Information about Trove user: Twoobasenjis

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,791,108
2 noelwoodhouse 3,902,372
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,281,178
5 Rhonda.M 3,105,397
...
179 BobC 273,336
180 JamesGibney 273,248
181 BrunswickNic 271,727
182 twoobasenjis 270,030
183 g.hoult 270,013
184 GlennD61 269,458

270,030 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 1,831
September 2019 269
August 2019 1,880
July 2019 1,708
April 2019 1,941
March 2019 361
February 2019 1,688
January 2019 11,673
December 2018 1,624
November 2018 837
October 2018 417
September 2018 1,350
August 2018 619
June 2018 454
May 2018 3,057
April 2018 5,532
March 2018 1,740
February 2018 59
December 2017 323
November 2017 1,010
August 2017 178
July 2017 195
June 2017 1,310
May 2017 329
March 2017 471
February 2017 145
January 2017 190
December 2016 2,426
September 2016 3,149
August 2016 6,321
July 2016 8,359
June 2016 3,017
May 2016 1,285
April 2016 196
March 2016 469
February 2016 4,944
January 2016 5,847
December 2015 5,663
November 2015 9,389
October 2015 945
September 2015 1,550
August 2015 13,878
July 2015 7,286
June 2015 2,065
May 2015 3,488
April 2015 1,033
March 2015 407
February 2015 2,611
January 2015 10,922
December 2014 4,632
November 2014 1,266
October 2014 3,789
August 2014 391
July 2014 537
June 2014 2,801
May 2014 3,845
April 2014 4,101
March 2014 737
February 2014 1,665
January 2014 1,044
December 2013 9,980
November 2013 6,100
October 2013 1,940
September 2013 4,613
August 2013 1,611
July 2013 4,161
June 2013 9,912
May 2013 12,871
April 2013 3,967
March 2013 196
February 2013 4,866
January 2013 12,523
December 2012 6,242
November 2012 2,591
September 2012 566
August 2012 4,236
July 2012 5,234
June 2012 10,361
May 2012 3,586
April 2012 2,288
March 2012 324
February 2012 375
January 2012 238

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,790,906
2 noelwoodhouse 3,902,372
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,281,157
5 Rhonda.M 3,105,384
...
177 BobC 273,336
178 JamesGibney 273,248
179 BrunswickNic 271,702
180 twoobasenjis 270,022
181 g.hoult 269,488
182 GlennD61 269,458

270,022 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 1,831
September 2019 269
August 2019 1,880
July 2019 1,708
April 2019 1,933
March 2019 361
February 2019 1,688
January 2019 11,673
December 2018 1,624
November 2018 837
October 2018 417
September 2018 1,350
August 2018 619
June 2018 454
May 2018 3,057
April 2018 5,532
March 2018 1,740
February 2018 59
December 2017 323
November 2017 1,010
August 2017 178
July 2017 195
June 2017 1,310
May 2017 329
March 2017 471
February 2017 145
January 2017 190
December 2016 2,426
September 2016 3,149
August 2016 6,321
July 2016 8,359
June 2016 3,017
May 2016 1,285
April 2016 196
March 2016 469
February 2016 4,944
January 2016 5,847
December 2015 5,663
November 2015 9,389
October 2015 945
September 2015 1,550
August 2015 13,878
July 2015 7,286
June 2015 2,065
May 2015 3,488
April 2015 1,033
March 2015 407
February 2015 2,611
January 2015 10,922
December 2014 4,632
November 2014 1,266
October 2014 3,789
August 2014 391
July 2014 537
June 2014 2,801
May 2014 3,845
April 2014 4,101
March 2014 737
February 2014 1,665
January 2014 1,044
December 2013 9,980
November 2013 6,100
October 2013 1,940
September 2013 4,613
August 2013 1,611
July 2013 4,161
June 2013 9,912
May 2013 12,871
April 2013 3,967
March 2013 196
February 2013 4,866
January 2013 12,523
December 2012 6,242
November 2012 2,591
September 2012 566
August 2012 4,236
July 2012 5,234
June 2012 10,361
May 2012 3,586
April 2012 2,288
March 2012 324
February 2012 375
January 2012 238

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 312,763
2 PhilThomas 129,091
3 mickbrook 108,069
4 murds5 61,555
5 GeoffMMutton 51,233
...
