Information about Trove user: albrechtj

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 6,133,497
2 noelwoodhouse 4,040,530
3 DonnaTelfer 3,562,108
4 Rhonda.M 3,551,622
5 NeilHamilton 3,494,329
...
323 Marie.Pinkewich 170,065
324 MaurieRose 169,540
325 Paul-Taro-Seto 169,403
326 albrechtj 167,771
327 enigma 167,280
328 d.overett 166,020

167,771 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2020 3,168
May 2020 18,482
April 2020 14,841
March 2020 1,092
February 2020 1,853
January 2020 11,522
December 2019 13,159
November 2019 3,235
October 2019 299
July 2019 356
June 2019 1,454
May 2019 3,085
April 2019 2,232
March 2019 1,266
February 2019 3,558
January 2019 5,752
December 2018 12,514
November 2018 24,698
October 2018 28,623
September 2018 16,407
August 2018 175

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 6,133,295
2 noelwoodhouse 4,040,530
3 DonnaTelfer 3,562,082
4 Rhonda.M 3,551,609
5 NeilHamilton 3,494,200
...
323 Marie.Pinkewich 169,987
324 Paul-Taro-Seto 169,340
325 MaurieRose 168,839
326 albrechtj 167,694
327 enigma 167,192
328 d.overett 166,016

167,694 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2020 3,168
May 2020 18,479
April 2020 14,841
March 2020 1,092
February 2020 1,853
January 2020 11,448
December 2019 13,159
November 2019 3,235
October 2019 299
July 2019 356
June 2019 1,454
May 2019 3,085
April 2019 2,232
March 2019 1,266
February 2019 3,558
January 2019 5,752
December 2018 12,514
November 2018 24,698
October 2018 28,623
September 2018 16,407
August 2018 175

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 408,501
2 GeoffMMutton 242,041
3 PhilThomas 145,472
4 mickbrook 115,362
5 DavoChiss 114,039
...
536 teragram4 78
537 trixiethepixi 78
538 WFRobb 78
539 albrechtj 77
540 AliVDB 77
541 casamela 77

77 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2020 3
January 2020 74


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
ROSES. (Article), Western Argus (Kalgoorlie, WA : 1916 - 1938), Tuesday 24 June 1930 [Issue No.2090] page 30 2020-06-05 13:21 fume, and well formed flowirs. with
ing thp cool months are delightful,_
carried on long stema.
and fine -ezibition blooms often
come from this variety. 'It is a good
oMadam Abel' Chatenay is always
Ethel Sonierset is good, and must
the good pinlks, there are many
others, such as Pink Cochet Mrs. E.
Wsllis, and Mrs. George Shawyer.
fume, and well formed flowers with
ing the cool months are delightful,
carried on long stems.
and fine exhibition blooms often
come from this variety. It is a good
Madam Abel Chatenay is always
Ethel Somerset is good, and must
the good pinks, there are many
others, such as Pink Cochet, Mrs. E.
Willis, and Mrs. George Shawyer.
ROSES. (Article), Western Argus (Kalgoorlie, WA : 1916 - 1938), Tuesday 24 June 1930 [Issue No.2090] page 30 2020-06-05 13:20 Aie hybrid perpetual class, but now
tqw are to be chosen, Hadley, Lord
Charleinont, General McArthur,
Ioosier Beauty, Hallmark Crimson,
ted Letter Day, Laurent. Curie,
Ohateau de C. Vougeot, and Lady.
MM. Stewart can be recommended.
fhe following brief descriptiong
Should prove useful.
¶reetly s tented and a strong grower.
m s the meet Qepalar of a tbe
red roses because -it flowers wel
General ' McArthur.--A strong
Laurent Carle.-Large brilliant
let crimson.' A grand variety, with
long stems ,and first-class for ex
flowering quality. Medium-sized I
Allenby, Edward Mawley,. Sensa
lion, Admiral Ward, and Perle des"
rola to the deeper tones of Belle Sei.
of the earliest flowering pinks is.
many championships, is well form
ed, sweetly soented and is of a de
lightful colour.
the hybrid perpetual class, but now
few are to be chosen, Hadley, Lord
Charlemont, General McArthur,
Hoosier Beauty, Hallmark Crimson,
Red Letter Day, Laurent, Curie,
Chateau de C. Vougeot, and Lady.
M. Stewart can be recommended.
The following brief description
should prove useful.
sweetly scented and a strong grower.
Perhaps the meet popular of all the
red roses because it flowers well
General McArthur.--A strong
Laurent Carle. Large brilliant
let crimson. A grand variety, with
long stems and first-class for ex
flowering quality. Medium-sized
Allenby, Edward Mawley, Sensa
tion, Admiral Ward, and Perle des
rola to the deeper tones of Belle Sei
of the earliest flowering pinks is
many championships, is well formed,
sweetly scented and is of a
delightful colour.
ROSES. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 17 July 1920 [Issue No.2,833] page 10 2020-06-05 12:44 Theve is nj> doubt "tJiat the love forflowcvs
exercises an ennobling "influence upon the
Jives <of men: and women of - the civilised
laces of the world. _ The most bumble
iiowcv that raises its head to the sun pro
claims the -wonderful and inimitable art
of natnro. The plant producing it isf preg
having'rea&hcd the climax in itfe groivthand
the height of its beauty', it develops a potcii;
tiality for . the perpetuation of its species.
Many of the plants that arc useless in our
System of economy, on account of 'some- at
tractive property their flowers 'possess, have
been allowed to escape beyond, control, to
become troublesome peste. There are many
beautiful flowers under cultivation, ;aud
cadi one lias its special coterie of admirers,
but none'can boast such an extensive aud
the national flower of "England, but by
dieputed precedence amongst flowers. The
poets of all countries - and -the classical
writers of all age? have accepted the queen
of flowers as the. symbol of beauty and*
sensual enjoyment." Its beauty is alluring,
its fragrance delightful, but not «o obtru
a distance. With such dclicacy docs it ap
reasonable. and reciprocal treatment, is-a
cheerful giver. Freeiy it produces its beaur
them upon a .further mission of delight, to
decorate the home, to chafer the sick and af
causee fresh buds to break iuto growth, to
again. crown the plant . with its wonderful
glory. There are no other plants that re
spond so readily to our desires and yield
such priceless floral treasures. But al
though the rose symbolises elegance, beauty,
and purity, it may not bie handled with im
respect from the carelccs' and thoughtless,
and for ever precludes the suggestion oi'
ihsipid beauty. The rose will'not thrive
situation and clear, pure, sunny air. In;
lesson- that for the development of the adv
niirable characteristics of human grace and
Enthusiastic cultivators of thi£ charming
flower seek such conditions of soil ana
atmosphere when establishing their own.
homes. Can it-be denied that in doing so
healthy citizejiship, upon which sturdy na

