In 1801 ‘Bond by Gilbert, Lord Minto and Admiral John Elliot to William Balderston, Executor of the late Miss Ann Bennet (half sister of Mrs Helen Douglas) for a sum of 400 pounds’. (Manuscripts Division - Minto Charters at the National Library of Scotland).

    In 1801 ‘Bond by Gilbert, Lord Minto and Admiral John Elliot to Miss Jean Bennet (half sister of Mrs Helen Douglas) for a sum of 400 pounds’. (Manuscripts Division - Minto Charters at the National Library of Scotland).

    In May, 1800 and June, 1806 – ‘Discharge by Mrs Helen Douglas and Mrs Isabel Hope in favour of Gilbert, Lord Minto and Admiral John Elliot from the bonds…’ (Manuscripts Division - Minto Charters at the National Library of Scotland).

    Archibald Douglas 1718 died on 4 June 1781 at Timpendean. Helen Douglas died in April,1808 in Kelso, Roxburghshire.

    Archibald took on the Bonjedward title as well – it was assumed that the Douglases of Bonjedward had died out, but that does not appear to be the case. It appears more likely that the lands were sold up over a long period of time due to financial necessity.

    Moreover, the Court of Lord Lyon ruled that the Bonjedward title could not be added to the Timpendean title by the Lairds of Timpendean.

    Crawlees – 1761 – ‘Titles (6) to six husbandlands in Lanton called Crawlees, disponed (disposed) by Mr Francis Scott, minister at Westruther, to Archibald Douglas of Timpandean on 4 Aug.1761’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    Lanton – 1718 to 1792 – ‘Titles (6) of ten merklands of Langtoun belonging to the family of Douglas at Timpendean’. (National Archives of Scotland).

    11th Major-General Sir William Douglas, 8 or 9 September 1770 Jedburgh to 14 April 1834 Kensington, London & Marrianne (Mary-Anne) Tattersall – died December 1835 m 27 August 1810 Liverpool, Lancashire, England.

    Marrianne was the daughter of Thomas Tattersall of Everton, Lancashire, who died in December,1835.

    William was made a Knight Commander of the Hanoverian Guelphie Order. [The Annals of a Border Club (the Jedforest): and biographical notices of the families connected therewith – George Tancred – Jedburgh, T S Small – 1899].

    Some of the children of William and Marrianne Douglas were – William Douglas c1811, Helen Douglas c1814 (Married the Rev.Thomas Boyles Murray 1798), Mary Anne (Marianne) Douglas 1815 St George, Everton, Lancashire (Married the Rev. George William Murray 1808); Thomas Douglas 1816 St George, Everton, Lancashire; Captain George Douglas 1819 Everton, Lancashire; Captain or Major Henry Sholto Douglas 1820 of Moorlands; (Surgeon Major Frederick Douglas 1823 Harrow, London (he died in 1873); Emma Douglas c1824 Harrow, London; and William Archibald Douglas c1837 England. (he died on 19 April,1884).

    There were 12 children in total.

    It appears that the Rev.Thomas Boyles Murray was an Author and the writer of ‘Pitcairn’. It was one of his many books. At one stage he and his wife Helen Douglas visited William and Dorothy Wordsworth. Thomas and William were probably friends.

    It appears likely too that the Rev.Thomas Boyles Murray who married Helen Douglas and the Rev. George William Murray who married Mary Anne or Marianne Douglas were brothers, their wives being sisters.

    Wills and Probate – A2A – Documents online - Sir William Douglas of Timpendean (Sir William Douglas General, K.H.C.) Description Will of Sir William Douglas, Major General of Timpendean, Roxburghshire. Date 03 June 1834. Catalogue reference PROB 11/1832. Dept Records of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury Series Prerogative Court of Canterbury and related Probate Jurisdictions: Will Registers. Piece Name of Register: Teignmouth Quire Numbers: 301 – 350. Image contains 1 will. Number of image files: 3 Refs 263/243, 244 and 245 pdf’s.

    This Will can likely also be found through Ancestry.co.uk and ordered from Canterbury. (Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills – 1384 to 1858).

    Fashionable Wedding of a Douglas, Timpendean family
    ‘A numerous and fashionable company assembled at St. Saviour's Church, Bitterne, on Wednesday, when Mr William Arthur Gillett, son of Mr W S Gillett, of Harefield, was married to Edith, daughter of Captain H. Sholto Douglas, of Moorlands, late 42nd Royal Highlanders (Black Watch), and granddaughter of the late Major General Sir Wm. Douglas, K.C.H of Timpendean, Roxburghshire. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. H.E. Trotter. The bride, who was given away by her father, wore bodice and train of white brocade, over a petticoat of satin, with handsome pearl embroidery, wreath and spray of orange blossoms, with tulle veil. The bridesmaids were Miss Constance Douglas, Miss Ethel Douglas, and Miss Florence Douglas, sisters of the bride, and her cousin, Miss Constance Smith (In the margin a further name is added to the bridesmaids: Miss G. Beadon). They wore cream surah dresses, with ficelle lace, white bonnets trimmed with wreath of Parma violets, and bouquets and gold bangles, the gift of the bridegroom. Mr H Loxley was best man, and the groomsmen Colonel Murray (a cousin of Constance Smith), Major Douglas, Mr F Murray (Miss Constance Smith's uncle) and Mr C Douglas. The day was beautifully fine, and considerable interest was evinced in the ceremony, after which a large company were entertained at Moorlands (the house no longer exists, but apparently the gatehouse does). The happy couple left early in the afternoon, amidst the customary showers of rice and expressions of hearty good wishes, for London, en route for the Lakes, where the honeymoon will be spent. The bride's travelling dress was electric blue satin merveilleux and cashmere, with bonnet to match'.

    'Amongst the presents, which were numerous and costly were the following:- Silver saltcellars, Mr and Mrs Douglas Murray. Silver salt cellars, Mr and Mrs Douglas Murray. Velvet and plush table, Colonel Bailie Silver muffineer and waitbuckle, Mr Sholto Murray. Gold bangle, the Misses Douglas. Pair of silver revolving entree dishes, Major & Mrs Murray Gold inlaid tea service, Colonel Murray, 28th Regiment. Entree dish, Major Douglas, 52nd Light Infantry. Plush photo-book and cruet frame, Mr Angus Douglas, R.N. Drawing room clock, Mr and Mrs H Sholto Douglas. Cuttack silver bracelet, Mr F.M.S. Douglas. Handpainted toilet set, Miss Ethel Douglas. Pair of china vases, Mr Frank Murray. Chippendale corner bracket and mirror, Mr C.C. Douglas, the Cameronians. Pheasant-eye glass bowl, Canon Murray; and numerous others'.

    'The connection between the Douglases and all those Murrays is that one of ‘Captain Henry Sholto Douglas' (father of the bride) sisters, Marianne, married the Rev. George William Murray; Mr Sholto Murray c1842 and Mr Frank Murray c1839 are two of their sons, and there was also a daughter Agnes Augusta Murray 1837. Miss Constance Smith is a grand daughter of theirs. Another of Captain Henry's sisters, Helen Douglas, married Rev. Thomas Boyles Murray, and their offspring include Mr & Mrs (Thomas) Douglas Murray 1841, Captain Henry Boyles Murray c1842 and Colonel Sir Charles Wyndham Murray 1844'.

    ‘Canon Murray mentioned at the end of the list of gifters is likely to be George William Murray, the husband of Marianne Douglas’

    12th Captain George Douglas, 21 September 1819 Everton, Lancashire to 29 December 1865 Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia & Mary Beevor Carver 11 July 1821 Shropham, Norfolk, England to 14 May 1893 Portsea, Hampshire, England m 15 July 1843 St Pancras, Middlesex, England.

    A description of Timpendean In February,1813 –
    A VERY DESIRABLE FARM IN ROXBURGHSHIRE TO LET.
    “To be LET, for 19 years after Whitsunday next… within the house of Mrs. Turnbull, vintner in Jedburgh, on Tuesday the 2nd of March 1813, at 12 o'clock noon, The Farm of TIMPENDEAN, lying in the parish of Jedburgh, at present occupied by Mr. John RiddelI. The total contents of this farm are 852 English acres, whereof 540 acres are in the highest state of cultivation, and mostly enclosed with well kept and thriving hedges. The farm lies on the south bank of the Tiviot, within three miles of Jedburgh. The great road from Kelso to Hawick runs through it, and the great road from Jedburgh to Edinburgh bounds it in part on the north east. The dwelling-house, offices and garden, are neat, and commodious and the ground adjoining to the house is in rich pasture, laid out with great taste, and surrounded and ornamented with strips and clumps of wood, For particulars apply to Mr. James Henderson, Writer in Jedburgh; or to Messrs. Balderston and Scott, W. 8…”

    Disposing of Timpendean Lands -
    • George Douglas sold off the lands of Timpendean to the Marquess of Lothian in 1843. (Heraldry of the Douglases by G Harvey Johnston).
    • Timpendean 1843 – ‘Titles (32) to the lands, and estate of Timpendean, Broomhall and part of Lanton, disponed (disposed) by trustees of deceased Major – General Sir William Douglas of Timpendean to the Marquess of Lothian on 10-14 Nov. 1843’. (National Archives of Scotland).
    • Timpendean:1844-1846 Assignation by John Elliot, tenant in Primrosehill near Dunse, 2nd son of late William Elliot of Harwood, in favour of the Trustees of the late Sir William Douglas of Timpendean of Bond of Annuity and Provision for £957:14:10½, with discharge annexed dated 13 April 1846. Dates May 8 & 13, 1844. (National Archives of Scotland)

    Captain George Douglas 1819 to 1865 – he was Court Martialed. It was a controversial decision, based on circumstantial evidence that was tailored to fit the crime of killing a farmer’s bullock when he was stationed on the Channel Island of Alderney.

    George Douglas and his family were obviously ‘forced to flee’ life in Britain and in the late 1850’s and 1860’s George was a Police Magistrate in Nundle and Tamworth, New South Wales. At one stage George had land at both Nundle and Gunnedah. George then became the Gold Commissioner for the Northern District of New South Wales, based in Bathurst.

    George Douglas and his wife Mary Beevor Carver had a daughter Emma Mary Douglas c1844 Upper Canada (Ontario); and a son Sholto George Douglas born March 1846 Paddington, Westminster but he died on 18 February 1859 at Nundle, New South Wales, Australia.

    George Douglas 1819 died on 29 December,1865 at Bathurst, New South Wales.

    Captain George Douglas does not get a mention in G Harvey Johnston’s Heraldry of the Douglases.

    In the reckoning of G Harvey Johnston the 12th was Captain or Major Henry Sholto Douglas 1820, and not George Douglas 1819, and consequently the other Lairds following him move back one step in numbering.

    It must be presumed that after George 1819 that the lands of Timpendean belonged to others.

    13th Captain or Major Henry Sholto Douglas 1820 of Moorlands (brother of Captain George Douglas 1819). He married Mary Mitchell c1822 Ireland on 22 December,1846 at Ryde, Isle of Wight, Hampshire. Mary Mitchell died on 2 December,1897. Captain Henry Sholto Douglas died on 11 December,1892 at South Shields, Durham, Tyne and Wear.

    One of their sons was James Douglas 1855 Claybrook, Leicester. James Douglas died in New Zealand in 1934 at the age of 78. James and his wife Alice Mary Neave had four sons in New Zealand – James Sholto Douglas, Henry Bruce Douglas, William Angus Douglas and Charles ‘Colin’ Douglas.

    Another son of Captain or Major Henry Sholto Douglas and Mary Mitchell, namely Captain R.N. Angus William Sholto Douglas born October,1852 was purported to hold the original grant deed for Timpendean “He possesses the original charter of 1479 granting Timpendean to his ancestor’. (The Heraldry of the Douglases by G Harvey Johnston – Edinburgh and London – December,1906).

    I wonder where it is now?

    UK Genealogy Archives –
    Burke's Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland 1879 Douglas –
    Douglas of Bonjedward and Timpindean Douglas of Cavers Douglas of Killiechassie Douglas of Mains Douglas-Boswell of Garrallan Douglas-Gresley of Salwarpe Douglass of Grace Hall.

    14th Colonel Henry Mitchell Sholto Douglas 1847 of Moorlands – the eldest son of Henry Sholto Douglas 1820 and Mary Mitchell c1822 Ireland.

    15th Major Henry James Sholto Douglas 1903 – son of Colonel Henry Mitchell Sholto Douglas. He presented a petition to the Court of Lord Lyon, discussed below.

    "Lord Lyon – 1952
    Major Henry James Sholto Douglas, representative of Douglas of Timpendean presented a petition to the Lord Lyon praying for matriculation in his name of the Arms appropriate to him as representative of the family of Douglas of Timpendean.

    On 2nd January 1952, the Lord Lyon King of Arms, found in fact:
    1. That the petitioner's descent through Andrew Douglas, 1st of Timpendean, younger son of George Douglas of Bonjedward, is satisfactorily established from Margaret Douglas, 1st of Bonjedward, natural daughter of William, Earl of Douglas, by Margaret, Countess of Angus, in favour of whose natural son, George Douglas, the said Countess resigned the Earldom of Angus.
    2. That the issue of the said Margaret Douglas, 1st of Bonjedward, by her husband, Thomas Johnson, bore the name and arms of Douglas of Bonjedward.
    3. That John Douglas of Bonjedward, in 1450, bore arms differenced by a label of three points charged with as many mullets, on what ground is not known.
    4. That in a painted armorial pedigree seen by Alexander Nisbet (System of Heraldry, Vol. I, p. 79) the descent of Douglas of Bonjedward was incorrectly deduced from a third son of the Earl of Angus, which may have been induced by the difference in the seal of 1450.

    His Lordship found in law:
    That the petitioner is entitled to matriculate arms on ancient user before 1672 and with a difference congruent to descent illegitimately through Margaret Douglas of Bonjedward from William, Earl of Douglas, and Margaret, Countess of Angus.

    Grants warrant to the Lyon Clerk to matriculate in the Public Register of All Arms and Bearings in Scotland in name of the petitioner, Major Henry James Sholto Douglas, representative of Douglas of Timpendean, the following ensigns armorial, videlicet, argent, a man's heart gules on a chief azure three mullets of the field, debruised of a riband sinister wavy sable charged with three round buckles or, alternatively, with as many mullets of the field, all within a bordure of the second; above the shield is placed an helmet befitting his degree with a mantling azure doubled argent, and on a wreath of the liveries is set for crest a dexter hand holding a scimitar, both proper, between two ostrich feathers, one on either side, argent, and in an escrol over the same this motto Honor et Amor, and decerns.

    The Lord Lyon, King of Arms (Innes of Learney) stated that.
    The petitioner is the great-grandson and representative of Major-General William Douglas of Bonjedward and Timpendean in the County of Roxburgh. The Major-General was the son of Archibald Douglas of Bonjedward and Timpendean, and this Archibald was the eldest son of William Douglas of Timpendean, an estate which the family had possessed in uninterrupted descent from Andrew Douglas of Timpendean, third son of George Douglas of Bonjedward who, by charter, dated 1st July 1479, received from his father the Timpendean portion of the Bonjedward estate. I am not told when or how Archibald came to possess Bonjedward, or satisfied as to how the senior line of Bonjedward descending from the eldest son of the laird of 1479 has been proved to be extinct. It was, of course, a laudable and proper act of Timpendean to acquire Bonjedward, if he did so by purchase upon its loss by the heirs of the senior line, or indeed if he had an opportunity to reacquire it. But in the circumstances, and without further proof of the conditions under which Bonjedward was recovered, I think the historic title of Timpendean is the appropriate one to be borne by the petitioner and his successors as the representers of the House of Timpendean, no proof having been offered that the main line of Bonjedward is extinct.

    Reverting to Andrew Douglas, 1st of Timpendean, third son of George Douglas of Bonjedward, in 1479, the pedigree of this House of Bonjedward is carried back to Margaret Douglas, illegitimate daughter of William Douglas, Earl of Douglas, by Margaret Stewart, Countess of Angus, eldest daughter and heiress of Thomas Stewart, Earl of Angus. By a Countess of Angus the Earl of Douglas had also an illegitimate son, George, upon whom the Countess settled, by due feudal procedure, the dignity and estates of the Earldom of Angus, which have since descended in the line of that George, who duly became Earl of Angus, which line, following the events of 1455 and a grant of the forfeited duthus, Douglasdale, was taken to have become chief by settlement and came to be recognised, and bore arms, as chief of the name of Douglas.

    The position of Margaret Douglas, the Earl of Douglas's illegitimate daughter by Margaret, Countess of Angus, is different, because no step was taken, as in the case of her brother, George, to bring her in as an heir of tailzie even to the Angus succession, and accordingly she remains in the status of the Earl's natural daughter, but her children took or bore the name of Douglas and, as we see, have done so for five and a half centuries. Her husband appears as Thomas filio Johannis, and by this person Margaret Douglas was mother of John Douglas of Bonjedward, ancestor of the Bonjedward and Timpendean line above mentioned. There is nothing to say who Thomas and his father, John, were. They may have been Douglasses, early cadets of the main line of Douglas, but on the other hand, the presence of a saltire in chief in the arms in one seal of Douglas of Bonjedward and Timpendean suggests that Filio Johannis was a latinisation of Johnston.

    Anyway, I do not consider it necessary to investigate the origins of Margaret's husband further, since there is no doubt about the foundation of the house originating in Margaret herself and her grant of the lands of Bonjedward in 1404. There is evidence of use of the arms by members of the family prior to 1672, first in the person of John Douglas of Bonjedward, 1450, who bore the paternal coat of arms with a label of three points gules charged with three mullets argent for difference. This suggests to me that Margaret and John sought to hold themselves out as the next line in “remainder” to the Angus inheritance after issue of her father, Earl George (cf. also Nisbet's System of Heraldry, p. 79). The painting of the genealogical tree of the House of Douglas to which he refers shows that an effort was there made to deduce Bonjedward legitimately from a third son of Angus. In the light of modern knowledge this is evidently incorrect, and it probably just shows the result of the self-assumed label difference on the painter of the pedigree. That is what correct differencing by the Lord Lyon is to guard against…"

    From the Clan Douglas of Australia – Newsletter of July,2013 –
    Henry Sholto Douglas of Claybrook Hall, Lutterworth, Leicestershire, was born 29/Dec/1820, 2nd son of Sir William, 11th Laird of Bonjedward & Timpendean and Marianne Douglas nee Tattershall; died 11/Dec/1892; JP Leicestershire and JP Huntingdonshire; Captain 42nd Royal Highlanders; married 22/Jul/1846, Mary Mitchell, daughter of James Dyke Molesworth Mitchell of Hemingford Abbotts and Hemingford Grey of Huntingdonshire and of Foulmere, Cambridgeshire; and had issue:
    a. Henry Mitchell Sholto Douglas
    b. Frederick Molesworth Sholto Douglas, born 24/Aug/1851; died 1885;
    c. Angus William Sholto Douglas
    d. Archibald Bruce Douglas born 17/Jan/1854; died 1895;
    e. James Douglas
    f. Cameron Charles Douglas born 28/Apr/1857; died 1922, Major Scottish Rifles
    g. Mary Douglas died 20/Feb/1920; married 19/Oct/1878 Sir Arthur Henry Grant, 9th Baronet of Monymusk, Aberdeenshire;
    h. Annie Douglas died 1922
    i. Constance Douglas died 1932; married 1893 Major WA Campbell, Dorsetshire regiment
    j. Edith Douglas married 1883, WA Gillett of Fair Oak, Huntingdonshire
    k. Florence Douglas
    l. Ethel Louise Douglas died 1887
    a. Henry Mitchell Sholto Douglas of Hemingford Abbotts and Hemingford Grey, St Ives, Huntingdonshire and Foulmere, Cambrideshire born 16/May/1847; died 21/Feb/1931; educ. Harrow and Royal Military Colleges; Lieutenant-Colonel 52nd Oxfordshire formerly Highland Light Infantry; 1898 High Sheriff of Longfordshire; married 1899, Georgina Ethel Gilbard daughter of George James Gilbard of Plymouth, Devonshire, Lieutenant-Colonel; issue:
    • a.a. Henry James Sholto Douglas of Timpendean born 14/Jan/1903; Lord of the Manors of Hemingford Abbotts, Grey and Foulmere; resident of Mounsey, Dulverton, Somershire; educ. Harrows and Cambridge University; Brevet Major, late Scots Guards; High Sheriff of Longfordshire; married Cynthia Armorel Emily, daughter of Hubert Aleack Nepean Fyers of London, M.V.O. and had issue:
    • a.a.a. James Alastair Sholto Douglas, born 15/Nov/1939
    c. Angus William Sholto Douglas was born 31/Oct/1852, 3rd son of Henry Sholto & Mary Douglas nee Mitchell of Claybrook Hall; died 25/Jan/1925; Captain Royal Navy; had the charter of 1479 by which the lands of Timpendean were granted to his ancestor Andrew Douglas; married 1893, Charlotte Meyer of Little Laver Hall, Essex.
    e. James Douglas born 090/Nov/1855, 5th son of Henry Sholto & Mary Douglas nee Mitchell of Claybrook Hall; died 1933; married Alice Neeve and had issue:
    • e.a.Sholto Douglas born 15/Feb/1888
    • e.b.Bruce Douglas born 16/Jun/1889
    • e.c.Angus Douglas
    • e.d.Colin Douglas
    William Archibald Douglas, 4th son of Sir William (11th Laird of Bonjedward? (according to Lord Lyon, not of Bonjedward – by me SED) & Timpendean) and Marianne Douglas nee Tattershall; died 19/Apr/1884; married Elizabeth Plomer of Sydney, NSW, Australia; family lived at Hemingford Abbotts, St Ives, Huntingdonshire, Clove Farm, Tiverton, Devonshire, England; and had issue:
    • a. William Sholto Douglas died 1891
    • b. A daughter
    • c. A daughter
    • d. A daughter

    Also see Bonjedward - https://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=123379

    Sally E Douglas

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-12-21
    User data
  46. Dr Alfred Howard (known as Alf) - BANZARE, ANTARCTICA
    List
    Public

    Alfred Howard (1906-2010) was born in Camberwell, Victoria. However Alf had said that he still felt that Melbourne was home, even when he was over 100. He was well known for being the last member of BANZARE to be alive.

    Dr Alfred Howard was the Chemist and Hydrologist on the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition of 1929-1931.

    When he was approached for BANZARE by Sir David Orme Masson who chaired the BANZARE Committee, Dr Alfred Howard was doing work in Organic Chemistry. Nevertheless, two days later and he was on his way to London and then on to Plymouth to spend a short period of study at an analytical laboratory. Alf Howard had to make his way to Fremantle to join the steamship Orvieto bound for Toulon and to then get to London. He went by train from Toulon and then caught the ferry from Calais to Dover. Besides attending the laboratory of the Marine Biological Association in Plymouth, Howard made his way to the Fisheries Laboratory in Lowenstoft on the other side of England. He later said that his training “...was intensive and turned out to be invaluable...”

    Alf Howard and Ritchie Simmers the Meteorologist who had both been chosen for BANZARE left Southampton on the liner the Armadale Castle on 20th September, 1929 to meet up with the Discovery at Cape Town. The Discovery had left London on 1st August, 1929 for Cape Town, to officially commence BANZARE from that port city. Luckily for the two men they had earlier met up in London. Under their charge were some ‘expedition stores’ which had been despatched on the Armadale Castle. The voyage from Southampton was one of excitement and anticipation with the liner calling in at Cherbourg in France, Madeira and then steaming past the Verde Islands. In 1927 Howard had completed his Master of Science degree at the University of Melbourne and it has been said that it was one of five degrees obtained there by him. He also received an Honorary Doctorate in Statistics and a PhD in Linguistics from the University of Queensland. He worked with the Department of Human Movement as a Programmer and Statistics Consultant for 20 years without pay until he was 97.

    Alf Howard was the man who monitored the sea water temperatures on the expedition and collected sea water samples for chemical analysis. (Alf Howard did not keep logs for himself on BANZARE).

    Eric Douglas wrote about some of Alf’s work in his BANZARE logs - 27th January, 1930 “...I gave Alf Howard a hand on his water bottle tests. The water temperatures are interesting. It shows a warm layer of water at 100 fathoms and 800 fathoms...” and - Tuesday 4th March, 1930 “...I gave Alf Howard a hand at his machine for water bottle samples, samples and temperatures are taken at 0, 10,20, 30, 40, 50, 60,70, 80, 100, 150, 200, 300, 400 metres. The water temp was + 6 Centigrade at the surface, it fell to a minimum at 150 metres (2.5C) and then rose again to 3.5C at 400 metres. From these stations the oceans currents directions are made known. The deep water bottle test carried out on the forecastle had to be repeated owing to the messenger (which closes the water bottles at the required depths) catching on a kink in the wire...”

    Dr Alfred Howard lived to be 104, and when congratulated on his age a bit before that he said “What for?” He obviously would have liked to have still been actively contributing to life. One of the best documentations of his life and work is Mawson’s Last Survivor – the story of Dr Alf Howard AM – by Dr Anna Bemrose. (Boolarong Press – Brisbane – 2011).

    Sally Douglas

    5 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-01-21
    User data
  47. Dr JAMES MARR - BANZARE, ANTARCTICA
    List
    Public

    James William Slessor Marr (1902-1965) was born in Turriff, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Marr became a Zoologist and Marine Biologist, specializing in the study of Antarctic Krill. He was on the BANZ Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE), Voyage 1 in 1929-30. This expedition in 1929-1931 was under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson.
    In his early life Marr read classics at the Aberdeen University and was a patrol leader in the First Aberdeen Scout Group. He was chosen as one of two boy scouts by Sir Ernest Shackleton to join the Quest in 1921 on the ‘Shackleton Rowett Antarctic Expedition’ to Coats Land on the Weddell Sea and some rarely visited Antarctic islands. However engine trouble and Shackleton falling ill on the journey forced a change of direction and the Quest headed for South Georgia via Rio de Janeiro. Shackleton had a heart attack and died on the Quest in Grytviken Harbour at South Georgia in January, 1922. Marr later wrote about the journey in his book Into the Frozen South dated 1923. Marr served as a cabin boy on the Quest. He earned the nickname ‘Babe’ because of his involvement at a young age in that expedition. His alternative nickname was Scout.
    In about 1924 Marr resumed his studies at Aberdeen University and he Graduated with an MA in Classics in 1924 and a Bachelor of Science in Zoology in 1925. In 1925 James Marr participated in the British Arctic Expedition to Franz Joseph Land.
    Marr was involved in the ‘Discovery Investigations’ as a Biologist and as part of these ongoing investigations he went on the ship William Scoresby to the Antarctic during 1928-1929. The Discovery Investigations were set up by the Discovery Committee in London to study the biological resources of the Falkland Island Dependencies and in particular the biology of Southern Ocean whales. Marr was on the Discovery II in 1931-1933 and again in 1935-1937. These were also Discovery Investigations. So he was onboard the Discovery II at the time of the ‘Ellsworth Relief Expedition’ in 1935/1936 when a RAAF party boarded the ship in Melbourne, together with a RAAF Gipsy Moth and a RAAF Wapiti. Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas previously of BANZARE led this RAAF party.
    At the start of WW II Marr conducted hands-on research in the Antarctic into the feasibility of whale meat for human consumption. Moreover, in 1940 Marr was commissioned by the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve serving in Iceland, the Far East and South Africa. In 1943 he was a Lieutenant Commander. He led ‘Operation Tabarin’ in 1944-1946. It was a British Antarctic Expedition ‘secretly’ set up to establish permanently occupied bases in the Falkland Island Dependencies. During 1944 the wintering team led by Marr was at Port Lockroy on the Antarctic Peninsula.
    James Marr returned to the Discovery Investigations after the War and in 1949 was appointed principal Scientific Officer at the National Institute of Oceanography at Godalming, Surrey. The James Marr collection can be found at the Scott Polar Research Institute at the University of Cambridge.

    Sally E Douglas

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-25
    User data
  48. Dr William Wilson Ingram - BANZARE, ANTARCTICA
    List
    Public

    Dr William Wilson Ingram (1888-1982). He was known as Bill on BANZARE. He was born at Craigellachie, West Banffshire, Scotland. He became a Soldier-Doctor, Physician and Antarctic Explorer.
    Dr William Wilson Ingram was the ship’s Doctor on the BANZARE Expedition to the Antarctic in 1929-1931 under the Leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson.
    On BANZARE as well as being the ship’s doctor, he assisted with Biological research and importantly was the ship’s Dentist. Dental attention was required by some of the crew and Ingram got out his Dental equipment, read the instructions and was ready to go.
    In 1912 he graduated in Medicine at the University of Aberdeen and worked at the Royal Aberdeen Hospital for sick children.
    In 1913 he worked for 18 months at the Lister Institute in London.
    In 1914 he was awarded the Military Cross for ‘gallant and distinguished services in the field’.
    In 1915 during WWI he was wounded in action and invalided to London. After his recovery he worked at the Mount Vernon Hospital in London, then in a Military Hospital. In September 1915 Ingram was promoted to Captain and in 1916 he returned to France. He became the Regimental Officer for the Dragoon Guards before being posted as Officer Commanding Pathology Services at the Headquarters of the British Expeditionary Force.
    In 1919 he returned to Aberdeen and was appointed Lecturer in Anatomy and he was awarded his Doctorate of Medicine with Honours in 1919.
    By 1920 Dr Ingram had established a Medical Practice in Killara, New South Wales.
    In 1923 Dr Ingram established the Institute of Pathological Research in Sydney. He was also a foundation fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.
    In 1928 Ingram established one of the first diabetic clinics in Australia. It was established in Sydney where he lived.
    In 1931 Dr Ingram founded the Kolling Institute of Medical Research (the Institute of Pathological Research which was extended and renamed) at the Royal North Shore Hospital in Sydney where for two generations he was a leader in both under-graduate and postgraduate education.
    In WW II Dr Ingram enlisted in the Australian Medical Corps. He was appointed as a substantive Lieutenant Colonel in September, 1942. He was in Darwin at the time of the Japanese bombing in 1942.
    Dr William Wilson Ingram undertook postgraduate research in Anatomy, Pathology, Biochemistry and Physiology. He also had a practical interest in natural history.
    Dr Ingram was also a Consultant Physician in specialist practice in Macquarie Street, Sydney, and was there till a 'good age'.

    Sally Douglas

    7 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-04-27
    User data
  49. Dr XAVIER MERTZ
    List
    Public

    Dr Xavier Mertz (1882 – 1913) was from Basel, Switzerland. He was a skilled and experienced Skier and Mountaineer. In 1906 Mertz was third in the Swiss cross country skiing championships and he came second in the German championships. While in 1908 he won the Swiss ski jumping championship. Moreover as a Mountaineer, Mertz had climbed the Swiss Alps, including Mount Blanc the most challenging and highest peak of all.

    Mertz was also academically well qualified as he had obtained a Degree in Patent Law at the University of Bern and a Degree in Science from the University of Lausanne, specializing in glacier and mountain formations. So as a Glaciologist he had ideal skills for Antarctic research and exploration.

    In 1911 Dr Xavier Mertz was initially chosen by Dr Douglas Mawson as a Geologist for the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) of 1911-1914. However, on arriving at Commonwealth Bay Mertz became a Dog handler along with Lieutenant Belgrave Ninnis. Part of the reason for the change of roles was that he and Ninnis had developed a strong friendship on the boat journey to the Antarctic. Forty nine Greenland or Husky dogs were taken to the Antarctic for this expedition, with the main party setting up the hut (Mawsons Huts) at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. The site was in the region of King George V Land and Adelie Land which was a French Antarctic Territory. From the main base party at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay – Dr Douglas Mawson formed a Far Eastern sledging party of three – Dr Xavier Mertz, Lieutenant Belgrave Ninnis and himself. Their intention was to explore the unexplored coastal regions of Cape Adare, 500 miles away towards Victoria Land.

    This small party of three left the hut (Mawsons Huts) at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay on 10th November, 1912 to explore, survey and chart King George V Land. After about a month of what was regarded as excellent progress tragedy struck, for Ninnis suddenly fell through a gap in a snow covered crevasse (now known as the Ninnis Glacier) on 14th December, 1912. Mertz and Mawson were ahead of Ninnis and had passed over this crevasse with their weight dispersed. Mertz was on skis and Mawson was on a sledge but Ninnis was jogging behind the second sledge and it is thought that he must have breached the top of the crevasse with his weight. When Mawson and Mertz looked back Ninnis was nowhere to be seen. They could not believe it. Mertz and Mawson called for some hours near the top of the crevasse but Ninnis was never heard from or seen again. Also meeting with that same fate were six of the husky dogs, most of the party’s rations, their tent and other essential supplies. A husky dog could be seen on a snow ledge far below and there was moaning and near it was another dog and scattered gear.

    Mawson and Mertz having no sleeping protection were forced by circumstances to sledge back for about twenty seven continuous hours to locate a spare tent which they abandoned thinking that they had no further need of it. After they had retrieved it they used part of a sledge and a theodolite stand or skis to hold it up. Antarctic explorers had to be good at improvising. They had one week’s provisions – biscuits, raisins, pemmican and cocoa for two men - and no dog food but plenty of fuel and a primus stove.

    Ultimately they were forced to eat their remaining huskies for food and this husky meat and bones was mixed with pemmican. Mawson and Mertz became extremely ill trying to survive on the meagre rations, pemmican and husky meat. In Mertz’s case he only had wet clothes as his waterproof overpants were lost on Ninnis’ sledge, so hyperthermia would have been setting in. Also it is though that Mertz must have been mortified and depressed by the loss of his friend Ninnis. He became weak, delirious and was very agitated and in poor physical condition with skin even coming off his legs. Mertz finally succumbed and died on 8 January 1913. His death was later thought to be due to Vitamin A poisoning from eating husky livers. Mawson buried Mertz in his sleeping bag under the snow, with papers and other records. The Mertz Glacier is named for Dr Xavier Mertz.

    Dr Douglas Mawson was obviously made of strong substance both mentally and physically. Somehow he staggered back into the hut at Cape Denison a month later after a lonely and reflective journey of about 80 miles. On the return journey on his own Mawson fell into a crevasse and somehow managed to pull himself back with his harness rope attached to his sledge. Once again his journey was delayed on the way back. For he had found and sheltered in Aladdin’s Cave, a food depot set up about five and a half miles from the main base but he was trapped there for a week as a blizzard raged outside.

    It has been said that Mawson was physically ideal for Antarctic exploration for he was extremely fit and robust, did not feel the cold like others and had a very strong intellect and mind. Nevertheless, Mawson had his physical challenges on this lonely journey in that he had to tie up the soles of his feet as they were pulling away from the flesh. Moreover, he was unrecognizable by those members of the expedition who had stayed behind at the hut after the Aurora had left Commonwealth Bay to collect expedition members at the Western base. They wanted to know which member of the party he was.

    At Mawson’s request a Memorial Cross and a Plaque dedicated to Lieutenant Belgrave Ninnis and Dr Xavier Mertz were erected at Azimuth Hill, Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay in November, 1913. The cross was carefully built by Francis Bickerton of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition. Over the years the cross has been blown off its position many times and has had to be replaced and repositioned. The original plaque from the cross can now be located in the Australian Antarctic Division’s Library at Kingston, Tasmania. A replica plaque is on the Memorial Cross at Azimuth Hill. When at sea it stands out on the coastline on the approach to Cape Denison.

    The story of the demise and death of Mertz will always remain controversial.

    Some of this story I heard first hand from my father Eric as told to him by Sir Douglas Mawson. My mother Ella too was conversant with this epic journey.

    Sally Douglas

    15 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-01-23
    User data
  50. EDWIN JAMES DOUGLAS - and Douglas artists and photographers
    List
    Public

    'Jersey Beauties' by Edwin James Douglas 1848 Edinburgh is signed E D entwined with the Douglas heart which was his distinctive signature. It is a horizontal and richly coloured oil painting on canvas, of some feet in height and width, surrounded by a gold frame. The painting is a landscape likely of the Jersey Islands and shows a young lady on the right leading a goat across a shallow stream and at the same time driving three jersey cows and a small calf across the same stream. The small calf is leading the way. Tall dark brown/black trees are a backdrop to a large part of the scene, with dark brown/black banks on both sides of the stream. In the top left hand corner the far away horizon shows hints of green grass and a sky of pale colours - blue, pink and yellow.

    This painting which was a gift to the Adelaide Art Gallery/Art Gallery of South Australia in the early 1900's was ultimately sold by them and is now owned privately, but not by anyone associated with or related to the Douglas family.

    I am not an art critic but just an art lover and in my opinion this painting is worthy of hanging in any art gallery in the world.

    Edwin James Douglas born 14th July 1848 in Edinburgh, Midlothian was the son of James Douglas born 24th July 1810 Kilmarnock, Ayrshire and Margaret McIlwraith c1804 Ballantree, Ayrshire. James Douglas was an Artist, Picture Restorer and Picture Liner following two generations of Clock and Watch makers - John Douglas 1759 a Master and Gabriel Douglas 1784 who was also an Innkeeper and Vintner. Gabriel was father to at least twelve children and James was number four.

    Besides Edwin James Douglas, James and Margaret Douglas had five daughters - Leonora, Georgina, Julia, Cecilia and Caroline.

    Edwin James Douglas married Christiana Maria (Feake) Martin born 25 December 1847 at Halstead, Essex on 23rd April, 1874 at Little Laver Church, Ongar, Essex (married as Edwin Douglas and Christian Maria F Martin) - they had nine children - Clare Henry, William Bruce, Guendolen Blanche, Charles Preston, Violet Constance, James Sholto, Marguerite (Margot) Laura, Edwin Roland and Cedric Christian.

    Edwin James Douglas and his father James Douglas both exhibited their art at the Royal Scottish Academy.

    Advice from the Royal Scottish Academy in 2006 -
    Dr Joanna Soden the Assistant Keeper/Librarian said that James Douglas attended the Royal Scottish Academy Life Class for the sessions 1841-1842, 1842-1843 and 1843-1844 and Edwin James attended for sessions 1866-67 and 1867-68.
    They exhibited at the RSA and/or the Royal Glasgow Institute of Fine Arts - Annual Exhibitions.
    Three relevant references suggested were -
    1. The Dictionary of Scottish Art & Architecture - P McEwan - Glengarden Press 2004
    2. The Royal Scottish Academy Exhibitors 1826-1990 - Hilmarton Manor Press 1991
    3. The Royal Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts 1861-1898 - The Woodend Press 1990

    "In 1831 a number of natives of Kilmarnock (and others) formed themseves into a society, under the name of the 'Kilmarnock Drawing Academy...They rented an apartment at Cheapside Street, where they exhibited their pieces..." they also studied art and the venture only lasted two or three years. "...The more prominent of the members, who were twelve in number were Messrs, William Macready, James Douglas, Thomas Barclay, and John K Hunter...Mr James Douglas resides, we believe, in Edinburgh, and follows the art of portrait-painting. In imitating the old masters, and retouching and repairing ancient pictures, he is said to be very successful..." (The history of Kilmarnock - Chapter 24 - by Archibald M'Kay - 1858).

    The (Kilmarnock) Academy had in its membership one riddlemaker, two house painters, one cobbler, one tailor, one confectioner, one cabinetmaker, one mason, one pattern designer, one currier, and two young artists, Douglas and Morris. The Academy was to be a home for wandered artists, or artists visiting the town were to be recognised as honorary members..." (Scenes from an Artist's Life by John Kelso Hunter 1802 to 1873).

    Art of James Douglas 1810 Kilmarnock -
    * James Douglas painted his grand-father John Douglas 1759 Jedburgh, Roxburghshire Master Watch and Clock maker in about 1826 - at the age of about 16 likely either in Kilmarnock his home town or Galston were his grand father John Douglas 1759 now lived ( I have tracked John Douglas as living in Galston by 1803 and he was there sometime after 1794).
    * James Douglas also painted a self portrait around the same time and later on he painted his son Edwin James Douglas. James Douglas apparently painted Lord Melville and the painting hung in Archer's Hall of the Royal Scottish Academy, he also painted several pictures of the Duke of Buccleuch, Earl of Strathmore and Earl of Moray. His equestrian portrait (after Sir Anthony van Dyck) hung in the Great Hall of Daraway Castle. In 2006 the Royal Scottish Academy checked with the current Lord Darnley re the painting that hung in the Great Hall but no positive outcome - I was told that at some stage there had been a fire in the Great Hall and the inference was that it may have been destroyed?
    * In 1830 James Douglas painted a coloured 'Self Portrait' where he is sitting, wearing a jaunty hat and watching an archeological dig.
    * James Douglas Painter - exhibited 1837 to 1843. Edinburgh Painter. Lived at a couple of addresses at Hill Square and exhibited a number of Portraits and Subject Paintings at the RSA.
    * James Douglas Painter - 1837 to 1843 - 9 Hill Square. Painted - 1837 "Crazy Jane", 1838 "Innocence", 1839 "The Young Coquet", 1840 "Portrait of a Gentleman" and "Portrait of a Lady", 1841 "The Parting Gift', 1842 "The Confidants" and 1843 "The Fisherman's Daughter"

    Some of the Art of Edwin James Douglas 1848 -
    * From the Royal Collection in 2006 "...According to our computer database the Royal Collection holds an oil painting by Edwin James Douglas of the racehorse 'Persimmon', dated 1897 (RCIN 406475). According to our records this painting was presented to the Prince of Wales by Sir James Blyth (late 1st Baron Blyth), summer 1897..." This painting can be viewed online in the Royal Collection.
    * 'Alderneys' Mother and Daughter (Jersey Islands) created 1875 - black and white, oil on canvas is at the Tate Britain in London. This painting can be viewed online at the Tate Gallery.
    * From the Easy Art site http://www.easyart.com/art-prints/artists/Edwin-Douglas-1328.html - "Edwin Douglas was born in 1848 and flourished between 1869 and 1892. Born in Edinburgh, he was the son of James Douglas, a noted portrait painter, and exhibited his first work at the Royal Scottish Academy at the age of only 17. Edwin Douglas' paintings were mainly of a sporting nature and he attracted many notable patrons, including Sir Charles Tennant and Queen Victoria. Edwin painted a [small autographed] picture of setters for Queen Victoria to be given by her as a birthday present to King Edward VII". It hung in Marlborough House in 1877 - it is no longer in the Royal Collection - Valerie Martin of the Findon Village site.
    * Edwin James Douglas exhibited around 40 paintings at the Royal Academy from 1869 to 1900 and he also exhibited at the Manchester City Art Gallery, the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool, the Tate in London and at the Worthing Art Gallery.

    More on the art of Edwin James Douglas 1848 -
    * Painted sporting animal and genre subjects somewhat in the style of Landseer whom he imitated...Works at the RSA included "The Deer Path - 1866"... In 1875 he illustrated the "Poems and Songs of Robert Burns". One of his best known works was a Portrait of the Triple Crown winner in 1896 "Persimmon" drawn in a stable interior and exhibited RSA 1869-1900.
    * Edwin James Douglas 1848 to 1914 - Painter and Engraver -1865 to 1872 - 24 Grange Loan, Edinburgh - Exhibited 1865 to 1872 inclusive. 1874 Dorking, Surrey and 1878 Lawbrook House, Guildford, Surrey.
    * Edwin James Douglas 1869 - 1872 - 24 Grange Loan, Edinburgh. 1873 Westcott Hill House, Dorking Surrey and 1877 to 1882 - Lawbrook House, near Shere, Guildford, Surrey.

    Some of my 2008 research on Edwin James Douglas -
    Main Categories found on his art (my category headings) -
    * Highland and Jersey Cattle, Dogs, Horses and Sheep (Edwin James Douglas had studied anatomy). His best work is perhaps of 'Persimmon' the race horse, Highland and Jersey cattle and dogs of many types eg - mongrel, puppies, Cairn Terrier, Fox Terrier, Pugs, Greyhound, Setters - Gordon and English and Collies.
    * Edwin James Douglas family portraits of Christiana Maria (Martin) Douglas and Margot (Marguerete Laura) Douglas
    * 4 different images, Coaching Postcards
    * 3 different images, Horse and Jinker
    * 3 different images, Hunting with hounds
    * Lone rose
    * Tranquil roses in a vase
    * Sailing ship
    * Baroque
    * Other categories (my category headings) -
    * ~ Nature sets - Tropical, Tahitian Sunset, Autumn Elegance, Alioa Fields
    * ~ Specifically Botanical sets - Rojo Botanical, Graceful State, Mystic Opus, Centimento, Equatorial, Bonaire
    * ~ Somewhat abstract - Palimpsest, Always Special, Geo Mosaic
    * ~ Ancient/Old World - Eden, Epoch, Etruscan, Old World, Tuscadero, Timeless Equino
    * ~ Oriental - Garden Haiku (perhaps Japanese), Japanese Feelings, InnerChi (perhaps Chinese)
    * 4 paintings/drawings by Geundolen Douglas
    * 1 drawing by Christiana Maria (Martin) Douglas
    * Reference to art by Margot Douglas - Marguerite Lora Douglas a Painter in France (likely daughter of Edwin James Douglas 1848)
    * Reference to art by Georgina Douglas Painter, Helensburgh, 1885 (likely sister of Edwin James Douglas 1848 Edinburgh)

    Personal details on Edwin James Douglas and Christiana (Feake) Martin and their lives can be found online at Valerie Martin's site of Findon Village - http://www.findonvillage.com/inded.htm

    The Worthing Museum and Art Gallery in Sussex has infomation on, and some on the art of Edwin James Douglas, including 'My Queen' which is of his wife Christiana - http://www.worthingmuseum.co.uk/collections/

    Also see - http://www.gis.net/~shepdog/BC_Museum/Permanent/Douglas/Douglas.html

    Also visit - http://www.edinphoto.org.uk/PP_D/pp_douglas_artists_family_tree.htm where I have sent some information on Artists, Photographers and Clockmakers in the Douglas family.

    Visit as well - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/edwindouglas.htm#.UOpCDqz4WSo where I have submitted some discoveries on Edwin James Douglas and some of the other Douglas Artists.

    From British newspapers of the day - some of the paintings produced and exhibited by Edwin James Douglas –
    • January 1866 Edwin obtained a prize for ‘Time Exercises’ in Drawing
    • May 1876 'Hailing the Ferry' sold for 262 pounds and 10 shillings
    • December 1882 a painting of a fat and dyspeptic pug called ‘Throw Physic to the Dogs’
    • May 1884 Paintings exhibited at the Royal Academy
    • June 1886 Edwin sold ‘Evening at South Downs’ for 400 pounds
    • May and November, 1889 an oil painting of a fox terrier
    • May 1889 ‘The Three Disgraces’ – three puppies scrambling on a hunting coat
    • February 1890 ‘The Firstlings of the Year’ was on display at the Atkinson Art Gallery in Southport
    • July 1890 ‘Grey Hack and Grey Hound’
    • February 1892 displayed a sheep picture called ‘Tally Ho’
    • September 1892 ‘Prize Jerseys’ was on display at the Birmingham City Council, either in the Great End Gallery or the Wedgwood Gallery
    • September 1892 – Edwin produced an Academy (England) picture of horses and foals, entitled ‘Young England’

    James Douglas 1810 died at 16 Amberley Grove, Croydon, Surrey on 17th March 1888 and Edwin James Douglas died on 22nd October 1914 at Thakenham, Essex.

    From the sites indicated it can be seen that there are a number of other Artists in this Douglas family and also there were a number of Photographers including Portrait, Landscape and Carte de Visite.

    Moreover there are many art sales sites on the web which are involved with selling Edwin James Douglas original art, to sites selling engravings, prints and posters.

    (From family history and other research including Trove).

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    Bachelor of Commerce and Diploma of Public Policy (Hons - Arts) - the University of Melbourne; Deakin University Hons Art Subjects under the History of Ideas.

    30 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-01-07
    User data
  51. ELIZABETH (BURRELL/BIRREL) SHIELS/SHIELDS
    List
    Public

    Elizabeth (baptised Elisabeth) Shiels (Shields) was the wife of William Shiels born 1815 in Markinch, Fife, Scotland - Proprietor and Licensee of the James Watt Hotel in Spencer Street, Melbourne - and after William's death Elizabeth became the Proprietor and Licensee. Elizabeth's nephew was Henry Burrell of the Argus newspaper and her niece was Agnes (nee Greig) Franks of Eureka fame. Henry Burrell was the son of Elizabeth's brother James Archibald Burrell 1826 Kirkcaldy, Fife; and Agnes was the daughter of her sister Margaret (nee Burrell/Birrel) Greig 1816 Linktown, Abbotshall, Fife. Margaret's husband John Greig 1815 Abbotshall, Fife - had a tent city on the goldfields at Ballarat and before that prospected for gold. John Greig and his daughter Agnes Greig were present at the time of the Eureka Stockade or Rebellion. Elizabeth's husband William Shiels had sucess in finding gold at Mt Alexander near Castlemaine likely fairly soon after the arrival of the family in Sydney in 1849 - as steerage class passengers on the barque rigged sailing ship "Agenoria" (670 tons in the old measurement and 724 tons using the new measurement) which had been built in 1846 in Saint John, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Canada and was 'sheathed in yellow metal' in 1848. A painting of this ship is to be found in an art gallery in Nova Scotia.

    The Barque Agenoria which transported WIlliam and Elizabeth (Burrell) Shiels and their family to Sydney in 1849 - http://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=34647

    (Trove and Family history research)

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    Bachelor of Commerce and Diploma of Public Policy (Hons - Arts) - the University of Melbourne; Deakin University Hons Art Subjects under the History of Ideas.