2020 Tom-Irl 8
2021 traveltrix 8
2022 Tusler 8
2023 Twoobasenjis 8
2024 vlbugden 8
2025 wazapearce 8

8 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2019 8


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
BRITISH ASTRONOMICAL ASSOCIATION. (Article), The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), Tuesday 22 January 1895 [Issue No.4863] page 4 2019-10-23 12:08 british astronomical asso
Tho first meeting of the New South
j Wales branch of the British Astronomical
| Royal Gcopraphical Society, Bridge-street,
I on Wednesday evening, 30th inst. According
| to a circular issued by the hon. secretary
| pro. tem., Mr. Walter F, Gale, the associa-
i tion numbers upwards of 000 members, and
In astronomy, for mutual help; the organi
of small telescopes, in the work of astro
nomical observation; the publication of re
tronomical information. The lack of or
Australasia has long been deplored, al
number of members of the British Astrono
Wales, therefore mado application for per
at onco granted, and the warrant of the
british astronomical asso-
The first meeting of the New South
Wales branch of the British Astronomical
Royal Gcopraphical Society, Bridge-street,
on Wednesday evening, 30th inst. According
to a circular issued by the hon. secretary
pro. tem., Mr. Walter F, Gale, the associa-
tion numbers upwards of 000 members, and
In astronomy, for mutual help; the organi-
of small telescopes, in the work of astro-
nomical observation; the publication of re-
tronomical information. The lack of or-
Australasia has long been deplored, al-
number of members of the British Astrono-
Wales, therefore madeo application for per
at onceo granted, and the warrant of the
Comet Approaching the Earth. (Article), The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 20 April 1894 [Issue No.956] page 13 2019-10-23 12:05 Mr. Walter F. Gale, writing' in the Sydney I
Australian Star of the 13th li instant, says : As 1
Mr. Walter F. Gale, writing in the Sydney
Australian Star of the 13th li instant, says : As
Comet Approaching the Earth. (Article), The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 20 April 1894 [Issue No.956] page 13 2019-10-23 12:04 Mr. "Walter F. Gale, writing' in the Sydney I
Australian Star of the 13th li instant, 6ays : As 1
R. T. A. Bines, it is apparent the comet is very
evening skyr.
Mr. Walter F. Gale, writing' in the Sydney I
Australian Star of the 13th li instant, says : As 1
R. T. A. Innes, it is apparent the comet is very
evening sky.
Comet Approaching the Earth. (Article), The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 20 April 1894 [Issue No.956] page 13 2019-10-23 12:03 Mr. "Walter F. Gale, •writing' in the Sydney I
Australian Star of the 13tli instant, 6ays : As 1
has become much more brilliant, and is readily |
light. It reached its greatest south declination I
on April 5, and is now. moving northward with J
From some preliminary computations • by Mr.
K. T. A. Bines, it is apparent the comet is very
near porihelion, and that it is rapidly approach
evening skr.
Mr. "Walter F. Gale, writing' in the Sydney I
Australian Star of the 13th li instant, 6ays : As 1
has become much more brilliant, and is readily
light. It reached its greatest south declination
on April 5, and is now. moving northward with
From some preliminary computations by Mr.
R. T. A. Bines, it is apparent the comet is very
near perihelion, and that it is rapidly approach
evening skyr.
WINDSOR. [FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.] ANTI., CORPORATION MEETING. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 5 March 1862 [Issue No.7408] page 2 2019-10-23 11:43 [rnOM OUR COUUESl'OSDBNT.l
ANÏI.;CORPORATION MEETING.