tion.il life is built? The fraternal" ties,
stately queen all the world over are of. the
strongest and purest character. The bar
riers of rank and Btation are 6wept aside,
all lust, of monetary gain is forgotten;
thev are actuated by common desires
.tiire of commercial products, such as rose
mitted that the mpst potential blessings it
millions of people derive from its cultiva-'
lion. Although the rose h3B*been loved
and admired for as long .is our authentic
knowledge of the. human race extends, it is
tliein are single, but. many show a tendency
to produce double or semi-doable flowers.
? T2>e wild races flowered- but once, usually
. in the summer, -aud -one of the earliest . re
ing upon the genus Eosa was to deprive the
and raising of hybrids, the type.now known
misleading,.-since the majority bloom only
twice during .the year, spring .and autumn,'
tains some of the most Vigorous and fcrdy
roses, as well as some of the moist fragrant
sorts, such as Prince Canrille de Rohan, hut,
011 the other hand, Frau Karl Drusehki is
. practically "scentless. Many people com
greatest charms of the flower has been lost..
flowering habit. , The tea roses are mostly
descended from the. Old Blush tea
rose introduced from- China early in'
the . nineteenth c&jtury, and include
some of the most delicate-and daintily
? scented flowers. They are also, perhaps,
zhore exacting in their demands fpr a pure
'atmosphere tl&n other varieties. "The hy
VwhT tea roses are derived from numerous
varieties, and to thi/5 class some of our best
twipelual-WooMng "TiaSt[ . most of. them
. iiave soinepei-fiime, being
dclitiou^y.^iitArfeht^- :Jaie tUousaitds
of'4»xbm*09^

a lid the selection of "twei v^fegist cWsps vbfe^i
comes -ati t-KUcinely \difficuH;^a^t'r.:' jWMSi
a IMjdilariMte

Meeount that fen^mal pmft^W^odvSGiiti
jnerifeal -pi^ftFeirbea -My>u1a* uimv>,rt)>»gly in
Huc^w>ouic.peopipf':T.vlH(sti!>tiieiS'may.7iot
lie familiar watli' the -m'erc^x'keMtJy-Hitror
dnced varieties. The rcVult of the latest
plebiscite, however; .'«?' exi^edftigly £i\itify