    B Comm - Five Hons in Final Examination Results - First class Honours in Labour Economics exam and this meant equal second place in the exam/unit (Approx 200 students in this 3rd year subject). Also in the top few students in Economic History (Australian) in the exam/subject - 2A Honours in the exam.

    32 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-07-25
    User data
  52. EMPIRE AIR TRAINING SCHEME - RAAF Point Cook - May 1940
    List
    Public

    The first flying training school established in Australia unit under the Empire Air Training Scheme known as EATS was at Point Cook - No1 SFTS. At the end of May, 1940 the then Squadron Leader Eric Douglas was appointed as the Engineer Officer. (In June, 1940 Eric Douglas was promoted to the rank of Wing Commander.) All the appointments at Point Cook were made by the Minister for Air, Mr Fairbairn.

    From the Australian War Memorial site - The Empire Training Scheme was set up at the beginning of WW II in response to the RAF not having a guaranteed supply of Air Crews. So the British Government proposed to it's Dominions that they jointly establish 'a pool' of trained Air Crews. From Australia's point of view the proposal was accepted in essence by the War Cabinet and after negotiation an agreement was signed on 17th December, 1939 which was to last for three years. Australia undertook to provide 28,000 (individuals for) Air Crews in the three years.

    The basic flying course commenced on 28th April, 1940, when training began in all participating countries.
    The following flying skills were to be taught -
    • Initial Training
    • Elementary Flying Training
    • Service Flying Training
    • Air Navigation
    • Air Observer
    • Bombing and Gunnery
    • Wireless Air Gunnery (AWM).

    Empire Air Training Scheme, Training of Aircrews - Initial subjects are to be about Air Force life. While amongst the technical subjects taught are - Mathematics, Navigation, Electrical Science, Signalling, Law and Administration, Anti-gas and Armament, a Brief outline of the Air Force Medical Service including Hygiene and Sanitation, Instruction in the Link Trainer to familiarise them with the controls of an aircraft. Then further training for those suitable to become - Pilots, Air Observers and Wireless Air Gunners. (September, 1940).

    The planes proposed for the Empire Air Training Scheme were to be - Avro Ansons and Fairey Battles from Great Britain; Wirraways, a prototype light reconnaissance bomber (to be built by CAC) and Wackett trainers made in Australia; and a share in machines to be produced in the United States. (September, 1940)

    Acquisition of new types of Aircraft for the Empire Air Training Scheme were to be - Airspeed Oxfords and a small fleet of Douglas DC-2 (14 passenger) planes, to be fitted as 'flying classrooms'. (January, 1941). * Note DC2's and not DC42's - ADF Serials.

    From mid 1937 to about mid 1942 Eric Douglas was in charge of the No 7 Service Flight Training School at Deniliquin.

    By December, 1940 Eric Douglas was also in charge of the No 1 Aircraft Training Depot at RAAF Laverton

    S E Douglas - 2nd November, 2015

    39 items
    created by: public:beetle 2015-11-01
    User data
  53. Eric Douglas - Aviator, Aeronaut, Yachtsman and Skier - both Snow and Water.
    List
    Public

    Gilbert Eric Douglas (known as Eric) (1902-1970) was born at Parkville, Victoria.

    This is where it all started. As a young child he saved his pocket money to go for ‘a flip’ with pioneer aviator Harry Hawker. The seeds were sown for of a life flying. He talked about the flip many times. In the meantime he would hang out of a tram window with his arms outstretched on school journeys.

    From 1916 to 1919 he belonged to the Senior Cadets. At the same time he was studying Mechanical Engineering at Swinburne Senior Technical College. In November, 1920 Eric Douglas joined the Australian Air Corps as an Air Mechanic and a little later he was also an Aero Fitter and Aero Rigger. He commenced work at the Central Flying School, Laverton on 12th December, 1920. (In a couple of hand written documents by Eric he says that he was in the Australian Flying Corps for five months before joining that RAAF but I have been told that it was the Australian Air Corps).

    In 1921 when the RAAF was formed Douglas transferred to the Service as an Aero Fitter ACI. His initial intention was to sign on for six years. At the same time he was doing a Motor Mechanics course by correspondence. In February, 1922 he commenced work in the Machine Shop at Point Cook and part of his aero work was on seaplanes. In September, 1922 he was transferred to the No I Flight (Flying) Training School at Point Cook to work on ‘B Flight Aeros’.

    From 1920 until he learnt to fly in 1927 he gained valuable experience as ‘crew’ on RAAF Cross Country flights.

    Interestingly in June, 1925 the seaplane Savoia-Marchetti S 16 ‘Gennariello’ was serviced at Point Cook and it appears that it was a full engine replacement. Eric Douglas was one of the RAAF servicemen who worked on this plane, under the leadership of the then Squadron Leader Lawrence Wackett, who became known as the father of Australian Aviation. The ‘Gennariello’ flew from Rome to Melbourne, with a successful return to Rome. Eric Douglas was at the official welcome to the Italian flyers at St Kilda Pier.

    In 1927 Douglas had graduated as a Pilot from the Central Flying School at Point Cook as a Sergeant Pilot, coming first in flying and third in theory in the ‘A’ Pilots Course. By 1928 he was a RAAF ‘AI’ Flying Instructor and had also attained AI in Gunnery. In 1928 Douglas also completed a course in parachute folding and maintenance. Then in April, 1929 he completed a special Air Pilotage course which was aerial navigation by the visible identification of landmarks.

    Eric Douglas also had a Civil Pilot’s licence and was a flying member of the Victorian Aero Club in his early flying days. He was also a flying examiner and safety pilot for the Aero Club.

    During May, 1929 Douglas took part in the RAAF search for Flight Lieutenant Keith Anderson and Mr Henry Smith (Bobbie) Hitchcock his mechanic who were lost in the Wave Hill and Tanami desert area of the Northern Territory in Anderson’s Westland Widgeon ‘Kookaburra’. Douglas left Laverton flying a training aircraft, a DH9A with the serial Number of A1-20.The RAAF search culminated in a wilderness search in the Tanami desert in a 1927 Buick tourer, on foot and by horseback; with two RAAF personnel (one being Eric Douglas), the Manager of Vestys who was based at Wave Hill Station and three trackers (station hands from Wave Hill Station) and 26 thirsty horses.

    In the period 1929 to 1931 Douglas was one of the two RAAF pilots chosen for the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition, under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson. For the purposes of this expedition the two RAAF pilots were transferred to the ‘Seaplane division’ of the RAAF. The aeroplane flown on the two Voyages which made up the expedition was de Havilland Gipsy Moth VH-ULD rigged as a seaplane with floats. Skis were also taken for the plane and they were stored in the floats. The pilots assembled and disassembled the Moth on the ship Discovery more than once. Douglas was also responsible for the maintenance and running of the Discovery’s motor boat on BANZARE.

    From November 1935 to February 1936 Douglas led the RAAF party of seven on the Discovery II searching for Lincoln Ellsworth and his pilot Herbert Hollick-Kenyon who were flying in Ellsworth’s plane the Polar Star from Dundee Island to the Ross Ice Barrier. The search by the Discovery II and the RAAF search party took place in the region of ‘Little America’, Bay of Whales, Ross Sea, Antarctica. The search was known as the ‘Ellsworth Relief Expedition’. In December, 1935 two RAAF aeroplanes rigged as seaplanes were loaded onto the Discovery II when it diverted to Williamstown, a de Havilland Gipsy Moth A7-55 and a Westland Wapiti A5-37. They were for the RAAF party.

    Sailing was introduced to the RAAF Air cadets at Point Cook as a recreation by Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas. It was called the Point Cook Class and Douglas was in charge. This class raced in regattas in Port Phillip Bay in the late 1930’s.

    During the period 1928 to 1937 Douglas became an AI Flying Instructor and an Aerobatic Pilot. He was often in RAAF air shows doing demonstrations and aerial stunts and taking part in aerial formation fly pasts and in flying escorts for pilots such as Amy Johnson, Bert Hinkler and Charles Kingsford Smith.

    From 1934 to 1938 he was a lecturer to RAAF flying cadet courses.

    From 12th April, 1936 to 12th June, 1936 Eric Douglas was at RAAF Headquarters.

    By 14th June 1937 Douglas was the Officer in Charge of the Aircraft Repair Section (ARS) of Number I Aircraft Depot, Laverton. He was also a Test pilot.

    From about 1937 to 1941 he was in Charge of the No 7 Flight Training School at Deniliquin.

    In 1938 Eric was the Staff Recruiting officer for the RAAF

    During 1938 to 1940 Douglas was the Officer in Charge of Workshops at Point Cook. He was also a Test pilot testing aeroplanes for the Workshop, Depot and Trade. In 1939 he successfully undertook a ‘Conversion Course’.

    From 1940-1942 he was the Commanding Officer of No1 Aircraft Depot, Laverton.

    Eric Douglas was posted to No 3 Aircraft Depot, Amberley in June, 1942 as an acting Group Captain and Commanding Officer [RAAF Amberley being known then as 3AD (Aircraft Depot)]. In October, 1943 when 3AD became Station Headquarters Eric Douglas became the Station Commander and he was made a Group Captain (later confirmed as from 1st December, 1943, with seniority). Group Captain Eric Douglas remained as Commanding Officer until the end of June, 1948. At Amberley Douglas also personally supervised the ‘Test and Ferry section’ of RAAF Amberley from 1942 to 1948. In about 1944 to 1946 Douglas invented and had patented the ‘Airwash Spray Mask’ (for breathing protection).

    In 1949 Eric Douglas was with the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Australian Navy in the Directorate of Aircraft Maintenance and Repair, known as DAMR. His role was as an Aircraft Engineer. He was a member Royal Aeronautical Society and Division Head (Civilian) at DAMR, Navy Office, Melbourne from 1949 to 1964. He had initially joined the Civilian Technical Staff of DAMR, Navy Office in 1949 as ‘a Technical officer on Airframes’.

    Eric Douglas was a keen and skilled yachtsman, joining the Royal Brighton Yacht Club in 1920 and the Port Phillip Yacht Club in 1922. He sailed in hundreds of Club races and Regattas from 1921 until 1936 and had many successes in winning yacht racing cups and trophies. His most favoured yacht was ‘the Vendetta’ B18 which he owned with a brother. It was registered as being with the Royal Brighton Yacht Club. He was also a hobby builder of boats and of models - planes, gliders and boats and of kites.

    Besides, he was also an early motor bike and motor car enthusiast. Being acrobatic it was no trouble for him in his youth to do a handstand on the handle bars while riding one of his eight motor bikes. He picked up this enthusiasm from an interest in Houdini. While to take an engine apart and reassemble it was for him a pure joy. There was nothing like being covered in grease. He was a downhill and cross country skier in the Victorian Alps from about 1921 to 1935 and belonged to the Ski Club of Victoria in its early days. Some of the cross country skiing by Eric was as RAAF recreation and sport.

    He did other things such as swimming, water skiing (aqua planing), ocean surfing, fishing, morse code and semaphore, knew all the boating knots and many of the star formations and he could read the weather by what the winds were doing and by how cloud formations were behaving in the sky. He was a risk taker but always did his 'homework' and had a mind on safety and unexpected outcomes. Besides, no practical task or technical solution was outside his range of ability and expertise.

    I have an Official RAAF letter telling Eric when he wanted to transfer to RAAF Administration that he would have retire at the age of 45. This happened and he was discharged from the RAAF because of 'high blood pressure'. The RAAF Doctor at the time was Dr Catchlove. Eric lived for another 22 years.

    Note: On Eric's wedding day on 6th January, 1934 his Best Man was Flying Officer Alister Murdoch and his Groomsman was Flight Lieut Wight - Wig immediately sprang to mind. So 'Wig' Wight.

    Sally Douglas

    69 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-01-22
    User data
  54. ERIC DOUGLAS - TECHNICAL LIST
    List
    Public

    This technical list is from the Australian Encyclopedia of Science which commenced as Bright Sparks in 1985 from bright idea by Professor Rod Home of the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Melbourne. Soon after it came onto the web as a site I quickly got in touch with them, as they had a only few facts listed about my father. I felt that I needed to supply them for a bit more of a summary on my father's RAAF career. But I have yet to supply them for information on his working time post RAAF, with the Fleet Air Arm in Australia (RAN). I also supplied the copies of the documents with the State Library of Victoria. The Sources given in the Encyclopedia site do not include the fact that I supplied this summary technical list from a technical list written up by my father. He had made a few of these lists both hand-written and typed by him, but with slight variations to this one as it depended who his target 'audience' was. I chose this one as it was as good as any of the other Technical Lists by him.

    1920
    Education - Mechanical Engineering studies completed
    1920 - March 1921
    Career position - Air Mechanic in the Australian (Army) Flying Corps
    March 1921 - 1927
    Career position - Aero Fitter in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF)
    1927 - June 1928
    Career position - Sergeant Pilot in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF)
    June 1928 - July 1929
    Career position - Flying Instructor in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF)
    1929 - 1930
    Career position - Pilot of a Gipsy Moth seaplane in the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE), under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson
    1930 - 1931
    Career position - Pilot of a Gipsy Moth seaplane in the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE), under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson
    1934 - 1938
    Career position - Lecturer on aero engines to flying cadet courses in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF)
    1935 - 1936
    Career position - Officer-in-charge of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) search for Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon in the region of the Bay of Whales in the Ross Sea, Antarctica
    1935 - 1940
    Career position - Officer-in-charge of Point Cooke workshops and Test Pilot for the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF)
    1937
    Career position - Transferred to the Technical Branch of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF)
    1937
    Career position - Officer-in-charge of the Aircraft Repair Squadron at No.1 Aircraft Depot in Laverton, Victoria and Test Pilot for the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF)
    1940 - 1942
    Career position - Commanding Officer of the No.1 Aircraft Depot, Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) in Laverton, Victoria
    1942 - 1948
    Career position - Commanding Officer of the No.3 Aircraft Depot, Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) in Amberley, Queensland
    1946 - 1948
    Career position - Station Commander with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) in Amberley, Queensland
    1 July 1948
    Career position - Retired from the Royal Australian Air Force with the rank of Group Captain (rank granted 1943)."

    This is the entry on Eric Douglas in the Encyclopedia - http://www.eoas.info/biogs/P001563b.htm

    The only aspect which I have been questioned by RAAF authorities (but not within the RAAF or Defence) or scholars is the fact that my father wrote that he was in the AFC - Australian Flying Corps before he joined the RAAF and their insistence is that he was not with the AFC but with the AAC - Australian Air Corps and that Eric must have forgotten or made a mistake.

    Gilbert Eric Douglas (his full name) joined what he called the AFC on 20 November, 1920. He was the youngest member on that date - he was to turn 18 on 6th December, 1920 having been born in 1902. On his photograph of that historic event for him, he wrote on the back of the print that it was the Australian Flying Corps. So if he made a mistake it was in 1920!

    The 1920 year was a time after WW1 when the Air or Aeroplane part of Australia's Army or Defence was transitioning to become a separate Defence Service breaking away from the Army. For a period of time it morphed from the Australian Flying Corps AFC to become the Australian Air Corps AAC to a fully fledged Royal Australian Air Force in March, 1921.

    Up to his early 20's, it could have been when he had to produce a Birth Certificate probably for the RAAF he fully obviously believed that his name was Eric Leslie Douglas. Hence his use of Eric as his name as up till then he believed it was Eric. Apparently his parents did not question it. It was only on obtaining his certificate did he find that there was a mix up somewhere. His younger brother who was meant to be Gilbert found out that he was called Leslie Gilbert. He had been used to being called Gill and stayed as such. To complicate matters even more their father was christened Gabriel but he had apparently changed his name to Gilbert, by deed poll.

    I have found signatures where Eric was practising Eric Leslie Douglas and ELD. Some of that use even turns up in newspapers at Trove in 1929, in that he is referred to Eric Leslie Douglas. The point I am making is that Eric's first presence in the Air service or with Aeroplanes as a career in pre-RAAF days would not have been recorded under his correct name. It may not affect anything but it is worth saying. A further point is that before 20 November, 1920, Eric was a member of the Air Cadets.

    RAAF ranks held by Eric - AC1 in 1921 on formation of the RAAF; LAC in 1922; Corporal in 1925 (passed all subjects); Sergeant in 1926; Sergeant Pilot in 1927; Pilot Officer in July 1929; Flying Officer in February, 1930; Flight Lieutenant in July 1934; Squadron Leader in March 1939; Wing Commander in June, 1940; posted to Amberley June 1942 - No 3 Aircraft Depot and in Oct 1947 was the Station Commander on formation of Station Headquarters, acting Group Captain in 1942 and temporary Group Captain in December 1943. Honorary Group Captain in 1956 and in 1958 this was amended 'Temporary Group Captain G. E. Douglas (39) is granted the rank of Group Captain, 1st July, 1948, with seniority as from 1st December, 1943.' [Page 2556, column 2 of the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, No.43. of 07-Aug-1958]. In his RAAF career Eric was also assigned the number 126. In early 1921 he had been given the number FG252928.

    So Eric Douglas had three service identification numbers - FG252928 possibly pre-RAAF and also RAAF 39 and later RAAF 126. I wonder why he had two RAAF numbers?

    Sally E Douglas

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-01-27
    User data
  55. Eric Douglas Collection - Antarctic books etc donated to the Australian Antarctic Division
    List
    Public

    Antarctic books and one book on the Arctic donated to the Australian Antarctic Division Library in August, 2008. The list of books donated by me -

    Antarctic
    The Home of the Blizzard Sir Douglas Mawson Paperback - Rigby/Seal Books as Seal 1969. Printed Name GE Douglas - by SE Douglas
    The Home of the Blizzard Sir Douglas Mawson Hodder & Stoughton, London September, 1930. Signed by Eric Douglas - 1930 (book is spotted)
    Such is the Antarctic Lars Christensen Hodder & Stoughton, London 1935. Interesting that Lars was accompanied by his wife
    Edward Wilson George Seaver John Murray, London 1950 Reprint
    High Latitude J K Davis MUP 1962. Cost $1
    South with Mawson Charles F Laseron Angus & Robertson Second Ed 1957. Signed by Eric Douglas - 1960
    Five to Remember Ed John Thompson Lansdowne 1964. Eric's comments were also taped by John Thompson
    South Latitude F D Ommanney Readers Union/Longmans, Green & Co, London 1940
    South Latitude F D Ommanney Longmans 1938. Signed by Eric Douglas - 1938. I have kept a later version for myself
    Skyward Commander Richard E Byrd G P Putnam's Sons 1928. Signed by Eric Douglas
    South Sir Ernest Shackleton William Heinemann 1927 Reprint. Signed by Eric Douglas -1931- cost 17 shillings-bought with prize winnings from Eric's yacht Vendatta - Royal Brighton Yacht Club (book is spotted)
    South with Scott Admiral Sir Edward Evans Collins 1950? Originally belonged to Peter Winchester, Malaya
    The Winning of Australian Antarctica Based on Mawson Papers - A Grenfell Price Hardback - Angus & Robertson 1962. Signed by Eric - 1962. I have kept a copy for myself
    A History of Polar Exploration L P Kirwan Paperback - Penguin 1962
    The Crossing of Antarctica V Fuchs & E Hillary Paperback - Penguin 1960

    Arctic
    Arctic Explorations - In search of Sir John Franklin Elisha Kent Kane Hardback - T Nelson & Sons 1885 Page 12 falling out. Originally belonged to someone who lived at Riddells Creek, Victoria
    New Soviet Discoveries in the Arctic Vasily Burkhanov Slim paperback - Foreign Languages, Moscow 1956

    My personal favourite is the Winning of Australian Antarctica by Grenfell Price (It covers BANZARE 1929/1930 and 1930/1931).

    In addition in the Multi-Media section of the Australian Antarctic Division at Kingston, Tasmania, there are about three unclassified files of material relating to BANZARE 1929/1930 and 1930/31, and the Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935/1936 put together by an Australian Antarctic Division Librarian from newspapers and other material sent to him by me over a period of a few years. (These files were initially held in the Australian Antarctic Division Library).

    Sally E Douglas

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-05-29
    User data
  56. Eric Douglas Collection - copies of BANZARE Reports donated to the Australian Antarctic Division
    List
    Public

    BANZ ANTARCTIC RESEARCH EXPEDITION 1929 -1931 - REPORTS (By Sir Douglas Mawson and others).
    Published by the BANZAR Expedition Committee - Adelaide - Hassell Press (unless stated otherwise). Copies of BANZARE Reports donated to the Australian Antarctic Division Library in February, 2006 - by me.

    Series A - Oceanography Volume 3 Part 2 Hydrology D MAWSON & A HOWARD Jan-40
    Series B Volume 2 Birds R A FALLA 20/8/1937
    Series B Volume 4 Part 3 Diptera, ...Insecta, Lepidoptera H WOMERSLEY & N B TINDALE 30/10/1937
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 4 Part 8 Nemerteans of Kerguelen & the Southern Ocean J F G WHEELER 20/12/1940
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 5 Part 4 & 5 Sipunculids & the Mollusca of Macquarie Island A C STEPHEN & J R Le B TOMLIN 30/7/1948
    Series A Volume 2 Part 6 Marine Tertiary Fossils H O FLETCHER Mar-38
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 4 Part 5 Opiliones & Araneae V V HICKMAN 25/2/1939
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 5 Part 2 Scleractinian Corals JOHN W WELLS - Government Printer, Canberra Jul-58
    Series A - Geology Volume 2 Part 3 Petrology of Heard Island & Possession Island G W TYRRELL Nov-37
    Series B Volume 4 Part 2 Cumacea & Nebaliacea H M HALE 30/10/1937
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 8 Part 1 Taxonomy…of Euphausiacea (Crustacea) KEITH SHEARD 30/6/1953
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 12 Turbellaria Dr LIBBIE H HYMAN - Government Printer, Canberra Jul-58
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 5 Part 3 Isopoda - Valvifera HERBERT M HALE 15/7/1946
    Series B Volume 4 Part 1 Collembola, Loricata, Brachiopoda & Coleoptera H WOMERSLEY & B C COTTON 20/8/1937
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 4 Part 7 Endoprocta T HARVEY JOHNSTON & L MADELINE ANGEL 30/9/1940
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 9 Asteroidea A M CLARK - The Griffin Press, Adelaide Aug-62
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 5 Part 2 Parasitic Nematodes T HARVEY JOHNSTON & PATRICIA M MAWSON 24/9/1945
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 1 Part 3 Cephalodiscus T HARVEY JOHNSTON & NANCY G MUIRHEAD 10/8/1951
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 2 Isopoda HERBERT M HALE 24/7/1952
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 5 Part 1 Pycnogonida ISABELLA GORDON 24/11/1944
    Series A Volume 2 Part 5 Tertiary Lavas from …Kerguelen Archipelago A B EDWARDS Feb-38
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 1 Part 4 Tunicata… PATRICIA KOTT & HAROLD THOMPSON 26/4/1954
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 1 Part 2 Fishes J R NORMAN 10/12/1937
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 4 Part 6 Crinoidea D DILWYN JOHN 30/3/1939
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 4 Part 4 Polychaeta C C A MONRO 20/2/1939
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 4 Part 9 Decapod Crustacea HERBERT M HALE 18/7/1941
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 8 Part 6 Parasitic Copepoda of Fishes Z KABATA - The Griffin Press, Adelaide Jun-65
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 7 Part 10 Radiolaria in Antarctic Sediments WILLIAM R RIEDEL - Government Printer, Canberra Apr-58
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 6 Hirudinea J PERCY MOORE - Commonwealth Printer, Canberra Jul-57
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 3 Free-Living Nematodes PATRICIA M MAWSON - Government Printer, Canberra Nov-56
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 5 Acanthocephala STANLEY J EDMONDS - Government Printer, Canberra Mar-57
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 9 Mollusca …Victoria-Ross Quadrants A W B POWELL - Government Printer, Canberra Jan-58
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 13 Free-Living Nematodes…Section 2 PATRICIA M MAWSON - Government Printer, Canberra Aug-58
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 7 Mollusca …Kerguelen & Macquarie Islands A W B POWELL - Government Printer, Canberra Sep-57
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 4 Part 10 Echinoidea TH. MORTENSEN 22/6/1950
    Series A Volume 2 Part 8 Plant Microfossils…Lignites of Kerguelen Archipelago ISABEL C COOKSON Dec-47
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 8 Medusae P L KRAMP - Government Printer, Canberra Sep-57
    Series A Volume 2 Part 7 Soils from Subantarctic Islands - Sections 1 & 2 C S PIPER & Miss P M ROUNTREE Mar-38
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 1 Part 1 Biological Organization & Station List T HARVEY JOHNSTON 15/8/1937
    Series A - MeteorologyTerrestrial Magnetism Volume 4 Part 1 Terrestial Magnetism CLINTON COLERIDGE FARR Oct-44
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 7 Lichens & Lichen Parasites CARROLL W DODGE 20/7/1948
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 14 Free-Living Nematodes…Section 3 PATRICIA M MAWSON - Government Printer, Canberra Sep-58
    Series A - Geology Volume 2 Parts 1 & 2 Rocks from…Enderby Land & MacRobertson Land C E TILLEY Year 1937
    Series A - Oceanography Volume 3 Part 1 Soundings S A C CAMPBELL, M H MOYES, K E OOM & … Aug-39
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 3 Copepods…Plankton Samples W VERVOORT - The Griffin Press, Adelaide Mar-57
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 5 Part 6 Foraminifera WALTER J PARR 24/5/1950
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 4 Cestodes from Mammals BETTY W McEWIN - Government Printer, Canberra Mar-57
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 1 Plankton…Australian-Antarctic Quadrant…Part 1 KEITH SHEARD 25/11/1947

    Many reports were produced and issued over the years following BANZARE and as far as I am aware all the BANZARE explorers received a copy of each. Some of the reports sent to my father did not survive the rigours of time since his passing.

    Sally E Douglas

    3 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-05-29
    User data
  57. FLYING LOG BOOK 1 - Group Captain Eric Douglas RAAF
    List
    Public


    FLYING LOG BOOK 1 - 18th MAY, 1927 to 27th February, 1929

    In 1927 Eric undertook the 'A' Flying Course and qualified in December of that same year
    In 1928 Eric was under Instruction as a Flying Instructor and was a Flying Instructor - he was an A1 Flying Instructor by June, 1828.
    In 1928 and 1929 Eric was a Flying Instructor, Test Pilot, Aerobatic pilot and a Formation flying pilot.

    'A' Flying Course at the No 1 Flying Training School RAAF - Point Cooke, 1927. (It had evolved out of the Central Flying School)

    Date
    Pilot Instructor
    Student Pilot
    Machine

    18/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    19/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    20/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    25/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-48

    26/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-48

    27/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-48

    27/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    27/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    30/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    30/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    30/5/1927
    F/o Eaton
    Eric Douglas
    A3-9

    30/5/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    30/5/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    30/5/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    31/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-29

    31/5/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    1/6/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    2/6/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    2/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    3/6/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    3/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    7/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    7/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    7/6/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    7/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    8/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    9/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    13/6/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    13/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-29

    14/6/1927
    Sgt Trist
    Eric Douglas
    A3-48

    14/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    14/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    15/6/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    16/6/1927
    Sgt Trist
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    16/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    17/6/1927
    Sgt Trist
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    17/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    21/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-29

    21/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-29

    21/6/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    21/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    22/6/1927
    F/o Eaton
    Eric Douglas
    A3-29

    22/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-29

    23/6/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-29

    23/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-29

    24/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    4/7/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-29

    4/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-29

    4/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-29

    8/7/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    11/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    12/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    12/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    13/7/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-9

    13/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-9

    14/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-10

    19/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-10

    19/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    20/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-10

    21/7/1927
    F/Lt Bladen
    Eric Douglas
    A3-40

    21/7/1927
    Sgt Trist
    Eric Douglas
    A3-10

    21/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-10

    25/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    25/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-40

    28/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    28/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    28/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    28/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    2/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    3/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-10

    3/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    9/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    9/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    10/8/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A6-22

    11/8/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A6-22

    11/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-10

    12/8/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A6-22

    12/8/1927
    F/Lt Bladen
    Eric Douglas
    A6-22

    15/8/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A6-22

    15/8/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A6-20

    15/8/1927
    F/Lt Bladen
    Eric Douglas
    A6-1

    15/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A6-1

    16/8/1927
    F/Lt Bladen
    Eric Douglas
    A6-1

    16/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A6-22

    16/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A6-22

    17/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A6-22

    17/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A6-22

    19/8/1927
    F/Lt Bladen
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    22/8/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Eric Douglas
    A3-12

    30/8/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-12

    1/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-45

    2/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    2/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    6/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    6/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    7/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    8/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-52

    9/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    9/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-52

    12/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    12/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-52

    12/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    12/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    12/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-12

    13/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4 (Note: SE 5A - A2-4 is at the AWM, Canberra)

    14/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31 (Note: SE5A replica A2-31 is at the RAAF Museum, Point Cook)

    14/9/1927
    Sgt Denny
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    14/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    16/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-12

    16/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    20/9/1927
    Sgt Denny
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    20/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    21/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-12

    21/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-12

    22/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-12

    23/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    26/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    26/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    30/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    30/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    30/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    30/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    4/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    5/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    5/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    7/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    10/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    10/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-12

    11/10/1927
    Sgt Denny
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    11/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    11/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    12/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    12/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    13/10/1927
    Sgt Denny
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A1-11

    13/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    13/10/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A1-11

    13/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    17/10/1927
    Sgt Denny
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A1-24

    17/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    19/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    19/10/1927
    Sgt Denny
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    20/10/1927
    Sgt Denny
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    20/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    20/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    20/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    27/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    28/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    28/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    28/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    28/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    29/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    30/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    30/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    31/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    31/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    31/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    3/11/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    3/11/1927
    Sgt Denny
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A1-24

    7/11/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    8/11/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-52

    9/11/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-52

    Avro and SE5A - Eric's flying was above average; the DH9 and DH9A - were not assessed

    Eric came first in flying in his 'A' Flying Course and third in theory.

    RAAF - First Series; A1 - DH9A, A2 - SE5A, A3 - Avro 504K, A6 - DH9A

    Book 1 - RAAF aeroplanes flown or flown in by Eric from 4th January 1928 to 27th February, 1929 (Flying - Instructing by Eric; and the 'A1' Instructors Course being undertaken by Eric in 1928) –
    A1-15, A1-16, A1-20, A1-24, A1-27
    A3-1, A3-11, A3-13, A3-25, A3-26, A3-30, A3-35, A3-37, A3-41, A3-43, A3-45, A3-49
    A6-2, A6-16, A6-19, A6-21, A6-46
    A7-2, A7-4, A7-5, A7-6
    A8-1 (DH50)
    Warrigal 1 (trainer aeroplane designed by Wackett).

    A7 Series was the DH60 Cirrus Moth and A8 Series was the DH50A

    Also recorded in Book 1 -
    Eric had flown dual controls on the Avro, DH9, DH9A and SE5A.
    Eric had flown solo on the DH Moth and the Warrigal 1

    In Book 1 Eric had also recorded - Types Flown
    Avro, DH9, DH9A, DH50, DH Moth, Warrigal 1, Fairy Seaplane, Wapiti, Gipsy Moth Seaplane and the Spartan. (These were types flown up to a later point in time which is not specified).

    In Book 1 Eric had also recorded - Types Flown in as a Passenger -
    Southampton, Seagull, Sopwith GNU, Bristol Tourer and Warrigal.

    Aircraft and Engines, Types Flown in (from Flying Log Book 1) -
    Avro - 130HP Clerget & 80HP Le Rhone
    DH9 - 240HP Siddley ‘Puma’
    DH9A - 400HP ‘Liberty’
    SE5A - 200HP ‘Viper’
    DH 50 - 240HP Siddley ‘Puma’
    DH Moth - Mark 2 ‘Cirrus’ 80HP & Gipsy Moth 100HP Gipsy Engine
    Warrigal 1st - 200HP ‘Lynx’
    Fairy (Fairey) Seaplane - 375HP Rolls Royce
    Wapiti - 480HP Bristol Jupiter
    Gipsy Moth Seaplane - 100HP Gipsy Engine
    Spartan - 105HP Mark 3 Cirrus.

    Aircraft and Engines, Types Flown in as a Passenger (from Flying Log Book 1) -
    Southampton - Two 520HP Napier Lions
    'Seagull' - 450HP Napier Lion
    Sopwith 'GNU' - 200HP Bently Rotary Engine
    Bristol Tourer 240HP Siddley 'Puma' and 'Warrigal' - 200HP Lynx.

    Subjects undertaken for the ‘A’ Flying Course at Point Cook in 1927 included –
    The History of Flight – Aero Dynamics with Professor Langley, Airmanship such aspects as definition of aircraft, propeller swinging, rudder control, wind indicators, landing without wind indicators, forced landings, types of landing surfaces, ground strips and aircraft signals, landing on mark, flying accidents, preliminary inspection of aeroplanes, the engine, instruments, anchoring machines in heavy weather, cross-country flying, compass flying, maps, ground contours, departure messages, aerial route cards, selection of aerodromes, landing spaces, emergency landing grounds and surrounding areas, layout of the aerodrome and technical and non-technical buildings, salvaging of crashed machines, log books and schedules, flying kits and the use of diagrams. Also Air Pilotage, Ignition Systems – Aero Engines, Petrol and Pressure Systems, Carburettors, Internal Combustion Engines Theory, Hygiene, Meteorology, Wireless Telegraphy, the Production of Pig Iron and Cast Iron and Steel, Reconnaissance from the Air and Army Co-Operation, Bombing with Dr Hoskins, Squadron Drill and Squadron Formation were undertaken. Other subjects likely pursued were Engine and Machine Airworthiness, Aeroplane Rigging and Air Navigation.

    “Aero Engines
    Types of Engines–
    1) The Vertical engine – an engine having its cylinders vertical and above the crank-shaft...
    2) The Vee engine – an engine having its cylinders arranged in two rows or banks forming in the end view the letter V...
    3) The Broad arrow or W engine – cylinders arranged in 3 rows forming in the end view the letter W or \|/...
    4) The Inverted engine – an engine having its cylinders below the crank-shaft and vertical...
    5) The X engine – an engine having 4 rows of cylinders whose axis meet the crank-shaft center in a manner resembling the letter X...
    6) The Flat engine – an engine having cylinders arranged in two rows on opposite sides of the crank-shaft...
    7) The Radial engine – that is an engine having stationary cylinders arranged around a common crank-shaft...
    8) The Rotary engine – an engine having revolving cylinders arranged radially around a common fixed crank-shaft...
    9) Band type – an engine having its cylinders arranged equidistant from & parallel to the main-shaft.” (Notes by Eric from Internal Combustion Engines Theory in 1927)

    Flying skills learnt in the ‘A’ Course included – Flying turns such as gentle - with engine off, straight, sharp and climbing, gentle turns with the engine off, gliding turns, figure of 8 turns, spins, stalling and regaining engine, landings and take-offs, approaches, forced landings, side slipping, circuits, aerobatics, cloud flying, general practice and practice of each specific flying skill. Also formation flying including cross-country such as a trianglular course around Point Cooke and return journeys to Diggers Rest, Geelong, Melbourne, Ballarat and Richmond in New South Wales. Plus skills such as instrument formation flying and formation gunnery, gunnery – camera target and Vickers gun ground target and Popham panel, dual flying and solo flying, reconnaissance and weather flying.

    Some interesting flights in the period soon after Eric became an 'A' Pilot (graduating in December, 1927) and when he was doing his 'A1' Instructors Course in 1928 -
    A flight on 18th March, 1928 from Point Cooke to Flemington in DH9A A1-16 with Pilot Officer Evans, being part of an escort formation to (Bert) Hinkler. A1-16 left Point Cooke at 1430 hours and the flight was 1.35 in length of time.
    A flight on 13th June, 1928 from Point Cooke to Seymour in DH9A A1-27 with Pilot Officer Stevens as the passenger, as part of a formation for (Charles) Kingsford Smith. A1-27 left Point Cooke at 1315 hours and the flight took 3.10 in length of time.

    Flying skills being learnt and practiced by Eric in 1928 and early 1929 -
    Dual control, back seat flying and landing, night flying, bombing - 'Wimpens' sight bombing, formation bombing, high bombing at 4000' and 6000', testing the Lewis Machine gun, parachute dummy dropping, inspecting landing grounds, observing bomb hits, cross wind landing, photography as an observer - including overlap, high banking, rolls and half rolls, 'Aldis' signalling lamp, semaphore, morse code, testing of Engines and Machines - Eric was both a Mechanic and an Air Mechanic before he undertook his 'A' Flying Course. Plus a special parachute folding course was undertaken by Eric in 1928.

    On 18th June, 1930 Eric was the second pilot on Southampton Flying Boat A11-2 that flew from Point Cooke to Queenscliff/Geelong (and return) to 'Welcome Amy Johnson' to Geelong. Other RAAF Personnel on the flight were F/O Campbell, Sgt Kirk, Cpl Kelly, LAC McCormack, LAC Holst, AC1 Richmond and AC1 Doherty.

    In February 1935 Cdt 'Barney' Creswell commenced as a student pilot of Eric's. Barney Cresswell was one of the 44 RAAF student pilots fully trained to fly by Eric. Also Barney was one of number of courageous RAAF Pilots never forgotten by Eric.

    As well in March 1936 Cdt Hitchcock began as a student pilot.

    On 4th and 5th October, 1937 Eric was the pilot of Avro Anson A4-4 which made three Naval Reconnaissance Flights in Western Bass Strait. These operations were ordered by the Air Board.
    The aircrews were –
    • 4/10/37 – 0740 – Sgt Clark, AC Marr and AC Crutchett
    • 4/10/37 – 1330 – Sgt Clark, AC Marr and AC Willmore
    • 5/10/37 – 0810 – Sgt Clark, AC Ranford and AC Marr

    Aeroplanes flown by Eric around Point Cooke in the year 1938, illustrating a flying skills diversity in one year - A1-2, A1-4, A1-17, A1-18, A1-37, A1-55, A1-58, A1-59, A1-60 (Hawker Demon) A4-26, A4-35, A4-36, A4-37, A4-43 (Avro Anson 652) A5-4, A5-14, A5-35, A5-37 (Westland Wapiti 2) A6-1, A6-12, A6-13, A6-14, A6-15, A6-16, A6-17 (Avro Cadet 643) A7-27, A7-54, A7-64 (De Havilland DH60 Moth) A12-2, A12-3 (Bristol Bulldog 11A) and A15-1 (Miles Magister).

    Eric's Flying Log Books number from 1 to 6 - with entries in No 6 ending on 31st January, 1948 when Eric returned to Amberley, Queensland as a passenger with W/C Hampshire in Lincoln A73-18, after attending an AOC (Southern Command) Conference at Schofields, New South Wales.

    Eric's last recorded flight as a RAAF Pilot was when he flew an Anson (number not supplied) on 21st August, 1946 with W/c Fleming as a passenger. The flight was for a tour of inspection - from Amberley to Strathpine, Kingaroy, Lowood, Archerfield and return to Amberley.

    As a further point of interest is a flight that Eric took as a passenger on a TAA DC3 on 2nd June, 1947 from Essendon (Melbourne) to Eagle Farm (Brisbane). The time taken for this flight was 6 hours for what was usually a '5 hour flight' (Eric's words), with Eric already having flown from Eagle Farm to Essendon on 29th May, 1947 on a 6 hour flight. A return journey on a TAA DC4 from Essendon to Eagle Farm on 12th July, 1947 took 5 hours. Similarly flights from Eagle Farm to Mascot (Sydney) or vice versa and from Essendon to Mascot or vice versa took a scheduled 2 hours and 50 minutes.

    Postscript: Harry Hawker was a catalyst for Eric to take up flying and for his love of aeroplanes and all things technical. He related a story that as a child he saved up his pocket money to go for a 'flip' in Elsternwick Park with Harry Hawker. Kevin O'Reilly - Writer of aeroplane histories has recently confirmed that Harry Hawker indeed flew at Elsternwick Park in 1914 - at this time Eric was only 11 and living in Elsternwick and likely attending Caulfield State School (which he did go to). Eric was so taken with these flying experiences that he used to hang out of the doors of the old trams on his way to and from school in 'make believe' flight. An image just found at www.kingstonavition.org (3/10/2014) shows Harry Hawker and his father George at Elsternwick Park. Moreover, Harry's plane there was a Sopwith, probably an SS.

    A further hero of the times for Eric was Harry Houdini - he marvelled at his escapism from seemingly impossible situations and also admired his enthusiasm for flight and flying. He talked about Houdini's dive into the Yarra (1910) when he (Houdini) was chained up and escape seemed impossible. Eric spoke as though he was present at the event; at this age he was only seven years old and I feel that experiences and impressions for him as a child were life defining events. (At this time his family was likely living at Middle Park where Eric attended his first school).Here were the seeds of Eric's love of Acrobatics and Aerobatics.

    [Eric Douglas Collection]

    ADF Serials state - "A2-4 Forced Landing on 20/10/27 at Anakie, Vic - Crew Corporal G E Douglas"

    Postscript in November, 2017. SE5A with the serial no A2-2 was a single seater but it was converted to a double seater - one seat behind the other - and was re-numbered as A2-36. Then it became known as the 'Flying Pig'. (RAAF Museum Archives and the Australian War Memorial). It was apparently then the only one of its type.

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    17 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-08-19
    User data
  58. FLYING LOG BOOK 2 - Group Captain Eric Douglas RAAF
    List
    Public


    RAAF aeroplanes flown by Eric Douglas from 1st March, 1929 to 26th May, 1932 - from Point Cooke (Cook) and Laverton -
    • A1-5, A1-7, A1-9, A1-14, A1-16, A1-20, A1-21, A1-28 (DH9A)
    • A2 (SE5A) Dual - 6 hours and 35 mins.
    • A3-41 (Avro 504K)
    • A5-1, A5-2, A5-3, A5-4, A5-6, A5-7, A5-8, A5-9, A5-11, A5-12, A5-15, A5-21 (Wapiti)
    • A7-4, A7-5, A7-6, A7-7, A7-9, A7-11, A7-13, A7-14 (A7-14 DH Moth Seaplane) A7-16, A7-17, A7-18, A7-22, A7-24 (A7-24 DH Moth Seaplane) A7-26 (A7-26 DH Moth Seaplane) A7-35, A7-38, A7-40, A7-43, A7-47, A7-48, A7-50, A7-51 (DH Moth)
    • A10-4 (Fairey 3D)
    • A11-2 (Southampton)
    • A12-3, A12-5 (Bulldog)
    • Warrigal 1
    • Spartan. Solo 15 minutes
    • VH-ULD (Gipsy Moth seaplane).

    As an A1 Flying Instructor Eric’s RAAF student Pilots in this period were –
    F/Lt Hewitt (eg dual instruction), F/Lt Ross (eg inverted flying), F/Lt Waters (eg blind flying), F/Lt Campbell (eg blind flying), F/O Henry (eg dual instruction), F/O Stewart (eg forced landings and instruction - Category B - D.E.F.H.I.), F/O Probert (eg dual instruction), F/O Evans (eg Instructors Course), F/O Klose, F/O Compaquonie, F/O Tamlyn, F/O Gibson, F/O Harding, F/O Wright, Sgt Austin, Sgt Collopy, Sgt Cameron, Sgt Curtain, LAC Holdsworth, LAC Brier, LAC Hamilton, LAC Stubbs, LAC Neil, LAC Redroff, LAC Newton, LAC Kennedy, LAC Ford, LAC Allen, LAC Davenport, LAC Bottomore, LAC Toll, LAC Mattock, LAC Harris, LAC Charters, LAC Morgan, LAC Spooner, LAC Byrnes, LAC Jordan, LAC Brockie, LAC Burns, LAC Sheppard, LAC Richards, LAC Selke, LAC Bateman, Cpl Barter, Cpl Cameron, Cpl Barlow, Cpl Harkur, P/O Shaw, P/O Boucher, P/O Grant, P/O Harding, P/O Heffernan, P/O Hancock, P/O Wright, P/O Thomson, P/O Dalton, P/O Hely, P/O Pither, P/O Blamey, P/O Strangman, Cdt Graham, Cdt Berry, Cdt Bates, Cdt Cameron, Cdt Webb, Cdt Proud, Cdt Lees, Cdt Littlejohn, Cdt Berg, Cdt Draper, Cdt Glen, Cdt Stowe, Cdt Miles, Cdt Bowman, Cdt Grace, Cdt Bennett, Cdt Paget, Cdt Rae, Cdt Smith, Cdt Drew, Cdt Murdoch, Cdt Garing, Cdt Candy, Cdt McLachlan, Cdt Curnow, Cdt Boss-Walker, Cdt Judge, AC1 Charters, AC1 Heading, AC1 Bateman, AC1 Cook, AC1 Corser, AC1 Jordan and AC1 Strickland. (Some are the same person but at different ranks).

    Moreover, as an A1 Flying Instructor (1928 to 1937 inclusive) Eric fully trained 44 RAAF student Pilots which was a British Empire record at the time.

    Flying lessons taught to the student pilots covered –
    forced landings, aerobatics, passenger flying, taxying, taking off, effect of controls, landings, gentle turns, gliding turns, approaches, steep turns, spinning, figure of 8 turns, side slipping, cloud flying, inverted flying, climbing, alightings, air gunnery, back seat gunnery, camera gun target, ground target gunnery, line bombing, testing bomb racks and bombs, high bombing, live bombing, diving on ground target, blind flying, front seat flying, slow rolls, rigging, wireless telegraphy, navigation, cross country wind landings, message picking up, weather testing, to scene of crash and return, Air Pilotage and even the A1 Instructors course (the skills were taught according to specific needs of the students).

    The sequence of Instruction was –
    * Passenger flying
    * Taxying and handling the engine
    * Effect of controls including aileron drag
    * Straight and level flying
    * Stalling, climbing and gliding
    * Taking off into wind
    * Landing and judging distance
    * Medium turns
    * Gliding turns
    * Steep turns, with and without engine
    * Spinning
    * Elementary forced landings
    * Low flying - with Instructor only
    * Solo test
    * Solo
    * Climbing turns
    * Sideslipping
    * Action in the event of fire
    * Taking off and landing across wind
    * Advanced forced landings
    * Aerobatics
    * Front seat flying
    * Air Pilotage
    * 10 hour test
    * Height test
    * Cross country test
    * Passenger test and
    * Instrument flying
    (1934 sequence of Instructions)

    In the interim, Eric personally brushed up on his solo flying on skills such as –
    night flying, inverted aerobatics, speed testing, M/C and engine testing, aerobatics, formation flying and meteorological surveys.

    On 17th October 1930 Eric flew in Supermarine Southampton A11-2 with F/Lt Lachal from Point Cooke to Mornington and return - the purpose was 'Signalling and Codes'.

    While on 12th August, 1931 Eric flew with S/Lr Jones in DH60 Cirrus Moth A7-47 on a 50 minute 'flying test'.

    At 1330 on 18th August 1931 Eric went on a 10 minute 'travel flight' in DH60 Cirrus Moth A7-55 from Point Cooke to No1 AD (Laverton) with S/Lr Brownell and Eric returned solo to Point Cooke at 1515 in Westland Wapiti A5-1.

    Additionally in this period Eric went as a RAAF Sergeant Pilot and Air Mechanic on the search for the Kookaburra in April and May of 1929 under the leadership of Flight Lieut Charles Eaton. LAC Smith accompanied Eric in DH9A A1-20 to Wave Hill Station in the Northern Territory. However Eric returned to point Cooke with Flight Lieut Eaton as co-pilot in DH9A A1-7, as A1-20 was written off at Wave Hill Station (the result of an engine fire on start-up). The DH9A A1-1 which Flight Lieut flew to near Tennant Creek from Point Cooke was also written off as it crash landed near Tennant Creek.

    Moreover as a Pilot Officer (Voyage 2 as Flying Officer) Eric was chosen as one of the two RAAF pilots for the two Banzare Antarctic Voyages with Sir Douglas Mawson on the SY Discovery (RRS Discovery) in 1929/30 and 1930/31. The other RAAF Officer (senior pilot) chosen was Flying Officer Stuart Campbell (Voyage 2 as a Flight Lieut). For both voyages Douglas and Campbell were transferred to the 'Seaplane Division' of the RAAF, and flew RAAF Gipsy Moth seaplane with the call sign VH-ULD. Both Eaton and Campbell attained the rank of Group Captain as did Eric Douglas.

    Cirrus Moth A7-13 is now displayed at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney as VH-UAU.

    [Eric Douglas Collection]

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    7 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-09-07
    User data
  59. FLYING LOG BOOK 3 - Group Captain Eric Douglas RAAF
    List
    Public

    FLYING LOG BOOK 3 – Eric Douglas RAAF - 2nd June, 1932 to 14th May, 1934.

    RAAF aeroplanes flown by Eric Douglas in this period – Solo, Dual Controls, searching for a missing boat in Port Phillip Bay, Aerobatics, Wireless Telegraphy exercises, as a Test Pilot; and an A1 Flying Instructor and Instructors Refresher Course – for students.
    • Westland Wapiti A5 – 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 15, 17, 19
    • DH60 Cirrus Moth A7 – 13, 20, 23, 25, 38, 40, 48 (some of the flying in A7-48 was to Geelong and Essendon), 50, 53, 54 (some of the flying in A7-54 was to Colac and Camperdown, returning to Point Cook via Ararat and Ballarat).
    • DH60 Cirrus Moth Seaplane A7- 24, 26
    • Supermarine Seagull A9 – 6. Flown from Point Cook to Welshpool, Chinamen’s Beach (SE side of Corner Inlet), Cape Liptrap, Rhyll (Phillip Island, Western Port) and return - for RAN and RAAF combined exercise in October, 1933
    • Supermarine Southampton A11 – 1
    • Bulldog A12 (Solo - 5 hours 20 mins.) A12-1 was flown in this period and it was likely all in A12-1.