MAROU 3.-A meeting, called by the anti-corpora
ducted in a very orderly manner. On the motioti of
Mr. John. Tebbutt, junior, Dr. Shaw waa called to the
The CUAIRMAN having thanked them for the honour
vtould be conducted in a spirit of kindness, and as
corporation preponderated over tho3e opposed to it
they must submit, and vice vasa. He called upon
read, viz , " That this meeting is of? opinion that the
pri mature and opposed to the wishes ef by far the
matter from the first, considering the Act a3 a mon-
requirements of the country. The framers of it them
.would willingly give it his support; but for himself
pause before endorsing so imprudent an Act. Lot
that tht-y could udopt the measure with advantage.
reap a benefit, if incorporated, as it waB too sparsely
there would be no necessity for taxation. Ile
tated, if the town were incorporated, before any benefit I
taxes here would not perhaps be very great, yet it wa9
ing land in, but living mthoul, the town from having
tenants had the power whilst the landlord was power,
lees. If he could sse how the town would benefit by
in BO doing he had great pleasure ia moving the reso-
' widely scattered to raise a sufficient amount to meet
in the town did not exceed £8000, which.would onlj
maintined that it was a misrepresentation of the
per cent, on the annual value of property for taxation» i
aud he would refer them to the clause relating to
special woiks. Ambitious people would not be satis-
being. If they hid" water-works erected at the Bell
PoBt every person who wanted water therefrom would
have to pay somuchper bucket, but he would tell them
that they would not be compelled to go tliereforit whilst
a maiket, when nothing but a very grand structure
would answ er- at all events, something equal to Par-
having to pay the Is. in the £, the'y would be bur-
dues upon their eggs, bacon, potatoes, &c. Then
stipendiary oflicers required, whilst in paint of fact,
died out, would their successors act likewise,-he
should like to see better roads, but not at the butden
won't have a corporation, bul want it short ! ") ILe
had visited Sjdney lately, where they were incorpo-
so butdensome as it was in England, but it was a
Mr. JOHN TEIWUXT, jun., ro3e to move the next
which this meeting has in view-viz , Dr. Day, J.P.,
bearing the signature of " J. R. Byram," as secretary
was a piece of misrepresentation trom beginning to
end, and be would not join in any movement, let it bo
to point out to him that, by the Act, two. thirds of the
were gulling the. people. He would also show by
taxation of Is. in the £ had, in every instance, been
chairmhn and the aldermen. If a labouring mm re
ctived more wages under a municipality than he now
subject to a penalty of £50. He then s^oke of the
principles of the present Government, who were a Bet
I was taken by Dr. Day, and a vote of thanks having
' been accorded Dr. Shaw, the meeting terminated. A
petition which lay on the table was then ituserouäly
[FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.]
ANTI- CORPORATION MEETING.
MARCH 3.-A meeting, called by the anti-corpora-
ducted in a very orderly manner. On the motion of
Mr. John. Tebbutt, junior, Dr. Shaw was called to the
The CHAIRMAN having thanked them for the honour
would be conducted in a spirit of kindness, and as
corporation preponderated over those opposed to it
they must submit, and vice versa. He called upon
premature and opposed to the wishes of by far the
matter from the first, considering the Act as a mon-
requirements of the country. The framers of it them-
would willingly give it his support; but for himself
pause before endorsing so imprudent an Act. Let
that they could adopt the measure with advantage.