nig, because ? it clearly . indicates, that. tie
ro'sc-Joters 'taltiitg*'jlait )n " ttie", votl>ng: «l"e
?well iip. tii datfej and havemade- an excel
lent selection.' >-A Jirief. desc^'i ption . of .-.each
of the selected .roses bas already beeii pub:
lislied, "but it wJl 1>e" ot" iflt«rest-to ' ntany
Auction of the . first twelve :
' Madaih A-bel thatenay, H.T.' -tPcraet Dufhcr),
1695. -
Frau Karl Druschki, , H.P, (I\ Lambert), 1900.
Miss Marion MaliifokT, lf.'f, (\V. AdaiBTOn, V ic.),
1911. . ."
Aladara EJuuaifl Ileritft, H.T. (Pcmet Ducticr),
3013. "
Oerieral Macartlmr, H.T." (B. G. Hill ana Co,),
1905.. ?
Lyons Rose, H.T. (Pemct Duelier), 1907,
ilrs. 'H ijtcreire, T. (M<*Greedy and Bona), 1910
Chateau <ie Olos Vougeot, H.T. <Pernct Difther),
Beiic Siebrecht, H.T. *A. Dickeofi), 1S95.
Uucah Coclii't, T. (- Cook) ,'1897.
Lady Hillingdon, T. tLowe aDd Shawyer), 1910.
An analysis of the votes cast by Uie-com
xuit-tec of the National Rose Society, made
by the secretary, 6l)ows that the varieties
Chatenav, 22; General Macartliur, 18; Frau
Karl Druschki, 1?; Red Letter Day,
16; Sunny South, 15; -Lady Hilling
don, 14: Miss -Marion Manifold, .- 14;
Madam ii.Heriot, 11; Chateau de CIob
Vougcot, 11; Mi's. H. Stevens, 11; TJustave
Grumeifi'ald, 8; Joseph Bill, 8. TliiB col
lection contains a good raugeof colour, all
are good garden roses, and most of . them
are fragrant. It is also interesting to', note
that eyery member of the contrrtittee Voted
for . Madam Abel Chatenay: It "will "tie ob
served -that most of our roses "are raised by.
British;' Continental, and; ? American
growers, and it frequently happens that-a
lose which has won an excellent reputation
in the northern hemisphere., fails to "give a
felt Availt amongst rose growers is a t&ting
,out ground where new varieties can be tried
pass final judgment upon any. rose until it
lias been given a patient trial for at least
cannot be. expected to do. We possess-one of
.the finest climates in the world . for roBe
too highly appreeiate^he work that is
being earned out by rose breeders in 'Aus
tralia.' First on the list stands the name of
Mr. Alister Clark, who lias., produced varie
such as JSunSiy South, Jessie Clark, Bor
derer, Mrs. Alister Clapk, Busk Fice, Rosy
Morn, Gwen Nash, BJacfcboj*, and many
others. "Mr. Clark has also given much as
sistance. to the National rose societies 'of
presented. Mr. L. Adamson is a, Victorian
grower who has produced two fine, varie
ties in Mrs. J. C." Manifold and Miss Marion
Manifold: whilst to Mr. Atdagb, one of the
due as the originator of climbing Ma da in
Segond Weber and climbing Cecils Hmn
Halstead. and Kniglit, of New South Wales;
and Williams, of Queensland, - have also
added to the list of "Australian-raised roses.
work by other experimenters entering the .
. to the selection of stocks for the different
varieties of roses already in cultivation, hi
conclusion, it is "safe to state that anyone
planting. "The Arpus" 12 best roses will
posses? 12 of the finest,, representatives of
the world's most popular flower.':Should
the planter, also tend the .roses himself he
will be rcgaid in pui&^pleaBure :f6r the
money expended a thousand Jtimes over.
individual '.varieties, and one very 'soon
upon meeting an old friend;"-®'"-"" '" -
Roses
There is no doubt that the love for flowers
exercises an ennobling influence upon the
lives of men: and women of the civilised
races of the world. The most humble
flower that raises its head to the sun pro
claims the wonderful and inimitable art
of nature. The plant producing it is preg
having reached the climax in its growth and
the height of its beauty, it develops a potentiality
for the perpetuation of its species.
Many of the plants that are useless in our
system of economy, on account of some at
tractive property their flowers possess, have
been allowed to escape beyond control, to
become troublesome pests. There are many
beautiful flowers under cultivation, and
each one has its special coterie of admirers,
but none can boast such an extensive and
the national flower of England, but by
disputed precedence amongst flowers. The
poets of all countries and the classical
writers of all ages have accepted the queen
of flowers as the symbol of beauty and
sensual enjoyment. Its beauty is alluring,
its fragrance delightful, but not so obtru
a distance. With such delicacy does it ap
reasonable. and reciprocal treatment, is a
cheerful giver. Freeiy it produces its beau
them upon a further mission of delight, to
decorate the home, to cheer the sick and af
causes fresh buds to break into growth, to
again crown the plant with its wonderful
glory. There are no other plants that
respond so readily to our desires and yield
such priceless floral treasures. But
although the rose symbolises elegance, beauty,
and purity, it may not be handled with im
respect from the careless and thoughtless,
and for ever precludes the suggestion of
insipid beauty. The rose will not thrive
situation and clear, pure, sunny air. In
lesson- that for the development of the
admirable characteristics of human grace and
Enthusiastic cultivators of this charming
flower seek such conditions of soil and
atmosphere when establishing their own
homes. Can it be denied that in doing so
healthy citizenship, upon which sturdy

national life is built? The fraternal ties,
stately queen all the world over are of the
strongest and purest character. The
barriers of rank and station are swept aside,
all lust of monetary gain is forgotten;
they are actuated by common desires
ture of commercial products, such as rose
mitted that the most potential blessings it
millions of people derive from its cultiva-
lion. Although the rose has been loved
and admired for as long is our authentic
knowledge of the human race extends, it is
them are single, but. many show a tendency
to produce double or semi-double flowers.
The wild races flowered but once, usually
in the summer, and one of the earliest re
ing upon the genus Rosa was to deprive the
and raising of hybrids, the type now known
misleading, since the majority bloom only
twice during the year, spring and autumn,
tains some of the most vigorous and hardy
roses, as well as some of the most fragrant
sorts, such as Prince Camille de Rohan, but,
on the other hand, Frau Karl Druschki is
practically "scentless. Many people com
greatest charms of the flower has been lost.
flowering habit. The tea roses are mostly
descended from the Old Blush tea
rose introduced from China early in
the nineteenth century, and include
some of the most delicate and daintily
scented flowers. They are also, perhaps,
more exacting in their demands for a pure
atmosphere than other varieties. The hybrid
tea roses are derived from numerous
varieties, and to this class some of our best
perpetual-blooming habit, most of them
have some peffume, being
deliciously fragrant. There are thousands
of hybrid garden roses under cultivation,

and the selection of twelve best roses becomes
an extremely difficult matter. With
a popular vote it must also be taken into

account that personal prejudices and sentimental
preferences would unwittingly influence
some people, whilst others may not
be familiar with the more recently introduced
varieties. The result of the latest
plebiscite, however; is exceedingly gratifying,