    Cirrus Moth A7-13 is now displayed at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney as VH-UAU.

    [Eric Douglas Collection]

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    5 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-09-30
    User data
  60. FLYING LOG BOOK 4 - Group Captain Eric Douglas RAAF
    List
    Public

    From Flying Log Book 4 – 14th May, 1934 to 12th November, 1935.

    Planes flown in this period were -
    Westland Wapitis – A5-1, A5-2, A5-3, A5-4, A5-5, A5-7, A5-9, A5-11, A5-12, A5-14, A5-15, A5-19 and A5-28
    DH60 Cirrus Moths – A7-23, A7-25, A7-31, A7-33, A7-38, A7-44 A7-47, A7-51, A7-52, A-53 and A7-54
    DH60 Cirrus Moths (Seaplanes) A7-24 and A7-43
    Bristol Bulldog – A12-2

    In this period to the end of June 1934 Eric Douglas was with ‘A Flight No 1 FTS at Point Cook and from then to the beginning of July 1934 till the end of this period he was with the ‘B Flight’.

    Some highlights of this period -
    On 15th May, 1934 with LAC Kennedy as crew Eric Douglas took part in the RAAF flying formation over Melbourne for the ‘Centenary appeal’ in DH 60 Cirrus Moth A7-53.
    On 21st May, 1934 Eric Douglas flew A7-54 from Point Cook to the Deniliquin drome with Ft Lieut. Wight as the passenger.
    On 5th June, 1934 Eric flew solo in Bristol Bulldog A12-2 on a ‘Meteorological flight’.
    In September, 1934 when instructing three flights were made in Westland Wapitis A5-3 (two flights) and A5-7 from Point Cook to the Western District. Pupils on these flights were Cadet Lavarack (A5-3), Cadet Carr (A5-3) and Cadet Walker (A5-7).
    On 21st September, 1934 a flight was made with Eric Douglas as pilot in Westland Wapiti A5-1 from Point Cook to Gisborne, Yendon and return to Laverton – Cadet Carr was his pupil pilot.
    On 3rd October, 1934 Eric flew solo doing ‘inverted flying’ in DH60 Cirrus Moths A7-25 and A7-38.
    The 18th October, 1934 and Eric was in Wapiti A5-1 as part of an escort for the HMS ‘Sussex’ to Port Melbourne with F/O Lightfoot as passenger. Later that same day Eric in A5-1 took part in formation flying over Melbourne and a ‘Welcome to HRH the Duke of Gloucester’. The plane’s passengers on this occasion were ACI’s Busteed and Everingham.
    On 29th October, 1934 in Wapiti A5-11 Eric practised ‘towing moth off ground and in air’ with F/Lt Rae and in Moth A7-47 went solo practising the same exercise (being towed by a Wapiti).
    10th November, 1934 and Eric Douglas was flying Wapiti A5-1 from Point Cook as part of formation ‘flypasts’ (three) in the ‘Air Pageant’ at Laverton – LAC Hurford was the passenger each time. That same day Eric carried out the manoeuvre of towing a moth (twice) from Wapiti A5-11 with LAC Ford as the crew both times. Moreover ‘Dummy parachute drops’ were made by Eric from Wapiti A5-11 with LAC Lalor as the crew.
    The 19th November, 1934 in Wapiti A5-1 with passengers LAC Mackintosh and LAC Russell as crew, Eric Douglas flew from Point Cook to Junee, NSW and then on to Richmond, NSW.
    On 22nd November,1934 the same team in Wapiti A5-1 took part in formation flying over Sydney and ‘a Welcome to HRH the Duke of Gloucester’.
    On 26th November, 1934 in Wapiti A5-11 Eric Douglas took part in the Richmond Pageant with ‘Tow home’ – ACI Torpey was the crew (twice) and a ‘Dummy parachute drop’. Also on that same day Eric was part of the ‘Fly Past’ (twice) in Wapiti A5-1 with LAC Mackintosh as the passenger.
    A ‘Fly past’ for the ‘Kings Jubilee’ was made over Royal Park, Melbourne on 6th May, 1935 and Eric Douglas was flying Wapiti A5-11 and u/o Creswell was the crew.
    On 8th May, 1935 after returning from a solo flight in Wapiti A5-7 Eric Douglas ran into a tractor and part of the lower wing was damaged.
    On 30th October, 1935 in Wapiti A5-7 Eric Douglas flew from Deniliquin to Echuca with Cpl Cottee as passenger and return to Deniliquin solo. Then he returned to Echuca with AC Sewell as passenger. The next day Eric piloted A5-7 from Echuca to Point Cook with F/O Headlam and A C Marriott as crew.

    (Eric Douglas Collection).

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    5 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-10-29
    User data
  61. FLYING LOG BOOK 5 - Group Captain Eric Douglas RAAF
    List
    Public

    Flying Log 5
    This log book commences on 13th November, 1935 – ending on 9th April, 1938

    RAAF Planes flown by Eric Douglas in this period –
    Westland Wapiti – A5-1, A5-3, A5-4, A5-5, A5-9, A5-11, A5-12, A5-14, A5-16, A5-19, A5-21, A5-23, A5-26, A5-27, A5-28, A5-33, A5-34, A5-35, A5-37
    Wapiti Seaplane – A5-37 – December, 1935
    Avro Anson – A4-4, A4-5, A4-11, A4-13, A4-15, A4-16, A4-17, A4-26, A4-36, A4-37, A4-38
    Avro Cadet – A6-5, A6-7, A6-9, A6-12, A6-13, A6-14, A6-15, A6-16, A6-17
    Hawker Demon – A1-1, A1-2, A1-4, A1-17, A1-18, A1-53, A1-55, A1-56, A1-57, A1-58, A1-59, A1-60
    Bristol Bulldog – A12-2, A12-3, A12-6
    NA -16
    Miles Magister – A15-1
    Moth Seaplane – A7-55 – in the Antarctic in the search for Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon in January, 1936.
    Moth Seaplane – A7-46
    DH 60 Cirrus Moth – A7-27, A7-30, A7-44, A7-48, A7-51, A7-52, A7-53, A7-61, A7-74
    There was a balance between Flying Instructing, tests for cadets and pilots under instruction, plane engine, frame and rigging testing in flight and solo flying
    A flight was made to Deniliquin and return from Point Cook, on 15th May, 1936 with LAC Morgan as crew in Westland Wapiti A5-23
    A flight was made to Hamilton and return from Point Cook, on 30th September, 1936 with W/Commander Brownell as crew in Westland Wapiti A5-33
    A flight was made to Richmond, NSW from Point Cook on 29th November, 1936 with Flight Sgt. Studley as crew in Moth A7-30
    A flight was made to Richmond, NSW from Point Cook on 3rd December, 1936 with Flight Sgt. Studley as crew in Westland Wapiti A5-37 (it had been earlier been a seaplane). The return flight was made on 4th December, 1936.
    Other flying activities included –
    * Operations ordered by Air Board to Currie, King Island and Naval Recce.
    * Air Pilotage
    * Dummy parachute dropping
    * Dive bombing
    * Vickers Gun test
    * Weather testing
    * General flying
    * Photography
    * Camera test
    * Night Flying
    * Gunnery
    * Circuits
    * Landing tests
    * Forced landings
    * Instrument flying
    * Rear seat flying
    * Compass flying
    * Navigation
    * Air Pageants - Flemington
    * Formation flying
    * Aerobatics

    (Eric Douglas Collection)

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-01-16
    User data
  62. FLYING LOG BOOK 6 - Group Captain Eric Douglas RAAF
    List
    Public

    Commencing on 12th April, 1938 and ending on 31st January, 1948 (Last Flying Log Book).

    ...1938 -
    12 April, 1938 – Demon A1-60 with CPL Smith as crew – Dummy parachute (run)
    Air Display, Richmond (17 to 22 April, 1938) -
    • 17 April, 1938 – Demon A1-55 with CPL Scaschiqini as crew – (RAAF) Laverton to (RAAF) Richmond
    • 21 April, 1938 – Demon A1-37 with LAC Ellerton as crew – Richmond – local
    • 22 April, 1938 – Demon A1-37 with LAC Ellerton as crew – Richmond – local
    • 24 April, 1938 – Demon A1-37 with CPL Nankervill as crew – Richmond – Laverton
    15 July, 1938 – Moth Seaplane A7-54 with AC1 Symons as crew – Point Cook – local
    20 July, 1938 – Wapiti A5-14 with LAC Ferris as crew – Point Cook – local
    10 August, 1938 – Anson A4-35 with Sgt Reid and 3 A/C’s as crew – Point Cook – local
    16 August, 1938 – Moth A7-27 with AC1 Harley as crew – Point Cook – local
    16 August, 1938 – Wapiti A5-35 with LAC Darlow as crew – Point Cook – local
    1 September, 1938 – Anson A4-35 with F/o Podger and 3 A/C’s as crew – Point Cook – local
    22 September, 1938 – Wapiti A5-37 with LAC Doherty as crew – Point Cook – local
    27 October, 1938 – Moth A7-54 with LAC Bennett as crew – Point Cook – local
    27 October, 1938 – Anson A4-43 with F/Lt Murdoch and 2 A/c’s as crew – Point Cook – local
    28 October, 1938 – Moth A7-64 with LAC Darlow as crew – Point Cook – local
    2 November, 1938 – Anson A4-43 with 3 A/C’s as crew – Point Cook – local
    17 November, 1938 – Avro Trainer A6-1 with LAC Darlow as crew – Point Cook – local
    1 December, 1938 – Avro Trainer A6-12 with LAC Ferris as crew – Point Cook – local
    2 December, 1938 – Avro Trainer A6-12 with SM1 Lister as crew – Point Cook – local

    1939 – January to March
    24 January, 1939 – Moth A7-70 with LAC Redenback as crew – Point Cook – local
    24 January, 1939 – Moth A7-70 with AC1 Clark as crew – Point Cook – local
    27 January, 1939 – Avro Trainer A6-12 with LAC Baty as crew – Point Cook – local
    30 January, 1939 – Avro Trainer A6-5 with LAC Fotheringham as crew – Point Cook – local
    2 February, 1939 – Moth (Seaplane) A7-54 with F/o Carroll as crew – Point Cook – local
    6 February, 1939 – Moth A7-39 with AC1 Bailey as crew – Point Cook – local
    16 January, 1939 – Moth Seaplane A7-54 with F/o Cohen as crew – Dual inst. Take off & alightings
    24 January, 1939 – Moth Seaplane A7-54 – solo – Point Cook – local
    9 March, 1939 – Moth A7-65 with AC1 Newport as crew – Point Cook – local
    14 March, 1939 – Anson L with LE Guest and two Airmen – Point Cook – local (Appears to be before the allocation of a RAAF serial number).
    17 March, 1939 – Moth Seaplane A7-54 – solo – Point Cook – local
    24 March, 1939 – Avro Trainer A6-8 – with AC1 Savage as crew – Point Cook – local
    29 March, 1939 – Avro Trainer A6-8 – with CPL Graham as crew – Point Cook – local
    29 March, 1939 – Avro Trainer A6-8 – with F/o Carroll as crew – Point Cook – local
    31 March, 1939 – Avro Trainer A6-8 – with Cpl Ferris as crew – Point Cook – local
    31 March, 1939 – Avro Trainer A6-5 – solo – Point Cook – local

    April 1939 –
    • Moth A7-53, A7-72
    • Avro Trainer A6-3 (A6-3- testing oil pump), A6-16
    • Anson A4-43
    May 1939 –
    • Avro Trainer A6-3
    • Wapiti A5-35
    July 1939 –
    • Avro Trainer A6- 4, A6-10, A6-15
    • Wapiti A5-17, A5-32
    August 1939 –
    • Wapiti A5-17, A5-42
    • Avro Trainer A6-10
    September 1939 –
    • Moth A7-71
    • Moth Seaplane A7-36 (one flight was for an engine test)
    • Seagull A2-6 (Dual take off & alighting by F/L Connelly with Eric Douglas as crew)
    • Avro Trainer A6-11
    October 1939 –
    • Avro Trainer A6-2
    • Wapiti A5-35 (27 October with AC1 Coltheart as crew – Force Landed and return from FL)
    November 1939 –
    • Wapiti A5-43 (radius rod pulled out)
    December 1939 –
    • Avro Trainer A6-8 (tail heavy)
    • Moth A7-30
    • Wapiti A5-1

    January 1940 –
    • Avro Trainer A6-5, A6-16
    February 1940 –
    • Wapiti A5-42
    • Avro Trainer A6-4, A6-25
    • Moth A7-66 (flight for a M/c & Engine test). A7-78 (A7-78 - one flight - knock in engine to be investigated. The next flight was for an engine test). After that - on 24 February, 1940 - ‘Cross country’ from Point Cook to Parafield, with short stops (re-fuelling – from the ‘Route Card’) at Ararat and Bordertown
    March 1940 –
    • Wapiti A5-16, A5-21 (M/c & Engine test for both A5-16 & A5-21)
    • Avro Trainer A6-14 (to Essendon & return), A6-28 (engine test), A6-34 (M/c & Engine test)
    • Moth A7-44 (M/c & Engine test)
    April 1940 –
    • Wapiti A5-21 (M/c & Engine test)
    May 1940 –
    • Avro Trainer A6-7, A6-12, A6-28 (All M/c & Engine test)
    • Wirraway A20-55 S/L Holinswood as pilot and Eric Douglas as crew (M/c & engine test)
    June 1940 –
    • Moth Minor A21-11 – Delivery to No 1 AD
    • Tiger Moth R 4882 and R 4888 – Test flight after erection on R 4888 and to test the rigging on R4882 – both solo flights
    • Anson N 3337 – ‘Self’ and ‘3 Airmen as crew’ – test
    (Once again appears to be before the allocation of RAAF serial numbers).
    July 1940 –
    • Hudson A16-97 – two flights after erection by Mr Parker as pilot – Eric Douglas with Mr Reynolds and Mr Sandifer as crew
    August 1940 –
    • Anson N 4955 – M/c and engine test – Eric Douglas as pilot and P/o Higgins and AC1 Stokes as crew
    • Battle – no number provided – one circuit flight by F/Lt Archer with Eric Douglas as crew, and then one circuit flight by Eric Douglas – solo. On 23 August 1940
    December 1940 –
    • Anson – no number provided – Eric Douglas with 2 A/C’s as crew.

    1941 Plane flights logged –
    • Anson W 1534, W 1961, W 2255, R 3529
    • Beaufort T 9540 (Pilot S/L Ingledew & crew F/Lt Hasker, self [Eric Douglas] and 1AC)
    • Wapiti A5-12
    • CAC Trainer A3-6

    1942 Plane flights logged –
    • Anson AX 285
    • Boeing B17 – no number supplied
    • Wapiti A5-12
    • Avro Trainer A6-31
    • DH Moth A7-63
    • C47 – no number supplied. Pilot Captain Taylor & crew self [Eric Douglas]) – observation flight around Amberley, Q
    • Vengeance A27-6. Pilot Capt. Kelly crew self [Eric Douglas] – Test flight. Another flight – Eric Douglas Pilot & IAC crew – General practice
    • Tiger Moth A17-, A17-19, A17-355, A17-426, N 6906
    • Beechcraft A39-,Pilot F/Lt Wood, Self crew [Eric Douglas]. General flying
    • Moth Minor A21-25.

    1943 Plane flights logged –
    • Lodestar – no number supplied. Self [Eric Douglas] solo from Archerfield to Townsville & return
    • C39 – July 1943 - self [Eric Douglas] a passenger from Mascot to Essendon, Essendon to Archerfield. September 1943 self [Eric Douglas] a passenger from Archerfield to Mascot. Another flight in September 1943 self [Eric Douglas] a passenger from Essendon to Mascot.
    • Anson EF 922 – Eric Douglas pilot with 5 crew – Amberley to Evans Head and return
    • Gipsy Moth A7-44
    • Oxford – no number supplied. Pilot W/C Adler and Eric Douglas as passenger. From Amberley to Oakey and return.

    1944 Plane flights logged –
    • Hudson A16-215 F/Lt Madden as pilot, Eric Douglas as crew – Local Amberley
    • Anson DJ 231 – Amberley to Evans Head and return. EG 473 – Amberley to Evans Head and return.
    • Vengeance A 35 B Model – Solo – Local Amberley
    • Gipsy Moth A7-44
    • Lancaster A66-1. F/Lt Isaacson as pilot, Eric Douglas as crew. Amberley, Tweed Heads, Warwick, Archerfield
    • Wapiti A5-16
    • 14th May 1944 – Empire Flying Boat – Qantas. Eric Douglas was a passenger. Brisbane to Sydney. 20th May 1944 returned on the Empire Flying Boat – Sydney to Brisbane.
    19th November 1944 Empire Flying Boat from Brisbane to Sydney – Eric Douglas was a passenger
    • Liberator B24-J _ A72-31. F/Lt Overheer was the pilot, plus Eric Douglas and crew. Liberator A72-105. F/Lt Rae was the pilot, plus Eric Douglas and crew. Liberator A72-108 – Pilot was F/Lt Rae and Eric Douglas the crew – to 6AD and return.
    • Oxford BG 614 – Pilot for three flights was F/Lt Rae and Eric Douglas for one flight.
    • Tiger Moth A17-730.

    1945 Plane flights logged –
    • Wapiti A5-16
    • Oxford BG 614- Passenger
    • C47 VH- Passenger
    • Liberator A72-317
    • Dakota – no number supplied.

    1946 Plane flights logged –
    • Dakota A65-, A65-60, A65-88
    • Anson – no number supplied

    1947 Plane flights logged –
    • DC3 – TAA. Passenger - Eagle Farm to Essendon (two trips) & Essendon to Eagle Farm (one trip). Eagle Farm to Mascot, Mascot to Essendon.
    • DC4 – TAA. Passenger – Essendon to Eagle Farm (two trips)
    • Liberator A72-395 - W/c Hampshire was the Pilot and Eric Douglas was the crew.
    • Lincoln A73-11 - W/c Hampshire was the Pilot and Eric Douglas was the crew.

    1948 Plane Flights logged –
    • January, 1948 – Lincoln A73-18 - W/c Hampshire was the Pilot and Eric Douglas was the crew.
    • At some stage (possibly in 1948) Eric flew on TAA DC3 on June 20th from Essendon to Launceston & returning on a TAA DC3 on June 23rd.

    (Flying Log Books - relate to many RAAF flights by Eric Douglas reported in Newspapers at Trove).

    Sally E Douglas

    3 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-02-05
    User data
  63. GABRIEL or GILBERT DOUGLAS - born 1869 Russell Street, South Melbourne (Melbourne)
    List
    Public

    Gabriel Douglas was a Watchmaker, Jeweller, Optician and Property Developer. He was also an accomplished Rider and Horseman and did not share the love of boats, boat making and sailing of his sons Cliff, Eric and Gill. His recreation preference was to be well-groomed and riding a fine horse. This would have suited his own good looks really well.

    Gabriel Douglas was named as such on his birth, first marriage and death certificates. He also went by the name of Gilbert in his adult life. The story was that he changed his name from Gabriel to Gilbert by deed poll? That story had good authority coming from my mother Ella (Sevior) Douglas who was a daughter in law of Gabriel. Apparently he didn't like the name Gabriel, but it may have been that his father was also named Gabriel and was also Watchmaker and Jeweller, so having a different first name would set them apart? Besides his father who was a Watchmaker, Gilbert had two brothers who were also Watchmakers - George Douglas 1862 and Robert William Arthur Douglas 1881.

    In 1887 Gilbert Douglas, Watchmaker was living at 22 Merton Cresent, South Melbourne (Sands & McDougall). Some of the old Victorian directories list Gabriel Douglas as a Watchman, rather than as a Watchmaker but in today's language if I use Watchman it can be misinterpreted as a 'Security Officer' which certainly was not the case in those earlier times!

    In 1891 Gilbert Douglas, Watchmaker was living at 175 Macpherson Street, North Carlton (Sands & McDougall)

    In February 1891 and Gilbert Douglas was a Watchmaker in Bacchus Marsh. His business was in the shop belonging to Mr W Watts, nearly opposite the Mechanics' Institute. (The shop was in Main Street, Bacchus Marsh). It was said that Douglas had come from 'some of the best establishments in Melbourne'.

    I wonder what attracted him to also take his watchmaking skills to Bacchus Marsh and a little later also to Gisborne?

    Mr G Douglas, Jeweller presented the First Trophy for Alderneys at the Bacchus Marsh show in September, 1891. The show was held by the Agricultural and Pastoral Society at the Society's Showgrounds, next to the Bacchus Marsh Railway Station. Mr G Douglas came third in the Lady's Palfreys 'owned in Bacchus Marsh'. (The Palfrey was a highly valued riding horse). Plus the Mr G Douglas comic singer with encores, at the Show Night concert was likely to have been Gilbert Douglas.

    G Douglas subscribed to the Bacchus Marsh Agricultural and Pastoral Society in October, 1892. This would refer to Gilbert Douglas. In July, 1892 Gilbert Douglas advertised as 'G Douglas - Watchmaker, Jeweller and Optician of Main Street, Bacchus Marsh'. Besides, in July 1892 a Mr G Douglas was the Secretary and Treasurer of the Bacchus Marsh Dramatic Club, and G Douglas also played the part or 'Peter Fletcher' in H J Byron's Comedy in Three Acts - this G Douglas was likely Gilbert Douglas.

    In July 1892 Gilbert Douglas commenced Watchmaking in Gisborne.

    From July to October 1892 Mr G Douglas had Watchmaking Businesses in both Gisborne and Bacchus Marsh. At Bacchus Marsh he had opened a shop next to Mr Hodgson's and in October 1892 was still there. Moreover in July, 1892 Gilbert Douglas also called at Mr Heath's the Saddler to attend to orders. The Saddle and Harness Maker was likely to have been Thomas Heath situated in Main Street, Bacchus Marsh.

    The G Douglas, Watchmaker working in Bacchus Marsh in 1893 would have been Gilbert Douglas. At this date Gilbert was still working from Mr W Watts's shop.

    In October, 1893 G Douglas advertised a Dog Cart and Harness for Sale in Bacchus Marsh - 'cheap'. (A Dog Cart is a light horse drawn vehicle). This was likely to have been an ad by Gilbert Douglas. It was probably used as a mode of transport for getting around Bacchus Marsh. The journey from Melbourne to Bacchus Marsh and Gisborne was likely made by train. By 1892 some of the Victorian country goods trains also carried first and second class passengers.

    From the Bacchus Marsh Express of 10th February, 1894 - "Mr. G. Douglas, watchmaker and jeweller, has resumed business at his father's establishlment, 71 Gertrude street, Fitzroy, and will visit Bacchus Marsh and district at regular intervals, when all orders entrusted to him will receive every attention". Once again this is about Gilbert Douglas.

    In 1893 and 1894 Gilbert Douglas Watchmaker was in Bacchus Marsh [regular visits] (Wise’s). In 1893 and 1894 Gilbert Douglas was living on the Esplanade, Port Melbourne (Sands & McDougall)

    In February, 1895 Gilbert Douglas was on the General List of Electors for the District of Bourke West, Bacchus Marsh Division.

    In April, 1895 Gilbert Douglas had his watchmaking business in Gertrude Street, Fitzroy. This was a branch of his business at his father's location of business.

    In October 1894 and also in December 1896 Gilbert Douglas advertised himself as a 'Practical Watchmaker' and stated that he was at 345 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne, near Lonsdale Street and that he had previously been in the watchmaking business at Bacchus Marsh. In 1896 Gilbert had still been visiting Bacchus Marsh.

    From 1895 to 1900 Gilbert Douglas was in business at 345 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne (Wise’s and Sands & McDougall)

    On 1st June, 1898 Gilbert Douglas married Elizabeth (Bessie) Thompson at her parent's home in Upper Hawthorn, Victoria. Moreover, Gilbert and Elizabeth (Bessie) Douglas were in Melbourne West in 1899.

    In 1901 Gilbert Douglas was still in business at 345 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne and by 1902 he and his family were living in 139 Park Street (now Park Avenue), Parkville within riding (horse) or walking distance from his work. (This property is still standing to date - 2013).

    By January, 1904 Gilbert Douglas was living at 'Larnook', Longmore Street, Middle Park. Gilbert Douglas and his family were still living in Middle Park in about 1907.

    In 1904 Gilbert Douglas still gave his Watchmaking address as 345 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne.

    In 1909 the Gilbert Douglas family was living at 26 Armstrong Street, Middle Park - Gabriel Douglas was listed as a Jeweller.

    At the time of the Australian Electoral Roll in 1914 Gilbert Douglas was living in Clarence Street, Elsternwick.

    In January 1915 at the Carnival at Luna Park, a Gabriel Douglas went dressed as a Tramp.

    In November 1918 and Gilbert Douglas was a Watchmaker at 316 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne. Yet in December, 1918 he advertised that he was at 345 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne.

    At the time of the AE Roll in 1919 Gilbert Douglas was living in Kooyong Road, Elsternwick (near North Road) where his first wife Elizabeth (Bessie) ran a small grocery business and one of his old clocks still sits perched high up on the outside of that old shop, which is now a local 'milk bar' or 'corner shop'. (This clock though perched high up has since been stolen). Another clock I have 'found' by Gilbert Douglas is an old 'Railway Clock' of the late 1890's/early 1900's and it is owned by a gentleman who lives near Ballarat - I have only seen a digital image of it attached to a living room wall!

    By December, 1922 and Gilbert Douglas had moved his Watchmaking business to 520 Elizabeth Street, opposite the Victoria Market.

    In November, 1924 the address of Gilbert Douglas's Watchmaking business was at 512 Elizabeth Street. As at September, 1926 and December, 1927 Gilbert Douglas was still a Watchmaker at 512 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne.

    In terms of his home - at the time of the AE Roll in 1924 and 1931 Gilbert Douglas was living at 'Allambie' (9) Marriage Road, Brighton (demolished in recent times).

    When Gilbert Douglas died in 1946 he was living in Bambury Street, Boronia. However his death certificate states that he died at Mooroopna, near Shepparton, Victoria.

    Gilbert Douglas had five children in his first marriage and two in his second.

    Gabriel/Gilbert Douglas was a great grandson of John Douglas, Master Clock and Watchmaker of Jedburgh, Roxburghshire and Galston, Ayrshire; a grandson of Walter Douglas born in Jedburgh who was a Master Clock and Watchmaker in Old Cumnock, Muirkirk, and (later) in Galston, Ayrshire - Dollar in Clackmannan - and Holytown, Bothwell (Glasgow) Lanarkshire; and he was a son of Gabriel Douglas born in Muirkirk, Ayrshire, who was a Watchmaker and Jeweller in Scotland and Victoria, Australia.

    (Trove and family history research).

    Sally E Douglas

    140 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-07-07
    User data
  64. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 1)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    (My main aim is to contribute to an understanding of the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum)

    PART 1 - PREAMBLE

    During 2008, 316 items of pictorial content were accepted by the Melbourne Museum (or Museum Victoria - now Museums Victoria) for donation from the Group Captain Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection. (Donation by me). All items donated were originally owned by my father Eric Douglas. Moreover, much of the photography in this collection was by Eric Douglas. All items were donated to the Melbourne Museum with the explicit understanding that there is 'no copyright' of these items by them.

    These 316 items consist of 328 full images, plus eleven 'split' images. (The split images are by Frank Hurley, baring one and they are on Lantern Slides or Glass Plate Negatives). These 316 items cover the BANZ Antarctic Research Expedition of 1929/1930 and 1930/1931 and the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935/1936, plus some other miscellaneous images by Frank Hurley relating to other Antarctic Expeditions. The BANZARE photography included here is by Eric Douglas and Frank Hurley the official photographer and cinematographer of BANZARE. While the Ellsworth Relief Expedition photography is by Eric Douglas, Mr Alfred Saunders the official photographer for the Discovery II (Discovery Committee) and miscellaneous photography, mainly by the Press.

    The Museum has allocated 320 item numbers for these Antarctic images, but four of the item numbers are not of images, so 316 items in total, covering the 328 full images (and another 11 images if the split images are counted as two images).

    I have used capital letters at times to emphasize some headings.

    The collection is made up of black and white Lantern Slides or Glass Slides, some of the slides being made up of 'split' images; black and white 'Whole Plate' Glass Negatives (Frank Hurley's terminology), most of which hold two full negatives, black and white prints and two paintings - 1. an oil painting of the Discovery II 1935/1936 by a British member of the crew and 2. a water colour painting of Lincoln Ellsworth's Northrop Gamma 'Polar Star' flying over an ice-covered plateau in Antarctica. This painting is by Sydney Austin Bainbridge the Purser on the Discovery II and is dated 1935 and it was signed by Lincoln Ellsworth in January, 1936. Both these paintings were presented to then Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas by the two artists. At that time Eric Douglas led the RAAF party of seven onboard the Discovery II in the search for the American Polar Explorer Lincoln Ellsworth and his Canadian based (an Englishman) Antarctic Pilot Herbert Hollick-Kenyon who were missing in the vicinity of Little America, Ross Ice Barrier, Bay of Whales, Ross Sea, Antarctica in late 1935.

    Also in the collection are seven professionally crafted coloured glass slide advertisements, obviously made in the period 1930/1931 to be shown at cinemas with Frank Hurley's Antarctic Films - Southward Ho! and Siege of the South (a revised and updated version of the first mentioned). So Eric Douglas obtained copies of some of them. Whenever we had a home sitting of Antarctic slides over the years (which was infrequent) Eric always showed these ads at our interval and when we saw the one of the Polar Bear enjoying an ice cream cone we all knew that it was time for an ice cream (sometimes homemade).

    Many of the photographic prints and the two paintings were initially framed. However over time some of the frames had deteriorated to the stage where they had fallen off or had to be removed. The paintings still retain their frames (as far as I am aware). Also donated to the Melbourne Museum a bit later was Eric Douglas' Zeiss Ikon Icarette camera which he used to take most of his Antarctic photographs. Eric also owned a Box Brownie camera; plus possibly other cameras in the early days of his life. However the Icarette was the main camera used by him for his Antarctic photography.

    I will make a brief run down of the items donated to the Museum in their ad hoc numbering sequence -
    * Black and white, Lantern Slides or Glass Slides and Coloured Advertisement Slides - 112743 to 112774 inclusive, 112780 to 112785 inclusive, 112791, 112797 to 112801 inclusive, 112809, 112810 to 112814 inclusive, 112822, 112825, 112829 to 112845 inclusive, 112854 to 112857 inclusive, 112880 to 112811 inclusive, 114700 to 114748, and 117500 to 117651 inclusive. (274 items).
    * Whole Plate Glass Negatives or Glass Plate Negatives, two paintings and Photographic prints - 114907, 114906, 114902, 114905, 114904, (The next two are Photographic prints) 117213, 117065, 28028 (oil painting), 28062 (water colour painting), 114913, 114909, 114908, 114912, 114903, 114974 to 114975 inclusive, 114941, 114919, 114938, 114940, 114939, 114937, 114918, 114916, 114911, 114917, 114914, 114901, 114915, 114910, (Photographic prints follow) 117078, 117075, 117068, 117077, 117072 to 117074 inclusive, 117076, 117070, 117069, 134407 and 117071 (42 items).

    Bearing in mind the sequence above -
    * Black and white Lantern Slides ...
    BANZARE items - 112743 to 112880, Frank Hurley AAE 1911-1914 image 112881, Ellsworth Relief Expedition items - 114700 to 114735, BANZARE items - 114736 to 114740, Coloured Ad Slides - 114741 to 114747, BANZARE items - 114748 to 117567, Frank Hurley AAE 1911 -1914 image 117568, BANZARE items - 117569 to 117587, Ellsworth Relief Expedition items - 117588 to 117651.
    * Glass Plate Negatives ...
    BANZARE items -114907 to 114906, Frank Hurley AAE 1911-1914 image 114902, BANZARE item - 114905, Frank Hurley AAE 1911-1914 image 114904, BANZARE items - 117213 and 117065, Ellsworth Relief Expedition (Paintings) - 28028 and 28062, BANZARE items - 114913 to 114903, Ellsworth Relief Expedition items - 114974 to 114918, BANZARE items - 114916 to 117068, Ellsworth Relief Expedition item - 117077, BANZARE items - 117072 to 117069, Frank Hurley Photographic print 'Crystal Canoe' relating to South Georgia and the Endurance Expedition c1916-1917 item 134407, BANZARE item (Photographic print) - 117071.

    A copy of this same photograph of the 'Crystal Canoe' by Frank Hurley is in the Art Gallery of New South Wales - https://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/collection/works/250.2014/

    The split images are Frank Hurley images except for one image. They are made up of two images on a Lantern Slide or Glass Plate Negative. The relevant BANZARE images are - (Lantern Slides follow) 112743 - is of two charts made of BANZARE surveys of 1929-1930 and 1930-1931. It is attributed to Sir Douglas Mawson and BANZARE explorers. All the rest are split images by Frank Hurley - 112763, 112783, 112812, 112832, 112854, 112855 and 117579. While the relevant BANZARE Glass Plate Negatives are 114909, 114911 and 114910. (It means that if these eleven images were added to the 328 full images then the number of separate images would in fact be 339).

    The Glass Plate Negatives with two whole images to a plate are -
    BANZARE - 114907 and 114916, Frank Hurley AAE 1911-1914 image 114902, and Ellsworth Relief Expedition images (made from a copy of two photographs) - 114974, 114975, 114941, 114919, 114938, 114940, 114939, 114937 and 114918. (It means that if these twelve images are added to the 316 items, then the number of full images donated to the Melbourne Museum is 328 as referred to in line 5 of this list).

    The identification of the BANZARE and Ellsworth Relief Expedition images involved -
    * The commencement of my scanning of the Lantern Slides or Glass Slides in the Multi-Media Section at the Australian Antarctic Division at Kingston, Tasmania in about 1996. Before that I had already visited the Division at Kingston and much earlier when it was based in Melbourne to let them know that I had Antarctic material belonging to my late father Eric Douglas. This visit to the Division at Kingston was followed up by about four succeeding visits over the years mainly for scanning Antarctic images. Kevin Bell the Director of Multi-Media told me on my first visit for scanning that I was the first to scan Lantern Slides or Glass Slides there. So it was good to be a first I suppose.
    * The last time I carried out any serious scanning there at the Division was just before the brilliant Antarctic photographer Wayne Papps plunged to his death at Bruny Island. That last time I saw him just before the tragic happening he had moved to another computer so that I could use his computer. I found him to be a quiet but a very lovely person. That last time he and I got into more conversation than was usual and he showed me results of his stitching of photos to create earlier and later digital panoramas of Heard Island. We discussed how he was recovering from food poisoning and I told him that my father had always said in the past 'be careful as it could come back'. Then on the next day which was a Friday I visited the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery and viewed some of Wayne's Antarctic photos in the Gallery and I couldn't wait to return to the Division on the Monday to tell him what I thought about his great images, but it was all too late. Wayne Papps and some of his photography - http://www.antarctica.gov.au/news/2003/wayne-papps-1959-2003
    * Scanning about 400 prints (Three Antarctic albums and loose prints) and over 800 silver gelatin negatives at home as I had by now worked out the techniques and bought myself top class Epson Scanners and the one for scanning negatives has proved particularly useful. Scanning the negatives for instance took me 800 hours and one problem which I had was the negatives curling with the heat of the scanner. I also wanted to get a result with images sitting straight, with the best contrast possible and I even digitally blackened the vertical and horizontal boundaries so that they would have a more finished look.
    * The prints and my father's comments on many proved to be extremely useful in helping me to identify what, where, when and who took the image etc.
    * Moreover, my father had made two wooden boxes for the BANZARE Voyages, Lantern Slides or Glass Slides and one for the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, Lantern Slides or Glass Slides. However, there was also a bit of an overflow in other smaller containers. Anyway the slides being roughly in three wooden boxes dedicated to the three Antarctic journeys by Eric Douglas was pivotal in helping me with identification of the individual images. The Lantern Slides of course were not in perfect voyage order in the boxes and there was also a mixture as over time my father had taken images out of their place to convey a story as he projected the slides eg about flying and the seaplanes or about brash ice and icebergs. Then as one would suspect they ended back somewhere else in the boxes.
    * Also I knew that there was an Album of photographs on the Ellsworth Relief Expedition which had been given to Dr Falla, the Director of the Dominion Museum - now the Te Papa Tongarewa in Wellington, New Zealand. On sending an email to that Museum the relevant Curatorial contacts replied that they would bring forward the scanning of that album and place and digital images online. That was a very responsive outcome.
    * Identification of the Photographer for each image may not be 100 percent definitive but was made with the information accessible to me. For instance many of the images appear also in my father's two Albums of photographs on BANZARE, and by scanning the over 800 silver gelatin negatives by Eric Douglas that helped me with this exercise - BANZARE and Ellsworth Relief Expedition negatives. Plus I have an Album of Frank Hurley photographs owned by Eric Douglas. Moreover for BANZARE the split images on Lantern Slides were obviously the photography of Frank Hurley, except for the chart 112743. Additionally for the BANZARE Glass Plate Negatives they would be by Frank Hurley. The Antarctic Division has a site online which I often referred to when researching. Then there are the many Frank Hurley images online especially at Trove and also at the State Library of New South Wales, Art Galleries and even in the Royal Collection. Another excellent source were the photos on Trove Newspapers. An additional resource of course was the many excellent books on Sir Douglas Mawson, Frank Hurley and other Antarctic books which also contain photographs.
    * Over the earlier years too I had made contact (sometimes face to face) with many people of an Antarctic predisposition eg Dr John Cumpston who wrote officially about the Antarctic for the Australian Government, Lady Mawson, Group Captain Stuart Campbell, Dr Phillip Law, Commander Morton Moyes, Dr Alfred Howard, Dr Brian Roberts who wrote officially on the Antarctic for the British Government, Mrs Lincoln Ellsworth, Ellsworth's friend Beekman Pool, Herbert Hollick-Kenyon, Dr George Deacon - later Sir George Deacon, the Leader and Chief Scientist on the Discovery II, Dr Frank Ommanney a Scientist and Author on the Discovery II. Plus I visited the Adelaide University's Mawson Wing and the Scott Polar Institute at Cambridge. I also went onboard the Discovery at Canary Wharf in the Thames.
    * For all the images scanned or otherwise I had to set up data bases, rough approximations to begin with and gradually more refined as my knowledge of each item developed over many years in terms of detail and accuracy.
    * Even now there remain some items which I cannot identify fully or cannot be completely certain as to who the photographer was. Usually it was a toss-up between Eric Douglas or Frank Hurley for BANZARE. For the Ellsworth Relief Expedition it was mainly between either Eric Douglas or Alfred Saunders.
    * Then there was the need to pore over of my father's Antarctic writings as well as word-processing them.
    * So to get to work. I have spent about 200 hours preparing specific information on each of the 316 items for the new Melbourne Museum over the last 3 and a half years. But still the task of conveying all the precise and correct information to the Melbourne Museum's online site remains incomplete. If there has been any satisfaction for me it has been in the journey and not in the endgame.
    * None of this is probably of interest to most persons but for a serious Antarctic researcher now or in the future I consider that this story behind the images will mean something in deciding what is historical and authentic.

    The following items contain the same image (also cross referenced here) -
    (Lantern Slides or Glass Slides) 112744 & 112745, 112745 & 112744, 112746 & 114916, 112755 & 114917, 112760 & 117076 & 117078, 112768 & 117074, 112797 & 117072, 112798 & 117547, 112801 & 114907, 112811 & 117065 & 117213, 112822 & 114903, 112832 & 114911, 112834 & 117071, 112840 & 114908, 112854 & 112855 & 114909, 112855 & 112854 & 114909, 112857 & 117075, 112881 & 114902, 114705 & 114919, 114708 & 114941, 114724 & 114974, 114729 & 114938, 114730 & 114975, 114731 & 117614, 114748 & 114915, 117502 & 114907, 117506 & 117070, 117535 & 114913, 117538 & 117543, 117543 & 117538, 117547 & 112798, 117559 & 114916, 117562 & 114905, 117563 & 114914, 117565 & 114906, 117568 & 114904, 117575 & 117073, 117579 & 114910, 117583 & 114912, 117588 & 114937, 117614 & 114731, 117615 & 114938, 117625 & 114918, 117627 & 114937, 117628 & 114975, 117631 & 114974, 117635 & 114939, 117643 & 114940, 117644 & 114941, 117645 & 114939, 117646 & 114940,
    (Glass Plate Negatives and Photographic Prints) 114907 - top image is the same as 112801 and the bottom image is the same as 117502, 114906 & 117565, 114902 & 112881, 114905 & 117562, 114904 & 117568, 117213 & 112811 & 117065, 117065 & 112811 & 117213, 114913 & 117535, 114909 & 112854 & 112855, 114908 & 112840, 114912 & 117583, 114903 & 112822, 114974 - top image is the same as 114724 and the bottom image is the same as 117631, 114975 - top image is the same as 114730 and the bottom image is the same as 117628, 114941 - top image is the same as 117644 and the bottom image is the same as 114708, 114919 - bottom image the same as 114705, 114938 - top image is the same as 114729 and the bottom image is the same as 117615, 114940 - top image is the same as 117646 and the bottom image is the same as 117643, 114939 - top image is the same as 117645 and the bottom image is the same as 117635, 114937 - top image is the same as 117588 and the bottom image is the same as 117627, 114918 - top image is the same as 114718 and the bottom image is the same as 117625, 114916 - top image is the same as 117559 and the bottom image is the same as 112746, 114911 & 112832, 114917 & 112755, 114914 & 117563, 114915 & 114748, 114910 & 117579, 117078 & 112760 & 117076, 117075 & 112857, 117072 & 112797, 117073 & 117575, 117074 & 112768, 117076 & 112760 & 117078, 117070 & 117506, 117071 & 112834.

    These are some of the headings used by the Melbourne Museum in their database (though not a complete list) -
    Details under the image
    MM number and Object Name
    Summary
    Description of Content
    Physical Description
    More Information
    • Collection Names
    • Collecting Areas
    • Acquisition Information
    • Place and Date Depicted
    • Creator - sometimes used
    • Photographer
    • Original Owner
    • Publisher if applicable
    • Expedition Leader - sometimes used
    • Person Depicted – sometimes used
    • Individuals Identified - sometimes used
    • Ship Depicted - sometimes used
    • Format
    • Language
    • Classification
    • Category
    • Discipline
    • Type of item
    • Mount Dimensions
    • References
    • Keywords

    When all these items are 'harvested' by Trove NLA from the Museums Victoria site (original digital images remaining with the Melbourne Museum) an extra heading of Date Published appears (I have discussed this with Trove and it is there because of Books). However in the case of the Museum the Date Published against an item is more to do with the Creation Date of the image and indicates that the item is held (now owned) by Museum Victoria. So within that heading two separate pieces of information are supplied.

    Eric Douglas was a keen photographic recorder of events in which he participated. The over-riding goal would have been for the sake of recording what was in time to become history. He recorded his early sailing and skiing days in this manner. Plus he recorded many of his RAAF experiences including early events in RAAF history and RAAF and RAAF related aeroplanes as well as the outback search for Lieutenant Keith Anderson's 'Kookaburra', the Antarctic - BANZARE and the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, and his days as Commanding Officer at RAAF Amberley. Of course too there were numerous things which happened in his working and recreational daily life which were not recorded by camera activity as life has to be lived and not only captured through the eyes of a camera, but I think that he captured enough images to give a real feeling of his life and times.

    In his early youth Eric made rough notes in small notebooks on some of his yachting and RAAF experiences. However he kept more substantial records on his part in the RAAF search for the Kookaburra in 1929, the BANZARE Voyages of 1929/1930 and 1930/1931 and the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935/1936. Plus there are also his six RAAF Flying Logs (donated by me to the RAAF Museum at Point Cook), his RAAF Flying Course notes which I still have as the RAAF Museum said that they did not require the originals as I had already given them copies, and a few notes relevant to Eric's time as Station Commander at RAAF Amberley. Plus he made a few summaries on his Career, also covering his time from 1949 to 1964 as a Technical Officer on Airframes, and later Aeronautical Engineer with DAMR at the Fleet Air Arm (RAN).

    These 316 items can all be found at Trove NLA with or without the MM prefix in each case.

    A few other points of interest -
    * Gipsy Moth VH-UDL flown on the two BANZARE voyages was a de Havilland DH60G while the Gipsy Moth flown on the Ellsworth Relief Expedition was a de Havilland DH60X with the RAAF serial number A7-55.
    * Captain Robert Falcon Scott's old ship the (RRS) Discovery used on BANZARE was registered separately on Lloyds Shipping Register as both a sailing and also a steam ship - ideally using Cardiff Briquettes; while the (RRS) Discovery II used by the search party on the Ellsworth Relief Expedition was an oil burning steamship.
    * For the purposes of BANZARE the Discovery was registered as a sailing ship belonging to a sailing club on the Thames, hence the 'SY Discovery'. (This move was possibly for Insurance purposes). Although it is noted that during BANZARE the ship was still inscribed as 'RRS Discovery'. When the Discovery II came into existence the Discovery in hindsight was also known as the 'Discovery I'.
    * At the time of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition the RRS Discovery II was known as that and also as the Discovery II.
    * During the time of BANZARE the home City and State locations of Sir Douglas Mawson was Adelaide, South Australia; Frank Hurley was Sydney, New South Wales and for Eric Douglas was Melbourne, Victoria. These names keep cropping up in the Melbourne Museum's database for the 316 items.
    * At the time of BANZARE, Kerguelen or the Kerguelen Islands were part of the French Colony of Madagascar.
    * The term Southern Ocean appears to be subject to debate as to its boundaries. The term seemed to have used loosely even if the terminology was that another ocean was more correct eg Antarctic Ocean or Indian Ocean.
    * The Ross Dependency – “In May 1923 the New Zealand government agreed to make the Ross Sea region a ‘dependency’, formally controlled by the governor-general. In the years before the Second World War, New Zealand did little to exert its claim to the Ross Dependency. In August 1923 the New Zealand attorney general had argued that the decision had been made by New Zealand ‘on behalf of the Empire as a whole, and not specially in the interests of New Zealand.’ In 1926 New Zealand promulgated regulations to manage whaling in the Ross Dependency, but no whaling licences were issued under the regulations”. https://teara.govt.nz/en/antarctica-and-new-zealand/page-3
    * The Antarctic lands and territories claimed by Sir Douglas Mawson in January, 1931 at Commonwealth Bay, Antarctica were in the name of the King and the British Commonwealth. These lands were later assigned by Britain as Australian Antarctic Territory.
    *Although the Melbourne Museum refers to the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection component of 274 slides as Lantern Slides which is a correct name Eric Douglas always referred to them as 'the slides'. (The other 42 images in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum are of Glass Plate Negatives, Photographic Prints and Two Paintings). The inference being that to use the term Lantern Slides was a bit outdated and he more likely understood them to be glass slides. Moreover, they were shown with a Lantern in the 1930's, 1940's and 1950's but I never heard it referred to as a 'Magic Lantern' by him, it was always the projector. Eric showed these slides at times over the years until the projector (lantern or magic lantern) started to run 'too hot' and would only last for a few slides till we had to wait for it to cool a bit. This understandingly became a bit tedious. Our 'screen' in the 1950's was either a white or a cream wall or a white bedsheet hung up over a square object or a blind or a curtain rail. I also have some memories in the 1940's of a white screen on a stand. That was probably mislaid or lost. When these slides were shown by my father Eric over the years it was exciting and today's equivalent of showing 'home movies' or even later watching movies or films in your own home 'dedicated theatre'.
    * I have always known or regarded these slides to be 'black and white'. However in some parts in the Melbourne Museum's description they call them 'Monochrome' a definition of which could be "Monochrome describes paintings, drawings, design, or photographs in one color or shades of one color. A monochromatic object or image has colors in shades of limited colors or hues" (from the web). To me although Monochrome covers it, 'black and white' is more precise as the slides are not coloured, though I do have a few Paget process prints.

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 is a SUMMARY to date.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    12 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-05-29
    User data
  65. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 10)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 10

    Numbering of the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives) Paintings and Photographic Prints by the Melbourne Museum.

    Glass Plate Negatives were called Glass Negatives by the Melbourne Museum. Frank Hurley in fact called his Glass Plates, "Whole Plate Negatives".