reap a benefit, if incorporated, as it was too sparsely
there would be no necessity for taxation. He
tated, if the town were incorporated, before any benefit
taxes here would not perhaps be very great, yet it was
ing land in, but living without, the town from having
tenants had the power whilst the landlord was power-
less. If he could sse how the town would benefit by
in so doing he had great pleasure ia moving the reso-
widely scattered to raise a sufficient amount to meet
in the town did not exceed £8000, which.would only
maintained that it was a misrepresentation of the
per cent, on the annual value of property for taxation
and he would refer them to the clause relating to
special works. Ambitious people would not be satis-
being. If they had water-works erected at the Bell
Post every person who wanted water therefrom would
have to pay so much per bucket, but he would tell them
that they would not be compelled to go there for it whilst
a market, when nothing but a very grand structure
having to pay the 1s. in the £, they would be bur-
dues upon their eggs, bacon, potatoes, &c., Then
stipendiary officers required, whilst in point of fact,
died out, would their successors act likewise, he
should like to see better roads, but not at the burden
won't have a corporation, bul want it short ! ") He
had visited Sydney lately, where they were incorpo-
so burdensome as it was in England, but it was a
Mr. JOHN TEBBUT, jun., rose to move the next
resolution, which was as follows : -- "That the follow-
which this meeting has in view -- viz , Dr. Day, J.P.,
bearing the signature of "J. R. Byram," as secretary
was a piece of misrepresentation from beginning to
end, and be would not join in any movement, let it be
to point out to him that, by the Act, two thirds of the
were gulling the people. He would also show by
taxation of 1s. in the £ had, in every instance, been
chairman and the aldermen. If a labouring man re
teived more wages under a municipality than he now
subject to a penalty of £50. He then spoke of the
principles of the present Government, who were a set
was taken by Dr. Day, and a vote of thanks having
been accorded Dr. Shaw, the meeting terminated. A
petition which lay on the table was then numerously
WINDSOR. [FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.] (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Monday 3 February 1862 [Issue No.7382] page 3 2019-10-23 11:28 nEronT.
The committee of tho St, Matthew's Parochial Association in
presenting tbeir report for 1881 have to express their regret that
it is an unfavourable one Former report» revealed the circum-
diminishing, and this j car the committco have to report a further
step in the downward progress loo amount remitted to the
parent society during tho past year ia £56 19s 9d., and is made
REPORT.
The committee of the St, Matthew's Parochial Association in
presenting their report for 1881 have to express their regret that
it is an unfavourable one Former reports revealed the circum-
diminishing, and this year the committee have to report a further
step in the downward progress. The amount remitted to the
parent society during the past year ia £56 19s 9d., and is made
THE SYDNEY OBSERVATORY. TO THE EDITOR. (Article), The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), Friday 10 September 1909 [Issue No.9449] page 5 2019-10-23 10:54 Sir,— Tiie prospects of astronomy, in this Statle must
indeed be more satisfactory when weo reflect on the treat
ment Which the Sydney Observatory -li has received at the
Commonwealth. Neither department Merita seems inclined to
takeo the Observatory under its wing, ""therefore, in order
that J the institution shall ri not be altogether- useless d it
li has been arranged that the energies of its staff shall for
some weeks Bonio wccluf to come .be .devoted . to the business of the "tlio buaineM fof tho
showman. H E If somethlng cannnot bo doneo in the way of
real work for theo advancement ot astronomy I it is just
as well that the large iWgc telescope should be o devoted to
the gratiflcaotlon of public curiosity. It appcears that
thh instrument. Jr. to be o .employed for the public in-
and I have no doubt that after the reading of the o sen
sational article on h "Looking for Mars" published in youjir
'Journal for Monday last, the o crowd of sightseers TS will, be lie-
great. I fear, howe\ycver, that In consoquence of bad.
definition, which is how so prevalent, and the expanded
notions created by v a perusal of the article referred ;r to,
the spectatorse will be -disappointed rather than pleased.
Soon after the lic death of my. friend Mr. Lcenehan, 1 I drew
public , attention to the circumstance that. a promising
young man, an Australian by birth, .possessed qsRCssed.„jn,:an
eminent degree the qualifications necsessary ,for py.. the vacant
office of Government Astronomer, but although nUhqugh he,, and,
for the office, no appointment has yet been made.- It
at when tlhie coldness of that institution towards astro-
nomy is considered. Notwithstanding thaut, its functions
are to teach theo higher branches of learning, it practic
ally ignores the science. . This circumstance is pretl ty
well understood from public examinations held in con,
ection with it. While students are examined in geo
logy. botany, chemlstty, and other sciences, astronomy
has nn been ignored. Is a.it then to be wondered at that a
one of the three learned professions, should hold - iWid. the
sciences, is synonymous j'nbnymoua with astrology, the so-called
science of fortune telling. Can Avewe wonder, too, that
Venus is often referred to as theo Star of Bethlehem lilchcm, and
trial lights. It is noti long since I was gravely informed
by a public school teacher that a heliocecntric conjunct-
for another catastrophe.. The fact 14 is neither the planet-
OB as was foretold by the astrologlcal gentleman referred to.
think fit to. ask me o. The. orily answer I received to this
to trouble you. as they have sent in their report on
.this matter." The matericrlals for the report seem to have
Verv interesting to mr' t6 many to see the v ' to 'rig tha report in 'tirfnt:.—
JOHnN TEBBBUTT.