because it clearly indicates, that the
rose lovers taking part in the voting are
well up to date and have made an excel
lent selection. A brief description of each
of the selected roses has already been pub
lished, but it will be of interest to many
duction of the first twelve:
' Madam Abel Chatenay, H.T.' -(Pernet Ducher),
1895. -
Frau Karl Druschki, , H.P, (P. Lambert), 1900.
Miss Marion Manifold, H.T., (W. Adamson, Vic.),
1911.
Madam Edouard Heriot, H.T. (Pernet Ducher),
1913.
General Macarthur, H.T. (B. G. Hill and Co,),
1905.
Lyons Rose, H.T. (Pernet Ducher), 1907
Mrs. H. Stevens, T. (McGreedy and Sons), 1910
Chateau de Clos Vougeot, H.T. <Pernet Ducher),
Belle Siebrecht, H.T. (A. Dickson), 1895.
Maman Cochet, T. ( Cook) ,1897.
Lady Hillingdon, T. (Lowe and Shawyer), 1910.
An analysis of the votes cast by the com
mittee of the National Rose Society, made
by the secretary, shows that the varieties
Chatenay, 22; General Macarthur, 18; Frau
Karl Druschki, 17; Red Letter Day,
16; Sunny South, 15; Lady Hilling
don, 14: Miss Marion Manifold, 14;
Madam E. Heriot, 11; Chateau de CIos
Vougeot, 11; Mrs. H. Stevens, 11; Gustave
Grumerwald, 8; Joseph Hill, 8. This col
lection contains a good range of colour, all
are good garden roses, and most of them
are fragrant. It is also interesting to note
that eyery member of the conmmittee voted
for Madam Abel Chatenay: It "will be ob
served that most of our roses are raised by
British, Continental, and American
growers, and it frequently happens that a
rose which has won an excellent reputation
in the northern hemisphere, fails to give a
felt want amongst rose growers is a testing
out ground where new varieties can be tried
pass final judgment upon any rose until it
has been given a patient trial for at least
cannot be expected to do. We possess one of
the finest climates in the world for rose
too highly appreciate the work that is
being carried out by rose breeders in Aus
tralia. First on the list stands the name of
Mr. Alister Clark, who has produced varie
such as Sunny South, Jessie Clark, Bor
derer, Mrs. Alister Clark, Bush Fire, Rosy
Morn, Gwen Nash, Blackboy, and many
others. Mr. Clark has also given much as
sistance to the National rose societies of
presented. Mr. L. Adamson is a Victorian
grower who has produced two fine varie
ties in Mrs. J. C. Manifold and Miss Marion
Manifold; whilst to Mr. Ardagh, one of the
due as the originator of climbing Madam
Segond Weber and climbing Cecil Brun
Halstead. and Knight, of New South Wales;
and Williams, of Queensland, have also
added to the list of Australian-raised roses.
work by other experimenters entering the
to the selection of stocks for the different
varieties of roses already in cultivation. In
conclusion, it is safe to state that anyone
planting. "The Argus" 12 best roses will
posses 12 of the finest representatives of
the world's most popular flower. Should
the planter also tend the roses himself he
will be repaid in pure pleasure for the
money expended a thousand times over.
individual varieties, and one very soon
upon meeting an old friend.
ROSES. (Article), The Northern Miner (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1874 - 1954), Friday 30 January 1925 page 3 2020-06-05 12:18 It 1ms been permanently associat
ed in the human vn»n£ with beauty,
and as ouu mit*Ut expect has esisfc
ed iu ralslug questions which have
on interest tar beyond what is mere
ly academic. Solomon in all his
i with a rose. The limited life ot
eral destiny awaken in UB a feeling
'we cannot easily dfcpeJ. Darwin and
protection for tfi3 r-pneies, and
there is nothing th* thoughtful
the propagation, why llie perman.
enoe of beauty? These questions are
more fixel in us than qualities arc
in the specWs. Flowers beautify the
earth and delight man, and It they i
do more (or tnan than for the bees
that find food in them, if they min.
ister more to cmscous intelligence
than to the lower form* of life, the
inference la obvious. Reauty In the
creative fon-i, which but another
way of savin* thai the creative
A rose Is a u:?st«jry, and nobody |
felt it so much or refers to" It so
divinely as Wordsworth. The mean* j
est flower gave him thoughts to? I
deep for tears. And iu one never- '
to-be-forgotten ' phrase he has ul»
tered .what millions have felt
flower #
Is thlB pantheism? And are we to
understand that 8elf.consclou8ne6S
and all (he forms of life inferior to
man? Have we not in common wlfli
talk, a wish which carries implira-1
lions of a nature not suspected?
There are many of us who in pres-j
once of a glorious rose have felt
as if some injustice lay upon that j
lovely form, condemning it to eve*
lasting ignorance of the Joy it waul
giving to the woild. It seems to be
point of opening Its dewy lips. No j
message from Mars would be so iu* I
tensely interesting as a solitary* sen
tence from a Madame Abel Phat-j

enay or a whisper from a Madame
Edward Harriot. And mayhap in the J
golden age, when the music of thei
spheres awakens, we may find the I
roBes quiring to the young.eyed
cherubim, J
It has been permanently associated
in the human mind with beauty,
and as one might expect has assisted
in raising questions which have
an interest far beyond what is merely
academic. Solomon in all his
with a rose. The limited life of
eral destiny awaken in us a feeling
we cannot easily dispel. Darwin and
protection for the species, and
there is nothing the thoughtful
the propagation, why the perman
ence of beauty? These questions are
more fixed in us than qualities are
in the species. Flowers beautify the
earth and delight man, and if they
do more for man than for the bees
that find food in them, if they min
ister more to conscious intelligence
than to the lower forms of life, the
inference is obvious. Beauty in the
creative force, which is but another
way of saying that the creative
A rose is a mystery, and nobody
felt it so much or refers to it so
divinely as Wordsworth. The meanest
flower gave him thoughts too
deep for tears. And in one never-
to-be-forgotten phrase he has uttered
what millions have felt -
flower
Is this pantheism? And are we to
understand that self.consciousness
and all the forms of life inferior to
man? Have we not in common with
talk, a wish which carries implications
of a nature not suspected?
There are many of us who in presence
of a glorious rose have felt
as if some injustice lay upon that
lovely form, condemning it to ever
lasting ignorance of the Joy it was
giving to the world. It seems to be
point of opening its dewy lips. No
message from Mars would be so
intensely interesting as a solitary sen
tence from a Madame Abel Chatenay