    The numbering on the left is numbering which I used when I initially scanned the images at the Australian Antarctic Division (The numbers which they asked me to use). The numbers on the right are the initial numbers by the Melbourne Museum when they scanned or photographed the images some years later -
    BANZARE
    Glass Plate Negatives - Boxes 1 and 2
    BOX 1
    For AAD purposes & Melbourne Museum
    840E mm114912-001
    841E mm114913-001
    842E mm114914-001
    843E mm114915-001
    844E mm114916-001
    845E mm114916-002
    846E mm114917-001
    BOX 2 BOX 2
    For AAD purposes & Melbourne Museum
    827E mm114901-001
    828E mm114902-001 - With Banzare - but is AAE 1911 to 1914
    829E mm114902-002 - With Banzare - but is AAE 1911 to1914
    830E mm114903-001
    831E mm114904-001- With Banzare - but is AAE 1911 to 1914
    832E mm114905-001
    833E mm114906-001
    834E mm114907-002
    835E mm114907-001
    836E mm114908-001
    837E mm114909-001
    838E mm114910-001
    839E mm114911-001

    Lincoln Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935/1936
    Glass Plate Negatives - these were in a Box numbered 3
    For AAD purposes & Melbourne Museum
    938E mm114918-002
    Twin with 938E mm114918-001
    939E mm114919-001
    Twin with 939E mm114919-002
    940E mm114937-001
    Twin with 940E mm114937-002

    Lincoln Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935/1936
    Also in Box numbered 3 -Scanned at Home (rather than at the Australian Antarctic Division)
    Number assigned by me & Melbourne Museum number
    ED1 mm114941-002
    ED2 mm114941-001
    ED3 mm114975-001
    ED4 mm114975-002
    ED5 mm114974-001
    ED6 mm114974-002
    ED7 mm114938-001
    ED8 mm114938-002
    ED9 mm114939-001
    ED10 mm114939-002
    ED11 mm114940-001
    ED12 mm114940-002
    The Museum renumbered all these images to become eg 114940-001 and 114940-002 became 114940. With numbers such as mm114912-001 where there was only one item, it became eg mm114912. I just deducted this.

    The Photographic Prints and Paintings which I obviously did not scan were given these numbers initally by the Melbourne Museum. But for the record I did photograph them all.
    mm117075a
    mm117076a
    mm117078
    mm117065a
    mm117213a
    mm117073a & c
    not yet advised - this was a single donation by me, sometime later than July, 2008. It became 134407
    mm117074a & c
    mm117071a & c
    mm117072a & c
    mm117969 & a & b
    mm117070a & c
    mm117068 & a

    It looks like there was also mm117077?

    Then there were the two paintings.

    Anyway they were finally all given these numbers (now 42 tems) -
    114907
    114906
    114902
    114905
    114904
    117213
    117065
    28028 - Painting
    28062 - Painting
    114913
    114909
    114908
    114912
    114903
    114974
    114975
    114941
    114919
    114938
    114940
    114939
    114937
    114918
    114916
    114911
    114917
    114914
    114901
    114915
    114910
    117078
    117075
    117068
    117077
    117072
    117073
    117074
    117076
    117070
    117069
    134407
    117071

    The 114 Series are the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives) and the 117 Series plus 134407 are the Photographic Prints and the two Paintings were part of the 117 Series.

    NOTE: The 114 Series and 117 Series numbering was also given to some of the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) by the Melbourne Museum).

    The Glass Negatives, Paintings and Photographic Prints totalled 42

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 is a SUMMARY to date.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    3 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-16
    User data
  66. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 11)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 11

    Identification of the Photographer (where applicable) -

    Lantern Slides or Glass Slides -
    112743
    112744
    112745
    112746 Frank Hurley
    112747 Frank Hurley
    112748 Eric Douglas
    112749 Frank Hurley
    112750 Eric Douglas
    112751 Eric Douglas
    112752 Eric Douglas
    112753 Eric Douglas
    112754 Eric Douglas
    112755 Frank Hurley
    112756 Eric Douglas
    112757 Eric Douglas
    112758 Eric Douglas
    112759 Eric Douglas
    112760 Frank Hurley
    112761 Eric Douglas
    112762 Eric Douglas
    112763 Frank Hurley
    112764 Frank Hurley
    112765 Frank Hurley
    112766 Frank Hurley
    112767 Eric Douglas
    112768 Frank Hurley
    112769 Frank Hurley
    112770 Frank Hurley
    112771 Frank Hurley or Eric Douglas
    112772 Frank Hurley or Eric Douglas
    112773 Eric Douglas
    112774 Eric Douglas
    112780 Eric Douglas
    112781 Frank Hurley
    112782 Frank Hurley
    112783 Frank Hurley
    112784 Eric Douglas
    112785 Frank Hurley or Eric Douglas
    112791 Frank Hurley
    112797 Frank Hurley
    112798 Eric Douglas
    112800 Eric Douglas
    112801 Frank Hurley
    112809 Frank Hurley
    112810 Eric Douglas
    112811 Frank Hurley
    112812 Frank Hurley
    112813 Eric Douglas
    112814 Eric Douglas
    112822 Frank Hurley
    112825 Frank Hurley
    112829 Frank Hurley
    112830 Frank Hurley or Eric Douglas
    112831 Eric Douglas
    112832 Frank Hurley
    112833 Eric Douglas
    112834 Frank Hurley
    112835 Frank Hurley
    112836 Douglas Mawson
    112837 Eric Douglas
    112838 Frank Hurley or Eric Douglas
    112839 Frank Hurley
    112840 Frank Hurley
    112841 Eric Douglas
    112842 Frank Hurley
    112843 Eric Douglas
    112844 Eric Douglas
    112845 Frank Hurley
    112854 Frank Hurley
    112855 Frank Hurley
    112857 Frank Hurley
    112880 Eric Douglas
    112881 Frank Hurley
    114700 Eric Douglas
    114701 Eric Douglas
    114702 Eric Douglas or Alfred Saunders
    114703 Alfred Saunders
    114704 Eric Douglas
    114705 Alfred Saunders
    114706 Eric Douglas
    114707 Alfred Saunders
    114708 Alfred Saunders
    114709 Eric Douglas
    114710 Eric Douglas
    114711 Eric Douglas
    114712 Alfred Saunders
    114713 Eric Douglas
    114714 Eric Douglas
    114715 Eric Douglas
    114716 Eric Douglas
    114717 Eric Douglas
    114718 Alfred Saunders
    114719 Eric Douglas
    114720 Eric Douglas
    114721 Eric Douglas
    114722 Eric Douglas
    114723 Eric Douglas
    114724 Alfred Saunders
    114725
    114726 Alfred Saunders
    114727 Eric Douglas
    114728 Eric Douglas
    114729 Alfred Saunders
    114730 Alfred Saunders
    114731 Eric Douglas
    114732 Eric Douglas
    114733 Likely by Alfred Sauders
    114734 Eric Douglas
    114735 Eric Douglas
    114736 Eric Douglas
    114737 Likely by Frank Hurley
    114738 Frank Hurley
    114739 Frank Hurley
    114740 Frank Hurley
    114741
    114742
    114743
    114744
    114745
    114746
    114747
    114748 Frank Hurley
    117500 Eric Douglas
    117501 Eric Douglas
    117502 Frank Hurley or Eric Douglas
    117503 Eric Douglas
    117504 Eric Douglas
    117505 Frank Hurley
    117506 Frank Hurley
    117507 Eric Douglas
    117508 Eric Douglas
    117509 Eric Douglas
    117510 Eric Douglas
    117511 Eric Douglas
    117512 Eric Douglas
    117513 Eric Douglas
    117514 Eric Douglas
    117515 Eric Douglas
    117516 Eric Douglas
    117517 Eric Douglas
    117518 Eric Douglas
    117519 Eric Douglas
    117520 Frank Hurley
    117521 Frank Hurley
    117522 Eric Douglas
    117523 Frank Hurley
    117524 Eric Douglas
    117525 Eric Douglas
    117526 Eric Douglas
    117527 Eric Douglas
    117528 Eric Douglas
    117529 Eric Douglas
    117530 Eric Douglas
    117531 Eric Douglas
    117532 Eric Douglas
    117533 Eric Douglas
    117534 Likely by Frank Hurley
    117535 Frank Hurley
    117536 Eric Douglas
    117537 Eric Douglas
    117538 Eric Douglas
    117539 Eric Douglas
    117540 Likely by Frank Hurley
    117541 Eric Douglas
    117542 Eric Douglas
    117543 Eric Douglas
    117544 Frank Hurley
    117545 Eric Douglas
    117546 Eric Douglas
    117547 Eric Douglas
    117548 Eric Douglas
    117549 Eric Douglas
    117550 Eric Douglas
    117551 Eric Douglas
    117552 Eric Douglas
    117553 Frank Hurley
    117554 Eric Douglas
    117555 Eric Douglas
    117556 Eric Douglas
    117557 Eric Douglas
    117558 Eric Douglas
    117559 Frank Hurley
    117560 Eric Douglas
    117561 Eric Douglas
    117562 Frank Hurley
    117563 Frank Hurley
    117564 Eric Douglas
    117565 Frank Hurley
    117566 Eric Douglas
    117567 Eric Douglas
    117568 Frank Hurley
    117569 Eric Douglas
    117570 Eric Douglas
    117571 Eric Douglas
    117572 Eric Douglas
    117573 Eric Douglas
    117574 Eric Douglas
    117575 Frank Hurley
    117576 Likely by Frank Hurley
    117577 Frank Hurley
    117578 Eric Douglas
    117579 Frank Hurley
    117580 Frank Hurley or Eric Douglas
    117581 Frank Hurley
    117582 Frank Hurley
    117583 Frank Hurley
    117584 Eric Douglas
    117585 Eric Douglas
    117586 Eric Douglas
    117587 Frank Hurley
    117588 Alfred Saunders
    117589 Eric Douglas
    117590 Eric Douglas
    117591 Eric Douglas
    117592 Eric Douglas
    117593 Eric Douglas
    117594 Eric Douglas
    117595 Eric Douglas
    117596 Eric Douglas
    117597 Eric Douglas
    117598 Eric Douglas
    117599 Eric Douglas
    117600 Eric Douglas
    117601 Eric Douglas
    117602 Eric Douglas
    117603 Eric Douglas
    117604 Eric Douglas
    117605 Eric Douglas
    117606 Eric Douglas
    117607 Eric Douglas
    117608 Eric Douglas
    117609 Eric Douglas
    117610 Eric Douglas
    117611 Eric Douglas
    117612 Eric Douglas
    117613 Eric Douglas
    117614 Eric Douglas
    117615 Alfred Saunders
    117616 Eric Douglas
    117617 Eric Douglas
    117618 Eric Douglas
    117619 Eric Douglas
    117620 Eric Douglas
    117621 Eric Douglas
    117622 Eric Douglas
    117623 Eric Douglas
    117624 Eric Douglas
    117625 Alfred Saunders
    117626 Eric Douglas
    117627 Alfred Saunders
    117628 Alfred Saunders
    117629 Eric Douglas
    117630 Eric Douglas
    117631 Eric Douglas
    117632 Eric Douglas
    117633 Eric Douglas
    117634 Eric Douglas
    117635 Alfred Saunders
    117636 Eric Douglas
    117637 Eric Douglas
    117638 Eric Douglas
    117639 Eric Douglas
    117640 Eric Douglas
    117641 Eric Douglas
    117642 Eric Douglas
    117643 Alfred Saunders
    117644 Alfred Saunders
    117645 Alfred Saunders
    117646 Alfred Saunders
    117647 Eric Douglas
    117648 Alfred Saunders
    117649 Eric Douglas
    117650
    117651

    Identification of the Photographer of the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives) and Photographic Prints and the Artists of the Two Paintings -
    114907 Frank Hurley for the top item, for the bottom item on the Gentoo Penguin Colony - Frank Hurley or Eric Douglas
    114906 Frank Hurley
    114902 Frank Hurley
    114905 Frank Hurley
    114904 Frank Hurley
    117213 Frank Hurley
    117065 Frank Hurley
    28028 Painting - by a member of the crew of the Discovery II
    28062 Painting - by Sydney Austin Bainbridge, the purser on the Discovery II
    114913 Frank Hurley
    114909 Frank Hurley
    114908 Frank Hurley
    114912 Frank Hurley
    114903 Frank Hurley
    114974 Top - Alfred Saunders & Bottom Image Eric Douglas
    114975 Alfred Saunders
    114941 Alfred Saunders
    114919 Alfred Saunders
    114938 Alfred Saunders
    114940 Alfred Saunders
    114939 Alfred Saunders
    114937 Alfred Saunders
    114918 Alfred Saunders
    114916 Frank Hurley
    114911 Frank Hurley
    114917 Frank Hurley
    114914 Frank Hurley
    114901 Frank Hurley
    114915 Frank Hurley
    114910 Frank Hurley
    117078 Frank Hurley
    117075 Frank Hurley
    117068 Press
    117077 Star Newspaper
    117072 Frank Hurley
    117073 Frank Hurley
    117074 Frank Hurley
    117076 Frank Hurley
    117070 Frank Hurley
    117069 Frank Hurley
    134407 Frank Hurley
    117071 Frank Hurley

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 is a SUMMARY to date.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    3 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-15
    User data
  67. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (Part 12)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 12

    SUMMARY

    * All 316 item descriptions have been re-checked by me for the purposes of Parts 1 to 12 inclusive, in my lists at the Trove website.
    * All 316 items (328 images) will be re-checked by me on the Museums Victoria, Melbourne Museum (nothing there yet) and Trove, in terms of the image and description details etc.
    * The correct date (where known) for each image is the date in the title.
    * Hoping this project can be totally completed soon. I have been working on all the individual items in the database of the Eric Douglas Collection at the Melbourne Museum since no later than December, 2012. At that time I posted in DVD's which I had prepared over some period of time. However, my input at the database at the Museum is only secondary. During 2016 I made a number of visits in person to the Museum to discuss the database and related matters and especially supplying information on titles and description details etc on the 316 items (328 images). Nevertheless, from there to the Museum's website is dependent on the Museum's response and input (in regard to data on all 316 items and hence 328 images). I was also advised recently (April, 2017) by inference that this database is not a priority.
    * I consider that the summary for each item should be something like this - 'One of 328 images in various formats including lantern slides, glass negatives, photographic prints and paintings. The collection at Museums Victoria also includes artefacts, and among those items is Eric Douglas’ Zeiss Ikon Icarette camera used to take the images attributed to him'. To be consistent nothing else should be in this summary.
    * The 'article' on the images at the Melbourne Museum attributed to me has been slightly altered by the Museum and I was told by them that this article had been altered.
    * Also on the artefacts which I began to donate to the Melbourne Museum about 12 years ago as far as I am aware have not yet been re-photographed by the Melbourne Museum (I provided a photograph on each item at the time of donation of the item). Moreover I have not yet been asked to contribute to any further information, other than the initial information which I provided at the time of donating each individual artefact.
    * For anyone using this besides me, then list the items under BANZARE, and BANZARE Voyages 1 and 2; and the Ellsworth Relief Expedition. In my opinion to look at any individual item and hence image, without its voyage context robs it of its historical context.
    * Sub Headings suggested for BANZARE - The Discovery or SY Discovery; Sir Douglas Mawson, Ship's Crew, Scientific Staff, Sailors etc; Cape Town; The Crozets; Kerguelen, Heard Island, Macquarie Island, The Antarctic Mainland, Icebergs and Ice conditions, Penguins and other wildlife, the de Havilland Gipsy Moth VH - ULD and seaplane operations, Meeting the Norwegians and Whaling Operations etc.
    * Sub Headings suggested for the 'Ellsworth Relief Expedition' - The Discovery II, Discovery II personnel, RAAF party, Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon etc, Loading the Discovery II with provisions, New Zealand, Heading South and Ice conditions, the RAAF de Havilland Gipsy Moth A7-55 and RAAF Westland Wapiti A5-37 (the Wapiti did not fly in the Antarctic), the Ross Ice Barrier (now Shelf), the Wyatt Earp, Little America, Ross Island and Cape Crozier, Balleny Group and other Antarctic Islands, Melbourne - departure of the Discovery II and the return of the Discovery II.

    On the article on my father (Gilbert) Eric Douglas at the Melbourne Museum it has my name alongside it as Sally Douglas as one of the two names but my contribution if any to this article has been remote in that it is via another member of the Museum’s staff. (I did write an article and even with the consideration of the donation to the Museum I was told that the present article there ‘still stays' but not mine (as the prime article). Also I did comment and make suggestions on the Museum's article but I had no input as to what goes and what stays). Anyway I had said withdraw my article (as I could see no point in running two parallel articles even if they were on my father).

    Who was on BANZARE?

    British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) 1929-1931

    The Expedition Commander
    Sir Douglas Mawson – Commanding the Expedition, Navigation Officers and crew of the Discovery – 1929-1931 Two voyages

    The Ship’s Company

    Captain John King Davis – Master of the Discovery and second in Command 1929-1930 Voyage I
    Kenneth Norman MacKenzie – First Mate 1929-1930 and Master of the Discovery, and second in Command 1930-1931 Two voyages
    Arthur Max Stanton – First mate 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    Lieutenant William Robinson Colbeck RN Reserve – Special Navigating Officer and Second Mate 1929-1931 Two voyages
    John Bonus Child – Third Mate 1929-1931 Two voyages
    Wilfred James Griggs – Chief Engineer 1929-1931 Two voyages
    Bernard Frank Welch – Second Engineer 1929-1931 Two voyages
    Arthur J Williams – Petty Officer, Signalling Division RN, Wireless Officer 1929-1931 Two voyages

    Scientific and Technical Staff

    Professor (Thomas) Harvey Johnston – Chief Biologist 1929-1931 Two voyages
    Harold Oswald Fletcher – Assistant Biologist 1929-1931 Two voyages
    Robert Alexander Falla – Ornithologist 1929-1931 Two voyages
    Ritchie Gibson Simmers – Meteorologist 1929-1931 Two voyages
    Alfred Howard – Chemist 1929-1931 Two voyages
    William Wilson Ingram – Medical Doctor and Bacteriologist 1929-1931 Two voyages
    Morton Henry Moyes – Instructor Commander RAN - Hydrographic Surveyor 1929-1930 Voyage I
    Dr James William Slessor Marr – Oceanographer 1929-1930 Voyage I
    Karl Eric (Erik ) Oom – Lieutenant RAN – Hydrographic Surveyor 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    Alexander Lorimer Kennedy – Physicist 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    James Francis Hurley – Photographer 1929-1931 Two voyages
    Stuart Alexander Caird Campbell – Flight Lieutenant RAAF 1929-1931. Senior RAAF Pilot Two voyages
    (Gilbert) Eric Douglas – Flying Officer RAAF 1929-1931. Two voyages

    The Ship’s Crew

    Frank G Dungey – Chief Steward 1929-1930 Voyage I
    Josiah John Pill – Chief Steward 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    F Sones – Cook 1929-1930 Voyage I
    John E Reed – Cook 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    George James Rhodes – Assistant Cook 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    Allan J Bartlett – Cook’s Mate 1929-1930 and Second Steward 1930-1931 Two voyages
    Clarence H V Sellwood – Assistant Steward 1929-1930 Voyage I
    Harry V Gage – Assistant Steward 1929-1930 Voyage I
    Ernest Bond – Assistant Steward 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    Stanley R Smith – Fireman 1929-1930 Voyage I
    James T Kyle – Fireman 1929-1930 Voyage I
    Richard V Hampson – Fireman 1929-1930 Voyage I
    Frank Best – Fireman 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    Murde Campbell Morrison – Fireman 1930-1931 Voyage 2 The Australian Antarctic Data Centre give his initials as H C.
    William Edward Crosby – Fireman 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    John J Miller – Sailmaker 1929-1931 Two voyages
    C Degerfeldt – Carpenter 1929-1930 Voyage I
    Joseph Williams – Carpenter 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    W H Letten – Donkeyman (Auxillary Engineer) 1929-1931 Two voyages
    W Simpson – Boatswain 1929-1930 Voyage I
    James H Martin – Able Seaman 1929-1930 and Boatswain 1930-1931 Two voyages
    Kenneth McLennan – Able Seaman 1929-1930 Voyage I
    Raymond C Tomlinson - Able Seaman 1929-1930 Voyage I
    F Leonard Marsland – Able Seaman 1929-1930 Voyage I
    John A Park – Able Seaman 1929-1930 Voyage I
    Lauri Parviainen - Able Seaman 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    A Hendrickson - Able Seaman 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    David Peacock - Able Seaman 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    William Porteous - Able Seaman 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    Norman C Matear - Able Seaman 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    Fred G Ward - Able Seaman 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    William E Howard - Able Seaman 1930-1931 Voyage 2
    George Ayres – Able Seaman 1929-1931 Two voyages
    John Matheson - Able Seaman 1929-1931 Two voyages

    Eric Douglas wrote in his log that there 38 onboard the Discovery on Voyage I and that tallies with what is shown here. It appears that there were 38 men on Voyage I and 40 men on Voyage 2. Then there was Brock who took five negatives of deep sea fish. (From a BANZARE Voyage 2 'negatives list' by Frank Hurley). If Brock is included the number for Voyage 2 was 41.

    BANZARE photography - http://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=104277

    Counting Lantern Slides (Glass Slides), silver gelatin negatives, loose photographic prints of varying sizes and prints in two albums on the Antarctic, I estimate that Eric Douglas took about 350 different still photographs on BANZARE 1929-1931 and about 50 different still images on the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936.

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 is a SUMMARY to date.

    Sally E Douglas

    3 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-21
    User data
  68. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 2)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 2

    Item details for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) in order as in the Melbourne Museum's database spreadsheets -

    112743
    A horizontally split slide showing two charts drawn up by the BANZARE Expedition surveys of 1929-1930 and 1930-1931. Published in August, 1932 by the Royal Geographical Society, London as 'Antarctic Regions - Mawson'. Eric Douglas said on this 'The chart is from sketch surveys made by the BANZARE Expedition during the Summer seasons of 1929-1930 and 1930-1931, adjusted by frequent astronomical observations taken on board the Discovery and at Scullin Monolith. The coastline with the exception of the parts shown by thicker lines, consists of inaccessible ice cliffs, 100 to 150 feet high. Kemp Land west of Cape Heard was charted from the Gipsy Moth seaplane at a height of 5,500 feet. Large numbers of icebergs were found at varying distances from the land. The new names on this chart were those proposed by Sir Douglas Mawson'.

    112744
    112744 is the same image as 112745.
    A chart depicting BANZARE Antarctic Territorial Claims 1929-1930.The claims are shown as 'Australian Dependency'. The discoveries and claims from BANZARE were initially in the name of the British Empire.

    112745.
    112745 is the same image as 112744.
    A chart depicting BANZARE Antarctic Territorial Claims 1929-1930.The claims are shown as 'Australian Dependency'. The discoveries and claims from BANZARE were initially in the name of the British Empire.

    112746
    This image is also on Glass Plate Negative 114916 - bottom image of two images.
    Southward Ho! Photograph of a Sea Elephant taken during BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. It is a composite photo of a roaring Bull Sea Elephant leaning towards a nesting bird. The roaring sound emitted by the Bull Sea Elephant is through his large proboscis (nose). The nose also acts as a 'rebreather' conserving the animal's body moisture (by reabsorbing it) during the mating season when Bull seal elephants do not leave the beach for food or water. Below the image is a caption which reads 'Southward Ho! with Mawson'. This was also the name for Frank Hurley's movie released after this voyage, but it was not considered a commercial success. Some of this film was reworked by Frank Hurley for his next Antarctic film 'Siege of the South' which was released to mainstream movie-goers after Voyage 2 of 1930-1931. The film premiered at Brisbane's Majestic Theatre in October, 1931, with Frank Hurley introducing the program. Screen Australia states that "the 'Siege of the South' is a great achievement in Antarctic actuality filmmaking". Frank Hurley took many risks for his reality photographs and film making, such as being strapped to the ship and hanging over the Discovery's side or even diving into an icy sea.

    112747
    Preparing Bird specimens on board the Discovery, BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930. Harold 'Cherub' Fletcher (left) Zoologist and Robert 'Birdie' Falla Ornithologist (right), were two members of the BANZARE 'Scientific party'. They were working in the area on the Discovery known as the 'bird cage' and were preparing bird specimens (specimens of bird types) for distribution to Museums at the completion of the voyage.

    112748
    Icebergs. It is hard to tell whether this is one oddly shaped iceberg or a few bergy bits travelling along together. Eric Douglas said 'Here and there are ice bergs looking like old castles and ramparts'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112749
    The Discovery at Cape Town, South Africa, Oct. 1929. The main wharf and port at Cape Town, South Africa, with the SY (Steam Ship) Discovery berthed at left. Table Mountain, a distinctive geographical feature of Cape Town is to the right. On 1st August, 1929 the Discovery berthed in London, commenced the journey to Cape Town bunkering coal at Cardiff, Wales on the way and also calling at St Vincent. The ship arrived in Cape Town on 5th October, 1929. In Cape Town it was converted from a barque to a barquentine rig as the Captain John King Davis considered that the barque rigging made the ship unsuitable for sailing to the Antarctic - somewhat top heavy and cumbersome. His intention was 'to make the vessel easier to handle with a small crew and to reduce wind resistence aloft when under steam'. Here it is pictured prior to the 'official' commencement of BANZARE Voyage 1 on 19th October, 1929. Nevertheless in spite of the alterations Eric Douglas wrote in his notes that the Discovery 'was like a hollow log of wood' it was rather a slow sailer but was capable of withstanding enormous crushing pressures 'when beset with ice.' He would not have said anything but being 'a Fiskebolle' (of the sea) and an experienced yachtsman he commented in his notes too that the Discovery was only sailed properly once during BANZARE.

    112750
    Table Mountain, Cape Town in South Africa. Photograph taken before the official commencement of BANZARE Voyage 1 on 19th October, 1929.

    112751
    The Discovery in the port at Cape Town. Eric Douglas said that 'the ship departed from England in early August, 1929 and arrived at Cape Town, South Africa in early October, 1929'...'This ship spoke of the sea and adventure, and excitedly I viewed a large case behind the main mast, in this was stowed a Gipsy Moth aeroplane'. Photograph taken before the official commencement of BANZARE Voyage 1 on 19th October, 1929.

    112752
    'Sail set' on the Discovery, 'bow view'. This sail is carried on horizontal spars or yards. After departing from Cape Town on 19th October, 1929, the Discovery was rigged as a barquentine having been modified from a barque or bark when in Cape Town early in October 1929. The Discovery by design had three main masts, square rigged on the fore and main and the great expanse of yards and rigging aloft offered much wind resistance, which was potentially disadvantageous in an Antarctic hurricane. In such a situation the only course of action for the navigator was to steam into the wind and wait it out. So steps were taken to reduce the sail wind resistance when in Cape Town before the official commencement of BANZARE. The yards and square rigging on the main mast were abolished, making the rig barquentine rather than barque. This meant that the ship was now square rigged only on the fore mast. The Discovery and crew gained in that the ship would be more stable but the downside was that as a sailer it would have less sailing options without its full rigging and would be more sluggish. Although the Discovery was heavily dependent on sail, sailing was of course was of little or no value in the Antarctic. For there was the imminent danger of pack ice and icebergs, together with a lack of suitable winds or in complete contrast hurricane conditions. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 'Sail set' 'stern view', 112753.

    112753
    'Sail set' on the Discovery, 'stern view'. This sail is carried on horizontal spars or yards. After departing from Cape Town on 19th October, 1929, the Discovery was rigged as a barquentine having been modified from a barque or bark when in Cape Town early in October 1929. The Discovery by design had three main masts, square rigged on the fore and main and the great expanse of yards and rigging aloft offered much wind resistance, which was potentially disadvantageous in an Antarctic hurricane. In such a situation the only course of action for the navigator was to steam into the wind and wait it out. So steps were taken to reduce the sail wind resistance when in Cape Town before the official commencement of BANZARE. The yards and square rigging on the main mast were abolished, making the rig barquentine rather than barque. This meant that the ship was now square rigged only on the fore mast. The Discovery and crew gained in that the ship would be more stable but the downside was that as a sailer it would have less sailing options without its full rigging and would be more sluggish. Although the Discovery was heavily dependent on sail, sailing was of course was of little or no value in the Antarctic. For there was the imminent danger of pack ice and icebergs, together with a lack of suitable winds or in complete contrast hurricane conditions. This photograph was taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 'Sail set' 'bow view', 112752

    112754
    West Coast of Heard Island with a rookery of penguins in the forefront. Eric Douglas' said 'West Coast of Heard Island...The island appears to be about twenty miles long by eight miles wide. It has several peninsulars and the land slopes up from all sides to terminate in a huge mountain 9,000 feet high (Big Ben)...There are several heavily crevassed ice glaciers running down for miles to terminate at the sea. The sea breaks heavily on this ice and every now and then large pieces of ice break away and fall into the sea with a deep roar. The origin of this island appears to be volcanic, near our hut were two volcanic craters and several square miles of lava...The weather seems to be of continual mists, snow and sleet with north east to north west winds prevailing, and now and then a ray of sunshine...' Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112755
    112755 is the same image as 114917.
    Kerguelen Cabbage growing on Kerguelen Island. The cabbage was growing wild and it was there in abundance. Eric Douglas said 'Kerguelen Cabbage grows in great numbers on all these islands...We motored about two miles up against the wind and went ashore on a fairly large island called Sukur... Wonderful vegetation, numerous Kerguelen Cabbages and plenty of duck.' Eric Douglas also made a note about the vegetation - Azorella and Accena. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112756
    Part of the 'Scientific party' from the Discovery in the ship's motor boat which is approaching the Antarctic coast. It shows two of the explorers who are facing towards the bow and hence away from the camera lens. The Discovery's motor boat or launch for BANZARE was commissioned by Captain John King Davis. It was built by Mr Jack of Launceston, Tasmania. It was constructed of Huon pine, 24 ft in length, 7 ft beam and fitted with an inboard 8 horse power, two-cylinder marine engine. It was painted navy grey and fitted with a special removable hard top cabin. The carrying capacity of the boat was up to 12 persons. It was shipped to Cape Town from Australia to be loaded onto the Discovery at that port. The motor boat often towed the Norwegian built snub nosed phram or dinghy when excursions were made from the Discovery. Sometimes the motor boat was anchored close to the shore and the final section of the journey was made in the phram. Eric Douglas was responsible for the maintenance and running of the motor boat during BANZARE. Comments by Eric Douglas on the motor boat "I spent the morning looking over the ships motor boat engine. It is a twin 8HP Regal engine...' Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112757
    A Snowy Sheathbill, also known as a Paddy, perched on a rock at Kerguelen. Eric Douglas captioned this image 'An inquisitive Paddy'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112758
    'SY Discovery' near an iceberg. Two explorers can be seen leaning on the ship's rail. It depicts a very peaceful scene with reflections from the berg and calm Antarctic waters. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112759
    Three of the ship's sailors out on the boom furling the upper topsail of the the ship Discovery. Eric Douglas captioned the image, 'Stowing the upper topsail'. This picture was taken on the journey between Hobart and Macquarie Island. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112760
    112760 is the same image as 117076 & 117078
    Heard Island looking west from Atlas Cove. Sea elephants are in the foreground lazing on the shoreline. Eric Douglas captioned the image. 'Typical day at Heard Island- View from Atlas Cove looking Westward'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112761
    The Discovery returning to Hobart, BANZARE Voyage 2, 1930-1931. The ship is in an ocean swell and some of the ship's rigging comprising cables, cordage and lines can be seen in a limited view. This would have been taken on the same photographic exercise as 112762.

    112762
    A limited view showing cables, cordage and lines of the Discovery which was on the return journey to Hobart, BANZARE Voyage 2, 1930-1931. The ship is in an ocean swell. This would have been taken on the same photographic exercise as 112761.

    112763
    A horizontally split slide. The top picture is of a coastal landscape at Royal Sound, Kerguelen and image below shows a whaling station in the Port of Jeanne d'Arc. Eric Douglas said for the top one 'Entrance to Royal Sound, Kerguelen Island and the bottom one ' Jeanne d'Arc - old Whaling station built in 1908'. About Kerguelen by Eric Douglas 'Eventually arrived off Royal Sound on 12th November, 1929. We steamed 20 miles up a winding fiord to the old Whaling station of Jeanne d'Arc. Coal was left here by a ship going south. Cardiff briquettes 500 tons. This island belongs to France. It is controlled by Governor of Madagascar. Size 80 miles by 40 miles. Wonderfully pretty, with inland lakes and glaciers. The mainland is overrun with rabbits, seals scarce, penguins on islands'. Photographs taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112764
    The Waterfall Gully, Port of Jeanne d'Arc, Kerguelen Island. Frank Hurley said 'The Discovery at Jean D'Arc from the cliffs above the cascade'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112765
    Summit of Mount Ross, Kerguelen Island. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'Aerial view of Mount Ross Kerguelen Island - 6000 feet above sea level'. Mount Ross is the highest mountain in the Kerguelen Islands. It is a Volcanic cone. Kerguelen was often referred to as Kerguelen Island but it is in fact consists of one main island 'Grand Terre' and some hundreds of smaller islands. When Kerguelen initially became French Territory it was part of the French Colony of Madagascar. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112766
    Three of the Discovery's explorers at one of the Kerguelen Lakes. Those three men would have been part of what was known as the 'Scientific party'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112767
    A wooden pen of live Sheep on the SY Discovery's deckhouse roof. This pen was used for Husky dogs on previous voyages of the Discovery. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112768
    112768 is the same image as 117074
    Sea Elephants and Gentoo Penguins, Crozet Islands. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'Sea Elephants and Gentoo Penguins, Crozet Islands...Twelve of us went ashore in the motor boat, anchored same about 100 yards offshore then did short trips in the dinghy we towed, bit of a surf running and a few of us got water down our sea boots'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112769
    An old Norwegian hut at Heard Island with a British flag to the left and seven of the Discovery's explorers gathered around the hut. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'Scientific party ashore at Heard Island. An old Norwegian Hut, November, 1929'. Eric Douglas said of the hut 'It appeared that this hut had been erected by sealers some years before as a shelter during their periodic visits when hunting seals and sea elephants and then left as a safeguard for ship wrecked people. It was complete with a rain water tank and a large steel tank containing “rusks” a form of hard toasted bread. The hut was securely fastened to the ground by wire cables and from the apex of its roof projected an iron chimney pipe. We found that its sides were about seven feet long and that the interior contained two tiers of wooden bunks with a stove for burning either coal or seal blubber in the centre of its earthen floor. The hut was a fortunate find as it offered good shelter for our period of stay and avoided the necessity to live under small tents which we had brought in the motor boat...' Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112770
    The 'Scientific party' ashore at the Crozet Islands. Nine of the Discovery's explorers having a lunch break on Possession Island, one of the Crozet Group. Three Paddys or Sheathbills have gathered in front of them. The men were identified by Eric Douglas as 'Back row - Marr, Johnston and Ingram, Front - Moyes, Douglas, Campbell, Sir Douglas Mawson, Falla and Fletcher'. Eric Douglas said of Possession Island 'This island is 4,000 feet high, twenty miles by ten miles and plenty of snow on the hills and mounts. The wind comes down the valleys in terrific gusts, and whips the sea into spray about 20 feet high and just about blows one overboard'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112771
    An Aerial view of 'Bras Bossiere' (Bossiers Arm) of the Kerguelen Lakes, Kerguelen Island. Besides Frank Hurley taking aerial photographs Campbell and Douglas did go out on a seaplane flight assignment together and took aerial photographs at Kergeuelen. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112772
    Three of the Discovery's Scientific party are standing on the deck of the Discovery around a Weather Balloon filled with hydrogen gas. These men are measuring the upper atmospheric wind inflow of air at high elevations over the South Polar region. Observations to a height of 50,000 feet could be made. One man is standing behind a theodolite on a tripod. Ritchie Simmers, the Meteorologist was in charge of this operation. As far as can be ascertained there were two types of theodolites on the Discovery and the 'modern' one was described by Frank Hurley as a 'Pilot Balloon Mirror Theodolite'. By contrast, the outer movement of air over the South Pole is at the level of land surface and low elevations. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112773
    Antarctic iceberg and its reflection. Eric Douglas related that it was not a black and white world in the Antarctic but a world full of colour. However, he did miss the sight or trees and flowers and the scent of the Australian bush. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112774
    A Wandering Albatross with out-stretched wings perched on the rail of the Discovery and an explorer to the right. Eric Douglas captioned this image 'Wandering Albatross - 11 ft 6' (wingspan). This wingspan was about the upper size limit, with the Wandering Albatross having the largest wingspan of all birds. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112780
    'SY Discovery' sailing through loose pack ice. It is likely that only a small amount of sail was set. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112781
    The de Havilland DH60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD stowed on board the 'SY Discovery'. Hot air from the ship's stoke hole is being led through a canvas chute to warm the seaplane's engine. The RAAF pilots tried a couple of methods to 'warm up' the Gipsy Moth's engine, before it was even slung over the side of the ship, the SY Discovery. The method shown here seemed to work fairly well. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112782
    Four of the Discovery's Scientists carrying out a scientific inspection of a netted sea haul. From left to right - Sir Douglas Mawson, Dr William Wilson Ingram, James William Slessor Marr and man behind the door is unidentified. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112783
    A horizontally split slide, showing Sea Elephants. Both images show a cradle of sea elephants basking in the sun on the Crozet Islands. Eric Douglas captioned the slide 'Top - Sea Elephants' and lower - Sea Elephants basking in the sun'. Photographs taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112784
    Three of the Discovery's explorers out on the ice. They could be collecting ice for water or checking the ice conditions for the safe passage of the Discovery. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112785
    An Aerial view of the Kerguelen Lakes, Kerguelen Island. Taken from the de Havilland DH60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112791
    The Discovery pushing slowly through pack ice with Adelie penguins in the foreground. Eric Douglas has said of this image 'SY Discovery slowly pushing south far in the pack ice and Adelie Penguins looking on - December 1929. Location 80 degrees East Longitude and 65 degrees South Latitude'. There are Adelie penguins in the foreground on the pack ice. Photograph taken in December 1929 - BANZARE Voyage 1.

    112797
    112797 is the same image as 117071
    A Cathedral type iceberg seen near Enderby Land. Eric Douglas has said of the taller berg in this image, 'A Cathedral type berg - 320 feet above sea level'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112798
    112798 is the same image as 117547
    Antarctic waters with an iceberg looming up in the distance. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112800
    Berg on the move. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112801
    112801 is the same image as 114907
    Superimposed image created by Frank Hurley of the Discovery 'pushing' through heavy pack ice. It is included with Hurley's BANZARE Voyage 1 photos of 1929-1930. Eric Douglas said the purpose was to give some reality as to what the Discovery would look like with its full sailing rig in solid pack ice and he added 'don't get too alarmed for the safety of the ship'.

    112809
    SY Discovery in open waters. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112810
    Explorer at the bow of the Discovery's motor boat, approaching the Antarctic mainland. This could be in the vicinity of Mac-Robertson Land. (Named for the Discovery's benefactor Macpherson Robertson of chocolate fame). Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112811
    112811 is the same image as 117065 and 117213
    Discovery in loose pack ice near Enderby Land. The ship's doctor, Dr Wlliam Wilson Ingram, stands looking out to sea. He is holding a whale marking gun. Eric Douglas has said of the image: 'SY Discovery near Enderby Land - Time approximately 10pm with the sun low in the sky...' Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112812
    A horizontally split slide. The top image shows the bow of the Discovery with Proclamation Island in the distance. The image below provides a view of brash ice ahead. Eric Douglas has said 'Top - The Discovery closing in on Proclamation Rock. This Rock is a small island just off the coast and is 600 feet above sea level and Below - Brash Ice held in by the ocean swell. The outline of the Antarctic Coast can be seen straight ahead'. Although this land feature became 'Proclamation Island' it had just been discovered and at this early stage to call it Proclamation Rock was quite acceptable. The Antarctic coast ahead was part of Enderby Land. Photographs taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112813
    Four Adelie penguins are standing on rocks at Cape Denison, Adelie Land or King George V Land. Initially Sir Douglas Mawson referred to this area as Adelie Land and when boundaries were defined it was in King George V Land. Eric Douglas said 'On our port bow is Cape Denison, a rocky outcrop extending half a mile or so seawards. The old huts are situated between two rocky rises and on the nearest rise can be seen the Cross erected by Sir Douglas in 1914 in memory of Lieut Ninnis and Dr Mertz who lost their lives while on a sledging trip'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112814
    The Discovery in open water. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112822
    112822 is the same image as 114903
    An aerial view of the Antarctic coast and Proclamation Island as seen from the de Havilland DH60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD, at an altitude of 1500 feet. Eric Douglas' caption 'Close up view Antarctic Coast and Proclamation Rock - Open water near the coast - taken from 1500 ft altitude'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112825
    Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) pilots Pilot Officer Eric Douglas - left and Flying Officer Stuart Campbell - right, standing alongside de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD, on board the ship Discovery. The Gipsy Moth was a new aeroplane built by de Havilland in England and it was crated on the Discovery to Cape Town and then to the Antarctic. When conditions were nearly suitable for flying it was uncrated and assembled by the RAAF pilots on the deck of the ship. Its storage place was normally for a whaleboat or lifeboat which was taken off the ship to make room for the aeroplane. On this voyage the whaleboat was taken off at Kerguelen Island and collected on the return journey, which meant of course that the Gipsy Moth was re-crated. The moth was flown as a float seaplane on the BANZARE Voyages. As well as the floats, skis had been made for the aeroplane and they were stored in the floats. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112829
    Proclamation Island, showing a rocky peak. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112830
    A very old and tall iceberg seen off the coast of Enderby Land. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'A very old Iceberg seen off Enderby Land - Observed height 342 ft. Possibly the tallest iceberg ever seen'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112831
    The Discovery pushing through solid pack ice. It is heavy going. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112832
    112832 is the same image as 114911
    A vertically split slide. The left image is an aerial view of the ship Discovery with Frank Hurley, looking up at the camera lens from within the ship's barrel. The right image shows the bow of the Discovery in open water. Eric Douglas said 'Left - Captain Hurley in the Barrel - A Bird's Eye View and Right - Heading South'. Photographs taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112833
    A large iceberg throwing a shadow. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112834
    112834 is the same image as 117071.
    Adelie Penguins seen along the slopes of Proclamation Island and with Icebergs in the far distance. Eric Douglas said 'Adelie Penguins sun baking on the slopes of Proclamation Rock'. Although this land feature became 'Proclamation Island' it had just been discovered and at this early stage to call it Proclamation Rock was quite acceptable. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112835
    Explorers aboard the Discovery looking towards the Norwegian ship 'Norvegia'. Eric Douglas' log of 14th January, 1930 - '...8PM Sail - Oh. Capt Davis reported a ship in sight dead ahead 8.30PM. She appears to be the “Norvegia” a wooden ship about 120 feet long, ketch rigged but uses steam all the time down here. She appears (from one mile off) to have two machines on board, stowed fore and aft. The one forrard is an American “Lockheed Vega” Cabin monoplane, the one aft is a German seaplane monoplane, after the style of their junkers. The Commander R Larson and first mate Mr Nielson came aboard'. Although there was intense rivalry at the time between the British and Norwegian Governments in terms of Antarctic Discoveries and claims, Capter Hjalmar Riiser Larsen of the Norvegia and Sir Douglas Mawson respected each other and got on extremely well. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112836
    An explorer from the Discovery planting the British Flag on Proclamation Island on 13th January, 1930. The Discovery is in the distance. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112837
    In the Pack Ice Belt. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112838
    Three Rockhopper penguins - a crested type of penguin. In fact all Rockhopper Penguins are crested. These Rockhoppers were probably seen on the Crozet Group or at the Kerguelen Islands. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112839
    A black and white iceberg. The black area is filled with grit and mud, indicating that it has probably rolled over. Black bergs are actually translucent. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'Black and White - a once grounded berg that has drifted away showing mud impregnated ice'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112840
    112840 is the same image as 114908
    A barrel view of de Havilland DH60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD housed on board the ship Discovery. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'A view showing the housing of Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112841
    The housing of de Havilland DH60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD seaplane on the skids or the skid deck of the ship Discovery. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112842
    Three of the Discovery's explorers walking along the coast of Proclamation Island, Enderby Land. A large amount of pack ice can be seen floating in the water. Eric Douglas said 'View of the Antarctic Coast from Proclamation Rock'. Although this land feature became 'Proclamation Island' it had just been discovered and at this early stage to call it Proclamation Rock was quite acceptable. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112843
    Two explorers from the Discovery with rope standing in front of the de Havilland DH60G Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD. They may be checking ice conditions. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112844
    The Discovery in heavy pack ice. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112845
    Two Wandering Albatrosses flying over water. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112854
    112854 is the same images as 112855 and 114909
    A vertically split slide. The image on the left shows the 'SY Discovery' with a man on the deck wearing a sailor's hat. The image on the right shows the 'SY Discovery' with a man climbing up the rigging of the ship's mast. Eric Douglas said 'Left - The Bridge looking aft and Right - A view from the foreyard looking aft'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112855
    112855 is the same image as 112854 and 114909
    A vertically split slide. The image on the left shows the 'SY Discovery' with a man on the deck wearing a sailor's hat. The image on the right shows the 'SY Discovery' with a man climbing up the rigging of the ship's mast. Eric Douglas said 'Left - The Bridge looking aft and Right - A view from the foreyard looking aft'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112857
    112857 is the same image as 117075
    Crabeater Seals and Adelie Penguins drifting on an ice floe. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'Crabeater Seals and Adelie Penguins drifting on their frozen raft'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112880
    An Iceberg side on. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112881
    112881 is the same image as 114902
    An Antarctic Explorer leaning on or against the katabatic wind of Cape Denison.This has been said to be the windiest part of he planet. Photograph taken during the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) of 1911-1914.

    114700
    RRS Discovery II in the pack ice zone in the Ross Sea. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114701
    RRS Discovery II and Cape Crozier, Ross Island in view. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114702
    Loading of spares for the two RAAF seaplanes - DH 60X Gipsy Moth A7-55 and Westland Wapiti A5-37. Note the fuel drums on the right. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114703
    Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas in the cockpit of the RAAF aircraft Wapiti in Williamstown, Victoria. Eric Douglas said 'RAAF Wapiti being loaded aboard the Discovery II at Williamstown, Victoria, December 1935 - Flight Lieut Douglas in the cockpit'. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114704
    Three crew members on the deck of the Discovery II. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114705
    114705 is the same image as 114919
    RAAF Personnel Flight Lieutenant Douglas right and Sergeant Cottee left, binding a sledge. This sledge was loaned for the search by Sir Douglas Mawson. It was apparently made with spotted-gum. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114706
    Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas standing on the RAAF Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55 near the lifting hook. This was at the end of the Reconnaissance flight of 13th January, 1936. Eric Douglas' log '...We climbed to about 1100 feet (could not go higher owing to clouds) and flew south for several miles. We sketched the general lay out and observed open water about 28 miles south. Heavy unbroken floes to the east. The ship was slowly steaming but with the wind on the wrong side for us to come on board, so I flew low and indicated to the Skipper to turn the ship about. This he did and then I alighted close by and tried to come on board, but the ship still had way on, so I put Al (Alister Murdoch) off into the motor boat and then took off solo to try and alight in a better position. This I did and without much trouble was hoisted on board'. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114707
    Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55 on board the ship Discovery II. Eric Douglas' caption reads 'Final Rigging of the Moth Seaplane in the quiet waters of the Ross Sea - January 1936'. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114708
    114708 is the same image as 114941
    Group photo of the RAAF Party on board the ship Discovery II on the return journey to Melbourne. Lincoln Ellsworth is in the middle of the front row. Lieutenent Leonard Hill, the Captain of the Discovery II is on Ellsworth's right and Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas leader of the RAAF contingent is on Ellsworth's left side. The other six men are members of the RAAF party of seven. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114709
    Pilot ship Akuna in Port Phillip Bay - 18th February, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114710
    RAAF Westland Wapiti A7-35 stowed aft (with its wings detached) on the Discovery II. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114711
    An Antarctic Island of the Balleny Group. It could be Young Island. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114712
    Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55 is ready with its engine running. It is rigged as a seaplane with floats and it is sitting on the Discovery II while the RAAF pilots wait for a patch of open water. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114713
    On the Discovery II or dinghy with the Ross Ice Barrier (now Shelf) or Polar Ice in the distance. It is January, 1938. At the forefront on the left of the image, there appears to be part of a scientific tow net resting on the surface of the water. The men responsible for these nets on such a ship were known as 'Netmen'. The nets were of several different sizes and mesh types. It was said by an authority that 'the mouth of one tow net (on this ship) was the size of a dinner plate, with another believed to be the largest in the world...' Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114714
    On the deck of the Discovery II. Lieutenant Leonard Charles Hill, the Captain of the Discovery II is on the right and one of the ship's Engineers Andrew Porteous is on the left. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114715
    RAAF pilot, Flying Officer Alister Murdoch at 'Little America' on the Ross Ice Barrier in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114716
    Four members of the Discovery II search party at 'Little America' on the Ross Ice Barrier in January, 1936. Eric Douglas called this search party an 'Ice Party'. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114717
    Rowing party from the Discovery II off Cape Crozier, Ross Island. The Discovery II is in the distance. The date is January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114718
    114718 is the same image as 114918
    Discovery II search party at 'Little America' on the Ross Ice Barrier in January, 1936. Eric Douglas called this search party an 'Ice Party'. The hole leading to the underground hut is near the man standing on the left. The date is January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114719
    RAAF - Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas, left and Flying Officer Alister Murdoch, right, flying the RAAF flag (actually the RAF flag) in the Antarctic, during January, 1936. Initially the British RAF flag was adopted by the RAAF. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114720
    Stowage of the Gipsy Moth seaplane which was a de Havilland DH60X with the RAAF serial number A7-55. Also shown three RAAF search party members near the Gipsy Moth which is sitting on the hospital of the Discovery II. The RAAF roundel (actually the RAF roundel) can be seen on the underside of the lower wing of the Gipsy Moth. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114721
    This shows the Wyatt Earp which was Lincoln Ellsworth's Expedition Ship. It was at the ice edge at the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea in January, 1936. Ellsworth's spare plane the Texaco 20 can be seen partly covered over sitting on the Wyatt Earp. A man can be seen standing on the ship in front of the Texaco 20. In the foreground on the ice are four explorers with skis. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114722
    RAAF Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55. There is a pilot in the cockpit and three other men in the dinghy in the water at the tail end of the aeroplane. Some last minute adjustments are being made to the Gipsy Moth. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114723
    The Wyatt Earp, Lincoln Ellsworth's Expedition Ship in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114724
    114724 is the same image as 114974
    The RAAF Wapiti A5-37 being loaded onto the RRS Discovery II at Williamstown, Victoria in December, 1935. Flight Lieut Eric Douglas is in the cockpit. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936

    114725
    A slide of a chart from BANZARE was used by Eric Douglas to illustrate the routes of some of the participants in the search for Lincoln Ellsworth and his pilot Herbert Hollick-Kenyon in 1935-1936. Three overlay lines using coloured pens were drawn by Eric Douglas on the slide. The black line is for the track for Ellsworth's Northrop Gamma 'Polar Star' from Dundee Island to 'Little America' on the Ross Ice Barrier (Shelf). The red line is for the track of the Discovery II to the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea and the blue line is for the track of the return journey of the Discovery II to Melbourne. This slide was used by Eric Douglas to illustrate 'tracks taken' by some participants during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936 as there was no other suitable slide of the Antarctic available for use.

    114726
    RRS Discovery II in polar ice in the Ross Sea. View looking aft, with the two figures on the platform trying to push the ship stern's clear of the ice floes with a long pole. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114727
    RRS Discovery II off Cape Crozier, Ross Island. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114728
    Flying Officer Alister Murdoch ot the RAAF search party holding the edges of the RAAF flag which is on a pole. This was at 'Little America' on the Ross Ice Barrier in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114729
    114729 is the same image as 114938.
    This is in the Ross Sea ice in January, 1936. Two of the crew from the Discovery II are 'poling off' standing on ice near the bow of the ship. Other crew members are assisting from the ship's deck above. Someone had to relay back to the Captain or Navigator as to what was happening in such a situation. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114730
    114730 is the same image as 114975.
    Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55 taking off in the Ross Sea. Eric Douglas' caption 'Solo Reconnaissance Flight in open water in the Ross Sea - January, 1936. Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas - Care has to be taken to avoid contact with brash ice during take off'. Eric Douglas' log of 12th January, 1936 'At about 8.30AM this morning we entered a pool of fairly clear water which seemed to me to have possibilities in regard to a reconnaissance flight. So the Skipper was in agreement we got the moth ready. At about 10.30AM I was lowered over the side and after a bit of manoeuvring I took off solo and climbed to 1100 feet (I could not go higher owing to clouds) and noticed that to the south (true) it appeared to offer the best path for the ship. About 30 to 35 miles away appeared to be clear water. I then alighted and was safely hoisted on board again'. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114731
    114731 is the same image as 117614.
    Ross Ice Barrier (now Shelf), Bay of Whales, Ross Sea, Antarctica, during January, 1936. This was and is the largest Ice Barrier in the Antarctic and it runs for hundreds of miles, with a vertical ice front to the open sea of the Ross Sea. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114732
    Bow view of 'Discovery II' in rough seas in the Southern Ocean. Drums, rigging and the front post or pole can be seen. The Discovery II was a triple oil burning steamship. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114733
    Group photo of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) party on board the ship 'Discovery II' with Lincoln Ellsworth in the middle in the front row. Eric Douglas' caption 'Moth seaplane (A7-55) with engine housing device. Personnel - Back Row - Reddrop, Cottee; Front Row - Easterbrook, Murdoch, Lincoln Ellsworth, Douglas and Gibbs'. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114734
    RAAF members of the search party on the deck of the Discovery II. Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas the leader of the party is on the right. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114735
    An Antarctic Island in or near the Ross Sea. This could be of Ross Island or an Island in the Balleny Group. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114736
    A Bull Sea Elephant and a female sea elephant on Macquarie Island. The caption by Eric Douglas reads 'A Bull Sea Elephant'. Moreover, the shore party had apparently pitched their tents at Buckles Bay (from Frank Hurley notes) which is at the northern end (now known as the Isthmus) of Macquarie Island. Eric Douglas said "Strewn along the foreshore were plenty of sea elephants, the majority of these being young ones. At 9PM Hurley, Stu and I set off to walk to the “Nuggets”. (Peaky rocks along the coast about three miles away). On the way we passed many bull sea elephants and a few Gentoo Penguins..." This image should be swung around horizontally. I have two prints of the same image which face this last direction. One is a large print. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    114737
    BANZARE Explorers on Christmas Day in 1930 in the wardroom of the Discovery. On the right seated - Eric Douglas (left), Sir Douglas Mawson and Captain Kenneth MacKenzie. On the left seated at the front is Professor T Harvey Johnston. There are gifts laid out on the table and balloons hanging from the ceiling. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    114738
    Five explorers (from the Scientific party) and the Discovery's motor boat on the shore at Bossiers Arm (Bras Bossiere), Kerguelen Island. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    114739
    The Discovery at Cape Town, South Africa in October, 1929. This photo was taken prior to the departure of the Discovery on BANZARE Voyage 1 of 1929-1930. Eric Douglas' caption 'SY Discovery and the Ship's Company at Cape Town'. Frank Hurley is in the middle row on the left.

    114740
    Young Sea Elephants at Heard Island. The caption by Eric Douglas reads 'Young Sea Elephants at Heard Island'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    114741
    'Prevent Forest Fires', a coloured advertisement for use with BANZARE Lantern Slides and Film,1930-1931. A colourful picture is shown with a devil burning down some bushland with a match and cigerette butt. Prevent Forest Fires. Put out that flaming match! Issued by the Forests Commission of Victoria. The date is 1929-1931.

    114742
    'Carlton Bock', a coloured advertisement for use with BANZARE Lantern Slides and Film,1930-1931. An advertisement for Carlton and United Breweries (CUB). Pictured is a sick man in a robe seated on a couch with a glass of bock in his hand. There is a yellow background on the slide and a bottle of 'Carlton Bock' to the left. Highly recommended for Invalids! The date is 1929-1931.

    114743
    'Berlei Step-in' coloured advertisement, for use with BANZARE Lantern Slides and Film, 1930-1931. An advertisement for Berlei step-in corsets. The slide is painted yellow with a picture of a woman wearing black stockings and yellow undergarments. She is bending down to place a golf ball on the ground. Comfort unbelievable, Freedom unhampered, Joy untold in a Berlei Step-in! The date is 1929-1931.

    114744
    'Berlei Foundation' coloured advertisement for use with BANZARE Lantern Slides and Film, 1930-1931. Pictured on the slide is a silhouette of a woman wearing a pink corset. The date is 1929-1931.

    114745
    'Sennitt's the ice cream that is different', coloured Ad for use with BANZARE Lantern Slides and Film, 1930-1931. An advertisement for Sennitt's ice cream. The slide is painted blue with a picture of a white polar bear licking a vanilla ice cream and a young boy crying. Bear In mind Sennitt's. This was the highlight of the slides when we showed the glass slides or lantern slides with the projector (magic lantern). We all knew that it was time to have an ice cream and Sennitt's if possible, but sometimes it was homemade (when Eric Douglas was showing the slides in the 1940's and 1950's this was our routine). Besides, the projector (lantern) ran 'hot' and had to be left for awhile to cool down. The date is 1929-1931.

    114746
    'Khaki Stout', coloured advertisement for use with BANZARE Lantern Slides and Film, 1930-1931. An advertisement for Carlton and United Breweries (CUB). The slide is painted green and yellow with a Khaki Stout bottle pictured on the left side. Most nourishing. The date is 1929-1931.

    114747
    'Palais De Danse', St Kilda, coloured advertisement, for use with BANZARE Lantern Slides and Film, 1930-1931. An advertisement for the next Saturday at the 'Palais de Danse' in St Kilda. The date is 1929-1931.

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 is a SUMMARY to date.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    5 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-05-31
    User data
  69. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 3)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 3

    Item details for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) in order as in the Melbourne Museum's database spreadsheets -

    114748
    114748 is the same image as 114915.
    Proclamation Flag Raising, Proclamation Island, BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930. Sir Douglas Mawson and some of the 'Scientific party' at Proclamation Island where they carried out a Proclamation ceremony and flag raising of the British Flag. This photo was taken after the reading of a Proclamation by Sir Douglas Mawson on the summit of this 'new' Island on 13th January, 1930. RAAF pilots Eric Douglas and Stuart Campbell were not present as they were working on the Gipsy Moth VH-ULD. Eric Douglas' Log of 13th January, 1930 '...9AM. A party left in the motor boat (ten of them) their main job being to hoist the flag. At 12 noon we saw them on top of this rock and observed the flag was hoisted. Stu and I spent the morning working on our machine...The party returned at 3PM with specimens of rock, penguins, birds etc'.

    117500
    'Dipping Our Ensign' (Eric Douglas caption). The SY Discovery leaving Hobart on 22 November, 1930. Dipping the Ensign was a maritime tradition. By Eric Douglas - 'At 2PM there was a large gathering on the pier and at 2.30PM the pier lines were let go and we slowly backed out to the resounding cheers and shouts of the people on the pier. We gave three lusty cheers for the Citizens of Hobart and then three blasts from our whistle'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931. The SY Discovery had come from Melbourne, but the 'Official' start of this voyage was from Hobart. In the Winter of 1930 the ship had docked and been refitted at Harbour docks, Williamstown (Eric Douglas).

    117501
    'Goodbye to All That' (Eric Douglas caption). SY Discovery leaving Hobart on 22 November, 1930. A crowd of onlookers at Queen's Pier, Hobart watching the SY Discovery depart for Macquarie Island and Antarctica. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117502
    117502 is the same image as 114907.
    A Gentoo Penguin colony on Macquarie Island. Eric Douglas said 'Rookeries are situated in the foot hills some distance from the foreshore. A mountain stream connects the Rookery to the foreshore. Penguins go by the water way to and from the Rookery...' Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117503
    Three explorers on the deck of the SY Discovery. Nearest the camera Eric Douglas is on the left and Max Stanton the 1st Mate is on the right. Douglas and Stanton are standing on the fo'c'stle (forecastle) head. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117504
    A large colony of penguins and seals are on the beach at Macquarie Island.The caption by Eric Douglas is 'Penguins Playing on the Sandy Beach.' Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117505
    A large colony of Royal Penguins swimming and spread out along the beach. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'The Nuggets - Macquarie Island' and added 'Royal Penguins gathered on the foreshore - The Rookerie is situated some distance inland. They come and go via a stream connecting the Rookerie to the coast'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117506
    117506 is the same image as 117070.
    SY Discovery. Eric Douglas said 'Under full sail'. It was a Barque or Bark rigging. This photograph was taken before the official start of BANZARE Voyage 1. In Cape Town the Discovery was converted to a Barquentine rig. It is included with Frank Hurley's BANZARE Voyage 1 photos of 1929-1930.

    117507
    Macquarie Island from a distance. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'Nor East End of Macquarie Island'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117508
    Four BANZARE explorers from the SY Discovery are pitching their tents on Macquarie Island. This appears to be at Buckles Bay (from Frank Hurley notes). Buckles Bay is on the Northern end (now known as the Isthmus) of Macquarie Island. The Discovery can be seen on the left in the background. These tents weighed 10 lbs and were made for Sir Douglas Mawson in Sydney by S Walder Limited, during September, 1929. The material used was balloon or parachute silk and the tents had the capacity to be completely airtight. The tents were of the pointed at the top, supported by five bamboo poles which were drawn together. Running around the full circumference at the bottom of each tent is a flap and when the tent is erected this flap lies flat on the ground or in the snow. Then say in the case of snow more can be piled on the flap holding it down excluding the cold winds. Eric Douglas said ' Preparing for a short stay at this Island'. From Eric Douglas' log of 2nd December, 1930 'Twelve of us landed and the launch and dingy were taken back to the ship by the Second Engineer and a seaman. The tops of the adjacent hills were obscured by mist and the wind was blowing fresh from the west. The ship was anchored in north east bay and was fairly well sheltered. We immediately erected four tents and put our camping gear inside to keep it dry'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117509
    Eric Douglas said 'Young King Penguins'. This was likely to have been at Lusitania Bay. It was on Macquarie Island. An explorer who could be Frank Hurley is looking towards the camera lens surrounded by a colony of young King Penguins. The SY Discovery is in the distance. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931. The image is missing from the web.

    117510
    Eric Douglas captioned this image 'Inquisitive Penguins'. This was likely to have been at Lusitania Bay. It was on Macquarie Island. An explorer who could be Stuart Campbell is standing behind a row of King Penguins. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117511
    Eric Douglas captioned this 'The Stately King'. King Penguins on Macquarie Island, with a bunch in the foreground and more scattered in the background. This was likely to have been at Lusitania Bay. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117512
    The Whaling factory ship Kosmos, showing its tunnel. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117513
    Tunnel and stern of the whaling factory ship 'Kosmos'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117514
    Macquarie Island and Royal Penguin Rookeries. Eric Douglas captioned this image 'Penguin Rookeries- Royal Penguins'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117515
    Two different types of whale chasers in Antarctic waters. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117516
    The Discovery is hugging the Antarctic coast. To add to the scene the sun is setting while the 'SY Discovery' sits in calm waters. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117517
    Eric Douglas captioned this as 'Captain Frank Hurley Taking Some Cine'. Macquarie Island with Frank Hurley on the beach shooting some film footage of two seals wrapped up in seaweed. The camera he is using is set upon a tripod. His camera equipment was often very heavy and so he needed the other explorers to help carry it at times. This was one such occasion, and Eric Douglas and Stuart Campbell had been lending a hand. They had been asked to do this by Sir Douglas Mawson. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117518
    'Bishop and Clerk Rocks' off the southern end of Macquarie Island. Eric Douglas had captioned the image 'Bishop and Clark Rocks'. (Note Clark rather than Clerk). Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117519
    Loose polar pack ice in Antarctic waters. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117520
    At Macquarie Island. An abandoned Sealers hut on the beach which has lost its roof and some of its walls. There are penguins and seals in the background. Looking south along the Nuggets beach towards Tom Ugly Point. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117521
    There were thousands of Royal Penguins in Rookeries on Macquarie Island - 2nd December, 1930. Eric Douglas' log 'Soon we came across a stream, and going up and down this stream were many (Royal) penguins. They were going to and from their rookeries. We walked up the shallow stream for several hundred yards and then came across a large rookery. Frank Hurley took cinema along the way and at the rookery. We returned to the beach and watched the penguins surfing. They were playing around just like people on the beach. The Penguins here were quite tame and did not take much notice of us.They estimate there are at least half a million penguins at this part of the Island. Probably the biggest rookery in the world'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117522
    The Whaling factory ship the 'Sir James Clark Ross' and dead whales alongside the ship. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117523
    Snowy mountains and the coast, likely Macquarie Island. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117524
    Five BANZARE explorers out on the ice near Boat Harbour at Cape Denison. Three of the men are dragging a sledge full of ice . Eric Douglas is on the right. Eric Douglas said on 5th January, 1931 'Frozen snow was loaded into the motor boat and carried off to the ship, this was repeated several times until our tanks were full, roughly four tons were brought off in this way'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117525
    Icebergs and rough seas. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117526
    The SY Discovery on the left, with the Whaling factory ship the Kosmos on the right in the Antarctic. Eric Douglas said 'We are now heading towards the Kosmos. This ship is 20 feet longer than the James Clark Ross and is 22,000 tons. She has nine chasers in attendance and is a Norwegian concern financially... The Kosmos broke a world’s record the other week when she handled forty whales in twenty four hours. Normally she cuts up about twenty whales per day'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117527
    The SY Discovery on the left, with the Whaling factory ship the Sir James Clark Ross on the right. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117528
    The Whaling factory ship Kosmos. It is a side view of the Kosmos. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931

    117529
    The deck of a Whaling factory ship on the right. A man is standing beside a whale's tail. The small ship moored to the left alongside the whaling factory ship is the Discovery. The Discovery is separated from the Whaling factory ship by the use of whale blubber as padding. Eric Douglas found whaling factory ships and their operations to be 'rather a gruesome sight, awful stench, blood and bones being continually emptied overboard (Norwegian and English Companies)'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117530
    The SY Discovery with the backdrop of the Antarctic coastline. These are quiet waters. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117531
    The Antarctic coast at Cape Denison Commonwealth Bay, looking towards the land. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117532
    A Whale chaser with a swivelling harpoon gun set up at the bow of the ship. Eric Douglas said in brief notes 'Chasers are powerful small vessels 90-100 ft long, 2000HP and 15 knots. They contain a muzzle loading swivelling gun for throwing an explosive headed harpoon'. The gun was operated by either the Captain of the vessel or a Gunner. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117533
    This is of a dead whale which had inflated with its own gas. Eric Douglas said 'In the afternoon we sighted what first appeared to be a black ice berg or a small island. But on approaching nearer we saw it had been a mirage effect and the object was a dead blue fin whale. It was blown up by its own gas to a huge size. Hundreds of birds were feeding off its tongue'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117534
    Adelie Penguins gathered in a Rookery at Cape Denison. (The slide is edged with newspaper printed text). Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117535
    117535 is the same image as 114913.
    Looking out to sea from the ice engulfed Boat Harbour at Cape Denison, with the Mackellar Islets showing up in the distance. Eric Douglas captioned this image 'Boat Harbour at Commonwealth Bay, Adelie Land'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117536
    A Whale chaser with a swivelling harpoon gun at its bow. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117537
    A Whale chaser in Antarctic waters with its Captain or Gunner ready for the chase standing near the swivelling harpoon gun on its bow. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117538
    117538 is the same image as 117543.
    Looking inland towards the Antarctic Plateau from an icy Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117539
    Adelie Penguins at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117540
    Adelie Penguins on the ice covered coastal fringe at Cape Denison with more of the coast visible on the left in this image. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117541
    Adelie Penguins at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. They are playing on a coastal ice covered rocky outcrop and the Discovery is well out to sea. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117542
    The de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD seaplane housed on skids or the skid deck of the Discovery. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117543
    117543 is the same image as 117538.
    Looking inland towards the Antarctic Plateau from an icy Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117544
    Ten BANZARE explorers are in a cabin on the Discovery. Three are lying on a top bunk and the others are seated below. Some are smoking pipes and cigarettes. There is a gramophone on the right and one man is holding a banjo. This was the 'Fiddely Club'. Eric Douglas said 'Out Antarctic Club - In the Top Bunk from the left - Eric Douglas, 2nd Mate Colbeck, Simmers and Lower row from the left - Stu Campbell, 'Cherub' Fletcher, Doc Ingram, 'Babe' Marr, 'Birdie' Falla, and Center two - 3rd Mate Child and Alf Howard'. They got together sometimes in the evenings to discuss events of the day and to play and listen to music. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117545
    A Barrel or Crow's Nest view of Gipsy Moth Seaplane VH-ULD. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117546
    The Antarctic coast. The shadow cast on the right side of the slide is from the side rail of the Discovery. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117547
    117547 is the same image as 112798.
    Antarctic waters with an iceberg looming up in the distance. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117548
    'Mickey Mouse and friends' at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay (Eric Douglas caption). Eric Douglas always thought of the penguins as friends. These are Adelies. This photo shows an image of a wooden cutout Mickey Mouse who is propped up between rocks in an Adelie Penguin Rookery. Mickey Mouse is raising his hat and the Adelie Penguin on the right is a bit interested. The cutout was likely made by Frank Hurley and Eric Douglas of BANZARE. The cartoon character Mickey Mouse was created by Walt Disney in 1928. Eric Douglas said 'this was a three ply cutout of Mickey Mouse standing about two feet high. In the Rookery he was received by pecks and beating flippers from the birds standing on their pebbled nests. Later we planted him in a pathway that the penguins take when walking along the icy foreshore, and here he was on object of great interest'. I understand fully why there was always a Mickey Mouse in our household when I was growing up! Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117549
    Two BANZARE explorers - Left - Frank Hurley and Right - Harold Fletcher standing at the side near the entrance of the 'old hut' (Mawsons Huts) at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117550
    Four BANZARE explorers - From the left - Captain Kenneth MacKenzie, Sir Douglas Mawson, William Colbeck and Doctor William Wilson Ingram at the back of the 'old hut' (Mawsons Huts) at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. They are all holding ice walking sticks. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117551
    Adelie Penguins alongside an HMV Gramophone, donated to BANZARE by His Masters Voice, in a Rookery at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. This gramophone was taken ashore at Cape Denison from the Discovery by Eric Douglas for purpose of playing music to the Adelies and getting their response and some photographs. A few were interested but most took no notice in spite of one version where they were responding in kind, but they were superimposed on that image by Frank Hurley (That image is not in this particular Antarctic collection). This image is by Eric Douglas. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117552
    The Memorial with a cross and plaque at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay at the top of Azimuth Hill. It commemorates the lives of Lieutenant Belgrave Ninnis and Dr Xavier Mertz who lost their lives in the Antarctic while on the Far Eastern sledging trip with Sir Douglas Mawson, during the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) of 1911- 1914. The hill on which the cross is standing is 25 metres high at the north end of a narrow rocky outcrop overlooking the old hut (Mawsons Huts). Eric Douglas said 'The Cross was erected on the direction of Sir Douglas in 1914 in memory of Lieut. Ninnis and Dr Mertz who lost their lives while on a sledging trip...' The Cross may have even been erected in 1913. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117553
    The interior of Sir Douglas Mawson's hut in Cape Dennison, Commonwealth Bay on 6th January, 1931. Eric Douglas said 'They had made an entry in the main hut through a skylight, snow was packed near the roof but the hut was fairly clear and one could walk about. Beautiful snow crystals were attached to old books, bottles, bunks and rafters, somewhat like inside a crystal cave'. Frank Hurley took flash light photos of the inside. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117554
    Abandoned Airframe at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. These are remains of the Air Tractor taken to the Antarctic with the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) of 1911-1914. It was taken there on the ship Aurora as a Air Tractor and flight was not intended. Before the AAE left it was stripped of it's engine and other mechanical parts and was virtually just an airframe sitting at the edge of the Boat Harbour. As an Air Tractor it proved to be cumbersome and heavy. Many years after the BANZARE visit in early 1931 to Cape Denison it disappeared. Small remnants of the airframe have been found in the Boat Harbour in recent years. There is still an ongoing interest by the Mawson Huts Foundation to find more parts of this Airframe.There could not have been much conversation about this Airfame when the BANZ Expedition called in during January, 1931 as Eric Douglas was under the impression that it had been taken to Cape Denison to fly it (but it was damaged and taken south by Sir Douglas Mawson at the time of the AAE of 1911-1914 with the intention that it would not fly but was to be an Air Tractor). I suppose it was a case of lessening the disappointment of not having a flyable plane? Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117555
    The de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD seaplane flying over a very large Tabular Berg. Eric Douglas said that he skimmed closed to a berg once to see what the surface looked like in case he had to land in an emergency. I believe that this berg was in the neighbourhood of the 78th degree of East Longitude,which places it at Princess Elizabeth Land. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 117556 and 117558.

    117556
    A very large Tabular Iceberg. Eric Douglas had said that some of the tabular bergs were as big as Melbourne city 'blocks' eg Flinders, Swanston, Collins and Elizabeth Streets as a block. I believe that this berg was in the neighbourhood of the 78th degree of East Longitude,which places it at Princess Elizabeth Land. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 117555 and 117558.

    117557
    The de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD seaplane. One of the RAAF pilots is standing on the fuselage. The Discovery is nearby. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117558
    The de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD rigged as a seaplane with floats. The seaplane is taking off in open water and there is a very large Tabular Berg nearby.I believe that this berg was in the neighbourhood of the 78th degree of East Longitude, which places it at Princess Elizabeth Land. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931. This would have been taken the same photographic exercise as 117555 and 117556.

    117559
    117559 is the same image as 114916.
    The de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD on the aeroplane hoist on the Discovery. The two RAAF Pilots with BANZARE are standing on the plane. Pilot Officer Eric Douglas on the left and Flying Officer Stuart Campbell on the right. This was at the completion of the historic flight of 31st December, 1929. Mac-Robertson land was sighted for the first time on this flight. It is now spelt as Mac.Robertson (2017). Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117560
    An Iceberg and its reflection in the water. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117561
    Eric Douglas said 'A Berg with much brash ice'. The Berg was ahead of the Discovery and can be seen from just behind the front mast. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117562
    117562 is the same image as 114905.
    'Peaks of Enderby Land' in the distance. Nunataks as seen from the Ship Discovery in January, 1930, they were Mount Codrington, Simmers Peaks and Mount Johnston. This is a copy of a printed version of the image. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117563
    117563 is the same image as 114914.
    'Mac-Robertson Land' in the distance. The Masson and David Ranges are shown and they are part of the Framnes Mountains. It is now spelt as Mac.Robertson (2017). Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117564
    Murray Monolith, Mac-Robertson Land, Antarctica. It is now spelt as Mac.Robertson (2017). However, there is some chance that this could be Scullin Monolith for the two Monoliths are hard to separate in photographs. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117565
    117565 is the same image as 114906.
    Coast of Enderby Land, Antarctica. Mount Biscoe is on the left, Cape Ann in the centre and Mount Hurley on the right. (The three closest images). This is a copy of a printed version of the image. The date is January, 1930. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117566
    Coast near Mac-Robertson Land. It is now spelt as Mac.Robertson (2017). Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117567
    Explorers (Scientific party) in the Discovery's motor boat near Scullin Monolith. Five men can be seen in the boat. It holds up to twelve persons. Those onboard included Ingram, Kennedy, Howard and Eric Douglas who took the photograph. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117568
    117568 is the same image as 114904.
    Frank Hurley said on this 'Margin of the Ice-Caped Land'. It shows an explorer at Lands End, Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. Lands End itself is characterized by high ice cliffs which border most of the Antarctic shoreline at Cape Denison. When going behind rocky hills and outcrops and the Adelie penguin Rookeries to the left of the old Hut (Mawsons Huts) there is the potentially dangerous slippery slope of Lands End. This is a copy of a printed version of the image. Photograph taken during the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) 1911- 1914.

    117569
    Murray Monolith in Mac-Robertson Land. It is now spelt as Mac.Robertson (2017). Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117570
    An Adelie Penguin on the rocks at Cape Denison. The Adelie Penguin Rookeries are in this vicinity. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117571
    A Penguin Colony on Murray Monolith, Mac-Robertson Land. It is now spelt as Mac.Robertson (2017). Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931. The image is missing from the web.

    117572
    Adelie Penguins in a Rookery are mingling with a wooden cutout of Mickey Mouse at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117573
    Royal Penguins at Macquarie Island. Eric Douglas said 'off for a surf'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117574
    A hint of the Discovery and choppy seas, taken from the deck of the Discovery. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117575
    117575 is the same image as 117073.
    A typical Tabular Iceberg with the sun reflected on its surface. Eric Douglas said 'A Typical Berg - 200 ft above sea level and 1000 ft below - it is heavily crevassed'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117576
    Adelie Penguins sliding down a rock face into Antarctic waters. This may be a copy of a printed photo. This image was initially duplicated by the Melbourne Museum, but this image is missing from the web. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117577
    Ship's Officers and the Scientific Party on the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE), Voyage 2 of 1930-1931. The Expedition Leader, Sir Douglas Mawson is pictured middle row and third from the right. Eric Douglas is in the bottom row and second from the right and Frank Hurley is to the left of Eric Douglas. This photo was taken by Frank Hurley with the assistance of Eric Douglas using the remote cord to activate the camera. Pictured here are - Back row from the left - Williams, Kennedy, Fletcher, Campbell, Falla, Child, Simmers; Middle row from the left - Griggs, Ingram, Captain MacKenzie, Sir Douglas Mawson, Johnston, Colbeck; Front row from the left Howard, Oom, Hurley, Douglas, Welch. Stanton who was the Chief Officer on this Voyage is absent. They are on the Discovery in Hobart at the completion of BANZARE. Photograph taken at the completion of BANZARE, 1929-1931.

    117578
    Eric Douglas on deck of the Discovery at the bow end. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117579
    117579 is the same image as 114910.
    A horizontally split slide. Eric Douglas said 'Southward Ho!'. Two pictures showing sail settings of the Discovery. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117580
    An aerial view of the Discovery steaming along in open water. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117581
    A compilation of portraits by Frank Hurley of the Scientific Party from the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE), Voyage 1 of 1929-1930. Each portrait is signed by the person shown. Pictured are - from the Top on the right, and moving clockwise - Mr Robert Falla, Commander Morton Moyes, Flying Officer Stuart Campbell, Dr William Wilson Ingram, Pilot Officer Eric Douglas, Mr Ritchie Simmers and Professor Harvey Johnston and the Centre two - Left to right - Mr Alf Howard and Mr James Marr. Captain Frank Hurley who took and compiled these portraits is missing from the compilation. This was compiled during the BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117582
    An Albatross in flight. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117583
    117583 is the same image as 114912.
    A Wandering Albatross getting ready to land. Eric Douglas said 'Albatross getting ready to alight'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117584
    Frank Hurley, left and James William Slessor Marr, right are washing their clothes in buckets on the deck of the Discovery. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117585
    Very steep seas in the Southern Ocean as seen from Discovery. Showing in the foreground is a rowlock or oarlock of the ship's dinghy. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117586
    The Discovery in a Southern Ocean swell. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117587
    A Portrait of Sir Douglas Mawson, the Expedition Leader of the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) of 1929-1931. Sir Douglas is wearing his now legendary balaclava. This photo was taken on board the Discovery. Photograph taken during the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE), Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117588
    117588 is the same image as 114937.
    The RAAF DH 60X Gipsy Moth A7-55 seaplane is in the distance in the air. This was at the commencement of the Reconnaissance flight in the Ross Sea. Eric Douglas said 'Start of the Reconnaissance flight in the Ross Sea, F/Lt Douglas and F/OMurdoch - from the Discovery II. The search for Explorers Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon'. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117589
    A Ross Seal lying on an icefield. It is a comparatively rare species of seal. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117590
    A Discovery II explorer feeding a penguin at Cape Crozier, Ross Island in January, 1936. There is a colony of penguins in the background. This was taken in the vicinity of Mt Terror and Mt Erebus. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117591
    The Southern Ocean as seen from the Discovery II. In the foreground at the right is part of the ship's dinghy. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117592
    Small white top waves in the Southern Ocean from the Discovery II. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 117593.

    117593
    White top waves in the Southern Ocean from the Discovery II. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 117592.

    117594
    Showing rigging on the Discovery II which is in open seas in the Southern Ocean. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117595
    Pilot Ship Akuna - Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, 18 February, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117596
    A snow capped Antarctic Island - probably Franklin or Coulman. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117597
    Aviator and Polar Explorer, Sir Hubert Wilkins who was in charge of the Ellsworth's expedition ship the Wyatt Earp. Taken in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea, Antarctica in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117598
    Six of the Discovery II crew members with an Adelie Penguin on board Discovery II. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117599
    Eric Douglas at the right, wearing snowshoes and saying hello to a couple of Adelie penguins on the Ross Ice Barrier in January, 1936. Five fellow explorers are in the background. Some of the party have skis. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117600
    Eric Douglas in front is with other members of the search party from Discovery II, en route to 'Little America', in January, 1936. Eric Douglas called this the 'Ice party'. Behind the men is the ship's motor boat which carried them and their gear to the ice edge of the Ross Ice Barrier. Their ship the Discovery II can be seen well out at sea. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117601
    The Wyatt Earp in the distance at the Ross Ice Barrier in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117602
    The Ross Ice Barrier (now Shelf) in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. The Discovery II and in the foreground is the deck of the ship. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117603
    Explorers with a snow tractor left behind at an icy landing strip by Admiral Richard Byrd near Ver-Sur-Mer Inlet on the Ross Ice Barrier (now Shelf). One man is sitting on the tractor. It was in January, 1936. This and another tractor were discovered half buried in the polar ice by Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon when they were on their way to 'Little America' after abandoning Ellsworth's aeroplane the 'Polar Star'. These tractors were used by Herbert Hollick-Kenyon and members of the Wyatt Earp's crew to later tow the 'Polar Star' back to the Wyatt Earp to be loaded on board for the return trip to the United States. The ship Wyatt Earp is in the background inscribed with the words 'Ellsworth Expedition'. The Texaco 20 Lincoln Ellsworth's spare aircraft is on the deck of the ship. Sir Hubert Wilkins was in charge of the Expedition Ship the Wyatt Earp. He and Lincoln Ellsworth got on well then but they later drifted apart. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 117613.

    117604
    The bow of Discovery II is shown in loose brash or pack ice. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117605
    An explorer on skis is on the ice. He is standing alongside Lincoln Ellsworth's ship the Wyatt Earp. This was in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117606
    The Radio Operator from the Discovery II is wearing headphones and is positioned in front of the ship's radio equipment. This Radio Officer was Petty Officer A E Morris. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117607
    The Discovery II moving through a solid icesheet. Two men on deck are leaning over to view the ice situation.This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117608
    A search party from the Discovery II is at 'Little America'. This was in January, 1936. The party has a sledge and are on skis or wearing snow shoes. Four men are in this picture. Eric Douglas called this the 'Ice party'. Wireless tripod masts of a height of 35 feet and snow measurement poles are in the background. These had all been erected by Admiral Byrd and his Antarctic expedition members on one of his previous expeditions to 'Little America'. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117609
    The Discovery II in the Ross Sea. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117610
    RAAF pilot Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas who was in charge of the RAAF contingent on the Discovery II is out on the ice pack checking space for taking off and landing and the ice conditions for a flight in Gipsy Moth A7-55.This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117611
    A fraction of the side of the Discovery II can be seen. The ship is moving through a lead (fracture) in the solid ice. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 117612.

    117612
    A side view of the Discovery II. The ship is negotiating a passage through the thick pack. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 117611.

    117613
    An explorer sitting in a closed snow tractor left behind at an icy landing strip by Admiral Richard Byrd near Ver-Sur-Mer Inlet. This was in January, 1936. One man is sitting on the tractor. This and another tractor were discovered half buried in the polar ice by Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon when they were on their way to 'Little America' after abandoning Ellsworth's aeroplane the 'Polar Star'. These tractors were used by Herbert Hollick Kenyon and members of the Wyatt Earp's crew to later tow the 'Polar Star' back to the Wyatt Earp to be loaded on board for the return trip to the United States. The ship Wyatt Earp is in the background inscribed with the words 'Ellsworth Expedition'. The Texaco 20 Lincoln Ellsworth's spare aircraft is on the deck of the ship. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 117603.

    117614
    117614 is the same image as 114731.
    The Ross Ice Barrier (now Shelf), at the Bay of Whales. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117615
    117615 is the same image as 114938.
    Lincoln Ellsworth's expedition ship the Wyatt Earp in sea ice and the Discovery II is in the background. These two ships are in the Bay of Whales.This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117616
    Discovery II in heavy pack ice in the Ross Sea. The RAAF Gipsy Moth A7-55 is sitting on the ship's hospital. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117617
    The RAAF party and the Discovery II explorers on deck. In the foreground are two cattle carcasses hanging from the rigging. Also part of the RAAF Westland Wapiti A7-35 can be seen at left. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117618
    A Burgee of the Royal Brighton Yacht Club flying at 'Little America', Antarctica. This was in January, 1936. This Burgee belonged to Eric Douglas, who was a long term member of the Royal Brighton Yacht Club (RBYC). This Burgee together with many signatures of the Discovery II, the RAAF party and Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon is proudly displayed at the Club together with a wall board of BANZARE Antarctic Prints. Also displayed is a Club Burgee on the Kookaburra story of 1929 which was presented to Eric Douglas by the RBYC. All items were donated by Eric Douglas, except for the last which was donated back to the Club me. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117619
    Open seas in the Southern Ocean. A very small part of the dinghy belonging to the ship Discovery II can be seen at bottom right in the image. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117620
    The Ross Ice Barrier (now Shelf). On the Ross Ice Barrier Eric Douglas said "Steaming south in open water you could see the ice glare. This is just a very bright or whitish light above the horizon. upon approaching closer you could see a long table of ice. The edge of the barrier extended as far as the eye could see in either direction, approximately 100 feet high". This Barrier was seen in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117621
    A Colony of Penguins at Cape Crozier, Ross Island. This was in the vicinity of the volcanic mountains Mt Terror and Mt Erebus. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117622
    Penguin chicks seen moulting at Cape Crozier, Ross Island. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117623
    Discovery II berthed at Dunedin, New Zealand. Dunedin was the only port of call by the Discovery II when in New Zealand where they stocked up on fuel and fresh provisions.The RAAF Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55 is shown housed on top of the ship's hospital. In the background are Port warehouses. On a personal note Eric Douglas replenished his supplies of pemmican and he noted "Actually, my only interest, apart from a desire to see the city, was the fact that I was anxious to replenish my supplies of pemmican, which is a highly concentrated form of food considered very handy when the chance of being without food of a normal kind is present". Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.


    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 is a SUMMARY to date.

    Sally E Douglas

    June 2017

    5 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-10
    User data
  70. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 4)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 4

    Item details for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) in order as in the Melbourne Museum's database spreadsheets -

    117624
    An explorer from the Discovery II in amongst the penguins at Cape Crozier, Ross Island. That man could be RAAF pilot Flying Officer Alister Murdoch. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117625
    117625 is the same image as 114918.
    This shows the bow of the Discovery II entering a lead (fracture) in sea ice or pack ice. The Latitude was 72 degrees South. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117626
    This is likely to be the coast of New Zealand. The Discovery II approached Dunedin, New Zealand by rounding the bottom of the South Island. The date is December, 1935. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117627
    117627 is the same image as 114937.
    Five members of the Discovery II search party at 'Little America' which is defined by tripod wireless masts and snow measurement poles. Eric Douglas called this the 'Ice party'. Access to the radio and accommodation hut was through a hole in the ice near the figure of the man on the left. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117628
    117628 is the same image as 114975.
    Polar explorers Lincoln Ellsworth at the left and Herbert Herbert Hollick-Kenyon right, on deck of the Discovery II in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. This was taken on 20th January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. This would have been taken at a similar time as 117638.

    117629
    A Penguin colony on Cape Crozier on Ross Island. The Discovery II is well out to sea. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117630
    The Discovery II is at the left in the image and the Wyatt Earp is out to sea at the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. A motor boat party from one of the two ships can be seen near the Wyatt Earp. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117631
    117631 is the same image as 114974.
    A search party from Discovery II. Lincoln Ellsworth is pictured in the middle. Eric Douglas called this an 'Ice party'. The date was 16th January, 1936. (Two small prints with makings on the back verify this was by Eric Douglas - the Te Papa Tongarewa Museum in Wellington shows this was by Alfred Saunders). Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117632
    Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas at the left and Flying Officer Alister Murdoch with a RAAF flag at 'Little America'. The RAAF had adopted the RAF flag. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117633
    This is of a Motor Boat party of six explorers from the Discovery II. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117634
    An explorer from the Discovery II having a beer while holding a long neck bottle of Melbourne Bitter Ale. He could be 'Babe' Marr. There is another man in the background to the left. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117635
    117635 is the same image as 114939.
    Two explorers on the Ross Ice Barrier looking out towards the Discovery II at the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117636
    117636 is the same image as 114940.
    The Motor Boat parked along the icy shore near 'Little America' with three explorers on board with one explorer standing alongside the boat. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117637
    Six Airmen of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) search party with their leader Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas who is pictured third from the right. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117638
    A Portrait of the Canadian based pilot Herbert Hollick-Kenyon smoking a pipe on the Discovery II in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. Hollick-Kenyon was in fact an English man. This was taken on 20th January, 1936. Herbert Hollick-Kenyon returned to the United States on the Wyatt Earp, together with the aeroplane the 'Polar Star' which is in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. This would have been taken at a similar time as 117628.

    117639
    Lincoln Ellsworth's expedition ship the Wyatt Earp with the Texaco 20 aeroplane sitting on board. The Texaco 20 was Ellsworth's spare or back-up aeroplane. On the side of the ship it states 'Wyatt Earp- Ellsworth Expedition'. Sir Hubert Wilkins was in charge of the Wyatt Earp and it's operations on behalf of Lincoln Ellsworth. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117640
    Flying Officer Alister Murdoch is standing beside the part wing of aircraft 331-N which was protruding out of the ice. It was a wing remnant from Admiral Richard Byrd's flying exploits at 'Little America'. The wing came from Byrd's single engine Fokker monoplane F-14 NC-331-N called Blue Blade. (At the time of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition Eric Douglas did not think that it belonged to Admiral Richard Byrd as he had heard that Byrd had removed all his aircraft from 'Little America').This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936

    117641
    Two explorers on board a motor boat belonging to the Discovery II. They are probably the RAAF pilots getting ready for a flight. It is likely to be Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas on the left. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117642
    Wyatt Earp and explorers in a motor boat on the left. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117643
    117643 is the same image as 114940.
    The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) flag in the foreground and the ship Wyatt Earp in the distance. (The RAAF had adopted the RAF flag). This was at the time of the meeting up of the Discovery II and the Wyatt Earp in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. It was on 20th January, 1936. In the interim while waiting for the Wyatt Earp to arrive at the Bay of Whales and after locating Ellsworth and Hollick-Kenyon at 'Little America' and when of course they were safely onboard the Discovery II's Master, Captain Leonard Hill and the Chief Scientist Dr (later Sir) George Deacon headed off in the ship for the purposes of 'Marine Stations'. In that few days till 20th January, 1936 the Discovery II had managed to steam away to a distance of about 70 miles from the Bay of Whales. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117644
    117644 is the same image as 114941.
    Whales are blowing near the Wyatt Earp which is at the icy shoreline. The Discovery II can be seen in the distance. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117645
    117645 is the same image as 114939.
    Four members of the Discovery II search party are at 'Little America'. Eric Douglas called this the 'Ice party'. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117646
    117646 is the same image as 114940.
    The de Havilland DH 60X Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55 is on the lifting hook on the Discovery II. Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas is in the cockpit. There was pack ice around the ship. This was the 1st Reconnaissance flight from the Discovery II after entering the Ross Sea and it took place on 12th January, 1936. It was a solo flight by Eric Douglas and took place at Lat. 71 45 S Long. 178 W. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117647
    Ross Island coastline, Ross Sea. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117648
    The Discovery II in heavy pack ice. Eric Douglas said 'Research Ship Discovery II in heavy pack ice en route to the Bay of Whales to search for the American Explorer Mr Lincoln Ellsworth and Mr Herbert Hollick-Kenyon, January, 1936'. Eric Douglas had noted that the Discovery II had entered loose pack ice after crossing the Antarctic Circle at 66 33 South, and at this time they were 1000 miles south of New Zealand. Two days after crossing the Antarctic Circle the pack ice was increasing and by 9th January, 1936 Eric said "...we had penetrated over 100 miles into the pack ice which is normally at least 300 miles deep at the head of the Ross Sea and which must be navigated before reaching the blue waters of the Ross Sea. This belt of pack ice is a feature of this locality, it is caused by the prevailing south east winds driving the hummocky pack ice from the region of the Bellingshausen Sea to the west across to Cape Adare at the North western tip of the Ross Sea...on the 14th January, (1936) we broke clear of the ice into the Ross Sea after traversing 380 miles of pack ice. We were now 400 miles from the barrier face of the famous Ross Ice Barrier. Except for a few isolated Ice bergs we were now in a glorious sea and able to continue at full speed". Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117649
    An explorer is on the ice wearing skis and another pair of skis nearby. The Wyatt Earp is in the background at the ice edge. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117650
    A Portrait of the King of England, Edward VIII, who bestowed an OBE on the Captain of the Discovery II, Lieutenant Leonard Charles Hill on 15th February, 1936. This is a copy of a print. The King is dressed in British Army Uniform and at this date as the King, he was the Chief Officer of the British Army with the rank of Field Marshal. Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935-1936.

    117651
    A Portrait of Lincoln Ellsworth. Photograph likely taken when Ellsworth was on the Discovery II. Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935-1936.

    Item details for the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two paintings and Photographic Prints. Many of these items double up with the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) but here I am using what I regard as a more 'formal' description. The order follows the Melbourne Museum's database spreadsheets -

    114907 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photo is of a superimposed image created by Frank Hurley of the SY Discovery 'pushing' through pack ice. It is included with Hurley's BANZARE Voyage 1 photos of 1929-1930. Eric Douglas said the purpose was to give some reality as to what the Discovery would look like with its full sailing rig in solid pack ice and he added 'don't get too alarmed for the safety of the ship'. Photograph taken during the British BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The bottom one is of a Gentoo Penguin Colony on Macquarie Island. Eric Douglas said 'Rookeries are situated in the foot hills some distance from the foreshore. A mountain stream connects the Rookery to the foreshore. Penguins go by the water way to and from the Rookery...' Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 2 - 1930-1931. The top image is the same as 112801 and the bottom image as the same as 117502.

    114906 Glass Negative.
    'Coast of Enderby Land', Antarctica. Mount Biscoe is on the left, Cape Ann in the centre and Mount Hurley on the right. (The three closest images). The date is January, 1930. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. This is a copy of a printed version. The same as 117565.

    114902 Glass Negative.
    Two photographs. 'Leaning on the Wind' & 'In the Blizzard'. The setting is at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay, Antarctica. These two images portray the effect of the katabatic winds which sweep down the Antarctic Plateau towards the Boat Harbour at Cape Denison. This has been said to be the windiest part of the planet. Photographs taken during the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) 1911- 1914. Both are copies of a printed version. The top image is the same as 112881.

    114905 Glass Negative
    'Peaks of Enderby Land'. Nunataks as seen from the Ship Discovery in January, 1930. They were Mount Codrington, Simmers Peaks and Mount Johnston. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. This is a copy of a printed version. The same as 117562.

    114904 Glass Negative.
    Frank Hurley said on this 'Margin of the Ice-Caped Land'. An explorer at Lands End, Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. When going behind rocky hills and outcrops and the Adelie Penguin Rookeries to the left of the old Hut (Mawsons Huts) there is the potentially dangerous slippery slope of Lands End. Photograph taken during the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) 1911- 1914. This is a copy of a printed version. The same as 117568.

    117213 Photographic Print.
    The Discovery in loose pack ice near Enderby Land. The ship's doctor, Dr Wlliam Wilson Ingram, stands looking out to sea. He is holding a whale marking gun. Eric Douglas has said of the image: 'SY Discovery near Enderby Land - Time approximately 10pm with the sun low in the sky...' Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same image as 112811 and 117065 Photographic Print.

    117065 Photographic Print.
    The Discovery in loose pack ice near Enderby Land. The ship's doctor, Dr Wlliam Wilson Ingram, stands looking out to sea. He is holding a whale marking gun. Eric Douglas has said of the image: 'SY Discovery near Enderby Land - Time approximately 10pm with the sun low in the sky...' Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same as image as 112811 and 117213 Photographic Print.

    28028 Oil Painting.
    A framed oil based colour painting of the steamship RRS Discovery II in 1936, by a Crew Member of the ship. The style could be described as impressionistic.The painting was presented by the artist to Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas, leader of the RAAF party on the Discovery II during the time of the search for the American Polar Explorer Lincoln Ellsworth and his Canadian based pilot Herbert Hollick-Kenyon. Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936.

    28062 Water Colour Painting.
    A framed water colour painting in soft hues, of Lincoln Ellsworth's Northrop Gamma aeroplane the 'Polar Star' flying over the Antarctic plateau. The painting was made in December, 1935 by Sydney Austin Bainbridge a Crew Member and the Pursar on the Discovery II. It was signed by Lincoln Ellsworth in January, 1936. It was presented by the artist to Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas, leader of the RAAF party on the Discovery II during the time of the search for the American Polar Explorer Lincoln Ellsworth and his Canadian based pilot Herbert Hollick-Kenyon. Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936.

    114913 Glass Negative.
    Looking out to sea from ice engulfed Cape Denison, with the Mackellar Islets showing up in the distance. Eric Douglas captioned this image 'Boat Harbour at Commonwealth Bay Adelie Land'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 2 - 1930-31. The same as 117535.

    114909 Glass Negative.
    A vertically split negative. On the left it shows the 'SY Discovery' with a man on the deck wearing a sailor's hat. On the right it shows the 'SY Discovery' with a man climbing up the rigging of the ship's mast. Eric Douglas said 'Left - The Bridge looking aft and Right - A view from the foreyard looking aft'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same as 112854 and 112855.

    114908 Glass Negative.
    A barrrel view of the de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD housed on board the ship Discovery. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'A view showing the housing of Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same as 112840.

    114912 Glass Negative.
    A Wandering Albatross getting ready to land. Eric Douglas said 'Albatross getting ready to alight'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same as 117583.

    114903 Glass Negative.
    The Antarctic coastline and Proclamation Island as seen at an altitude of 1500 feet, from the de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD. Eric Douglas' caption 'Close up view Antarctic Coast and Proclamation Rock - Open water near the coast - taken from 1500 ft altitude'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same as 112822.

    114974 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph is of the RAAF Wapiti A5-37 being loaded onto the RRS Discovery II at Williamstown, Victoria in December, 1935. Flight Lieut Eric Douglas is in the cockpit. The bottom photograph shows search party from Discovery II. Lincoln Ellsworth is pictured in the middle. Eric Douglas called this an 'Ice party'. The date was January, 1936. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The top image is the same as 114724 and the bottom image is the same as 117631.