or a whisper from a Madame
Edward Harriot. And mayhap in the
golden age, when the music of the
spheres awakens, we may find the
roses quiring to the young eyed
cherubim.
ROSES. (Article), The Northern Miner (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1874 - 1954), Friday 30 January 1925 page 3 2020-06-05 12:13 I It is on record that Nero spent I
'£30,000 on roses for one feasl. The j
[floor of the banquet hall was strewn
ing It. What a sacrilege to compel
sweeten Lady Macbeth's little band,
and. all the roses of Italy would not
make Nero's banquet fragrant.1
Roses have flourished in &U
civilised lands, and figure' constant
sort that he never wrote, the scene
are plucked is so emphatically suit
with retort and Incomparable wit
betray the master hand
jpure shame to counterfeit our
I roses. .
| And so the brawl in the temple
jand the white a thousand souls to
Who knows but in the garden 01
Eden the roses saw the creation ot
Eve and felt her sweet, breath upon
hut. that in these idyllic days the
In converne with His creatures.
Perhaps the. fragrance which clings i
to the beloved flower is a remlniB.
sconce of the golden age, an some
thing that baB survived the ruin c?
There is scarcely a poet In ancient
of modern days but must needs
there are more allusions to It than
to any other plant, for how can ,a
the rose? $appho, wbo flourished
herself, but claims to be tbe mouth
Achilles and tbe helm of Hector.
But In truth some of tbe loveli
est compllnieots to the roses are
modern. Wllberforce declared roses
to be God's smiles, George MacDon.
aid speaks of God's rose'.thoughts,
Tbe rose Is sweetest washed with
And love is loveliest wlies embalm
ed In tears. .*
It-is Christian RoBsettl who dwells
It Is Bhe, too* wbo sees that though :
in the dewy morn the rose is fair, j
its loveliness Is born upon a thorn*
How melancholy and truly Irish j
is Moore's lament over the last rost»
of summer! But the sum of thei
whole matter Is furnished by Shake
speare. who utlefs the English
thought in tbe English way: "Of
all flowers mettiinks the rose is
erence to flowers Is furnished In
the mummy wrappings of Set! I.
and Roineses II. were found GO j
period of the Pharaohs of the titn.'i
of Moses. Being hermetically seal. I
ed th«m specimens were perfectly)
preserved, aud after being placed in
warm water were found to be quite ,
satisfactory for the purposes of1
science. The colour* of the flow. I
ers woven Into the garlamlR could I
pecularities of living plants were alJ
tomb .and so some botanists main
about 40 diRttnct species. The rest
Brkain claims 1G, and quite holf of
all Rpecies come from Asia. Thous-1
nnds of varieties hovr; been produc

ed during the past GO yeors. It is I
(inexpressibly touching to think ttiat |
through all the ages of the pnst and |
the coming and going of mlllenlums*
of summers are old familiar faces:
of the flowers hove piaddened sue.

opssive generators. The dog rosoJ
Is the mother of all roses, and there I
1$ a saying that wh«ifv*r the wild j
rose grows the cult:vr,ied rose will
prosper. The rose 7s net only a pub.'
[He institution, but tbe
glory uuil delight ot the human
rare.
It is on record that Nero spent
'£30,000 on roses for one feast. The
floor of the banquet hall was strewn
ing it. What a sacrilege to compel
sweeten Lady Macbeth's little hand,
and all the roses of Italy would not
make Nero's banquet fragrant.
Roses have flourished in all
civilised lands, and figure constant
sert that he never wrote, the scene
are plucked is so emphatically sup
with retort and incomparable wit
betray the master hand.
pure shame to counterfeit our
roses.
And so the brawl in the temple
and the white a thousand souls to
Who knows but in the garden of
Eden the roses saw the creation of
Eve and felt her sweet breath upon
not that in these idyllic days the
in converse with His creatures.
Perhaps the fragrance which clings
to the beloved flower is a reminiscence
f the golden age, and some
thing that has survived the ruin of
There is scarcely a poet in ancient
or modern days but must needs
there are more allusions to it than
to any other plant, for how can a
the rose? Sappho, who flourished
herself, but claims to be the mouth
Achilles and the helm of Hector.
But in truth some of the loveli
est compliments to the roses are
modern. Wilberforce declared roses
to be God's smiles, George MacDon
ald speaks of God's rose thoughts,
The rose is sweetest washed with
And love is loveliest when embalm
ed in tears.
It is Christian RoBsettl who dwells
It is she, too, who sees that though
in the dewy morn the rose is fair,
its loveliness is born upon a thorn.
How melancholy and truly Irish
is Moore's lament over the last rose
of summer! But the sum of the
whole matter is furnished by Shake
speare, who utters the English
thought in the English way: "Of
all flowers methinks the rose is
erence to flowers is furnished In
the mummy wrappings of Seti I.
and Rameses II. were found 50
period of the Pharaohs of the time
of Moses. Being hermetically sealed,
these specimens were perfectly
preserved, and after being placed in
warm water were found to be quite
satisfactory for the purposes of
science. The colours of the flowers
woven into the garlands could
pecularities of living plants were alJl
tomb and so some botanists main
about 40 distinct species. The rest
Britain claims 16, and quite half of
all species come from Asia. Thous-
ands of varieties have been produced

during the past 50 years. It is
inexpressibly touching to think that
through all the ages of the past and
the coming and going of milleniums
of summers are old familiar faces
of the flowers have gladdened suc