    114975 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph is of the RAAF DH 60X Gipsy Moth A7-55 seaplane taking off. Eric Douglas' caption 'Solo Reconnaissance Flight in open water in the Ross Sea - January, 1936. Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas - Care has to be taken to avoid contact with brash ice during take off'. Eric Douglas' log of 12th January, 1936 'At about 8.30AM this morning we entered a pool of fairly clear water which seemed to me to have possibilities in regard to a reconnaissance flight. So the Skipper was in agreement we got the moth ready. At about 10.30AM I was lowered over the side and after a bit of manoeuvring I took off solo and climbed to 1100 feet (I could not go higher owing to clouds) and noticed that to the south (true) it appeared to offer the best path for the ship. About 30 to 35 miles away appeared to be clear water. I then alighted and was safely hoisted on board again'. The bottom photograph is of Polar explorers Lincoln Ellsworth at the left and Herbert Herbert Hollick-Kenyon right, on deck of the Discovery II in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The top image is the same as 114730 and the bottom image is the same as 117628. The bottom image would have been taken at a similar time as 117638.

    114941 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph is of Lincoln Ellsworth's ship 'Wyatt Earp'. Whales are blowing near the Wyatt Earp which is at the icy shoreline. The Discovery II can be seen in the distance. This was taken in January, 1930. The photograph below is a group photo of the RAAF Party on board the ship Discovery II on the return journey to Melbourne. Lincoln Ellsworth is in the middle of the front row. Lieutenent Leonard Charles Hill, the Captain of the Discovery II is on Ellsworth's right and Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas leader of the RAAF contingent is on Ellsworth's left side. The other six men are members of the RAAF party of seven. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The top image is the same as 117644 and the bottom image is the same as 114708.

    114919 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph is of 'Discovery II' in the pack ice. Eric Douglas said 'A view from the pack ice of the Discovery II cutting through the ice floes, January 1936'. The bottom photograph is of RAAF Personnel Flight Lieutenant Douglas right and Sergeant Cottee left, binding a sledge. This sledge was loaned by Sir Douglas Mawson. It was apparently made with spotted-gum. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The bottom image is the same as 114705.

    114938 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top or left photograph shows two of the crew from the Discovery II who are 'poling off' standing on ice near the bow of the ship. Other crew members are assisting from the ship's deck above. Someone had to relay back to the Captain or Navigator as to what was happening in such a situation. This is in the Ross Sea ice in January, 1936. The bottom or right photograph is of Lincoln Ellsworth's expedition ship the Wyatt Earp in sea ice. In the background is the Discovery II. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The top or left image is the same as 114729 and the bottom or right image is the same as 117615. This item needs to be swung around to be consistent with how the other Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives) are presented in this exercise ie the 'poling off' needs to be at the top and not on the left.

    114940 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph is of de Havilland DH 60X Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55 on the lifting hook on the Discovery II. Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas is in the cockpit. There was pack ice around the ship. This was the 1st Reconnaissance flight from the Discovery II after entering the Ross Sea and it took place on 12th January, 1936. It was a solo flight by Eric Douglas and took place at Lat. 71 45 S Long. 178 W. The photograph below is of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) flag in the foreground and the ship Wyatt Earp in the distance. (The RAAF were at that time using the RAF flag). This was at the time of the meeting up of the Discovery II and the Wyatt Earp in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. It was on 20th January, 1936. In the interim while waiting for the Wyatt Earp to arrive at the Bay of Whales and after locating Ellsworth and Hollick-Kenyon at 'Little America' and when of course they were safely onboard the Discovery II's Master, Captain Leonard Hill and the Chief Scientist Dr (later Sir) George Deacon headed off in the ship for the purposes of 'Marine Stations'. In that few days till 20th January, 1936 the Discovery II had managed to steam away to a distance of about 70 miles from the Bay of Whales. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The top image is the same as 117646 and the bottom image is the same as 117643.

    114939 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph is of four members of the Discovery II search party at 'Little America'. Eric Douglas called this the 'Ice party'. This was in January, 1936. The bottom photograph is of two explorers on the Ross Ice Barrier looking out towards the Discovery II at the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. This was in January, 1936. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The top image is the same as 117645 and the bottom image is the same as 117635.

    114937 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph is of RAAF DH 60X Gipsy Moth A7-55 seaplane in the distance in the air. This was at the commencement of the Reconnaissance flight in the Ross Sea. Eric Douglas said 'Start of the Reconnaissance flight in the Ross Sea, F/Lt Douglas and F/o Murdoch - from the Discovery II. The search for Explorers Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon'. This was in January, 1936. The bottom photograph is of five members of the Discovery II search party at 'Little America' which is defined by tripod wireless masts and snow measurement poles. Eric Douglas called this the 'Ice party'. Access to the radio and accomodation hut was through a hole in the ice near the figure of the man on the left. This was in January, 1936. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The top image is the same as 117588 and bottom is the same as 117627.

    114918 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph shows the Discovery II search party at 'Little America' on the Ross Ice Barrier. Eric Douglas called the search party the 'Ice party'. The hole leading to the underground hut is near the man standing on the left. The date is January, 1930. The bottom photograph is of the bow of the vessel Discovery II entering a lead in sea ice. The Latitude was 72 degrees South. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The top image is the same as 114718 and the bottom the same as 117625.

    114916 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy two photographs. The top photograph is of the de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD on the aeroplane hoist on the Discovery. The two RAAF Pilots with BANZARE are standing on the plane. Pilot Officer Eric Douglas on the left and Flying Officer Stuart Campbell on the right. This was at the completion of the historic flight of 31st December, 1929. Mac-Robertson land was sighted for the first time on this flight. It is now spelt as Mac.Robertson (2017). Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The bottom photograph is a composite photo of a roaring Bull Sea Elephant leaning towards a nesting bird. The roaring sound emitted by the Bull Sea Elephant is through his large proboscis (nose). The nose also acts as a 'rebreather' conserving the animal's body moisture (by reabsorbing it) during the mating season when Bull seal elephants do not leave the beach for food or water. Below the image is a caption which reads 'Southward Ho! with Mawson'. This was also the name for Frank Hurley's movie released after this voyage, but it was not considered a commercial success. Some of this film was reworked by Frank Hurley for his next Antarctic film 'Siege of the South' which was released to mainstream movie-goers after Voyage 2 of 1930-1931. The film premiered at Brisbane's Majestic Theatre in October, 1931, with Frank Hurley introducing the program. Screen Australia states that "the 'Siege of the South' is a great achievement in Antarctic actuality filmmaking". Frank Hurley took many risks for his reality photographs and film making, such as being strapped to the ship and hanging over the Discovery's side or even diving into an icy sea. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.The top image is the same as 117559 and the bottom image is the same as 112746.

    114911 Glass Negative.
    A vertically split negative. The left image is an aerial view of the ship Discovery with Frank Hurley, looking up at the camera lens from within the ship's barrel. The right image shows the bow of the Discovery in open water. Eric Douglas said 'Left - Captain Hurley in the Barrel - A Bird's Eye View and Right - Heading South'. Photographs taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The images are the same as in 112832.

    114917 Glass Negative.
    Kerguelen cabbage growing wild. The Kerguelen cabbage was plentiful - Eric Douglas said 'Kerguelen Cabbage grows in great numbers on all these islands...We motored about two miles up against the wind and went ashore on a fairly large island called Sukur... Wonderful vegetation, numerous Kerguelen Cabbages and plenty of duck'. Eric Douglas also made a note about the vegetation - Azorella and Accena. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The image is the same as 112755.

    114914 Glass Negative.
    'Mac-Robertson Land' in the distance. It is now spelt Mac.Robertson (2017). The Masson and David Ranges are shown and they are part of the Framnes Mountains. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 2 - 1930-1931. The image is the same as 117563.

    114901 Glass Negative.
    A Portrait of Pilot Officer Eric Douglas. Eric has a beard so the Voyage is underway. He is dressed in typical Antarctic attire at the time which was nothing too special - a dark woollen jumper and a dark woollen beanie. This photograph was taken in November or December, 1929 on BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. This image is now facing the correction direction (it was swung around by the Melbourne Museum at my request). It is now facing the same direstion as two prints which I have, the same as Frank Hurley negatives and the same direction as a similar image in one of Sir Douglas Mawson's BANZARE albums. As in Mawson's album the writing at the top of the image ie 'Eric Douglas' is to do with identification of the image when viewed from the reverse side. That was the method by which Frank Hurley identified his BANZARE images.The same image 114901 linked to the article by the Melbourne Museum staff member should be relinked to match the image of 114901. (In other words 'swung around').

    114915 Glass Negative.
    Sir Douglas Mawson and some of the 'Scientific party' at Proclamation Island where they carried out a Proclamation ceremony and flag raising of the British Flag. This photo was taken after the reading of a Proclamation by Sir Douglas Mawson on the summit of this 'new' Island on 13th January, 1930. RAAF pilots Eric Douglas and Stuart Campbell were not present as they were working on the Gipsy Moth VH-ULD. Eric Douglas' log of 13th January, 1930 '...9AM. A party left in the motor boat (ten of them) their main job being to hoist the flag. At 12 noon we saw them on top of this rock and observed the flag was hoisted. Stu and I spent the morning working on our machine...The party returned at 3PM with specimens of rock, penguins, birds etc'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The image is the same as 114748.

    114910 Glass Negative.
    A vertically split negative. Eric Douglas said 'Southward Ho!'. Two pictures showing sail settings of the Discovery. Photographs taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The images are the same as in 117579.

    117078 Photographic Print.
    Heard Island looking west from Atlas Cove. Sea elephants are in the foreground lazing on the shorline. Eric Douglas captioned the image. 'Typical day at Heard Island- View from Atlas Cove looking Westward'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same image as 112760 and 117076 Photographic Print.

    117075 Photographic Print.
    Crabeater Seals and Adelie Penguins drifting on an ice floe. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'Crabeater Seals and Adelie Penguins drifting on their frozen raft'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same image as 112857.

    117068 Photographic Print.
    Photo of Eric Douglas on the left, and Frank Hurley on the Discovery circa 1930. Photograph taken by the Press. BANZARE 1929-1931.

    117077 Photographic Print.
    A family portrait of the Eric Douglas family in February, 1936. From left to right is Eric's wife Ella, then Eric and their son Ian. This photograph was taken after Eric Douglas's return from the Ellsworth Relief Expedition (1935-1936) in the search for Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon. Eric Douglas is holding an Admiral Richard Byrd flag from 'Little America' (Little America II) on the Ross Ice Barrier in the Antarctic. It was signed by Lincoln Ellsworth and presented to him by Lincoln Ellsworth. Ian was to have Ellsworth as his second name and Lincoln Ellsworth gave him a silver Christening mug. A press photograph by the Star Newspaper.

    117072 Photographic Print.
    A large cathedral type iceberg seen near Enderby Land. Eric Douglas said of the taller berg in this image 'A Cathedral Type Berg, 320 ft above sea level'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The image is the same as in 112797

    117073 Photographic Print.
    Typical tabular iceberg in the distance with the sun reflected on its surface. Eric Douglas said 'A Typical Berg - 200 ft above sea level and 1000 ft below - it is heavily crevassed'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The image is the same as in 117575.

    117074 Photographic Print.
    The Crozet Group, with Sea Elephants and Gentoo Penguins basking on the shore. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'Sea Elephants and Gentoo Penguins, Crozet Islands'. Crozet Islands by Eric Douglas 'Twelve of us went ashore in the motor boat, anchored same about 100 yards offshore then did short trips in the dinghy we towed, bit of a surf running and a few of us got water down our sea boots'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same image as 112768.

    117076 Photographic Print
    Heard Island looking west from Atlas Cove. Sea elephants are in the foreground lazing on the shorline. Eric Douglas captioned the image. 'Typical day at Heard Island- View from Atlas Cove looking Westward'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same image as 112760 and 117078 Photographic Print.

    117070 Photographic Print.
    SY Discovery. Eric Douglas said 'Under full sail'. It shows the Discovery with a Barque or Bark rig. This photo was taken before the official start of BANZARE Voyage 1 in 1929-1930. Frank Hurley included it with his Voyage 1 Photography. The same image as 117506.

    117069 Photographic Print.
    SY Discovery. A side view of the Discovery rigged as a Barque or Bark. This was taken before the official start of BANZARE Voyage 1 in 1929 - 1930.

    134407 Photographic Print.
    Of a glacier in South Georgia. This was a favoured photograph of Frank Hurley's and a copy was sitting on his desk about a week before he passed away. This photograph was taken in South Georgia in 1916-1917 when Frank Hurley was on the ‘Endurance’ Expedition under the leadership of Sir Ernest Shackleton. Frank Hurley called it 'The Crystal Canoe'. It is of the Fortuna or Degeer Glacier in South Georgia. The image is missing from the web.

    117071 Photographic Print
    Adelie Penguins at Proclamation Island. Icebergs can be seen in the far distance. Eric Douglas said 'Adelie Penguins sun baking on the slopes of Proclamation Rock'. Although this land feature became 'Proclamation Island' it had just been discovered and at this early stage to call it Proclamation Rock was quite acceptable. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same image as 112834.

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 is a SUMMARY to date.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    5 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-14
    User data
  71. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 5)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 5

    THIS IS A ROUGH INDICATION OF THE VOYAGE ORDER OF BANZARE VOYAGE I - 1929-1930.

    Lantern Slides or Glass Slides. These glass slide numbers starting with 656E on the left are in the order from the front to the back of the box.

    From a wooden box made by Eric Douglas to contain the slides. (73 slides).This box was labelled - Start of Voyage 1. It is BANZARE. I used the numbers on the left when I scanned the Lantern Slides or Glass Slides at the Australian Antarctic Division as it fitted in with their numbering at the time. I was asked to use those numbers by the - Multi-Media Section of the AAD. 658E refers to a print which the AAD wanted me to try out and compare with the slides. The numbers on the right are the initial Melbourne Museum numbers used by them when they scanned or photographed the slides some years later. I worked out the Museum's numbers from deduction by comparing my original scans and the Museum's scans or photographs of the same images -
    656E 57976
    657E 58086
    658E Print only so not valid
    659E 58087
    660E 58085
    661E 57977
    662E 58084
    663E 58083
    664E 57978
    665E 57979
    666E 58082
    667E 58081
    668E 57980
    669E 58080
    670E 58079
    671E 58078
    672E 57981
    673E 58077
    674E 58076
    675E 58075
    676E 57982
    677E 58074
    678E 58073
    679E 58072
    680E 57983
    681E 58071
    682E 58070
    683E 58069
    684E 58068
    685E 57984
    686E 57985
    687E 58067
    688E 58066
    689E 58065
    690E 57986
    691E 58064
    692E 58063
    693E 58062
    694E 58061
    695E 57987
    696E 58060
    697E 57483
    698E 57594
    699E 57484
    700E 57485
    701E 57593
    702E 57486
    703E 57592
    704E 57591
    705E 57590
    706E 57589
    707E 57487
    708E 57488
    709E 57489
    710E 57588
    711E 57587
    712E 57490
    713E 57585
    714E 57586
    715E 57584
    716E 57491
    717E 57583
    718E 57582
    719E 57581
    720E 57492
    721E 57580
    722E 57579
    723E 57578
    724E 57493
    725E 57576
    726E 57577
    727E 57575
    728E 57494
    729E 57574 (With BANZARE - but is AAE 1911 to 1914).

    A bit later the Melbourne Museum re-allocated new numbers. These new numbers were provided to me verbally one by one from the Museum and many remaining items were matched by me by deduction. The items can be found at Trove with or without the MM prefixes -
    MM112743 = 57976
    MM112745 = 58086
    MM112744 = 58087
    MM112746 = 58085
    MM112747 = 57977
    MM112748 = 58084
    MM112749 = 58083
    MM112750 = 57978
    MM112751 = 57979
    MM112752 = 58082
    MM112753 = 58081
    MM112754 = 57980
    MM112755 = 58080
    MM112756 = 58079
    MM112757 = 58078
    MM112758 = 57981
    MM112759 = 58077
    MM112760 = 58076
    MM112761 = 58075
    MM112762 = 57982
    MM112763 = 58074
    MM112764 = 58073
    MM112765 = 58072
    MM112766 = 57983
    MM112767 = 58071
    MM112768 = 58070
    MM112769 = 58069
    MM112770 = 58068
    MM112771 = 57984
    MM112772 = 57985
    MM112773 = 58067
    MM112774 = 58066
    MM112780 = 58065
    MM112781 = 57986
    MM112782 = 58064
    MM112783 = 58063
    MM112784 = 58062
    MM112785 = 58061
    MM112791 = 57987
    MM112797 = 58060
    MM112798 = 57483
    MM112800 = 57594
    MM112801 = 57484
    MM112809 = 57485
    MM112810 = 57593
    MM112811 = 57486
    MM112812 = 57592
    MM112813 = 57591
    MM112814 = 57590
    MM112822 = 57589
    MM112825 = 57487
    MM112829 = 57488
    MM112830 = 57489
    MM112831 = 57588
    MM112832 = 57587
    MM112833 = 57490
    MM112835 = 57585
    MM112834 = 57586
    MM112836 = 57584
    MM112837 = 57491
    MM112838 = 57583
    MM112839 = 57582
    MM112840 = 57581
    MM112841 = 57492
    MM112842 = 57580
    MM112843 = 57579
    MM112844 = 57578
    MM112845 = 57493
    MM112855 = 57576
    MM112854 = 57577
    MM112857 = 57575
    MM112880 = 57494
    MM112881 = 57574

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 is a SUMMARY to date.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-05
    User data
  72. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 6)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 6

    THIS GIVES A ROUGH INDICATION OF THE VOYAGE ORDER OF BANZARE VOYAGE 2 - 1930-1931.

    Lantern Slides or Glass Slides. These glass slide numbers on the left starting with 730E are in the order from the front to the back of the box.

    From a wooden box made by Eric Douglas to contain the slides. (97 slides). This box was labelled Start Voyage 2. This box was second box containing BANZARE slides. I used the numbers on the left when I scanned the Lantern Slides or Glass Slides at the Australian Antarctic Division as it fitted in with their numbering at the time. I was asked to use those numbers by the - Multi-Media Section of the AAD. The numbers on the right are the initial Melbourne Museum numbers used by them when they scanned or photographed the slides some years later. I worked out the Museum's numbers from deduction by comparing my original scans and the Museum's scans or photographs of the same images -
    730E 57573
    731E 57572
    732E 57495
    733E 57571
    734E 57570
    735E 57569
    736E 57496
    737E 57568
    738E 57567
    739E 57566
    740E 57497
    741E 57565
    742E 57564
    743E 57563
    744E 57498
    745E 57499
    746E 57500
    747E 57562
    748E 57561
    749E 57560
    750E 57501
    751E 57559
    752E 57558
    753E 58059
    754E 58058
    755E 57988
    756E 58057
    757E 58056
    758E 58055
    759E 58054
    760E 57989
    761E 58053
    762E 57990
    763E 58052
    764E 58051
    765E 58050
    766E 60223
    767E 60357
    768E 60216
    769E 60360
    770E 60502
    771E 60501
    772E 60500
    773E 60224
    774E 60499
    775E 60217
    776E 60498
    777E 60497
    778E 60496
    779E 60225
    780E 60495
    781E 60221
    782E 60218
    783E 60220
    784E 57557 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    785E 60219
    786E 60361
    787E 60226
    788E 60494
    789E 60493
    790E 57502 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    791E 60492
    792E 60491
    793E 60362
    794E 60490
    795E 58238
    796E 58237
    797E 58236
    798E 58235
    799E 58234
    800E 58233
    801E 58232
    802E 58231
    803E 57556 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    804E 58230
    805E 58229
    806E 58228
    807E 58227
    808E 58226
    809E 57555 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    810E 57554 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    811E 57503 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    812E 57553 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    813E 58224 & 58225 (duplicated by the Melbourne Museum)
    814E 58223
    815E 60227 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    816E 58222
    817E 58221
    818E 58220
    819E 58219
    820E 58218
    821E 58217
    822E 58216
    823E 60228 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    824E 58215
    825E 58214
    826E 58213

    A bit later the Melbourne Museum re-allocated new numbers. These new numbers were provided to me verbally one by one from the Museum and many remaining items were matched by me by deduction. The items can be found at Trove with or without the MM prefixes -
    MM117500 = 57573
    MM117501 = 57572
    MM117502 = 57495
    MM117503 = 57571
    MM117504 = 57570
    MM117505 = 57569
    MM117506 = 57496
    MM117507 = 57568
    MM117508 = 57567
    MM117509 = 57566
    MM117510 = 57497
    MM117511 = 57565
    MM117512 = 57564
    MM117513 = 57563
    MM117514 = 57498
    MM117515 = 57499
    MM117516 = 57500
    MM117517 = 57562
    MM117518 = 57561
    MM117519 = 57560
    MM117520 = 57501
    MM117521 = 57559
    MM117522 = 57558
    MM117523 = 58059
    MM117524 = 58058
    MM117525 = 57988
    MM117526 = 58057
    MM117527 = 56056
    MM117528 = 58055
    MM117529 = 58054
    MM117530 = 57989
    MM117531 = 58053
    MM117532 = 57990
    MM117533 = 58052
    MM117534 = 58051
    MM117535 = 58050
    MM117536 = 60223
    MM117537 = 60357
    MM117538 = 60216
    MM117539 = 60360
    MM117540 = 60502
    MM117541 = 60501
    MM117542 = 60500
    MM117543 = 60224
    MM117544 = 60499
    MM117545 = 60217
    MM117546 = 60498
    MM117547 = 60497
    MM117548 = 60496
    MM117549 = 60225
    MM117550 = 60495
    MM117551 = 60221
    MM117552 = 60218
    MM117553 = 60220
    MM117588 = 57557
    MM117554 = 60219
    MM117555 = 60361
    MM117556 = 60226
    MM117557 = 60494
    MM117558 = 60493
    MM117589 = 57502
    MM117559 = 60492
    MM117560 = 60491
    MM117561 = 60362
    MM117562 = 60490
    MM117563 = 58238
    MM117564 = 58237
    MM117565 = 58236
    MM117566 = 58235
    MM117567 = 58234
    MM117568 = 58233
    MM117569 = 58232
    MM117570 = 58231
    MM117590 = 57556
    MM117571 = 58230
    MM117572 = 58229
    MM117573 = 58228
    MM117574 = 58227
    MM117575 = 58226
    MM117591 = 57555
    MM117592 = 57554
    MM117593 = 57503
    MM117594 = 57553
    MM117576 = 58224 & MM117576 = 58225
    MM117577 = 58223
    MM117595 = 60227
    MM117578 = 58222
    MM117579 = 58221
    MM117580 = 58220
    MM117581 = 58219
    MM117582 = 58218
    MM117583 = 58217
    MM117584 = 58216
    MM117596 = 60228
    MM117585 = 58215
    MM117586 = 58214
    MM117587 = 28213

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 is a SUMMARY to date.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    1 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-05
    User data
  73. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 7)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 7

    BANZARE slides (6 slides) and BANZARE coloured advertisement slides (7 slides).

    There was a small overflow of BANZARE images that were not in wooden boxes. These Lantern Slides or Glass Slides were scanned by me at home rather than at the Australian Antarctic Division and with my numbering on the left. The numbers on the right are the Melbourne Museum numbers assigned when they later scanned or photographed the images some years later. I worked out the Museum's numbers from deduction by comparing my original scans and the Museum's scans or photographs of the same images. The images 1ED to 6ED inclusive are black and white Lantern Slides or Glass Slides which actually belong with the BANZARE slides and 7ED to 13ED inclusive are the seven professionally crafted coloured advertisement Lantern Slides or Glass Slides relevant to the BANZARE Voyages -
    1ED 111098
    2ED 111099
    3ED 111100
    4ED 111101
    5ED 111102
    6ED 111108
    7ED 110049
    8ED 111050
    9ED 111103
    10ED 111106
    11ED 111105
    12ED 111104
    13ED 111107

    A bit later the Melbourne Museum re-allocated new numbers. These new numbers were provided to me verbally one by one from the Museum and many remaining items were matched by me by deduction. The items can be found at Trove with or without the MM prefixes -
    MM114736 = 111098
    MM114737 = 111099
    MM114738 = 111100
    MM114739 = 111101
    MM114740 = 111102
    MM114748 = 111108
    MM114741 = 110049
    MM114742 = 111050
    MM114743 = 111103
    MM114744 = 111104
    MM114745 = 111105
    MM114746 = 111106
    MM114747 = 111107

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 is a SUMMARY to date.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    1 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-06
    User data
  74. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 8)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION.

    PART 8

    The Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936. (The search for Lincoln Ellsworth from the RRS Discovery II and a RAAF Party onboard that ship). These Lantern Slides or Glass Slides were in a wooden box to hold the slides. (56 slides). The slides numbers on the left are in the order from the front to the back of the box - giving a rough indication of the journey order.

    I used these numbers on the left when I scanned the Lantern Slides or Glass Slides at the Australian Antarctic Division (Multi-Media Section) as they fitted in with their numbering at the time. The numbers on the right are the initial Melbourne Museum numbers used by them when they scanned or photographed the slides some time later on. I worked out the Museum's numbers from deduction by comparing my original scans and the Museum's scans or photographs of the same images -
    883E 60489
    884E 60488
    885E 60363
    886E 60487
    887E 60486
    888E 60485
    889E 60229
    890E 60484
    891E 60483
    892E 60364
    893E 60482
    894E 60481
    895E 60230
    896E 60480
    897E 60479
    898E 60478
    899E 60365
    900E (60477 &) 111093 (Two slides with the same image - these two are counted here - there was one in the wooden box and one in a small box.
    901E 60476
    902E 60231
    903E 60232
    904E 60475
    905E 60474
    906E 60366
    907E 60473
    908E 60472
    909E 60233
    910E 60471
    911E 60470
    912E 60469
    913E 60367
    914E 60235
    915E 60234
    916E 60468
    917E 60467
    918E 60368
    919E 60466
    920E 60465
    921E 57552
    922E 57504
    923E 57551
    924E 57550
    925E 58212
    926E 58211
    927E 58210
    928E 58209
    929E 58208
    930E 58207
    931E 58206
    932E 58205
    933E 58204
    934E 58203
    935E 58202
    936E 58201
    937E 58200

    A bit later the Melbourne Museum re-allocated new numbers. These new numbers were provided to me verbally one by one from the Museum and many remaining items were matched by me by deduction. The items can be found at Trove with or without the MM prefixes -
    MM117597 = 60489
    MM117598 = 60488
    MM117599 = 60363
    MM117600 = 60487
    MM117601 = 60486
    MM117602 = 60485
    MM117603 = 60229
    MM117604 = 60484
    MM117605 = 60483
    MM117606 = 60364
    MM117607 = 60482
    MM117608 = 60481
    MM117609 = 60230
    MM117610 = 60480
    MM117611 = 60479
    MM117612 = 60478
    MM117613 = 60365
    MM117614 = (60477 &) MM114731 = 111093
    MM117615 = 60476
    MM117616 = 60231
    MM117617 = 60232
    MM117618 = 60475
    MM117619 = 60474
    MM117620 = 60366
    MM117621 = 60473
    MM117622 = 60472
    MM117623 = 60233
    MM117624 = 60471
    MM117625 = 60470
    MM117626 = 60469
    MM117627 = 60367
    MM117628 = 60235
    MM117629 = 60234
    MM117630 = 60468
    MM117631 = 60467
    MM117632 = 60368
    MM117633 = 60466
    MM117634 = 60465
    MM117635 = 57552
    MM117636 = 57504
    MM117637 = 57551
    MM117638 = 57550
    MM117639 = 58212
    MM117640 = 58211
    MM117641 = 58210
    MM117642 = 58209
    MM117643 = 58208
    MM117644 = 58207
    MM117645 = 58206
    MM117646 = 58205
    MM117647 = 58204
    MM117648 = 58203
    MM117649 = 58202
    MM117650 = 58201
    MM117651 = 58200

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 is a SUMMARY to date.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    1 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-06
    User data
  75. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 9)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION.

    PART 9

    The Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936. (The search for Lincoln Ellsworth from the RRS Discovery II and a RAAF Party onboard that ship). There was an overflow of Ellsworth Relief Expedition Lantern Slides or Glass Slides that were not in a specially made wooden box. These slides are not in the journey order. (There are 35 slides).

    I used these numbers on the left when I scanned the Lantern Slides or Glass Slides at the Australian Antarctic Division (Multi-Media Section) as they fitted in with their numbering at the time. The numbers on the right are the initial Melbourne Museum numbers used by then when they scanned or photographed the slides some time later on. I worked out the Museum's numbers from deduction by comparing my original scans and the Museum's scans or photographs of the same images.

    In a small box -
    847E 111058
    848E 111063
    849E 111064
    850E 111065
    851E 111066
    852E 111067
    853E 111068
    854E 111069
    855E 111070
    856E 111071
    857E 111072
    858E 111073
    859E 111074
    860E 111075
    In another small box -
    861E 111076
    862E 111077
    863E 111078
    864E 111079
    865E 111080
    866E 111081
    In a further small box -
    867E 111082
    868E 111084
    869E 111083
    870E 111085
    871E 111086
    872E 111087
    873E 111091
    874E 111089
    875E 111090
    876E 111088
    877E 111092
    878E 60477 (& 111093), Two slides with the same image. These two are already listed in Part 8. There was one in the wooden box and one in this small box.
    879E 111094
    880E 111095
    881E 111096
    882E 111097

    A bit later on the Melbourne Museum re-allocated new numbers.These new numbers were provided to me verbally one by one from the Museum and many remaining items were matched by me by deduction. The items can be found at Trove with or without the MM prefixes -
    MM114700 = 111058
    MM114701 = 111063
    MM114702 = 111064
    MM114703 = 111065
    MM114704 = 111066
    MM114705 = 111067
    MM114706 = 111068
    MM114707 = 111069
    MM114708 = 111070
    MM114709 = 111071
    MM114710 = 111072
    MM114711 = 111073
    MM114712 = 111074
    MM114713 = 111075
    MM114714 = 111076
    MM114715 = 111077
    MM114716 = 111078
    MM114717 = 111079
    MM114718 = 111080
    MM114719 = 111081
    MM114720 = 111082
    MM114722 = 111084
    MM114721 = 111083
    MM114723 = 111085
    MM114724 = 111086
    MM114725 = 111087
    MM114729 = 111091
    MM114727 = 111089
    MM114728 = 111090
    MM114726 = 111088
    MM114730 = 111092
    MM114731 = 111093 Already counted in Part 8.
    MM114732 = 111094
    MM114733 = 111095
    MM114734 = 111096
    MM114735 = 111097

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 is a SUMMARY to date.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    1 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-07
    User data
  76. GROUP CAPTAIN ERIC DOUGLAS - RAAF - (Gilbert) Eric Douglas 1902 -1970
    List
    Public

    Eric Douglas joined the Port Phillip Yacht Club by 1922, the Royal Yacht Club of Victoria in 1940 and the Royal Brighton Yacht Club in 1920 and remained a member there till at least 1949. His most favoured yacht was "the Vendetta" - B Class [no 18 in 1921] (also known as the Ven) which was bought by Eric and his younger brother Gill (Leslie Gilbert) in equal half shares in 1921 - Eric and Gill raced this yacht in regattas from 1922 to 1936 - sailing from the Royal Brighton Yacht Club.

    On one of Eric's yachts - 1920's to 1940's had a rich ochre coloured sail.

    In 1937 Eric owned a ‘Snipe Class’ yacht – he sold it in about that year.

    Other boats owned by Eric included - "Beetle" (12 foot yacht), "Katinka" (18 foot half decker), "Iris" (yacht), "Roslyn" (yacht), "Hinemoa" (motor boat) - possibly owned; yacht "Kestrel" (c1939 at Point Cook/Laverton) and "the Myth" (Idle Along yacht), snub nose dinghies and other boats built by Eric - eg yachts and speedboats; Canoeist - teenage years, until at least his mid 30's - one canoe being called "Ludine"; Motor and Speed boat enthusiast with "Hartford Atom","Douglas Bullet", "Douglas Cruiser", "Nautical Nymph" and "Rover" the fishing dinghy.

    Moreover in about 1918/1919 Eric and his older brother Cliff and younger brother Gill had their own business in Hampton Street, Brighton simply called 'Douglas Brothers' - they were Motor Mechanics with a Service Station and workshop. Yet they were more than that and were quite innovative, but young, taking a keen interest in motor cars, motor bikes, marine engines and building dinghies and boats, plus model boats. If they sold a pint of oil or fixed a puncture along the way, well and good. Motoring was a new method of travel in Australia with the launch of the Model T Ford in Geelong in 1915 and so it was a new learning curve for all.

    Sailing was introduced as a recreational activity to the air cadets at Point Cook through the suggestion of Flight Lieutenant Douglas - [1937 - The Third Brother - The Royal Australian Air Force 1921-39 C D Coulthard-Clark - page 203]. The RAAF 'Point Cook' class raced in regattas in Port Phillip Bay in the late 1930's and Eric was in charge of this class.

    Downhill and Cross country skier - Ski Club of Victoria - Mt Buller; Mt Hotham, Mt Feathertop, Mt St Bernard, Mt Buffalo and Mt Donna Buang (as a Sergeant Pilot Eric went skiing with other members of the RAAF at Mt St Bernard); Motor Cyclist [owned eight - three examples are the Rudge Multi (1921), the Abigndon King Dick (1922) and the AJS and sidecar (c1929 to mid 1930’s)] - and of course doing such acrobatics as riding doing handstands on the handle - bars; Motor Car enthusiast eg Chrysler - 1928 model bought in May, 1930, Pontiac - bought in the mid 1940’s, Jeep - 1946, Chevrolet - 1936 and Toyota c1965; Bass drum player in the RAAF Amberley band; Carpentry and Woodwork - boats and dinghies, paper planes, model aeroplanes - motor and gliders, model yachts, and kites of many types such as triangle and box. Amateur photographer including on the search for Anderson and Hitchcock and in the Antarctic; Parachutist, tug of war champion, jogger, amateur boxer, rifleman, water-skier, fisherman, ocean beach - body and board surfer, swimmer and an early member of life saving in Port Phillip Bay (likely belonged to the Brighton Lifesaving Club); Civil Pilot’s Licence - flying member of the Victorian Aero Club - and flying examiner and safety pilot; also took part in aeroplane gliding trials eg Koroit in Western Victoria. He was an avid reader of - boat and plane manuals, histories, biographies, philososophy and philosophical poetry - Omar Khayyam and Khalil Gibran, travelogs, (true) exploration and frontier stories, cowboy stories based on real heroes; while favourite music tastes included Enrico Caruso and Richard Tauber.

    Brief Outline of Eric’s Flying and RAAF Career –
    • Senior Cadets c1916 to c1919 – in the period 1917 to c1919 Eric was a day student at Swinburne Senior Technical College ‘on a course of mechanical engineering'. Before that he had spent two years as a day student as Swinburne Junior Technical College ‘to Intermediate standard’ in 1916.
    • Australian Air Corps in November, 1920 - joined as an Air Mechanic (Aero Fitter and a little later he was also an Aero Rigger). Started work at the Central Flying School, Laverton, Victoria on 12th December, 1920.
    • In 1921 Eric did some correspondence subjects with International Correspondence Schools (Colonial) Limited – the Head Office was at Finsbury Square, London with a branch Head Office in Australia at 399-401 George Street, Sydney. Two of the subjects were – Internal Combustion Motors – result 94% (Motor Mechanics course) and Arithmetic Part 3.
    • When the RAAF was formed in 1921 he transferred as an Aero Fitter (AC1). Eric’s number was FG252928 at the Central Flying School, Laverton as at June and November, 1921. On 1st April, 1921 it was Eric’s intention to ‘sign on for 6 years Australian Air Force’.
    • From 7th November, 1921 to 26th February, 1922 (time off for Christmas) Eric attended a training Camp at Liverpool, New South Wales.
    • On 27th February, 1922 commenced working at the Machine Shop at Point Cook - part of the Aero work was on Seaplanes
    • On 18th September, 1922 he was transferred to the No1 Flight (Flying) Training School, Point Cook, to work on 'B Flight Aeros’.
    • In the period from 1920 to when he learnt to fly in 1927, Eric was an Aero Fitter and Rigger, AC1, LAC, Corporal and Sergeant and he gained valuable experience as crew (motor and air mechanic and aero fitter and rigger) on a substantial number of RAAF Cross Country Flights.
    • 'After 6 years in the Workshop and on Flight aero fitting and maintenance duties underwent a Flying Training Course at Point Cook in 1927 and graduated as a Sergeant Pilot'.
    • Overall - in the RAAF 1921 to 1948 - Pilot and Administrator, Motor Mechanic - 'Douglas Brothers'; Air Mechanic, Aero Fitter, Mechanical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Pilot plus Test pilot and A1 Flying Instructor (A1 for four years) and attained A1 for Gunnery, Aircraft Engineer and Administrator.

    RAAF ranks held by Eric - AC1 in 1921 on formation of the RAAF; LAC in 1922; Corporal in 1925 (passed all subjects); Sergeant in 1926; Sergeant Pilot in 1927; Pilot Officer in July 1929; Flying Officer in February, 1930; Flight Lieutenant in July 1934; Squadron Leader in March 1939; Wing Commander in June, 1940; posted to Amberley June 1942 - No 3 Aircraft Depot and in Oct 1947 was the Station Commander on formation of Station Headquarters, acting Group Captain in 1942 and temporary Group Captain in December 1943. Honorary Group Captain in 1956 and in 1958 this was amended 'Temporary Group Captain G. E. Douglas (39) is granted the rank of Group Captain, 1st July, 1948, with seniority as from 1st December, 1943.' [Page 2556, column 2 of the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, No.43. of 07-Aug-1958]. In his RAAF career Eric was also assigned the number 126.

    On 9th June, 1925 at St Kilda, Melbourne there was a reception for around the world Italian flyers – Pilot Francesco de Pinedo and Mechanic Ernesto Campanelli who had flown from Rome to Melbourne (with stops at other cities) in their seaplane a Savoia-Marchetti S16 called "Gennariello”. (Eric Douglas is depicted in a formal photograph at that reception). The plane was serviced at RAAF Point Cook - Eric Douglas was one of the air mechanics who worked on the plane under the leadership of Squadron Leader Wackett together with the involvement of Ernesto Campanelli who was apparently a car mechanic. An image of RAAF boat 2 and three images of the Savoia in an album confirm this involvement by Eric working on "Gennariello” which appears to have had a full engine replacement. The Italian Aeronauts then left from near Point Cook for their return journey to Rome via Tokyo and it was a successful return and welcome homecoming for them.

    1922 - The Third Brother - The Royal Australian Air Force 1921-39 C D Coulthard-Clark - page 252 - 253
    "When Flying Officer Loris Balderson took the plane (AVRO 504K) up at Mascot on 22 November 1922, he took with him AC1 Eric Douglas as front-seat passenger. The Aircraft had reached an altitude of about 1500 feet when Douglas signalled that there was a problem with the throttle control, and Balderston decided to land to have this fault rectified...Witnesses to the crash provided a ...colourful description of the event, recalling that Douglas foresaw the impending collision and stood up in his seat moments before the Avro demolished six panels of fence: 'the engine was thrust back into the front cockpit; the plane momentarily rose - the pilot had switched on his engine - and then subsided in an integrated mass of wreckage, none of it more than two feet above the ground. A truly comprehensive crash.' Douglas's quick reaction had saved his life (and the life of the pilot), although he (Eric) suffered severe cuts to the forehead from broken wires and the crash had propelled him forward so that he now sat astride the crankshaft, unconscious and bleeding. Stumbling from the wreckage, the pilot noticed his companion's plight and reached into his pockets to produce a small camera, prying away rescuers rushing to Douglas's assistance 'until I take this ruddy picture'. Given the trouble that he went to, it was a shame that Balderston's own unsteady state resulted in the spoiling of these photographs" (Note Eric was a passenger on this flight)

    1928 - The Third Brother - The Royal Australian Air Force 1921-39 C D Coulthard-Clark - page 268
    Air Commodore 'Paddy' Heffernan recalls: "From what I heard later, I learnt that it was most unpopular (Warrigal 1), being under-powered and overweight. It also had most peculiar spinning habits. On one occasion it was being flown by Squadron Leader Charles Eaton with Sergeant Eric Douglas as passenger and was deliberately placed in a spin. After several turns Eaton attempted recovery, but nothing happened. As the aircraft was still in an uncontrolled spin at 2000 feet, he called on Douglas to abandon ship. Douglas undid his belt and stood up and his action apparently varied the air flow over the tail surfaces and the spin stopped at 1000 feet. As the spin had stopped, Douglas did not jump, but two frightened pilots got out of the aircraft after landing" (Note Eric was a passenger on this flight)

    Eric learnt to fly on the AVRO Trainer 504k - this type was the famous World War 1 British 2-seater trainer powered with either an 80 H.P. Le Rhone or 110 H.P. Clerget Rotary Engine which used castor oil as an engine lubricant.

    RAAF A Pilot's Course 1927, A1 Flying Instructor 1928.

    “A” Pilot’s Course at Point Cooke (Cook) - Flying Training School – Commenced 18th May, 1927 - Avro, DH9, DH9A, DH50, DH Moth, SE5A, Fairy Seaplane, Gipsy Moth Seaplane, Spartan, Wapiti & Warrigal. On this course flying skills included - take offs and landings, approaches, gliding turns, spins, steep turns, stalling and regaining engine, figure of 8 turns, climbing turns, right hand circuit and land, gentle turns with engine cut off, side-slipping, aerobatics, cloud flying, formation flying, instruction, solo (1st solo 12/9/1927), gunnery, camera gun target, bombing, dummy parachute dropping, rigging test and engine test.

    Eric topped his A course in marks for flying and came third in theory.

    By June, 1928 Eric's flying now included inspecting landing grounds, dual instruction, back seat approaches and landings, forced landings, engine cut out, back seat flying, instruction flying, level flying, photography (as observer), Air Pilotage test (as observer), cross country landings, taxying, travel flights, blind flying, night flying, instrument flying, test flights, to scene of crash and return, windspeed and direction, air observation, high altitude bombing, live bombing, and use of signalling lamp, air pageants and fly pasts.

    As an A1 Flying Instructor from June, 1928 planes flown included -
    • Anson, Avro 504K, Cirrus Moth, DH9, DH9A, Demon, Gipsy Moth & Wapiti.
    • Other –
    DA Moth
    • Planes flown both as an Officer and Test Pilot –
    Anson, Avro Trainer, Battle, Beaufort, Beechcraft, Boeing B-17, Bulldog, CAC Trainer, Dakota C47, DH9A, DH Moth, DH Moth Minor, DH Moth Seaplane, Demon, Empire Flying Boat, Gipsy Moth, Hudson, Lodestar, Liberator, Lancaster (Lancastar), Seagull, Magister, Tiger Moth, Oxford, Wapiti, Wirraway & Vengeance (Vengance) .
    {In addition Eric was often the second pilot sometimes with dual controls; and more rarely as a passenger}.
    • As a Passenger –
    Bristol Tourer, Sopwith GNU, Southhampton, Lincoln, DC2 (C-39 Commercial), DC3 (TAA) and DC4 (TAA).

    Eric fully taught 44 pupils to fly (which was the British Empire record at that time) including their Service flying training such as navigation, gunnery, bombing and cross country flying. Some of these pupils became Battle of Britain Pilots. He also taught many other RAAF student Pilots some of their flying skills, the details of which are in his Flying Logs (Nos 1 to 6).

    1928 Eric successfully completed the course on parachute folding and maintenance.

    Early April 1929 - Special Qualifications - Air Pilotage Course (aerial navigation by visible identification of landmarks)

    RAAF search (DH9A - A1-20) for Flight Lieut Keith Anderson and Mr Henry Smith (Bobbie) Hitchcock in 1929 (NT - Wave Hill and the Tanami desert - RAAF land search party of Flight Lieut Charles Eaton - leader, Sergeant Pilot Eric Douglas, Mr Moray of Vesteys, Aboriginal trackers - Daylight, Sambo and Jimmy, 1927 Buick car and 26 horses). Eric's skills as a motor mechanic - attended to the Buick, and air mechanic - checked out the flying condition of the "Kookaburra" - all in the Tanami desert.

    An Air Force Medal citation was made 'As an airman pilot and a fitter-aero ... displayed devotion to duty and rendered valuable assistance to Flight Lieut Eaton, both in the air search operation and as a member of the ground expedition' - not awarded.

    BANZARE (Antarctic) with Sir Douglas Mawson in 1929-31 on the SY Discovery (Gipsy Moth Seaplane VH-ULD) - other responsibilities (fitter/rigger) - running and maintenance of the Moth Seaplane and the SY Discovery's motor boat - in his capacity as an Air and Motor mechanic and onshore semaphore (also knew morse code); Polar Medal and Bar 1934, Douglas Peak and Douglas Bay - Antarctica, named after Eric. [See SCAR maps].

    Posted to ‘B’ Flight (Wapitis) May 1931 to 30th June, 1932

    Posted to ‘A’ Flight (Gipsy Moths) 1st July, 1932

    Posted to ‘B’ Flight on 1st July, 1934

    January, 1935 - Gazetted as a Flight Lieutenant - promotion dating back to July, 1934.

    With RRS Discovery 2 for RAAF search for Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon 1935/36 (Antarctic) (Wapiti A5-37 fitted with floats and Gipsy Moth Seaplane A7-55); Eric was the leader of the RAAF search party - 'Flying operations'.

    1934 Secretary Officers' Mess for 2½ years.

    1934 - 1938 Lecturer on Aero Engines to flying cadet courses in the Royal Australian Air Force

    1937 Officer in Charge Aircraft Repair Section No 1 Aircraft Depot Laverton and Test Pilot. (Transferred to the technical side of General duties at his own request after completing 2,200 hours of flying).

    In the period from 1928 to 1937 (inclusive) when Eric was an A1 Instructor he was also an Aerobatic Pilot including performing loop the loop, rolling and aircraft towing of another aircraft; and Formation flying - at Air pageants and Air displays eg – at Point Cooke, Laverton and Nhill in Victoria plus at Richmond and Sydney in NSW; and he was involved in Fly pasts eg the Melbourne Cup and for Royalty.

    In 1928 Eric took part in the RAAF Flying formation escort for Bert Hinkler and also the one for Charles Kingsford-Smith in the same year.

    In June 1930 Eric took part in the greeting for Amy Johnson at Geelong (flying from Point Cook to Queenscliff in Southhampton Flying Boat A11-2).

    1938 Staff Recruiting Officer.

    In 1939 Eric successfully undertook a 'Conversion course'.

    1938-40 Officer in Charge of Workshops at Point Cook and Test Pilot – testing aeroplanes for Workshop, Depot and Trade.

    1940-42 Commanding Officer No 1 Aircraft Depot, Laverton.

    1942-45 ‘CO No 3 Aircraft Depot, RAAF, Amberley, Queensland’

    1945-46 A brief period at Laverton and Point Cook, Victoria (Heidelberg - with health problems)

    1945-48 ‘CO No 3 Aircraft Depot, RAAF, Amberley, Queensland’ (Station Headquarters formed in October 1947).

    1948 – ‘Retired from RAAF after serving the last six years with rank of Group Captain and completing 10 years in charge of RAAF Workshops.’ Eric personally supervised ‘the Test and Ferry Section of No 3 Aircraft Depot…and was instrumental in introducing several improvements in the acceptance flying of service aircraft…’

    Group Captain at RAAF Amberley - June 1942 to November 1948 (with seniority from 1943 - gazetted in 1958) - Engineering facilities for the RAAF were expanded after the outbreak of War with Japan, and [No 3 Aircraft Depot] was established - ie Amberley - the then Wing Commander Eric Douglas was appointed as Commanding Officer. Eric's prime duty was the formation of No 3 Aircraft Depot, Amberley and its build up of Workshops and Ancillary sections to a self contained unit of 1600 RAAF personnel. Amberley ancillary locations (in 1946 and 1947) included Archerfield, Charleville, Kingaroy, Strathpine, Lowood, Oakey, Toogoolawah and Coominya (these last two were Relief Landing Fields for Lowood during WW2) and Goolman (Relief Landing Ground for Amberley during WW2); and when the Americans vacated Victoria Park, Spring Hill became a RAAF depot. Oakey [6AD] was of interest to Eric at least from 1943 and Lowood at least from 1944). At Amberley also were the 82 Bomber Wing and AD HQ - all these topics were included in Eric's duties. Also control of all Flight fields in Queensland was another important duty.

    There was also a close tie between RAAF Amberley and what was known then as the WAAF (WAAF - appears to be initially known in Australia as the Women's Auxiliary Air Force - 1946; but was later known as WAAAF ie Women's Australian Auxiliary Air Force). In 1943 there were WAAF fabric workers at RAAF Amberley - one of their jobs was to 'fold parachutes' and there was an certainly a skill and need to fold them correctly for lives were at stake. In March 1946 the WAAF's held Fifth Anniversary Celebrations at Amberley, Sandgate and Toowoomba in Queensland by means of dinners accompanied by dancing - over 100 persons attended the celebrations at Amberley.

    Besides, Amberley was the terminal of the Trans Pacific air route and an erection and overhaul base for the American Air Force for a considerable period. [RAAF history - National Archives of Australia].