cessive generations. The dog rose
Is the mother of all roses, and there
is a saying that wherever the wild
rose grows the cultivated rose will
prosper. The rose is not only a public
institution, but the undying
glory and delight of the human
race.
ROSES. (Article), Fitzroy City Press (Vic. : 1881 - 1920), Friday 15 May 1903 [Issue No.1133] page 3 2020-06-05 12:06 unpromising weather,. the small at
tendance at the Horticultural meet
ing, held in the Fitzroy School of
probably due. The glorious un-.
roses might be a very poetical rea
son for failure to appear elsewhere,
tuality at church ceremonies.- The
therefore thrown on their own re
sources, as the Government of the
State was to be a few hours later.'
ployees in .lieu., of the striking' of
frst pause of dismay at'Canon God
by's : defection .., a fairly .interesting
evening was . arranged;::. : Me:sts:
Blamey and' Hfodgson:'camed'to the
them gave a 'very good talk on'
beautiful roses' with' him to point
their moral and adorn his tale,- and
another member had'brought a bou
quet' of other bloomns, but it is .to be
noted that members are chary of cono
tnbuting flowers which are" stich a
to say of them for'otherithan show
purposes, the prizes for: which are of
more flowers, were brought to these
the- hands, of secretary: and of mem
bers striving, to establish the Society
on a good- and progressive working
base.'would '? .materially strength
ened; and the sficcess of the Society
greatly enhanced. -People need' to
he way of beauty at very 'small cost
t o have it brought home to them and
carry-conviction to their souls in any
I practical way. A' little more disin
unpromising weather, the small
attendance at the Horticultural meeting,
held in the Fitzroy School of
probably due. The glorious un-
roses might be a very poetical reason
for failure to appear elsewhere,
tuality at church ceremonies. The
therefore thrown on their own
resources, as the Government of the
State was to be a few hours later.
ployees in lieu of the striking of
frst pause of dismay at Canon God
by's defection, a fairly interesting
evening was arranged. Messrs.
Blamey and Hodgson came to the
them gave a very good talk on
beautiful roses with him to point
their moral and adorn his tale, and
another member had brought a bou
quet of other blooms, but it is to be
noted that members are chary of con
tributing flowers which are such a
to say of them for other than show
purposes, the prizes for which are of
more flowers were brought to these
the hands of secretary and of mem
bers striving to establish the Society
on a good and progressive working
base would be materially strength
ened; and the success of the Society
greatly enhanced. People need to
the way of beauty at very small cost
to have it brought home to them and
carry conviction to their souls in any
practical way. A little more disin
ROSES. (Article), The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), Saturday 22 April 1905 [Issue No.8076] page 18 2020-06-05 10:49 who have time nnd inclination for gardening
know what wc mean. Thoso who do not under
stand us had better not nsk for any explanations
until they have jollied the ranks of tho men
nnd women who arc nil eyes and cars for tho
In response to our request, we have hnd tSf>
lists filled In nnd returned. The lists have
come from nil corners of tho Siatc, from Anglo-
dc-ol in the fur west, where one would think It
was next to impossible to grow anything In
flowers; from Albury, ill the south; from tho
range, nnd from all quartern on the seaboard;
Showing very plainly Hint the serious duties of
spending n few of their hours in tlic pursuit of
There Is a deal of difference of opinion among
flic rosc-growlng people, as will he seen when
we state that some 330 varieties lmvo been
mentioned by those who have helped us in tho
formation of our list of 2-1. To I he uninitiated
quite an easy matter. So it would bo If all
roses were grown In the Bamc soil, nnd under
the same conditions, and by gardeners who wero'
nil of tho one opinion.
Men differ so much in matters of roso-tasto
that It is difficult to find any trvo.of our con
tributors who think alike. It Is well that It
should be so, for diversity of opinion is tho
splco of llfo.
the number of votes sent In. Out of so wide an
Interest, 1S5 returns seem not to count for
face, wo are of this opinion: — If the returns
had been 10 times ns great, the result would
not be altered In the least. Kaiserln Augusta
Victoria took tlio lead after 10 votes had been
counted. If wo hnd a thousand to register,
tho same rose would still remain In the premier
plnce. By Increasing the returns \Ve would
only emphasise tho popularity of tho chosen
Here they arc: —
Kaiserln Augusta Victoria (I-I.T.); 100
Mninan Cochet (T.) 154
La Frnnce (H.T.) 124
Marie Van Houttc (T.) 119
"White Maman Cochet (T.) 110
Mnrcclial Nell (H.T.) S3
Frail Karl Drusehkl (IhP.) 91
Souv. do Thcrose Level (T.) 88
Prince Camilla dc Rohnn (H.P.) S2
Madame Jules Grolcz (H.T.) S2
Perlc des Jardlns (T.) SI
NIpbetos (T.) 13
Madame do Waltcville (T.) 69
Comlcssc de la Bartho (T.) 01
Belle Sicbrccht (H.T.) '. 57
Devoniensis (T.) 50
Madnmo Abel Chatenny (H.T.) 54
Gruss nu ToplUz (H.T.) 54
Relno Mnrle Honricttc (H.T.) 62
Earl of Duffprln (H.P.) 43
petual we cannot say. If taken Iti the sense of
a perpetual or frco-floworing the term is mis
leading. Tho H.P.'s usually only flower In tho
spring nnd autumn. Many of them never show
H.T. signifies n class of roses which are the
or tea-scentod sorts. These are all very free
T. stands for tca-sconteds. These are mostly
constant bloomers. The T.'s nnd II.T.'s are
quite the best for colonial rose tgardens.
Now let us sny a word or two about tho his
tory, color, aud habit of growth of our cham
of such a long list dosorve the place, for they