    By 1942 there were up to 1,000 American service personnel stationed at Amberley and by 1943 the numbers totalled approximately 2,300 - scaled back to about 500 after the War. [Australia at War website]

    Amberley as at 30/9/1946 -
    Strength of 3AD - 240 Airmen and 40 Officers; 82 Wing 95 Airmen and 60 Officers and ADHQ - 11 Airmen and 3 Officers. Of these persons - 30 Absent on duty, 10 Detatched, 5 in Hospital and 10 on Recreation leave.
    Plus 53 Labourers, 9 Accounts Clerks, 3 Store Clerks, 3 Headquarters Clerks, 2 Female Typists at Headquarters, I Female Typist at Stores, 6 Storemen, 2 Watchmen and 1 Watchman at Strathpine and 3 Temporary Labourers at Charleville. I Watchman required for Charleville and 1 Civilian required for Canteen. (Eric's notes)

    Amberley Aircraft Storage as at 30/9/1946 -
    • Mosquito - 3AD - 32; Lowood - 24 and Kingaroy - 7. Of these 43 were Category B Storage and 20 were Category E Storage.
    Total Storages Category B • Dakota 5, Mosquito 43, Mustang 9, Liberator 7 and Spitfire 6.
    Total Storages Category C • Liberator 33 and Dakota 5.
    Total Storages Category E • Anson 10, Beaufighter 2, Beaufort 4, Ventura 1, Mosquito 20, Mustang 53, Wirraway 1, Boomerang 1, Vengeance 41, Mitchell 33, Spitfire 43 and Liberator 23.
    Total Storages Category D • Beechcraft 1.
    • Other - 3 AD Armament is at Kingaroy. (Eric's notes)

    Civilian Employees at 3AD as as 31/3/1947 -
    • 4 Typists D HQ, 3 Clerks 8 Squadron, 3 Clerks D HQ, 9 Clerks Accounts Section, 2 Telephonists - Main switch, 12 Storemen 8 Squadron, 1 Assistant Storeman 8 Squadron, 6 Transport, 39 Labourers, 19 General hands, 12 Stewards, 8 Cooks Assistants, 4 Watchmen at Archerfield, 2 Watchmen at Amberley, I Caretaker at Lowood, 1 Caretaker at Charleville, Nil at Kingaroy and 7 Labourers at Archerfield. (Eric's notes)

    Other activities at Amberley which involved Eric included food distribution in Queensland by RAAF aeroplanes; RAAF Amberley planes searching for lost aeroplanes, yachts, fishing boats and launches; dealing with the consequences and investigations of RAAF Air crashes at and in the vicinity of Amberley; Mock wars off the coast of New South Wales - Bomber input from Amberley; RAAF charitable (fund-raising) marches through Brisbane, high level RAAF and other meetings. RAAF entertainment - Theatre (live) - including visits by Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, Gracie Fields, Gary Cooper, the Glen Millar band, the Mills Brothers, Will Mahoney, Evie Hayes and Rita Hayworth; and movies - examples - Charlie Chaplin, Laurel and Hardy and the Marx Brothers; the Officers' Mess, Sergeants' Mess and the Airmens' Mess (included parties, dances, Christmas dinners and even Weddings); Sporting - including cricket, tennis, table tennis, baseball (American), football - rugby and gridiron. There were also boxing and gymnastics and all the basic facilities that were necessary for all these sports.

    Besides, there were RAAF ceremonies, marches, parades, and inspections with and by dignitaries eg Chief of the Air Staff, HRH the Duke of Gloucester, General Douglas MacArthur, General George C Kenney, Lord Bernard Montgomery, the Prime Minister, the Minister for Defence, the Governor of Queensland, the Premier and Lord Mayor of Brisbane; RAAF Pageants and Air displays - open to the Public. Part of the small Courier Mail Committee judging sponsored flying scholarships. Flying School; Logistics involved with the training Air Training Corps Cadets; Welcoming home via Amberley to Australian ex-prisoners of War. Welcome to Gracie Fields as an entertainer and singer at Amberley and in 1946 a welcome to Miss Australia to Amberley. Housing visiting personnel from other nations beside America eg Royal Navy visitors from British Aircraft carriers. In 1948 responsible for organizing the patrol of all Queesland aerodromes - Eric was the Senior RAAF Officer stationed in Queensland.

    On a more personal level meeting with, and providing financial and moral support for local organizations in Brisbane, Ipswich, Boonah and Amberley such as Railway workshops, the Australian Citizen Forces, local schools, pre school children, rugby and cricket teams, the Red Cross, churches - including Debutante Balls; and the boy scouts; plus local families and individuals especially those associated with RAAF Amberley.

    RAAF (and other) Aircraft at Amberley during the period 1942 to 1948 included – The Anson, Beaufighter, Beaufort, Beechcraft, Boomerang, Dakota C47, Gipsy Major, Hellcat, Liberator, Lincoln Bomber (including Aries II in 1947), Lodestar, Maurauder, Mitchell, Mosquito, Moth Minor, Mustang, Oxford, Scout Fighter, Spitfire, Tiger Moth, Vampire, Vengeance, Ventura and Wirraway (Eric's notes). Other aircraft in the skies over Amberley in that same period included – the Airacobra (Aerocobra), Black Widow, Boston, Catalina, Commando, Corsair, Dauntless, Flying Fortress, Hudson, Kingcobra, Kittyhawk, Lancer, Lancaster, Lancastrian, Lightning, Lincoln Bomber, Mustang, Percival Gull, Rapide, Skymaster, Superfortress, Taylor Craft, Vampire, York, Waco Glider and Wapiti. A family member who was an older child at the time, lists the following aeroplanes types as being some that he remembers at Amberley - Airacobra, Anson, Beaufighter, Beaufort, Boomerang, Black Widow, Boston, Buffalo, Catalina, Commando, Corsair, Dakota, Dauntless, Flying Fortress, Hudson, Kingcobra, Kittyhawk, Lancaster (G for George and and Queenie VI), Lancastrian, Liberator, Lightning, Lincoln (short and long nose), Maurauder, Mitchell, Mosquito, Mustang, Oxford, Percival Gull, Rapide, Skymaster, Superfortress, Spitfire, Tiger Moth, Thunderbolt, Vultee Vengence, Ventura, Wapiti, Waco Glider, Wirraway, York and Vampire (public demonstration flight).

    Eric Douglas - Flying Log No 6 - Amberley - June 23, 1942 to end 1943 -

    June 23, 1942 – C47 Pilot Capt Taylor & Eric Douglas – observation around Amberley

    August 4, 1942 - Vengeance A27- 6 Pilot Capt Kelly & Eric Douglas – test flight

    August 4, 1942 – Tiger Moth A17- Pilot Eric Douglas & F/Lt Mac Gill - observation around Amberley

    August 5, 1942 - Vengeance A27-6 Pilot Eric Douglas & one A/C – general practice

    August 21, 1942 – Tiger Moth AA-19 Pilot Eric Douglas & one A/C - general practice

    August 24, 1942 - Tiger Moth AA-19 Pilot Eric Douglas & S/L Nicholson – observation local

    Sept 10, 1942 – Tiger Moth N 6906 Pilot Eric Douglas – engine test

    Sept 24, 1942 - Tiger Moth A17-426 Pilot Eric Douglas & F/Lt Appleby - observation local

    Oct 12, 1942 – Tiger Moth A17-355 Pilot Eric Douglas & Mr Patts – Amberley – Maryborough – Bundaberg

    Oct 13, 1942 – Tiger Moth A17-355 Pilot Eric Douglas & Mr Patts – Bundaberg – Maryborough – Gympie – Amberley

    Oct 24, 1942 – Beechcraft A 39 Pilot F/Lt Wood & Eric Douglas – general flying

    Nov 11, 1942 - Moth Minor A21-25 Pilot Eric Douglas & P/O Sleeman – general flying and machine test

    Nov 13, 1942 - Moth Minor A21-25 Pilot Eric Douglas & P/O Sleeman – Inst to P/O Sleeman

    April 1943 – Lodestar - Pilot Eric Douglas – Archerfield – Townsville

    April 1943 – Lodestar - Pilot Eric Douglas – Townsville – Archerfield

    July 1943 – DC2- C39 – Eric Douglas Passenger – Mascot to Essendon

    July 1943 – DC2- C39 – Eric Douglas Passenger – Essendon to Archerfield

    Sep 1943 – DC2- C39 – Eric Douglas Passenger – Archerfield to Mascot

    Sep 1943 – DC2- C39 - Eric Douglas Passenger – Essendon to Mascot

    Oct 27, 1943 – Anson EF 922 – Pilot Eric Douglas – Crew F/O Hilford & W/C Nicholson – Amberley to Evans Head

    Oct 27, 1943 – Anson EF 922 – Pilot Eric Douglas – Crew F/O Hilford,

    W/C Nicholson & F/Lt Isaacson – Evans Head to Amberley

    Oct 28, 1943 – Gipsy Moth A7-44 – Pilot Eric Douglas & F/O Moss – Local m/c and engine test

    Oct 29, 1943 – Gipsy Moth A7-44 – Pilot Eric Douglas & Sgt Wittaker – To Goolman and return

    Oct 29, 1943 – Gipsy Moth A7-44 – Pilot Eric Douglas & Sgt Allen – Local test

    Oct 30, 1943 - Gipsy Moth A7-44 – Pilot Eric Douglas & W/C Adler – To Oakey [6AD] from Amberley

    Oct 30, 1943 - Gipsy Moth A7-44 – Pilot Eric Douglas – solo – From Oakey [6AD] to Amberley

    Nov 30, 1943 – Gipsy Moth A7-44 – Pilot Eric Douglas – solo – To Coominya (11RSU - ie Repair and Salvage Unit), solo - From Coominya

    Dec 8, 1943 – Oxford – Pilot W/C Adler & Eric Douglas – To Oakey, From Oakey

    Plane Speaking (RAAF Amberley) December, 1942 -

    A Christmas Message to all Personnel of No 3 Aircraft Depot "Providemus" is the motto of an Aircraft Depot, meaning 'We shall Provide.' This is the reason for our existence, this is our aim. This Aircraft Depot is in its infancy, but is advancing rapidly both in output and personnel. We are fast gaining a reputation for efficiency and co-operation, which must be proudly upheld. The majority of personnel of this Depot have entered the Service since war began. Their reason for doing so is the desire to serve their country by helping to win this war. This will be achieved only by placing the Service before self. And the Service demands unremitting toil by all. Whatever our job may be, it is most important that we be of good cheer and endeavour, at all times, to carry it out to the best of our ability. For some months, we have worked adjacent to our American comrades who are playing an equivalent part. Their co-operation and good fellowship are greatly appreciated. Trusting that all personnel of this Depot will stick to our motto until we have successtully finished this job. Season's Greetings to all. Signed G E Douglas, Group Captain, Commanding No 3 Aircraft Depot, Amberley.

    In 1944 – Inventor - Airwash Spray mask (Patented on 4th November, 1946) - for painting and industrial usages. Another idea that Eric had was for a 'boltless undercarriage' but did not pursue it as far as a Patent as he felt that it was a RAAF perogative.

    Some special Aeroplanes/Visitors at RAAF Amberley –

    • General George C Kenney's plane landed at Amberley in August, 1942. (General Kenney - Reports). General Kenney also said that he formed the P38 group (Lightnings) and 'started training out of Amberley Field'.
    • There was an Official visit of American Senators to Amberley in September, 1942 (John Oxley Library - State Library of Queensland - web blog from the Library). However 'Trove' newspapers show that 5 US Senators visited Brisbane in September, 1943.
    • Flying Ace, Clive 'Killer' Caldwell arrived at RAAF Amberley on 14 September 1942.
    • On 25th October, 1942 General Hap Arnold, Major General Street and Colonel Bill Ritchie landed at Amberley Field. They were from the SWPA (South West Pacific Area) - US - War Department. (General Kenney - Reports).
    • On 3rd June, 1943 RAF Lancaster Four-Engined Bomber ‘Queenie VI' landed at RAAF Amberley. This aeroplane was flown to Australia by RAAF Flight Lieutenant Peter Isaacson and an all RAAF crew. It was taken on RAAF charge as A66-1.
    • On 13th September, 1943 Mrs Eleanor Rooseveldt landed at Amberley and among those greeting her was Mrs Douglas MacArthur. (Ref Roger Marks QAWW2 - NARA (US National Archives and Records Administration) - SC250309 (7567).
    • 3rd November, 1943 and Mr (Arthur) Calwell addressed the 'Loan Rally' at the Amberley Picture Theatre.
    • In 1943 United States Air Force Liberator B24 ‘Crosby's Curse’ was on the tarmac at Amberley.
    • It was on 8th February, 1944 that General Kenney 'received a message to meet General MacArthur at Amberley Field in an hour.' (General Kenney - Reports).
    • On 7th July, 1944, VIP Consolidated Liberator C-87 arrived at Amberley. This plane had been allotted to Admiral Sir Bruce Fraser, Commander of the British Fleet.
    • On 20th August, 1944 the famous aviator Charles Augustus Lindbergh arrived on Aircraft 975 at Amberley (called Amberley Field by the Americans). [Item details held at the National Archives in Brisbane].
    • On 7th October, 1944 Bob Dyer entertained at Amberley.
    • 8th November, 1944 was the day that ‘G for George’ arrived at Amberley. This Lancaster Bomber was flown from the UK by RAAF Flight Lieutenant K A Hudson a 22 year old DFC and Bar winner of Rockhampton; and a RAAF crew. The famous plane of 90 operational flights arrived for its final destiny at the Australian War Memorial. The young Captain taxied to a stop after flying out of 'a cloud of dust storm' and was warmly welcomed by Group Captain Eric Douglas. (G for George is now on permanent display at the AWM in Canberra).
    • On 1st June, 1945 Gracie Fields arrived at Amberley Aerodrome - she entertained in the RAAF theatre there.
    * In July, 1945 No 1 Squadron RAAF Mosquito ‘Bondi Blonde’ A52-518 was at Amberley. Mosquito A52-500 was also based at Amberley.
    • In July, 1945 a ‘test and ferry flight’ was carried out on Mitchell A47-44 by Flight Lieutenant A Egan from No 3 Depot at Amberley.
    • The Duke and Dutchess of Gloucester touched down at Amberley on the 8th August, 1945 in the Duke's plane 'Endeavour'. They lunched at the Amberley Mess as guests of the Commanding Officer, Group Captain Eric Douglas after which the Duke carried out an inspection of No 3 AD with Group Captain Douglas as his host.
    • Newspaper report of 17th September, 1945 - 45 Army and 3 RAAF liberated POW's "will arrive at Amberley...after an all-night flight from Darwin in two Liberators...A third Liberator will be in the flight convoy carrying 20 wounded soldiers from Borneo..."
    • On 31st January, 1946 it was reported that 600 US Airmen making a mass goodwill tour of Australia were due to land at Amberley in 42 planes. The planes were to be 30 B29s (Superforts) and 12 C54s (four motored Douglas bombers of the 'Sky Master' type). At Amberley they were due to stay for 48 hours and after refuelling will go on to Sydney - the B29s to Mascot and the C54s to Schofield. Group Captain Douglas said that 'he did not know when the planes would arrive, but he expected three weeks notice before their landing at Amberley'. He would like to see the men given 'a grand welcome' and had already approached the Premier, Mr Hanlon on the matter. He had reason to believe that suitable arrangements would be made.
    • On 30th October, 1946 Group Captain and Mrs Gordon Savage were guests at a cocktail party at Amberley Aerodrome.
    • 13th June, 1947 saw the arrival at Amberley of Avro Lincoln B2 Aircraft Serial No Re-364 (The AWM shows this aeroplane as an Avro Lincoln) ‘Aries II’ of the RAF Empire Air Navigation School. From Group Captain E E Vielle of ‘Aries II’ dated 13th November, 1947 from Whenuapai, Royal New Zealand Air Force to Eric “Dear Douglas, Thank you very much indeed for your hospitality and the way you looked after all of us at Amberley…Many thanks for the assistance we received on the Aircraft…”
    • On 26th September, 1947 Group Captain and Mrs Douglas were to receive 80 guests at a cocktail party and were to give the party at the RAAF Officers Mess, Amberley.
    • 26th November, 1947 "About 140 guests will attend an at home which the Governor (Sir John Lavarack) and Lady Lavarack will hold at Government House tonight. Members of the Indian Cricket Team will be present. Among the invited guests will be...Group Captain and Mrs Douglas..."
    * In early December, 1947 it was reported in the papers that No 82 Wing of RAAF Amberley was to be flying Prime Minister Benjamin Chifley to New Zealand. Group Captain Douglas C.O. of Amberley stated that 'the plane was one of three in Australia converted for very important personages and known as VIP Liberators. Another is in Japan while the third is being overhauled. The planes have luxurious accommodation including upholstered chairs, a bed above the command deck and a kitchen fitted with the latest electrical appliances'.
    • On 22nd December, 1947 Group Captain Eric Douglas represented the RAAF at the Funeral or Memorial Service of the 'Unknown US Soldier' in Brisbane.
    • On 4th March, 1948 a RAF Lincoln bomber landed at Amberley. Group Captain Douglas stated that '...the crew will lecture RAAF air mustering, to keep them informed of the latest developments incorporated in the construction of the Lincoln bomber and it's equipment.'
    • 5th April, 1948 "The Pathfinder Vickers Vimy aircraft carrying the insignia of the King's Flight landed at Amberley from Darwin this evening...In command is the Captain of the King's Flight Air Commodore E Fielden...Accompanying him are three RAF Officers and five ground crew..." (Townsville Daily Bulletin - Tuesday 6th April, 1948).

    The Cairns Post reported on 14th July, 1947 that Field Marshall Montgomery was due 'to arrive at Eagle Farm...'and that 'he will be met by...and the RAAF Senior Officer (Group Captain Douglas)...' Amongst others Eric was accompanied by his young son Ian Ellsworth Douglas. Then on 15th July, 1947 Group Captain and Mrs E Douglas were among 700 Guests who attended a Civic Reception at the Brisbane City Hall hosted by the Vice Lord Mayor of Brisbane - Alderman Moon. "Group Captain and Mrs Douglas motored down from Amberley. Mrs Douglas wore a tabac brown frock, matching coat ...She added brown felt and daffodil accessories."

    Debutants - on 22 June, 1945 it was reported that 17 Debutants were presented to the Catholic Archbishop at a Catholic Ball at St Mary's Hall...At 9 o'clock Archbishop Duhig and the guests arrived. They included...Group Captain and Mrs Douglas... On 5th June, 1947 Group Captain and Mrs E Douglas also attended the Catholic Ball. Besides, on 14th August, 1947 - 12 Debutants were presented to the Governor General (Mr McKell) and Mrs McKell and the State Governor (Sir John Lavarack) and Mrs Lavarack at the Church of England Ball at City Hall (Brisbane). The official party included...Group Captain and Mrs Douglas...

    The Fleet Air Arm (Navy) - Directorate of Aircraft Maintenance and Repair - role of Aircraft Engineer (member RAS; and Dip ME and Dip EE) and Division Head (Civilian) 1949 to 1964. Duties - The immediate control and overseeing of all technical work performed by the technical section of the Aircraft Maintenance and Repair – Directorate of the Fleet Air Arm (DAMR). The technical division consisted of the following – airframe, engine, component repair, materials and inspection; ground equipment and plant, aircraft modifications, drawing office and technical library.

    Included was the maintenance of ‘helicopter aircraft’, a ‘working knowledge of jet turbine aircraft and their maintenance requirements’ and co-ordinating ‘Technical Conferences’ and the overseeing of special projects such as the - ‘conversion of a Dakota aircraft to a Flying classroom’

    Eric had initially joined the Civilian Technical Staff of DAMR, Navy Office in 1949 as ‘a Technical Officer on Airframes’.

    From the Royal Australian Navy site – Nowra, NSW - Aircraft operated by the Royal Australian Navy – Fleet Air Arm in Eric's time at Navy Office -

    Auster J5-G Autocar – communications aircraft
    Bell UH-1B/1C Iroquois – search and rescue/training helicopter
    Bristol Sycamore HR50/51 – rescue and training helicopter
    CAC Aermacchi MB-326H (Macchi) – land based jet trainer
    CAC CA-16 Wirraway – fighter/training aircraft
    CAC CA-22 Winjeel prototype – basic trainer
    De Havilland Sea Vampire Mk T.22 (Vampire 873) – land based pilot trainer
    De Havilland Sea Venom F.A.W. Mk 53 – carrier borne fighter bomber
    De Havilland Tiger Moth – land based trainer
    Douglas C-47A Dakota – land based navigational trainer and transport aircraft
    Fairey Firefly AS.5/AS.6 – carrier borne fighter, anti-submarine and reconnaissance aircraft
    Fairey Gannet AS1/4 – carrier borne anti-submarine aircraft
    Fairey Gannet T.2/T.5 – carrier borne anti-submarine aircraft
    GAF Jindivik pilotless target aircraft – pilotless target drone
    Hawker Sea Fury Mark 11 – carrier borne fighter bomber
    Millicer Air Tourer - Prototype – trainer aircraft
    Westland Scout AH-1 – survey utility helicopter
    Westland Wessex 31A – carrier borne submarine search and rescue helicopter
    and Westland Wessex Mk31B – carrier borne submarine search and rescue helicopter

    Member of the Antarctic Club of 1929 - Australian Section commenced in 1940; Hon Secretary of the Royal Aeronautical Society (Victoria) - incorporated as the Institution of Australian Engineers (Eric Douglas was accepted and recognized as an Aeronautical Engineer by this prestigious body);President of the pre-War (WW2) Air Force Association 'Old Permos' for many years until his death in 1970 (his old RAAF mates would not let him resign). Other memberships included - the Royal Brighton Yacht Club, Royal Yacht Club of Victoria, Ski Club of Victoria (early member), Victorian Aero Club, Aircraft Industries, Adastral Lodge (Werribee), the RAAF Fidelity Club (when at 3 AD Amberley), the Naval and Military Club, the Kelvin Club and the Melbourne Cricket Club. War Medal 1939-45, Australian Services Medal 1939-45 and General Services Badge.

    Eligible for Returned from Active Services Badge [RAAF history July 1948 - National Archives of Australia].

    Some of the RAAF persons and friends who Eric spoke about with respect over the years included - Al Murdoch - Eric's Best Man; Stu Campbell, Sherg, 'Snow' Lachal, Dal Charlton, Donny Summers, Carroll, Cobby, Gerard, Garrat, Knox-Knight, Lascelle, Leo Ryan, Max Allen, McColl, McNamara, Lavarck, Keenan, Berry, Bates, Berg, Stewart, Draper, Lancaster, McKay, Chapman, Walker, Carr, Chalmers, Mann, Tuttleby, Glen, Hely, Edgerton, Spencer, Mullholland, Graham, Balmer, McCutcheon, Wood, Horne, McKenzie, Ashton-Shorter, Walsh, Fowler, Good, Dillon, Charles Probert, 'Barney' Creswell, 'King' Cole, Charles Eaton, Bladin, Daley, Wally Rae, Ned Allen, Regie Wood, Colin McK Henry, Darcy Power, Littlejohn, Wrigley, Hitchcock (son), Hal Harding, Collopy, Heffernan, Chadwick, Knox, 'Kanga' De la Rue, Dickie Williams, Val Hancock, Curnow, Candy, Jones, Ray Brownell, Cottee, Easterbrook, Walter Nicholson, Jimmy Melrose, Parry, Lukis, Headlam, Lerew, Truscott, Hannah, Ridley, Wackett, Scascheqini, Appleby, Nankerville, Charlie Matheson, Peter Isaacson, Ingulfsen, Seekamp, Waddy, Hampshire, Fred Thomas, Luxton, Lerew, Ham, Kingwell, Beaurepaire and Whalley; also Tavener (RAF) and C P Jones, Major H Ray Millard, Lt Colonel Claude F Gilchrist and Colonel Leo B Reid (last four from the US Army USAAF/USAF).

    The 22nd Service Group of the Fifth Air Force (American) arrived in Brisbane and located to 'Camp Ascot' on 6th March 1942 to 15th March, 1942; and on 15th March 1942 they relocated to Archerfield Airfield and then on 6th June 1942 they relotated to Amberley Airfield - the 22nd Service Group's Commanding Offiicer was Lt Colonel Claude F Gilchrist or in the recent words (October 2012) of the Deputy Director of American Air Force History at the Pentagon "...the 22nd Service Group assigned to the Fifth Air Force was responsible for the American portion of Amberley Field from 15th June 1942 until the group's disbandment on 9 January 1944. Before that time, it was at Camp Ascot near Brisbane from 6 to 15 March and at Archerfield from 15 March through 14 June 1942. At Amberley the Unit operated a post headquarters and it's mission was to service aircraft received from the US and those returned from forward areas. The group commander was Lt Col Claude F Gilchrist..."

    Major H R Millard was with Air Transport Command (American) at Amberley and in October 1943 he is listed as the Chief Executive.

    25th December, 1943 - Major Millard and Lt Colonel Gilchrist were at RAAF Amberley as they had Christmas dinner with Eric Douglas and his family.

    Information obtained from the RAAF Museum at Point Cook in October, 2012 lists the following involvement at Amberley -
    RAAF - 23 Sqn 1942, 85 OBU 1945, 3 Aircraft Depot 1942 -, 3 Central Recovery Depot 1944-46, 10 RSU 1942, 3 Recruit Depot 1942, 6 Recruit Depot 1942 and 3 SFTS 1940-42.
    USAAF - 3BG 1942, 35 Air Base G & 2 Material S 1942, 22 Service Group 1942-45 and the US Air Transport Command - 1943-1945 (Pacific Wing Station 3).

    United States Army Air Force at Amberley during World War II - from Wikipedia - The airfield became a major American Air Force base during 1942 and 1943. ''Known Fifth Air Force units assigned to 'Amberley Field' were -
    • 22nd Bombardment Group B-26 Marauder (7 March - 7 April 1942) • 38th Bombardment Group B-25 Mitchell (Headquarters 30 April -10 June 1942) • 69th Bombardment Squadron (30 April -20 May 1942) • 70th Bombardment Squadron (11 May -15 August 1942) • 475th Fighter Group P-38 Lightening (Headquarters 14 May - 14 August 1943) • 431st Fighter Squadron (I July - 14 August 1943) • 432nd Fighter Squadron (11 June - 14 August 1943) • 433rd Fighter Squadron (17 June - 14 August 1943). In 1943, with the Allies advancing against the Empire of Japan in the southwest Pacific, American units moved north to forward airfields".

    From the - Royal Australian Air Force - RAAF Base Amberley facts site (for students) -

    • '...From October (1941) until July 1942 the base was...home to No 3 Service Flying Training School, operating a fleet of 54 Wirraways. • Throughout 1942 there was a considerable American presence at the base, as newly-arrived US Army Air Force bomber and fighter squadrons assembled their aircraft before moving north. • After the formation of No 3 Aircraft Depot (3AD) in March 1942, Amberley was also an important aircraft assembly and engineering base for the RAAF. 3AD remained there until June 1992. • After the end of World War II, Amberley became the base for No 82 Bomber Wing, which then formed the RAAF's main strike element...'

    Also seek out Dunn's excellent pages on RAAF Amberley in World War II (web).

    Some Inward letters –
    • 30th August, 1939 from Colin McK H (Group Captain Colin McK Henry) living in Herts, England “This…course is too hard & too much work…Wally Kyle and I went to London to meet Watson & Hely…Trouble with this course is never have anything to do with aircraft…I fly a Magister for 1½ hours in 2 weeks, one flip 5 miles from Henlow…There are 10 service Aerodromes within a radius of 15 miles. Am only allowed 20 hours flying in a year…Saw a Blenheim once on Aerodrome otherwise have seen no new stuff at all…For goodness sake take ½ hour off one day & write me a note…Cheers Eric…"
    • Note from Wilfrid R Jackson of Amberley - 24/12/1943 "...my appreciation of the happy conditions experienced under your command..."
    • Letter from a former Airman residing at the St Laurence Club, Sydney on 2 April, 1944 “… I aver that the spirit of harmony and team-work for which Amberley is known throughout the Service is due solely to the atmosphere, which you yourself have created…a 3AD posting is universally hailed with feelings of pleasurable anticipation…A Great Bloke …” (name supplied).
    • On 14th April 1946 from George R Snaddon of Mosman, NSW - he was an LAC at Amberley "...I find I'm kept much busier (if that is possible) than when at Amberley...I believe W/C Connolly has left for pastures new...I'd be interested to know where he was sent to. Even after having left the RAAF I find myself wondering what the fate of this & that will be (Aircraft I mean)..."
    • 2nd July 1946 from L Bowling of Ipswich - Hon Sec of the 'Ipswich and District Motor Cycle Club' "...I would like, on behalf of the Club, to request permission to use...portion of the Airfield. I refer to the part known as the Eastern Taxiway...At no time would the event encroach on any actual landing strip..."
    • Dated August 12th, 1946 from J Wild the Hon Sec of the Railway Workshops - Ipswich 'Ipswich Workshops Educational Assocation' "...our very sincere thanks & appreciation for your most interesting & educational address...Many appreciative remarks have been made by members re your talk & all hope that someday in the future we will meet again...Re your proposed invitation to members...to inspect RAAF Station Amberley may I suggest that Saturday Sept 14th (if it is) be suitable for you...Mr Jackson working on the hearing machine was very pleased to know that Mr Hall would accept your donation of a 'Respirator'..."
    • 26th August 1948 from Victor Turnbull of 7 Mile, Rosewood “…I go to the Aerodrome each week, generally on my way to town, the good people there like to get our eggs, cream etc…”
    • A letter from the Lowrys of North Rockhampton in December, 1950 “…I have had several inquiries here from some of his (Douglas's) friends who were at Amberley and always ask if he is still in the RAAF, he was held in the highest esteem at Amberley and was very much liked…I often look back at Amberley and think of the many friends I made there and the good station it was…”
    • From a fisherman and marine navigator at Victoria Point in April, 1951 “…Dear Captain…life at Victoria Point is moving along very smoothly and we are gradually becoming a name in its history. You would not know the old spitfire box (his home - old aeroplane packing boxes or cases were considered a prime possession at the time)...We now have a bedroom on its back plus a shower room and also a bedroom on the front…the place is admired by every one who sees it, not only inside but outside…” (name supplied).
    • A letter from Arthur Middleton residing at Hermanus South Africa in 1960 “…I was at Point Cook as a Rigger in 1926 to 1928. Left there to return to South Africa in 1928….Well Eric lots of water has flowed under the bridge since Point Cook days…Have had several trips back to Aussie, in fact went back to Sydney in 1946…Did meet a few of the old Point Cook boys in 1946 with ANA at Essendon. Smith & Snowy Cooper & a couple of others...Still have my old discharge signed by Cole…”

    [Sources - Published records, Trove - newspapers and images, files from the National Archives of Australia, information held at the RAAF Museum at Point Cook, notes and logs by Eric, letters from Eric's contemporaries and recollections by the writer].

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    1,007 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  77. GROUP CAPTAIN ERIC DOUGLAS - RAAF - Supplementary information.
    List
    Public

    In about July, 1929 - to Eric Douglas from Charlie Matheson "...Ballina, NSW, Dear old Eric, Was immensely pleased to get your note...Was very pleased when you were picked for the job (Banzare - Antarctic pilot) & if everything comes to a successful end you should be home & dried. I sincerely trust you have the maximum of luck on the trip to assist your good old common sense & flying & only wish I were accompanying you but somehow or other these great old trips seem to escape me. Yes Eric, The Gypsys should do the job but don't let any one force you into trying to do something with them that your own common sense tells you shouldn't be done. I mean, find out the petrol range etc oil consumption for various weights & lifting distances yourself and adhere to your own judgement in all things...While I seem to be on the advising subject old son. I may as well give you some more. You very probably know & have tried to do what I'm going to tell you, but that doesn't matter anyway.

    I don't know what type of forced landing country or ice bergs etc exist where you are going but recently I tried out both the unslotted & the slotted wing Gypsy to see if the machine could be brought down in timbered or mountainous country without injury to pilot or passengers.

    Well on with it. In the event of engine failure & absolutely no hope of a cleared space, immediately stall. Hold stick back into stomach just sufficiently to prevent nose from doing a drop. Use ailerons coarsely and freely to stop spinning tendency. Rudder needs coarse usage also for straight running. Its best to start this floating stall from the height where the engine failed as it gives you plenty of time to make sure you are doing the controlling. Keep floating until within about 20 feet of the objects (trees or anything else) & then finally hold stick hard back. Machine has then not enough forward impetus to do more than longerons & without shock to anyone. During the last 20 feet the tendency was to push the stick forward owing to the natural horror of stalling near the ground, but don't. Hold it back...

    I have started a private flying school up here & doing well & am teaching any other club trained pilots this method of getting down without injury at 10 pounds each. Don't bother sending the tenner. We will drink it when you return if the hint is handy.

    By ginger I'd love to have been at your send off. Another headache I'll bet. Poor old Reg. Tell him I bet every Bristol Jupiter has forced landings with him looking after them. Of course a simple engine like a Puma is nothing to Reg...Violet & kiddies send their love...Your sincere friend Charlie Matheson..."

    When in South Africa in late 1929 to meet the Discovery in Cape Town and await the ship's departure Eric Douglas went for two flights in a Gipsy Moth (The same or two different Moths) - one flight was with a Mr Blake as passenger over Muizenberg on 18th October, 1929. The other flight was recorded as solo in Eric's general log but it is not recorded in Eric's Flying Log Book. Moreover, Eric had recorded in his notes at the time the name of Mr Stanley Halse, who was a famous Aviator from South Africa. So perhaps that meant that he had contact of some sort with him? Earlier when the ship SS Nestor taking him and other explorers including Sir Douglas Mawson to South Africa Eric had visited the Aero and Sailing Clubs in Durban.

    In April 1931 Flying Officer Eric Douglas was touring Western Victoria by car on a holiday with Flight Sergeant Reg Wood of No 1 Air Squadron. They went to the Gliding Trials at Koroit and the Air Show at Mt Gambier. Eric gave talks to the Pageant organizers and to the Mt Gambier High School at the invitation of the Headmaster.

    On 14th December, 1932, Eric Douglas of the RAAF landed at Echuca after flying from Hay and then Mildura.

    At the St Andrew's Society at Williamstown in October, 1934, Flying Officer Douglas gave a talk on the Antarctic.

    Eric Douglas married in January, 1934 and his best man was Flying Officer Alister Murdoch and his Groomsman was Flight Lieutenant 'Wig' White.

    In November, 1934 at the Air Pageant at RAAF Richmond a Gipsy Moth piloted by Squadron Leader G Jones was towed by a Wapiti flown by Flying Officer G E Douglas.

    In 1934 also Jimmy Melrose's plane was at RAAF Laverton.

    In about 1937 - Group Captain Brian 'Black Jack' Walker in February, 1993 "...I'd be twenty-two...when we left Echuca there were Wapitis doing all sorts of terrible things. I can still remember the flight lieutenant in charge of the Deniliquin end was Eric Douglas, Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas, and he was racing around firing off red Very lights and Wapitis were screaming down at him and attempting to flatten him...it was just jolly stupid, and we'd only had a couple of beers..." Eric Douglas was in charge of the no 7 Service Flight Training School at Deniliquin at least to 1941 and maybe till mid 1942 before he moved to RAAF Amberley. (When in charge of this Flight School Eric was based at RAAF Point Cook and made flights to Deniliquin.)

    January 1938 and Eric and his wife Ella went as guests onboard the Imperial Airways, Empire Flying Boat 'Centaurus' G-ADUT when the Centaurus was on an a world goodwill visit. When in Melbourne between the 13th to 16th January, 1938 the seaplane was at Hobson's Bay at the mouth of the Yarra River with moorings at Williamstown. Eric took images of the 'Centaurus' including an image of the inside of the cockpit, and there are images of Eric and Ella and a few other guests standing on a wing of the plane. (Reference - silver gelatin negatives and black and white album prints, plus one larger print of the 'Centaurus').

    In Melbourne as in other cities, the arrival, presence and departure of the Centaurus created a large amount of local interest with people making use of vantage points in streets and on the roofs of buildings (in the case of Melbourne and other cities). It was also reported that thousands of people made their way to Hobson's Bay, and many went by motor car. Invitation flights were offered for VIP guests - in this case the flying route was over the City of Melbourne - and the plane was open for Public Inspection. The Commander of the Flying Boat at this time was Captain J W Burgess. In addition this plane was used by the RAAF as A18-10 in c1939/42.

    The Centaurus was unfortunately destroyed during a Japanese air raid in Broome in March, 1942 (Museum Victoria - on the web).

    Eric Douglas flew from Melbourne (Essendon Airport) to Launceston (airport was at Western Junction) on 21st June, 1938 on the ANA aeroplane DC3 VH-UZK called 'Kurana' returning to Melbourne on the same plane on 24th June, 1938. About that time or little later the Kurana was also labelled 'Royal Mail'. Four silver gelatin negatives by Eric Douglas and the same four as album prints verify this fact about it being labelled 'Royal Mail'. Also this plane became RAAF A30-2 for a brief period on 11th September, 1939. Eric possibly flew on it to Launceston and return to assess its performance or perhaps it had something to do with a RAAF air training facility that was set up at Western Junction by 1941.

    This plane crashed at Mt Macedon in 1948 when the Pilot deviated from his approved Flight Plan.

    On 2nd March, 1939 'Flight Lieutenant G E Douglas was piloting a RAAF Seagull accompanied by an observer searching between San Remo and Flinders Island, without finding any trace of the launch Cynara which with a crew of three, is four days overdue at Flinders Island. The plane returned to Laverton after completing a zig-zag course as far as the Tasmanian coast'. This flight was not recorded in Eric's Flying Log probably due to the fact that it was an emergency flight. The next day the launch was found to be safe - it had been sheltering at Deal Island. The RAAF flight was possibly made in Seagull V - A2-6.

    In July, 1940 Eric gave a lecture to the Women's Air Training Corps which was based at Capital House in Swanston Street, Melbourne. He was accompanied by Flight Lieut Stevens.

    December, 1940 – extract from RAAFERS – an unofficial publication of …Members of No 1 Aircraft Depot, Laverton – a copy was given to Wing Commander G E Douglas who was the Commanding Officer of the Depot “…Gone with Wind (accompanied by a sketch of a Gipsy Moth flying over the South Pole) –
    We seek him here, we seek him there
    In fact we seek him everywhere,
    If he’s in Depot, it’s a great revelation
    We chase him all over the ruddy Station.
    He hides behind hangars, he hides behind doors
    And when he goes flying there must be a cause
    When taking up passengers he seems quite reserved
    But Orderly Room members don’t ever get served.
    At modifications he’s got them all beat
    He fixed up an Anson with a soft office seat
    The Anson he flew for hours on end
    And the Vent Pipe he modified with a single small bend.
    We know how to get him and ask for a dime
    For he’s always in when it comes tea time
    We peep’s through the key hole to see if he’s there
    But damned if he hasn’t vanished in thin Hair".
    Eric Douglas was in charge of the No 1 Aircraft Depot from May 1940 till early 1942.
    From memory the Commanding Officer's office was at the far end of the Amberley station village in a complex, which also housed the control tower for the air base. One of the chairs in Eric's office and perhaps his main chair was a steel swivel chair with a cushion on the seat. Files were kept in steel cabinets and on Eric's desk writing materials and papers were set on in an orderly way in a large wooden desk and there was carpet on the floor. On the wall somewhere, there were diagrams and maps decorated with pins with coloured heads, depicting I presume places of strategic interest.

    Somewhere else, perhaps within the complex a very large table level area portrayed housings for aeroplanes such as hangars and dedicated areas with camouflaged vegetation ie grass and trees, or net coverings, or seemingly natural mounds and undulations; and landing strips and numerous metal 'aircraft recognition art' aeroplanes and even more numerous camouflaged wooden 'trench art' aeroplanes - set out in an impressive reality display. The wooden aeroplanes were of various sizes from about 6 to 18 inches in length - the most outstanding being aeroplanes such as Catalina Flying Boats and Super Flying Fortresses. (Re: Group Captain Eric Douglas was C/O at Amberley from June 1942 to June 1948 with a brief period away in Melbourne in 1945 due to illness - gall bladder attacks).

    On Eric's arrival at Amberley in mid 1942 planning and action quickly took place to strengthen and lengthen the main runway to cater for heavy aircraft and both runways had to cater for what was to become extremely busy aeroplane activity at Amberley during World War 2. (There is a lengthy and detailed illustrated RAAF Report dedicated to this project, bound with a reddish brown cloth cover - the copy that I had was mislaid about 17 years ago).

    The Bunker Facility at "Frogs Hollow" Gully in the southern area of RAAF 3 AD, Amberley Air Force Base was used for a three month period by General MacArthur during World War 2 (Reference - Parliament of Australia 2011).

    There were approximately 2,000 American Air Corps (USAAF/USAF) personnel stationed at Amberley during the 1940's (Reference - Department of Defence, Australian Government 2010).

    Some snippets from the - Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works - Report on the Redevelopment of Facilities at RAAF Base Amberley...Fifth Report of 1998 -

    * 'In 1938 Defence acquired a 320 (or 330 from some reports) hectare site for the development (of RAAF Amberley).' (Besides some land in the early stages of the base was obtained by compulsory acquisition, and more in particular in the 1970's - See the National Australian Archives for individuals affected).
    * "...It was not until 1942 that the Base assumed its principal support role (for the RAAF) with the formation of No 3 Aircraft Depot. This had the responsibility for the assembly and repair of a wide range of Aircraft. During the Second World War, numerous operational units used Amberley for refitting and as a staging area before moving to forward bases. Several United States squadrons were also based at Amberley during this period."
    * 'In the wartime there were at least two (Waddingtons) igloo type hangars at Amberley.'
    * 'The No 82 Wing Headquarters constructed during the Second World War were originally a series of huts placed together and reclad in brick.'

    Five types of wooden model aeroplanes have been identified as being made by Eric in the late 1930's and early 1940's (and there were more). Balsa and thin plywood were his favoured woods for model making - accompanied by thin pins, tarzan's grip, aeroplane dope and excellent quality white or coloured tissue paper. Tools and equipment necessary seemed to be chisels, woodplanes, plyers, hammers, screw drivers, grinders, spikes, elastic bands, small clamps, scissors and razor blades, good quality string and bees wax; measuring tapes and rulers, sketches of aeroplanes and parts, sometimes plans of models and a soldering iron to be heated on the stove or primus, and of course the solder.

    We used to go Archerfield and Warwick and Eric flew his model planes and gliders in one or both places - Warwick in particular stays in my mind for this activity.

    Features added to the models included wooden pilots and passengers, wooden life boats and self-made metal and wooden fittings. Where it was considered appropriate coloured paper aeroplane labels were stuck onto the wood or tissue coverings. Besides much use was made of bright coloured enamel paints that came in small tins and together with the glue and aeroplane dope the scent of model making filled the air. Some of the planes had small engines and 'much testing' was carried out on the kitchen bench and that left no doubt that this hobby was in full flight! If none of that was happening well perhaps a box or triangle kite was being made, or the small model/toy donkey steam engine was puffing away to keep us interested and amused. (Memories of Amberley 1942 to 1948).

    The five types of planes (mentioned above) were the Heron competition duration model, the Red Wing low wing Cabin Monoplane, Moth Seaplanes - one of each of the latter given to Frank Hurley and to Lincoln Ellsworth, Flying Boats and Gliders.

    On March 5, 1947 'certain air navigation, air communication and weather facilities at Eagle Farm and Amberley' were transferred from the Government of the United States of America to the Government of Australia, with certain considerations to be met by Australia (Agreement signed by H Evatt - Australia, and Robert Butler - America).

    From the Australian Government site - Australian Heritage Database - as at 20/11/2012 - RAAF Amberley is registered on the National Estate and listed on the Commonwealth Heritage List.

    RAAF Amberley is also listed on the Defence Heritage Register (this Register listing the Commonwealth Heritage List of the Australian Heritage Database) along with other related facilities such as - RAAF Williams Laverton - Eastern Hangers and West Workshop; RAAF Williams Point Cook - Air Base, Museum and Heritage Precincts and College and Training area; RAAF Richmond - Air Base and North Base Trig-Station and Victoria Barracks Melbourne. (I selected my places of interest only).

    The Department of Sustainability...advised in November, 2012, that what the condition of places listed for heritage values 'may change over time' but they do not consist 'just of facades'.

    Further from the Defence Heritage Register site - Amberley served "...as the major departure point for traffic to and from the United States and major ports, to theatres of war in the Pacific and as a major depot for the maintenance, salvage and assembly of new aircraft...Amberley RAAF Base is one of the few surviving examples of pre World War Air Force planning and construction under British influence...A key planning feature is the diamond-shaped command and administration area, which is linked to the Guardhouse, by the original access road, which separated the hangars and airstrip(s) from other areas of the base...” Within the diamond-shaped precinct were the Air Base HQ, the Air Base support building and the parade ground. “Hanger 76, the largest hangar of the period, is closely linked to the Air Base HQ...” (Defence Heritage Register).

    “Other structures important in illustrating the wartime functional layout of the Base” included the Emergency Power Generator building...the Cinema...Airmens Mess...Sergeants Mess...“ (and the Guardhouse). The Guardhouse identifying the original base structure, illustrates the operational context of the base during World War 2 and is linked both visually and by road with the command precinct. Individual structures within the pre and early World War 2 facilities important for their ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of their type include …the Air Base HQ…the Air Base support building…Hangar 76 and the Guardhouse”. (Defence Heritage Register).

    Other features which illustrate the context of the base...during World War 2 - The 13 Bellman Hangars that remain were prefabricated and “illustrate the primary function of maintenance and repair during World War 2 and the operational layout of the base...” By 1943 17 Bellman hangars had been built and 13 of those were in place by 1941 “flanking the runway” (Defence Heritage Register).

    In these same times, Bellman hangars were also in the production line for Archerfield, Kingaroy, Lowood and Oakey and a number of other establishments, with at least 283 on order. "The advantages of the Bellman hanger (prefabricated) designs were that they were lightweight, portable, low cost and easily erected..." (Comeng - A History of Commonwealth Engineering Vol. 1 1921-1955 Rosenberg NSW - John C Dunn 2006). Moreover there are 14 Bellman Hangars at Point Cook which are on the National Heritage List and 5 at Laverton which are on the Commonwealth Heritage List with a further 2 exised from the site (Laverton) on the other side of the Geelong Road. Fortunately too for Australian history many other examples of Bellman hangars remain. (Wikipedia).

    The “former subterranean operation building of May 1942 (likely Frogs Hollow) “illustrates the need to separate strategic command during wartime operations ..." (Also it says here that this concrete facility in a dry quarry appears to have been shared by US and RAAF commands and that it is on the Ipswich Heritage Register). (Defence Heritage Register).

    Perhaps it was also a wireless communications facility? Eric for one was tops with morse code. (Also semaphore). We had home demonstrations of morse code - a small flat wired-up board with a short flexible handle which had a metal button on top at the end (transmitter) - so many dots and dashes to spell out key letters or words accompanied by the appropriate 'dit dit dit' or 'dat' sounds.

    Safety trenches were built on the Air Station. (I imagine at the start of the War). [Defence Heritage Register]. As well there were reinforced concrete air raid shelters close to the Base - I went down steps to at least one near the old Toowoomba Road in the company of my father Eric and others just to have a look. Also my brother and I and another boy went down a muddy slit trench in the jeep in about 1944/45 as we rounded the corner past the school in the grounds of the school and schoolhouse. My brother was driving and bragging, the other boy was next to him and I was in the back - I lent forward and put my hands over my brother's eyes. We were not injured but the power lines came down and a tractor and crane were necessary to extract the jeep. Needless to say we got covered in mud and the boy in the front had his glasses caked in it.

    “In September 1942 the USAFIA advance party commenced operations". [USFA/USAFA or USFIA/USAFIA - standing for United States Forces in Australia]. (United States - Pentagon advice in October 2012 is that it was on 6th June 1942 that the US arrived at Amberley). "At about the same time the USAFIA Ferry Division of Air Transport arrived at the base as well as the US Army Airways Communications Service and the 22nd Service Group of the 5th Air Force”. (Defence Heritage Register). 'Willobank became the site of the clubhouse for Officers of the US Air Force'. (City of Ipswich - on the web). I wonder where at Willowbank?

    “Amberley became a major base for the assembly, repair, salvage and servicing of operational aircraft. Work included major inspections of Wirraway and Hudson aircraft and the assembly of Martin Marauder and Kittyhawk aircraft. By the end of 1942 No 3 Aircraft Depot was also assembling Vultee Vengeance aircraft as well as conducting major inspections of Aerocobra (Airacobra), Kittyhawk, Lancer and Boston aircraft. The Engine Repair Section worked on Hamilton, De Havilland and Curtis Electric units. New aircraft appeared on the base by May 1944 with the arrival of the RAF Spitfires and the first new B24J Liberator series…The veteran Lancaster bomber, G for George…was overhauled at Amberley in 1944”. (Defence Heritage Register).

    The C/O's family homes at RAAF Amberley from mid 1942 to mid 1948 -

    * First Home - From June 1942 to about the end of 1945 it was the "schoolhouse" next to the Amberley school on the base (not being used as a school) and was outside the then fenced off boundaries of the base. There was a school and a head teacher's house and we lived in the latter. Both the school and the schoolhouse were painted a light pink on the outside. Inside the school my recollection is of a large hall. The were a few flowers and bushes growing near the front veranda of the schoolhouse which was a 'typical Queenslander' - wooden, with a veranda with railings and of course a corrugated iron roof - and there were also large areas covered in grass. There was primitive outside loo at the back of the house where I kept my pet calf who liked to specialize in chasing individuals when they emerged to go back into the house! Over the fence at the back there were trees and a longer grass covered vacant area. Both the school and schoolhouse were to be found on the old Toowoomba Road (Rosewood Road).