Messrs. R. Lambert nnd Roller, and mnde its
appearance in 1S91. Many of our growers clas3
it as a while; wc put It down as a cream, fre
quently shaded lemon. It Is one of tho finest
roses that was ever raised, free In (lowers that
queen. We hnve done well to pluce her quito ut
Maman Cochet wns put out by Cochet in 1S93.
the base of tho petals. This rose has won the
boarts of many growers nnd stunds high as a
La Franco is nn old favorite. It was raised
by J. B. Guillot (Ills) as far back as 1SG7. It is a
ing of n deep rose. As a scented rose La
why grumble? She hns admirers nil round tho
Cochet, listed first by Cook In 189S. It is a
glorious long-budded white, and no anxious to
make a roso tree as any rose every known. You
cannot pass It.
Mario Van I-Ioutto enme from Ducher's hands
In 1871, and is of a lemon-yellow, frequently
shaded t'ose, especially on the outer petals. It
Is a lovely old favorite, nnd a very strong
rine Mermet, dating back to 1S85, and raised by
Cook. Quito distinct from tho W. Maman
Cocliof, but not nearly so vigorous. Still a grand
flowers hold their fnces down. But, for nil that,
rose, nnd so willing!
Frau Karl Druschki is tho surprise of our list.
Why surprise? It Is the newest thing of tho
lot, and yet high ih favor. It wns only last year
that lift Druschki began to sell. By the lime
It is ten years old, wo think it will head tho list.
Souv. de Thcrcse Lcvet Is the darkest of the
tpa-scenteds, nnd is, necording to our opinion,
ono of tho most useful roses grown. Not much
scent, hut such ft. lot of flower! Levct put it
out in 1S82.
Prince Gamille dc Rohan, one of tho few hy
brid perpetunls that have found their way into
near to black. Camilla wns first put out by E.
Vordlor during 1801.
Madnmo Jules Grolez Is tho sweetest of rosy
v.ns the raiser of it, and 1897 saw it listed for
tho first time.
I'erlo des Jardlns, a canary-yellow, full nnd
shapely, one flint should never be forgotten
when yellow rosos are being ordered.
reputation and a great history. Tills rose has
. held tho public eye for 51 years. It was raised
1 by Bougero ill 1844, and has been selling freely
i ever since. Get the climber, and keep it as n
I standard.
j Jladamo dc Watlcville, from Guillot in 1883:
a lovely soft desk-pink, with each petal bordered
Comtesse de hi Barthe, a pretty loose decora
bo grown whoro cut flowers arc in demand.
Belle Siebreqht, from the roso gardens of
Dickson nml Sons, somo time during 1895. A
blight rosy plnlt, nnd vory finely formed. Some
times a llttlo shy in growth. Got the elimbor,
Gruro au Teplltz Is n lovely, fiery senrlct, nnd
very free. It Is one of our best ilecoratlves,
anil wns raised by Gcschwlnd in 1S97.
Devoniensis— everyono knows this old rose.
It is really tho oldo3t of tkom nil, making its
first how to tho public in 1838.
Madnmo Abol Chatciiay is a satin pink, with
a deep roso ccntro— a bonuty.
Bcaslo Brown is good ns a show roso, and ex
cellent for gnrden purposos, having only ono
fault, a vory lliln petal. A croumy white, run-
uing into a soft pink in tho centre.
Heine Marie Henrietta, a cherry carmine,
raised during i Is7s; Madame Lombard; salmon
pliik-slinded rose, grown by Lacbnrmo, dating
IS77; Enrl of Dufiurlii, vclvoty-orlmson, shaded
limroon, from Dickson nnd Sons during 1887:
nnd Sunset, deep apricot, and of great form and
1899. are all old triors, and all good doers.
Next week wo hope to deul with tile 21 next in
order, nmong which there are many excellent
varieties. -
who have time and inclination for gardening
know what we mean. Those who do not under
stand us had better not ask for any explanations
until they have joined the ranks of the men
and women who are all eyes and ears for the
In response to our request, we have had 185
lists filled in and returned. The lists have
come from all corners of the State, from Angle-
dool in the far west, where one would think It
was next to impossible to grow anything in
flowers; from Albury, in the south; from the
range, and from all quarters on the seaboard;
showing very plainly that the serious duties of
spending a few of their hours in the pursuit of
There is a deal of difference of opinion among
the rose-growing people, as will be seen when
we state that some 330 varieties have been
mentioned by those who have helped us in the
formation of our list of 24. To the uninitiated
quite an easy matter. So it would be if all
roses were grown in the same soil, and under
the same conditions, and by gardeners who were
all of the one opinion.
Men differ so much in matters of rose-taste
that it is difficult to find any two of our con
tributors who think alike. It is well that it
should be so, for diversity of opinion is the
spice of life.
the number of votes sent in. Out of so wide an
interest, 185 returns seem not to count for
face, we are of this opinion: — If the returns
had been 10 times as great, the result would
not be altered In the least. Kaiserin Augusta
Victoria took the lead after 10 votes had been
counted. If we had a thousand to register,
the same rose would still remain In the premier
place. By Increasing the returns we would
only emphasise the popularity of the chosen
Here they are: —
Kaiserln Augusta Victoria (IH.T.); 169
Maman Cochet (T.) 154
La France (H.T.) 124
Marie Van Houtte (T.) 119
White Maman Cochet (T.) 110
Marechal Nell (H.T.) 98
Frau Karl Druschki (IhP.) 91
Souv. de Therese Levet (T.) 88
Prince Camille de Rohan (H.P.) 82
Madame Jules Grolez (H.T.) 82
Perle des Jardins (T.) 81
Niphetos (T.) 73
Madame de Watteville (T.) 69
Comtesse de la Barthe (T.) 61
Belle Siebrecht (H.T.) 57
Devoniensis (T.) 56
Madame Abel Chatenay (H.T.) 54
Gruss au Tepliz (H.T.) 54
Reine Marie Henriette (H.T.) 52
Earl of Dufferin (H.P.) 43
petual we cannot say. If taken in the sense of
a perpetual or free-flowering the term is mis