    The short straight path from the front of the house to the front gate led to the popular privately run corner store at the junction of Rosewood and other roads. This store was not on the Air Base. It is where we saw the Americans, and many of them were American negroes pulling up in their heavy army convoy trucks up to buy coke, sarsparilla, passiona, lemonade, dixies, wafers, malted milks, milkshakes, pies, hamburgers and hot dogs - while we competed with our billy-carts for a place to park. One day our billy-cart ended in splinters when I was 'parked' - I was in it, run over by an eight tonner. I ducked and ended in the Air Force base hospital - my brother predicted to our father that I had an hour left! Luckily for me the kerbside wheels of the truck crunched the billy-cart but I survived without a scratch but that was the end of billy-carts for us. I regarded my role as being that of a 'test pilot'. This is the home too were we hosted Major Ray H Millard and Lieut Colonel Claude F Gilchrist of the United States Services, on Christmas Day 1943.

    Also in December, 1943 Brigadier General William Ord Ryan was the Commanding General Pacific Wing, Air Transport Command, United States Services, which was then based at Station No 3 - which was presumably No 3 Aircraft Depot, RAAF Amberley.

    * Second Home - From about the beginning of 1946 to June 1948 it consisted of two-prefabricated homes pushed together joined by a small outside alcove (opened kegs of beer were kept in this alcove at Adult's party time). This was fairly basic and modest accommodation by any standards. Moreover this home was just about on the tarmac towards the north end of the main and longest runway which ran NW to SE; and not that far from where the Ipswich to Rosewood road crossed this runway. Part of the fenced in area around our house was bitumen. At the far end of the main runway there were a series of hills. Hangars and workshops; and parked and taxying aeroplanes were part of the mix where this home was situated and there was plenty of action in the sky above and we had to get used to the fact that we were in the midst of all this activity. It appears from aerial views of Amberley in that period that the two (Waddingtons) Igloo hangars were just to the back of us and I certainly remember hangars as I used to ride my push bike around them. The redeeming feature of this home was that it had a ballroom for entertaining. There was a copper for boiling the washing and clothers were hung out to dry on wires strung between wooden cross supports. It was here too that I copped plenty of fully clothed hosings by my brother.

    My brother and I used a daisy air rifle to fire at old jam tins lined up on the back fence. We showed movie reels upside down and looked bent over through our legs to watch them. School text books were covered in brown paper with birds or other colourful jam tin labels being pasted on the covers. It was a ritual to throw out our home made sandwiches through the open bus window as we crossed the creek on the way from Amberley to the Ipswich State Schools (mixed and one for older boys). Life size parachute dummys were covered in bright red tomato sauce by my brother and hung up a tree (or set up in the long grass) and the rumour was that 'the C/O had hung himself' or other such mischief!

    RAAF Amberley troops and bands often passed the side gates, coming to attention in that precinct. I used to hang over the fence to see who was out of step and tell them so - some as they passed had sly glances at me or poked their tongues out - it was just a game! I was suitably attired I thought in my brother's (hand-me-down) small child size RAAF navy coloured 'winter uniform', complete with cap. It was in this period too or even earlier (from c1944) that absolutely dozens of similar types of aircraft started to be lined up nearby in blocks and rows on the tarmacs and grass verges looking 'used and worn out' and waiting to be 'written off' for scrap. Their final ending was not obvious to me at the time - they were just sitting there. My brother and I got onboard and we had seemingly endless planes just to ourselves. I can still smell the musty aroma and that it was very exhilarating to sit in the pilots' tattered seats in the various cockpits and wonder what it would have felt like and sounded like to take to the skies in these old warplanes.

    As well it was 'an obligation' at Amberley for us to chew gum - from our father down (our mother did not catch onto this habit) - it was Wrigleys peppermint, PK and juicy fruit and we had supplies by the box-full. Old habits die hard and even in recent times my brother has offered me chewing gum and I too keep some handy. Plus there was highly coloured and scented bubble gum, sherbert in triangular paper packets with small licorice straws, licorice blocks, aniseed balls, humbugs, all day suckers and musk sticks. So we had plenty to chew on.

    On the Station there were Fairs with 'punch and judy' and toffee apples; and at Christmas time Santa arrived by plane much to the excitement of all the children, with bags of presents and giant Xmas stockings (for those more in need) and not just for the children of Service men and women for other children came along. Eric also used to visit local families and take presents for families and children who were having unhappy times. I know as I went with him on some visits.

    Halloween was celebrated by the wearing of cut out water melons as faces and we covered our bodies in white sheets and all including the C/O, then proceeded to outside the Officers' Mess where we made some ghostly noises of 'whoooo' 'whoooo'. This was the same Mess that held a legendary circular gold fish pond, which doubled-up on 'official ' occasions if it got raucous, as the Officers' 'swimming pool'. Some Officers went 'for a swim' fully dressed in uniform and even with their tight elastic-sided long-legged mess boots still on! I imagine that there was much singing and music as an accompaniment.

    There is a Douglas Street, RAAF Amberley which could be named for Eric Douglas.

    A newspaper report of 13th May, 1943 'A large crowd witnessed some very interesting fights at the boxing tournament held at St Mary's Hall, last night. Among those present were Mayor Ald J C Minnis, Mr Jos Francis MP and Group Captain Douglas RAAF'.

    It was reported on 3rd November, 1943 that on that day 'the (Commonwealth) Information Minister, Mr Calwell '...will address a loan rally at the Amberley Picture Theatre'.

    It was scheduled that on 8th November, 1943 at 8pm, there would be a special screening at the Teviot Theatre in Boonah and the presentation of Proficiency Certificates to Boonah Cadets by Group Captain Douglas, RAAF (Amberley).

    A parade was held over the long weekend at 3AD, RAAF Amberley commencing on Saturday 30th June, 1945 'Group Captain Eric Douglas took the salute and later addressed the parade, congratulating cadets on their appearance and efficiency. The C/O also gave prospective RAAF personnal excellent advice'. The cadets included those from Headquarters and the 'Gatton Flight'.

    On 7th August, 1945 the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester flew into Amberley in their Avro York 'Endeavour' and lunched at the RAAF Mess with Group Captain Douglas, before a tour of country areas of Queensland. I imagine that Mrs Eric Douglas was also present. There was an official RAAF party with their wives at the airstrip ready to greet the Gloucesters.

    At the end of August, 1945 an Air Race of three planes was held out of Amberley with the planes flying over Boonah. The race was to raise funds for the Boonah branches of the Red Cross Society and the ACF. The official guests, Group Captain and Mrs Douglas were welcomed by Cr Richter of Boonah. Group Captain Douglas congratulated the three committes involved for their wonderful efforts and reminded those present that although hostilities had ceased there was still more to be done for the boys by the Red Cross and ACF. As part of the ceremony for the winning plane the Boonah Band led a small procession comprising a decorated truck carrying local Airmen and a minature plane and three decorated trucks representing the three planes which took part in the competition.

    For 6th April, 1946 Eric was invited to an Official Reception at King George Square in Brisbane, for Admiral Lord Louis Mountbatten.

    It was reported that the 8th Ipswich Scout and Club Pack have a new den (9th September, 1946). It was officially opened by Group Captain G E Douglas, Commanding Officer at Amberley RAAF station. Eric Douglas said "This has been erected through the good will and work of people who have the movement at heart...A very worthy movement it is. It brings out the best in us and subdues the bad. Little can be done in the world to-day without the team spirit, and the Scout movement has this spirit in no small way".

    At a regular meeting of the Ipswich Branch of the Air Force Association held on 28th November, 1946, Mr R G Andrew representing Ipswich Commerce paid Eric Douglas a tribute by saying "...Group Captain Douglas has more time for the 'under dog' than any other man I have seen in a C O's position anywhere in Australia". Just before, Eric Douglas had said after detailing the functions of the Association that he was there for two reasons "...Firstly, because he regarded it as his duty and secondly, because he knew he would have a great time amongst a lot of good chaps".

    On 10th December, 1946 Group Captain Eric Douglas was elected Patron of the Ipswich branch of the Air Force Association.

    In early April, 1947 Group Captain G E Douglas accepted the position of Patron of the Ipswich branch of the Air Force Association.

    The Morning Bulletin, Rockhampton reported on 22nd October, 1947 that - 500 (sic 503) RAAF aeroplanes at Oakey and 163 (sic 160) at Amberley "...were to be sold as scrap...Those to be sold at Oakey for scrap include 38 Boomerangs, 225 Spitfires and 240 Kittyhawks; and at Amberley 26 Liberators, 2 Beaufighters, 42 Mitchells, 47 Spitfires, 42 Vultee Vengeances and 1 Ventura. There are also 10 Mosquito and 1 Douglas Dakota at Amberley regarding which no decision has yet been made." A total of 674 planes for scrap disposal. I think that there is a good chance that this particular Douglas Dakota was given to the RAN - Fleet Air Arm, and used as 'a Flying Classroom' and Eric was involved in lecturing or instructing on this simulation model in the late 1940's and early 1950's. Adding too, for those who are curious - yes I think that the Spitfires did arrive in boxes or packing cases and were assembled at Eagle Farm or Amberley.

    Open Day at Amberley on 23 May, 1948 - it was reported in the Queensland Times of 13th May, 1948 that Group Captain Douglas, CO at Amberley said the previous day that "The public will be given the run of the station...The gates will be open between 10am and 4pm, and the public will be able to see every aspect of Air Force life. The public will see, a Helicopter, Lincolns, Liberators, Mosquitoes, Spitfires and Mustangs on display. Aircraft will be taking off from Amberley every half hour in the afternoon. Aircraft and engine repair units will be open to inspection..."

    RAAF and I imagine USAAF/USAF seaplanes/flying boats eg Catalinas operated out of Moreton Bay and in the general region of Redland Bay, Cleveland, Victoria Point and Coochiemudlo and North Stradbroke Islands and were supported by RAAF motor launches and Fairmile boat 015-5 may have been one of them. The RAAF Catalina Squadrons were apparently part of a 'silent service'. We spent many happy hours crabbing, prawning, fishing - from boats and night fishing for flounder - and prizing oysters from rocks in and around Moreton Bay.

    Eric's first cousin was Percy (Percival Francis) Douglas of Canberra - son of George Douglas; whereas Eric was the son of Gabriel (Gilbert) Douglas. Both George Douglas and Gabriel Douglas were Watchmakers and Jewellers - the 4th Generation of Douglas - Master Watchmakers, Watchmakers and Clockmakers - commencing with John Douglas a Master Watch and Clock Maker in Jedburgh, Roxburghshire in the late 1700's and in Galston and Loudoun Kirk, Ayrshire in the early 1800's.

    (Details from Trove, the writer's early childhood memories and the Eric Douglas Collection)

    Note: As at October/November, 2014 - 38 of the Heritage Listed buildings at RAAF Amberley are going to be sold - demolished/relocated to make way for runway expansion and further development at the Air Base

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    1,041 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-11-04
    User data
    Tags:
  78. GROUP CAPTAIN STUART CAMPBELL - BANZARE
    List
    Public

    Pencil notes -
    With The Discovery 1929-30
    by F/Lt S. Campbell

    The British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition was organized by Sir Douglas Mawson for the purpose of carrying out exploration and scientific investigation of that area of the Antarctic Continent and adjacent seas lying immediately south of Australia and South Africa. The expedition was to be divided into two cruises extending over the summer months of 1929-30 and 1930-31 respectively and it is with the first cruise that this article proposes to deal. At the outset it must be realized that this expedition differed considerably from the previous well known expeditions of Scott, Shackleton and Mawson in as much as it was intended from the outset that no party should winter in the Antarctic nor were any extensive land operations to be carried out.
    The Discovery left Cape Town on Oct 19th 1930 [sic 1929] with the intention of filling in the existing gaps in the coastline of Antarctica from the 40th to the 180th meridian of east longitude, investigating the sub-Antarctic islands in this area and carrying out an extensive geographical programme. From Cape Town the ship was headed SE to Possession Is the largest of the Crozet Group. There the scientific party spent two days ashore carrying out magnetic observations, making a rough survey of the anchorage in American Bay and studying the flora and fauna.
    Leaving the Crozets we made with a fair wind and soon came in sight of Kerguelen Island. Here we met with our first taste of the Roaring Forties. When within half a days steam of the entrance to Royal Sound a strong westerly gale sprang up and drove us relentlessly out to sea and it was not until a week later after hard battling with mountainous seas that we at last made fast to the ricketty wharf of the abandoned whaling station on the shores of Jeanne D’Arc, in Royal Sound. There all hands turned to and we replenished our bunkers from the supply of Cardiff briquettes left for us by a South African Whaling ship on the way south. Coaling over we put to sea again and shaped a course for Heard Island the last outpost of the sub-Antarctic and a few days later dropped anchor in the roadstead of Corinthian Bay.
    Few members of the expedition will forget our first glimpse of this little known island, the black cliffs rising 150 feet out of a restless grey sea, the ledges packed with snow and on top a cap of snow through which here and there protruded rugged masses of black rock leaving great gashes in the gleaming white. Further to the east these cliffs gave place to a surf pounded beach of black sand and rock from the eastern end of which rose the majestic peak of Big Ben, a dome shaped mountain rising abruptly from the sea to 7000 feet. Round the top of the mountain hovered a permanent blanket of white mist while down the lower slopes cascaded heavily crevassed glaciers pushing out to the sea and ending in vertical cliffs of blue ice from which came a continuous roar as blocks were carved off by marine erosion.
    Owing to the difficulty landing and bad anchorage for the ship only half the scientific staff went ashore intending to survey the immediate vicinity of the anchorage and investigate the bird and animal life. The weather however was against us and soon the wind swung round to the north and put the ship on a lee shore with both anchors dragging. Steam was immediately ordered and we put to sea and for a week remained hove to in one of the roughest seas experienced during the voyage.
    As soon as the weather cleared we steamed back to Corinthian Bay and signalled the shore party to return on board as quickly as possible as there were signs of another storm approaching. There was still a high sea running but they had no option but to make the attempt and shortly the heavily laden motor boat appeared round the adjacent headland white with frozen spray and containing the sorriest looking collection of sick and wet scientists that it would be possible to imagine. The motor boat was hoisted and we waved good bye to the inhospitable shores of Heard Island and turned our bows at last to the Great White South.
    On the third day out from Heard Island the echo soundings which were taken regularly every 4 hours showed that the depth was beginning to decrease and soon there was only 250 fathoms beneath our keel instead of the more usual 1700 fathoms. In these little frequented seas there is still a possibility of meeting a hitherto undiscovered island and there was a continuous stream of ships company and scientists up to the Crows nest all anxious to be the first to sight the new land. However no new island loomed in sight and soon the echo sounder showed the sea bed to have sloped away again to over 1000 fathoms.
    We were now in the region of icebergs and for several days there were always some half dozen or more in sight from the mast head and finally we entered the fringes of the pack ice. Here the ship was hove to and we ran our first oceanographical station, a procedure which we were to repeat every 200-300 miles throughout the remainder of the voyage. The depth is ascertained and the fine steel cable wires are lowered over the side to as much as 5000 metres below the surface carrying a varied assortment of nets, water bottles and thermometers. When these are all in position at the correct depths a weight is dropped down the wire and by means of trigger mechanisms the nets and water bottles are closed and the mercury column in the thermometer broken. Thus we obtain the temperature at various depths and samples of the sea water and marine life. In deep water these stations occupy upwards of 3 hours and monopolize the services of about 8 of the scientific staff. In the meantime others take advantage of the reduced motion of the ship, the meteorologist releases pilot balloons or sets up the complicated pyroheliometer on its enormous gimbal table on the f”o’castle; the photographer returns to his dark room and develops plates and the medical officer and bacteriologist work at the microscope.
    From now onwards we are amongst the pack ice twisting and turning, following open leads for a short distance only to be held up by heavy ice, retracing our steps and trying again in some other lead or pushing through thin floes but ever working slowly southwards towards the well guarded coastline of Antarctica. A few days before Christmas in Lat. 66 29 S we came to an impasse. We had reached a pool of open water inside the pack and before us as far as the eye could reach stretched heavy almost unbroken ice. To the South nothing but a glaring white, no sign of ‘water sky’ that heavy dark clouded appearance in the sky beckoning a lead of open water in the pack and luring the Antarctic navigator ever onward.
    It was decided that the aeroplane should be sent out on a reconnaissance flight and for three days the ship lay in the calm ice bound pool whilst the moth seaplane was unpacked from its cases and assembled. By the time the aircraft was ready the drifting ice had closed in the pool and the ship had to work her way through the ice 10 miles to the westward before more suitable water could be found.
    All was now ready, the great moment was at hand. It came and went and was succeeded by countless other moments but nothing happened. The engine refused to start. For hours the aviators (Stuart Campbell and Eric Douglas) ‘tickled’ ‘sucked in’ ‘doped’, switched on and off and swung the propeller but all to no purpose. The long sea voyage had allowed the magnetos to get damp and there was nothing to do but take them to pieces and dry them in the oven for hours.
    In the meantime the ship made slowly westward in the hope of striking a south trending lead of open water. By Christmas time the magnetos had been dried out and replaced and the engine run up and all was ready for an ascent next morning. But it was not to be. Shortly after midnight the wind began to freshen and by 4 AM it was blowing a whole gale. For four days the blizzard howled through the rigging and covered the ship with a coating of ice. Being well inside the pack we encountered very little sea and were able to maintain our position in the lee of some large icebergs and when the storm abated we found to our joy that we were able to make some southing into a huge indentation in the pack.
    After a few miles however our progress was again blocked by a closely packed ice field extending to the Southern Horizon. The water being calm and free from ice it was decided to put the aeroplane up and carry out a reconnaissance ahead of the ship. The lifting tackle was rigged and the engine started up and in a short time the two aviators (Stuart Campbell and Eric Douglas) were lowered over the side for the first flight. The seaplane took off and flew splendidly and climbed in the vicinity of the ship to 6000 feet. To the south lay the unbroken pack stretching as far as the eye could reach with its monotonous flat surface broken here and there by the towering mass of some imprisoned iceberg. To the south west were darker shapes standing out boldly against the deadly whiteness. They were too big for icebergs, islands probably or perhaps rocky outcrops on the coast itself. Their nature cannot of course be definitely established at this great distance but it is well worth reporting as ‘Appearance of Land’. What appeared from the ship to be an open lead running away to the SW is now seen to extend only for about 20 miles and then end in a cul-de-sac in the heavy pack ice. The aeroplane alights close to the ship and is soon hoisted on board again with its report of ‘Probable Land’ and a sketch of the ice conditions in the immediate vicinity of the ship.
    Since pushing through 40-50 miles of this heavy pack would be far too wasteful both of coal and valuable time we reluctantly turned NW again hoping to find an easier way south in some other place.
    Within a few days we found to our delight that the edge of the pack was again trending to the SW and following this on the evening of Jan 5th, 1930 land was reported from the mast head. As soon as reasonably clear water was reached the aeroplane was hoisted over the side and took off with Sir Douglas Mawson on board to reconnoitre. From a height of 2000 feet a long line of bare black mountain peaks could be seen projecting through the ice covered slopes of what was undoubtedly the Antarctic Continent. A strip of pack ice about 15 miles wide separated the ship from the open water along the coast and though this pack offered no difficulty to our progress no places where a landing could be effected were observed as the coastline consisted of precipitous ice cliffs so common in Antarctica.
    Once again the seaplane returned to the ship bearing the good news that the long looked for goal was in sight and arrangements were made for another flight early the next morning to try and locate a suitable landing place where the Union Jack could be raised and British Sovereignty proclaimed over this new land. But not yet were we to penetrate the secrets of Antarctica and by 4 AM another raging blizzard had set in and for three days anxious eyes were focussed on the frail seaplane which with its air speed indicator standing steadily at 65 M.P.H. threatened every moment to be torn from the deck and disappear in the driving snows.
    It was as if the Antarctic was doing its utmost to wreck the frail example of man’s handiwork which had dared to probe her secrets. At length the wind abated and all on board breathed a sigh of relief. But the forces of nature were not yet baffled!
    During the blizzard the wind driven snow had collected all over the masts and rigging and coated them with a shell of ice an inch or more in thickness and with the first appearance of the sun this ice thawed and came crashing down from aloft onto the unprotected surfaces of the wings and tail unit and wrought havoc with the fabric and ribs.
    Also sights showed that the ship had been driven many miles out of its position and the wind had sent down the pack from the eastward so that now between the ship and the coast were many miles of closely packed ice all heaving and grinding in the ocean swell. To attempt to push through this heaving mass was courting disaster and so whilst the aviators (Stuart Campbell and Eric Douglas) worked feverishly to repair their damaged charge the ship steamed slowly westward again.
    Gradually the swell decreased and the ice became less congested allowing the ship to make southing and in a few days we again heard the welcome cry of ‘Land’. For 18 hours we coasted along inhospitable ice cliffs 100 feet high and offering no possibility of a landing. At last however we were rewarded with the sight of a dark patch against the dazzling white and as we drew nearer this resolved itself into a steep rocky island 800 feet high separated from the mainland by a narrow gutter practically frozen over. The ship was pushed through the surrounding pack into the sheltered water on the lee side of this island and soon the motor boat with its party of scientists was chugging its way across the narrow strip of intervening water. The day was spent ashore investigating the bird and animal life, taking pictures and carrying out the ceremony associated with the hoisting of the Union Jack and proclaiming British Sovereignty over new lands.
    Getting under weigh again we steamed along the coast first charted in 1831 by Captain Biscoe in a British whaling ship from the Falkland Islands. Our observations showed Biscoe’s positions to err by as much as 30 minutes of Longitude but considering the crude navigating instruments of that period and the fact that he was six weeks battling against adverse winds, short on provisions and with his crew depleted by the ravages of scurvy one realizes that here was a man fit to be ranked with the England’s foremost seamen.
    The weather now treated us kindly and in sparkling sunshine we pursued our westerly course within a few miles of the coast whilst on our starboard hand stretched lines of stranded tabular icebergs forming an effective breakwater from the long swell of the Southern Ocean.
    Gliding silently through this maze of bergs it seemed almost incredible that these mighty islands of ice seemingly so solid, so permanent and so unchanging could be carried northwards by the current to melt and disappear in a few short months back into the sea from which they came.
    We passed the westerly limit of Enderby Land and were working a tedious passage towards a great double range of mountains to the SW when the next blizzard caught us. Again we were driven irresistibly to the NW for several days and again when the weather cleared we found ourselves well out in the open sea with an extensive ice field between us and the coast.
    In order to complete our programme it was necessary to investigate the ice conditions as far west as the 40th Meridian of East longitude so we continued our Westerly course along the fringe of the pack which in this vicinity was uniformly thick and extended probably 100 miles from the land. In this area it was not possible to make use of the aeroplane for reconnaissance owing to the heavy ocean swell.
    Two days before reaching the westerly limit of our cruise we were amazed to see another ship ahead, the first we had seen since leaving Kerguelen. As we drew together we identified her as the Norvegia, a small vessel of about 180 tons carrying two aeroplanes. This ship belonging to the Christiansen whaling interests of Norway is sent down to the Antarctic each season to carry out exploration and whaling research and to find new whaling grounds for the floating factories. The leader of this expedition is Commander Riiser Larsen of the Norwegian Navy who had already achieved fame in Arctic aviation as Nobile’s navigator. He then returned to the Norvegia, one could not help thinking that Commander Larsen and his gallant crew of 18 were truly imbued with the spirit of their Viking forefathers in this venturing into the stormy Antarctic in their heavily overloaded little ship and operating two long range seaplanes over what is probably the most dangerous flying ground on the face of the earth.
    Shortly after this meeting we turned eastward again without having been able to approach the coast and retraced our steps along the border of the ever changing pack and though our course was considerably south of our outward track we were unable to make any landfalls until we reached Enderby land again.
    Here the coast was again free from ice and we were able to carry out a running survey supplemented by aeroplane flights from sheltered water in the lee of ice bergs and projecting tongues of the pack.
    Our coal supply was now running short and before long the day arrived when discretion forced us to reluctantly say good bye to Antarctica and turn our bows northwards on a course for Kerguelen Is where we were to replenish our bunkers for the long trip back to Australia. Fair weather favoured us an in a fortnight we were once again alongside the wharf at Port Jeanne D’Arc. Three enjoyable weeks were spent in and about Royal Sound, coaling, making scientific collections and charting some of the dozens of unexplored fiords and waterways both from the motor boat and by means of aeroplane photographs.
    From Kerguelen it was originally intended to make a sweep down the pack ice on our homeward track and carry out a line of oceanographical stations but bad weather set in and we realised that if we attempted to carry out our programme in the stormy seas of the south we would probably loose a considerable amount of our valuable gear whereas in the lower latitudes of the Great Circle track to Australia we were more likely to meet better weather conditions and at the same time would be able to carry out an equally valuable line of stations. Accordingly we set a course straight back to Australia and were favoured with light winds and smooth seas which enabled us to successfully complete our programme of deep water stations and dredgings. Finally on April 2nd 1931 [sic 1930] we arrived back in Adelaide where the expedition was disbanded until the next spring when we were to meet again to carry out the second cruise.

    (These notes are in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection).

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    100 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  79. Harold Oswald Fletcher - BANZARE, ANTARCTICA
    List
    Public

    Harold Oswald Fletcher (1903-1996) was the assistant Zoologist on the BANZARE Expedition to the Antarctic in 1929-1931 under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson.
    Harold Fletcher became an Antarctic and Outback Explorer, Zoologist, Palaeontologist and Curator of Fossils.
    He earned the nickname “Cherub” on BANZARE as he had dressed up as a Cherub for a party on the SS Nestor when it was making its way to meet with the ship Discovery at Cape Town at the end of 1929. Other BANZARE explorers were also passengers, including Sir Douglas Mawson.
    Harold Fletcher started work at the Australian Museum in Sydney in 1918 at the age of 15. He studied for his undergraduate degree at the University of Sydney and for his Masters degree at the University of New South Wales.
    In 1941 Fletcher was the Curator of Fossils at the Australian Museum. His main interest was in marine invertebrate fossils particularly those of the Permian geological period.
    World War II and he was in the Anti-Aircraft Brigade
    From 1957 to 1967 Fletcher was the Deputy Director of the Australian Museum.
    Harold Fletcher participated in many field trips as a Zoologist and Palaeontologist – 1922 Lake Eyre, 1929 Mount Kosciuszko, 1929-1931 the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE), 1933 the Central North of New South Wales, 1936 the Northern Territory and Queensland, 1939 the Simpson Desert – he was second in charge on this Expedition, 1952 Central and North West Australia, 1954 Mootwingee near Broken Hill and in 1956 to Canowindra, New South Wales – on this expedition he found a large slab of 100 Devonian fish of eight species and in 2015 the slab was on display at the Age of Fishes Museum at Canowindra.
    Harold Fletcher was the author of Australian Museum articles and wrote a very informative book Antarctic Days with Mawson published in 1984. It was a personal account and he dedicated this book to Sir Douglas Mawson.

    Sally Douglas

    5 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-05-01
    User data
  80. HEARD ISLAND - Banzare - Log by Eric Douglas in 1929
    List
    Public

    We should be at Heard Is tomorrow morning if this fine weather holds. Had teal duck for lunch today, very fine. Not much doing this afternoon.

    Tuesday 26th Nov. 1929

    Corinthian Bay - Heard Island

    Arrived at Heard Is, anchored at Corinthian Bay. LAT 53 04 LONG 73 25. 87 miles. 10AM. Not very good shelter from North or North West. Went ashore after lunch to Atlas Cove 3 miles away. Party consisted of Sir Douglas Mawson, Com Moyes, Capt Hurley, Babe Marr, The Doc, Falla, Fletcher, Harvey Johnson and myself. Did two trips to get the gear ashore. Fine day. We are camped in a wooden hut just near the shore. This hut is hexagon shape 6 ft 6 in. a side and has eight bunks and a stove.

    Wednesday 27th Nov. 1929

    Spent the morning adjusting things in the hut, the others went for walks to observe the nature of the land. In the afternoon I went for walks with Hurley along the coast to a large ‘Macaroni’ penguin rookery. He managed to get some good snaps.

    Thursday 28th Nov. 1929

    To day the weather is rotten, rain and sleet coming down and the wind in the N.W. with the barometer falling, cant do much today. We went out in the motor boat to do some trawling but the swell is too big. We will not get to the ship today.

    Friday 29th Nov. 1929

    Barometer still falling and the wind coming in strong from the N.W. I signalled the ship yesterday that we could not get off, and about noon she has pulled up her anchor and is steaming slowly out to sea. Late in the afternoon she was out of sight. We will have to remain here until we get some better weather.

    Saturday 30th Nov. 1929

    Barometer down to 28.4, wind from the N.W. and occasional snow squalls, now and then one obtains a view of the magnificent crevassed ice glaciers that terminate at the sea. We are camped on a peninsular and the ground is basalt lava covered largely with moss and vegetation. Ships position LAT 53 02 LONG 73 21.

    Sunday 1st Dec. 1929

    Weather is still much the same, but we are thoroughly enjoying this life ashore, so much to see and do. Hundreds of Skua gulls and Dominion gulls nests and eggs. These skua gulls are like a big hawk and they prey on small birds, mostly prions that come home just at dusk from the sea.

    Monday 2nd Dec. 1929

    The glass has risen and the morning is fairly fine. In the morning I went with the Doc over to the glacier foot, it was very interesting. On our way home we sighted the ship making for Corinthian Bay. Later I went with Sir Douglas Mawson and signalled the ship by Semaphore. They replied ‘come of right away’. We returned to the hut about a mile away and then went aboard the launch, with us came Prof Johnson and Babe. A fair sea was running and we had to be careful when off the head land, to keep clear of the breakers. We reached the ship OK, but the wind started to freshen and they decided to delay the return trip for the others until the next day.

    Tuesday 3rd Dec. 1929

    Left ship by motor boat with Sir D. Mawson to go around to Atlas Cove to pick up remaining chaps and gear, snowing slightly and fair swell running. Off the head land the engine cut out, due to water in the pipe line, we had an anxious ten minutes because we were close into the breakers and rugged coast. However we got her going again, proceeded to the cove and picked all the gear and people up. Then against a freshening wind and rising sea we had a slow trip out to sea, this time towing the dingy as well, the boat rode the seas well and in an hour we sighted the ship through the thickening snow fall and were soon along side, and unloaded the boat safely.

    The boat was then hauled aboard, our anchor weighed and the old ship plugged out to sea against a strong north wind. Later that afternoon we were well out to sea and running south before a northerly gale.

    Wednesday 4th Dec. 1929

    The wind has gone to the west and eased down, but there is still a big swell running. We all had one hour trecks on the wheel last night, the idea being to give the helmsman a hand to hold the wheel and keep the ship steady on her course. 7PM. Fresh wind from the west, but we are steaming along OK and doing about 6 knots, no sail set, except one staysail and the spanker. Our position at noon today is LAT 54 28 LONG 75 29 and distance run 120 miles. It is becoming a little colder today. The air temperature is round 34 F and the water temp 32.5 F and 50F below decks.

    Heard Island

    This island appears to be about 20 miles long by 8 miles wide. It has several peninsulars and generally speaking the land slopes up from all sides to terminate in a huge mountain 7000 ft high. I only had one clear view of the peak for a few minutes and at all other times the last 1000 ft was covered with perpetual mist. There are several heavily crevassed ice glaciers running down for miles to terminate at the sea. The sea breaks heavily on this ice and every now and then large pieces of ice break away and fall into the sea with a deep roar. The origin of this island appears to be volcanic, near our were two volcanic craters and several square miles of lava. The types of penguins were, Gentoo, Rockhopper, Macaroni and a few stray Kings. This King Penguin is a large bird standing about three feet six inches high and beautifully marked. Plenty of Sea Elephants were seen, especially on inaccessible beaches. Also a few Sea Leopards. We shot two of the latter and have their skins. The birds were Cape pidgeons, Dominican and Skua gulls, Giant petrels (Stinkers), Prions and Diving petrels. We had several meals of Rockhopper eggs and they were very good and quite fresh. The weather seems to be continual mists, snow and sleet with the north east to north west winds prevailing, and now and then a ray of sunshine. I have a Rockhopper Penguin skin to bring home. (This penguin fell overboard from the dingy when it was being hauled aboard. I will get another later on).

    (Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection)

    PS - I never saw or heard about the penguin skin. I don't think another Rockhopper was
    actually viewed by Eric as being a potential 'skin'. I think that was the end of it.

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    23 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-06-15
    User data
  81. HIGH SHERIFF - By RED DEER - Out of MISS JULIA BENNETT
    List
    Public

    On 28th May, 1857 'a fine blood horse' High Sheriff was 'landed in good order' on the ship Avon. The stud owner was George Allan Esq. It was said he was 'glad to be given the opportunity to have a horse with a dash of Venison blood'.

    'Blood Horse' is the subject of various definitions today. Plus to complicate matters there even appear to be three categories of blood horse - cold, warm and hot. In 1857/58 a 'Blood Horse' was probably a thoroughbred with at least fifty percent Arabian and/or Barbs and/or Turks blood. Additionally a blood horse had to have the appearance of, and to act like a blood horse. Moreover, the terms of blood horse and pedigree horse seem to be roughly interchangeable. Is a thoroughbred horse really the equivalent of a blood horse? It appears that hot blooded horses are thoroughbreds but that the term has also been applied more loosely to mean pure bred.

    Some of the mares who were paired with High Sheriff when Mr Allan was the owner, and who produced foals in 1858, were - Beeswing, Mincemeat, Quincey, Maid of Islay, Kiss Me Quick, Lapwing, Little Browny (owner John Sevior), Lucretia, Wild Bird, Flight, Jenny Lind, Margravine, Pilot, Romp, and Jeannette/Jeanette.

    By September, 1857 the blood stock horse High Sheriff was for sale. In February 1858 it was reported that Mr Allan had sold High Sheriff to Robert Sevior for £600. (In todays value that was nearly $48,000). Robert Sevior was 21. His brother John was 23.

    An Advertisement by John and Robert Sevior in Bell's Life in July, 1858 - THE IMPORTED THOROUGH-BRED HORSE - HIGH SHERIFF
    High Sheriff will stand at Mount Eccersley near Portland Bay at the rate of ten guineas per mare. The paddock contains a thousand acres, well grassed and watered. Grass three shillings per week. Every attention paid; no responsibility. The Sheriff is a sure foal-getter, 8 years old, rich dark brown, stands at sixteen hands and one inch, with immense bone and substance. (No unbroken mares will be received). The High Sheriff gained the first prize at the Melbourne Cattle Show in September, 1857.
    The High Sheriff is by Red Deer out of Miss Julia Bennett, by Muley Moloch, the dam Patty by Laurel, her dam Brandy Ann by Eryx, out of Misery by Camerton.
    Red Deer is by Venison out of Soldier's Daughter by the Colonel, dam by Oscar out of the dam Rubens Mare (Aka Camerine's Dam) by Rubens by Tippitywitchet by Waxy.
    Muley Moloch is out of Nancy by Dick Andrews, her dam Spitfire by Beningbrough.

    Thoroughbred horse pedigrees can be found here - http://www.pedigreequery.com/red+deer2

    High Sheriff had six starts winning three races in England at York, Lincoln and Stamford, he came second at Manchester and third at Radcliffe where he had a bad start. There are no comments about the sixth race.

    It was reported at the time of the Hamilton show in July 1859, that Mr Sevior's High Sheriff was much admired in that the horse had won first prize in 1858 at Hamilton. High Sheriff was considered as one of the finest horses in the district.

    From Bell's Life of 8th October, 1859 one reporter on horses gave his opinion of High Sheriff '...he is an exceedingly showy graceful animal, admirably adapted for a park horse or a review day charger, but although sixteen hands high, he is ... deficient in pace and substance; there is too much daylight under him. In fact he is unfurnished as a colt, but his head and neck are a study for a painting'.

    At one stage High Sheriff was kept at Dooling Dooling a property near Hamilton which was rented by the Sevior brothers. In this regard advertisements in the daily papers said that High Sheriff was at Hamilton in July, 1859.

    By May, 1862 High Sheriff was up for sale.

    By September 1862 a Mr McPherson was the owner of High Sheriff.

    At the eighth Annual Horse Show in Melbourne in September, 1863 High Sheriff was one of two horses who captured the most public attention.

    Some of the progeny of High Sheriff who were racing in the 1860's in Victoria were - Miss Jessie, Young Sheriff, Fireaway, Waverley, Grannie/Granny (owned and raced by the Seviors), Cyclone, Lady Mornington, Shenandoah (Dozey/Dosy) - a grey mare, she raced in the Melbourne, Australian, Ballarat and Sandhurst Cups, Lady Constance and Medora. One of Medora's offspring was Grey Dawn (This could be by the Skeleton 'Medora', and out of Grey Dawn was Light of Day. Was this the Medora from High Sheriff? There was more than one horse called Medora - in fact quite a few of the horses had 'doubles'. For some of the horses there were a few with the same name. Besides, many of the early racehorses in Australia were named after earlier horses in England. Some reports say that Skeleton was the sire of Medora, while other reports say that it was High Sheriff. Nevertheless, there was a Medora from High Sheriff).

    Other progeny by High Sheriff were Sheriff and a filly Grisette by Annette. There was also Miss Constance who had Orphan and The Marquis, she was a daughter of High Sheriff and Lady Constance. The latter was said to be a handsome mare. Further offspring of High Sheriff were First Love, Impudence, Lucy Ashton and Guy Fawkes.

    High Sheriff was also the ancestor of Herod, Topper, Blink Bonny/Blinkbonnie (a Caulfield Cup Winner) and Liberty - all were winners. Herod especially, seems to have a good reputation. As well, Miss Constance was also a winner, she was a daughter of Lady Constance.

    Some other descendants of High Sheriff were Ben Arnold, Vandamme, Antler, Tradition, Ostra, Ladybird, Eugenie, Erin's Isle, Belle, General Hamilton, After Dark (Petrel), Peter Parr, San Toy, Turnkey, The Fop, Dewhurst, Saffron, Nocturne, Lady Hurst, Mary Hurst, Kure, Georgette, Queenette, Solemnity, Coquette, Reindeer, King of the Ring, Gazelle, Baanya, Australian, Annie, Papatune, Yattendon, Heiress, Patchwork, Patchwork II, Queen Eliza, Lesbia, Fireball, Fireworks, Queen of Hearts, Queen of Diamonds, Brazen Nose, Brazen Lad, Druid, Baroness (a Sevior horse in 1861), Medea, Lilish, Spark, Orithlamme, Folly, Feu d'Artifice, Royal Highlander, Seaforth Highlander, Coolgardie, Sunbeam, Pioneer, Tara, Peerless, Red Deer, Legend, Opal, Merrimu, Newminster, Bismarck, Minette, Para List, Brownie, Brilliant, Phoebe, Job (or JC), and Noonday.

    The first Melbourne Cup was in 1861 and there were 17 starters - these included The Moor (Darkie), Medora and Grey Dawn (this last horse could be by the Skeleton 'Medora' ?) At least two horses then were likely descendants of High Sheriff. Medora was the first of High Sheriff's offspring to race in Australia and she had an accident and did not survive beyond this day. Earlier in 1861 she had successful races. She was known as a speedy filly. Archer was in this Melbourne Cup.

    In the 1870's in Melbourne, there was Prince Alfred by King Alfred and Lucy. Lucy was by High Sheriff. There was also Darkie (The Moor), a well made horse by Young Sheriff and Othello a handsome black horse also by Young Sheriff.

    In 1870 Darkie was sent to India to race and 'beat all the horses of India in the Madras races'. In September, 1878 Darkie as The Moor was standing at the Millewa Stud Farm. At the time it was said that this horse was a beautiful black horse with fine flat bone and splendid action. He had immense staying powers, standing at 16 hands high. In October, 1879 The Moor was at the Millewa Stud Farm and at the Niagra Hotel in Echuca.

    In late 1872 and 1874 and presumably in 1873 Prince Alfred was 'standing' at the Governor Grey Hotel, Harrisville, New Zealand as a sire, and travelling in the surrounding districts.

    Winners at the Williamstown Races in June,1914 were Kure (by Mikado II) and Georgette or Queenette (by George Frederick) and they were from Coquette by Coup d'Etat (son of Maribyrnong), by Maribyrnong, by Brown Girl, by Australian, by Mr Martin, by a mare by High Sheriff (1849).

    George Frederick a son of Carbine had Salatis a descendant of High Sheriff by Georgette or Queenette, also a descendant of High Sheriff.

    Another line for High Sheriff; Reindeer - King of the Ring - Gazelle descended from High Sheriff.

    High Sheriff was still being mentioned in newspapers in June, 1934 in regard to the breeding history of specific racehorses.

    Descendants of High Sheriff gradually made there way to the other States of Australia, New Zealand and to other overseas destinations.

    Stud Books and/or Thoroughbred Pedigrees need to be checked for relationships as I have only taken information from newspapers of the times, which can be correct but can alternatively be subject to errors. One could draw up an excel spreadsheet to trace relevant ancestry back to High Sheriff.

    Sally Douglas

    294 items
    created by: public:beetle 2016-11-06
    User data
  82. Isabel or Isabella Bowman (Beaumont) born 24th June, 1788 Dunfermline. (A coal mining family).
    List
    Public

    Isabel or Isabella Bowman (Beaumont) was born in Northfod, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland on 24th June, 1788. Isabel or Isabella was baptised on 3 July, 1788 at the Dumferline Associate Session, Dunfermline, Fife.

    North Fod was a Farmstead in the 19th and 20th Centuries, so I am assuming that it was agricultural and the site of a farm or farms in 1788.

    In 1534 it was referred to as Northfoid - foid or fod meaning sod or an area where peat or turves are found.

    As far back as the 13th Century there was a Coal pit or (open cast) Coal mine in Dunfermline - https://canmore.org.uk/site/49342/dunfermline-coal-mine

    "...A charter was granted in 1291 by William de Oberwill, the proprietor of the estate of Pittencrieff, giving to the abbot and convent of Dunfermline the power to open a coalheugh on the estate."

    Wikipedia - "Dunfermline is a town and former Royal Burgh, and parish, in Fife, Scotland, on high ground 3 miles (5 km) from the northern shore of the Firth of Forth..."

    Dunfermline Carnegie Library Records - http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/sct/FIF/libraries/Dunfermline_lib

    Isabel Bpwman was from the large family of 'Bowman' in Fife who were coal workers, coal hewers and Coal Mine owners. Isabel was the second of twelve children. Isabel's siblings were - Archibald, Margaret, Unnamed, Lawrence or Laurence, John, Alexander, William, David, Elizabeth (Betsy), Agnes and Grizel. Their parents were Archibald Bowman, born 25 January, 1763 in Urquhart, Dunfermline, Fife and Agnes (Ann) Lumsden baptised in June, 1776 in Ceres or Largo, Fife. Archibald Bowman was baptised on 30 January, 1763 at the Dunfermline Associate Session, Dunfermline, Fife. Archibald Bowman was a Coal Miner. Agnes' parents were Henry Lumisden/Lumsdain and Margaret McGrigor/McGreigor.

    Before that on the Bowman side there was Archibald Bowman, born 11 November, 1729 in Methilhill, Dunfermline, Fife and Margaret Williamson, born 4 October, 1736 at Berilaw, Dunfermline, Fife. This Archibald Bowman was a Coal Miner. Margaret Williamson was the daughter of William Williamson and Bessie Hunter.

    The parents of the Archibald Bowman last mentioned were John Bowman born 21 July, 1699 at Kilconquhar, Fife (he was baptised on 23 July, 1699) and Margaret Dryburgh or Drybrugh born c1694 in Kilconquhar or Wemyss, Fife. She was probably the Margaret Drybrough (Dryburgh) baptised on 16 September, 1694 at Wemyss, Fife. Her parents being Archbald Drybrough and Margaret Dunsaire. John and Margaret Bowman also had a daughter Margaret Bowman born on 12 July, 1727 and baptised on 17 July, 1727 at Wemyss, Fife.

    John Bowman's parents were Thomas Bowman c1670 Wemyss, Fife and Margaret Pried/Pryd c1669. They married on 24th July, 1697 at Ceres, Fife.

    Thomas' father in turn was John Bowman born c1640 Wemyss, Fife and his mother was Barbra (Barbara) Rosburgh born c1642 Elie, Fife. John Bowman was baptised on 16 August, 1640 at Elie, Fife. They (John and Barbra) also had a daughter Margaret Bowman who was baptised on 3 August, 1667 at Abbotshall, Fife.

    Wikipedia - "Elie and Earlsferry is a coastal town and former royal burgh in Fife, and parish, Scotland, situated within the East Neuk beside Chapel Ness on the north coast of the Firth of Forth, eight miles east of Leven. The burgh comprised the linked villages of Elie and Earlsferry, which were formally merged in 1930 by the Local Government Act of 1929..." and "Wemyss is a civil parish on the south coast of Fife, Scotland, lying on the Firth of Forth. It is bounded on the north-east by the parish of Scoonie and the south-west by the parish of Kirkcaldy and Dysart..."

    Isabel Bowman 24th June, 1788 married Henry Birrel/Burrel/Burrell on 17 June, 1807 at St Cuthbert's Edinburgh. Henry was born on 2 April, 1785 at Culross, Perth or Fife. Henry Birrel was an Innkeeper and a Stonemason. Isabel and Henry Birrel had ten children - Ann, Eupheme, Henry, Isabella/Isabel, Margaret, Elizabeth (spelt Elisabeth) known also as Betsy, Archibald, Grace, Alexander and James or James Archibald.

    Henry Birrel was a Stonemason and Architect and went to Kilmallie, Fort William, Argyllshire; Isabella or Isabella to Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire; Margaret, Elizabeth and James migrated to Australia and settled in Victoria while Archibald a Tinsmith and Coppersmith migrated to Chicago, Illinois, USA. Archibald's children and other descendants became famous in America as Coal Miners and Mine owners. One of the children of Archibald's brother Henry ie Andrew Burrell migrated to Illinois to be with his male cousins.

    Burrell in the US - http://genealogytrails.com/ill/cook/chicagobios7.html

    About Archibald (Archie) Burrell and his son Henry Burrell - http://archiveswest.orbiscascade.org/ark:/80444/xv58829

    Henry Birrel the husband of Isabel Bowman died on 1 March, 1836 in Kirkcaldy, Fife and Isabel Bowman died on 17 May, 1840 in Kirkcaldy, Fife.

    Some points of interest on the Bowman family -
    * I have come across a Bowman female in my research who was a Coal Hewer at a Bowman mine and there were many females who took up such a job in the Coal Mines. Children also worked in the mines.
    * It has been said that many of the early mine workers were essentially serfs or slaves to the mine owners.
    * The offending law of 'Collier Bondage' though legally abolished in 1799 took many years to dissipate. To be a Coal miner, worker or hewer etc was a dangerous, dirty and unhealthy job and existence.
    * Beaumont is an alternative spelling to Bowman. I have come across Bouman too.

    I wrote this in about 2006 when Immigration Place was Immigration Bridge - https://immigrationplace.com.au/story/elizabeth-shiels-nee-burrell/

    An account of some of the broad Bowman family - http://www.fifepits.co.uk/starter/stories/stor_10.htm

    It is probably about William Bowman and his descendants. William was a brother of Isabel Bowman 1788.

    Scottish Coal Mining - http://www.scottishmining.co.uk/316.html

    Electric Scotland - Coal Mining - https://www.electricscotland.com/history/industrial/industry1.htm

    National Records of Scotland - Coal Mining Records - https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/research/guides/coal-mining-records

    Sally E Douglas

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2018-08-31
    User data
  83. JAMES FRANCIS HURLEY - BANZARE, ANTARCTICA
    List
    Public

    James Francis Hurley (1885-1962) was born in Sydney, NSW. He was known as Captain Frank Hurley or Frank Hurley. He became a professional photographer, cinematographer, explorer, author and broadcaster.

    He even broadcast for children - for instance his book of childrens’ stories called Shackletons Argonauts was broadcast by him on the Australian Broadcasting Commission (ABC).

    At the age of 13 Hurley ran away from home to work at the Lithgow steel mill in New South Wales. He worked there for two years.

    At the age of 17 he bought his first camera, a Kodak box brownie. He started his photographic career with a postcard company in Sydney at the age of 20.

    Frank Hurley was the official Photographer to the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) 1911-1914 on the ship Aurora, with Sir Douglas Mawson as leader. Hurley made the film of Home of the Blizzard as a result of his experiences and photographic work when with the AAE. The Australian Antarctic Division states that Hurley’s “…pictures of men blown backwards by the driving katabatic winds at Cape Denison brought magic and power to ordinary people…”

    In 1914 Hurley filmed in Java and he also returned to the Antarctic on the Aurora with Captain John King Davis, to collect the stranded Dr Douglas Mawson and a small party still at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay.

    Frank Hurley was the official Photographer with the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914-1917) with Sir Ernest Shackleton on the ship Endurance. In this period Hurley produced his most famous work, his still photographs of the Endurance being crushed slowly by the pack ice. He risked his life to save and preserve the glass plate and film images that recorded these extraordinary events of 1916. With the Endurance being trapped and slowly disintegrating in the pack ice hundreds of miles out to sea ‘all hands’ abandoned the ship to set up camp on the floating sea ice. With the Endurance about to disappear at any time Hurley dived into the freezing water to rescue his submerged plates and film.

    Later with the exploration team facing a manhaul across the sea ice, Hurley had to negotiate with Shackleton to keep 120 plates. The remaining 400 were smashed intentionally on the ice so that there was no going back. Also Hurley had to replace his photographic equipment with a small pocket camera, another huge loss. Yet with this pocket camera he later photographed Sir Ernest Shackleton and party departing on their epic whaleboat voyage on the James Caird from Ele