leading. The H.P.'s usually only flower in the
spring and autumn. Many of them never show
H.T. signifies a class of roses which are the
or tea-scented sorts. These are all very free
T. stands for tea-scenteds. These are mostly
constant bloomers. The T.'s and H.T.'s are
quite the best for colonial rose gardens.
Now let us say a word or two about the his
tory, color, and habit of growth of our cham
of such a long list deserve the place, for they
Messrs. R. Lambert and Roller, and made its
appearance in 1891. Many of our growers class
it as a white; we put it down as a cream, fre
quently shaded lemon. It is one of the finest
roses that was ever raised, free in flowers that
queen. We have done well to place her quite at
Maman Cochet was put out by Cochet in 1893.
the base of the petals. This rose has won the
hearts of many growers and stands high as a
La France is an old favorite. It was raised
by J. B. Guillot (fils) as far back as 1867. It is a
ing of a deep rose. As a scented rose La
why grumble? She has admirers all round the
Cochet, listed first by Cook In 1898. It is a
glorious long-budded white, and as anxious to
make a rose tree as any rose every known. You
cannot pass it.
Mario Van Houtte came from Ducher's hands
in 1871, and is of a lemon-yellow, frequently
shaded rose, especially on the outer petals. It
is a lovely old favorite, and a very strong
rine Mermet, dating back to 1885, and raised by
Cook. Quite distinct from the W. Maman
Cochet, but not nearly so vigorous. Still a grand
flowers hold their faces down. But, for all that,
rose, and so willing!
Frau Karl Druschki is the surprise of our list.
Why surprise? It Is the newest thing of the
lot, and yet high in favor. It was only last year
that the Druschki began to sell. By the time
It is ten years old, we think it will head the list.
Souv. de Therese Levet is the darkest of the
tea-scenteds, and is, according to our opinion,
one of the most useful roses grown. Not much
scent, but such a lot of flower! Levet put it
out in 1882.
Prince Camille de Rohan, one of the few hy
brid perpetuals that have found their way into
near to black. Camille was first put out by E.
Verdier during 1861.
Madame Jules Grolez is the sweetest of rosy
was the raiser of it, and 1897 saw it listed for
the first time.
Perle des Jardins, a canary-yellow, full and
shapely, one that should never be forgotten
when yellow roses are being ordered.
reputation and a great history. This rose has
held the public eye for 51 years. It was raised
by Bougero in 1844, and has been selling freely
ever since. Get the climber, and keep it as a
standard.
Madame de Wattteville, from Guillot in 1883:
a lovely soft flesh-pink, with each petal bordered
Comtesse de la Barthe, a pretty loose decora
bo grown where cut flowers are in demand.
Belle Siebrecht, from the rose gardens of
Dickson and Sons, some time during 1895. A
bright rosy pink, and very finely formed. Some
times a little shy in growth. Got the climber,
Gruss au Teplitz is a lovely, fiery scarlet, and
very free. It Is one of our best decoratlves,
and was raised by Geschwlnd in 1897.
Devoniensis— everyone knows this old rose.
It is really the oldest of them all, making its
first bow to the public in 1838.
Madame Abel Chatenay is a satin pink, with
a deep rose centro— a beauty.
Bessie Brown is good as a show rose, and ex
cellent for garden purposes, having only one
fault, a very thin petal. A creamy white, run-
ning into a soft pink in the centre.
Reine Marie Henrietta, a cherry carmine,
raised during 1878; Madame Lombard; salmon
pink-shaded rose, grown by Lacharme, dating
1877; Earl of Dufferin, velvety-crimson, shaded
maroon, from Dickson and Sons during 1887:
and Sunset, deep apricot, and of great form and
1899, are all old triers, and all good doers.
Next week we hope to deal with the 21 next in
order, among which there are many excellent
varieties.
ROSES. (Article), The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), Saturday 22 April 1905 [Issue No.8076] page 18 2020-06-05 10:35 "How do people get up 011 interest in such a
thing ns a rose?" one man asks of another.
"II boats me altogether," says his friend in
"If there was nay money in it, I could under
stand their going, 'head nnd cars' into the
enmo. My attitude is best expressed as fol
lows:— "No money, no rcses. That's mine, too.
Jack; 60 we'll keep off roses.' "
But (hero arc others, nnd thesn are numbered
in thousands, who nro wise enough in their day
and generation to sec something of interest in
the queen of all (lie flowers. Those of you
"How do people get up an interest in such a
thing as a rose?" one man asks of another.
"It beats me altogether," says his friend in
"If there was any money in it, I could under
stand their going, 'head and ears' into the
game. My attitude is best expressed as fol
lows:— "No money, no roses. That's mine, too,
Jack; so we'll keep off roses.' "
But there are others, and these are numbered
in thousands, who are wise enough in their day
and generation to see something of interest in
the queen of all the flowers. Those of you
ROSES. (Article), The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), Saturday 22 April 1905 [Issue No.8076] page 18 2020-06-05 10:34 "THE DAILY TELEGRAPH" TWLNTA -b UL U.
Rose lovera nnd rono growers have been wait
_< full in mwlni'et fill fl
Ui Kuiuujiiiih ww.......
"THE DAILY TELEGRAPH" TWENTY -FOUR.
Rose lovers and rose growers have been wait
of gardening fail to understand.
INTERESTING ROSE QUESTION. WINTER ROSES. (Article), The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954), Saturday 6 June 1914 [Issue No.110] page 10 2020-06-05 10:32 is nearly every bud will send out a flower
as nearly every bud will send out a flower

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.