The Observatory, Windsor, September 9.0. ' ; .
Sir,— Tiie prospects of astronomy, in this State must
indeed be more satisfactory when we reflect on the treat-
ment which the Sydney Observatory has received at the
Commonwealth. Neither department seems inclined to
take the Observatory under its wing, therefore, in order
that the institution shall ri not be altogether useless d it
lti has been arranged that the energies of its staff shall for
some weeks to come be devoted to the business of the "tlio buaineM fof tho
showman. If something cannnot beo done in the way of
real work for the advancement ot astronomy I it is just
as well that the large telescope should be o devoted to
the gratificaotlon of public curiosity. It appears that
the instrument is . Jr. to be o .employed for the public in-
and I have no doubt that after the reading of the sen-
sational article on "Looking for Mars" published in your
Journal for Monday last, the crowd of sightseers TS will, be lie-
great. I fear, however, that in conseoquence of bad.
definition, which is now so prevalent, and the expanded
notions created by a perusal of the article referred ;r to,
the spectators will be -disappointed rather than pleased.
Soon after the death of my friend Mr. Lcenehan, I drew
public attention to the circumstance that. a promising
young man, an Australian by birth, possessed in an
eminent degree the qualifications neccessary ,for the vacant
office of Government Astronomer, but although he, and,
for the office, no appointment has yet been made. It
at when the coldness of that institution towards astro-
nomy is considered. Notwithstanding that, its functions
are to teach the higher branches of learning, it practice-
ally ignores the science. . This circumstance is pretty
well understood from public examinations held in con-
ection with it. While students are examined in geo-
logy, botany, chemlstty, and other sciences, astronomy
has been ignored. Is a.it then to be wondered at that a
one of the three learned professions, should hold the
sciences, is synonymous with astrology, the so-called
science of fortune telling. Can we wonder, too, that
Venus is often referred to as the Star of Bethlehem and
trial lights. It is not long since I was gravely informed
by a public school teacher that a heliocentric conjunct-
for another catastrophe.. The fact is neither the planet-
as was foretold by the astrologlcal gentleman referred to.
think fit to. ask me. The only answer I received to this
to trouble you, as they have sent in their report on
.this matter." The materials for the report seem to have
Verv interesting to many to see the report in print: —
JOHN TEBBUTT.
The Observatory, Windsor, September 9.
THE SYDNEY OBSERVATORY. TO THE EDITOR. (Article), The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), Friday 10 September 1909 [Issue No.9449] page 5 2019-10-23 10:46 the sydney observatory.
Sir,— Tiie prospects of astronomy, in this Stale must
indeed be more satisfactory when wo reflect on the treat
ment Which the Sydney Observatory -lias received at the
hands of both the Federal and State authorities- of the
Commonwealth. Neither department Merita inclined to.
tako the Observatory under its wing, ""therefore, in order
that J he institution shall riot be altogether- useless dt
lias been arranged that the energies of its staff -shall for
. Bonio wccluf to come .bo .devoted . to "tlio buaineM fof tho
showmnn. H Eomcthlng c.nnnot bo dono in the way of
real -work for tho advancement ot astronomy It is just
as well that the liWgc telescope should bo devoted to
the gratiflcotlon of public curiosity. It oppcars that
thh instrument. Jr. to bo .employed for . the public .in
spection of the planet Mars, which Is now becoming so
and I have no doubt that after the. reading of tho sen
sational article oh "Looking for Mars" published in yojir
'Journal for Monday last, tho crowd of RightseeTS will, lie-
great. I fear, ho\ycver, that In consoquence of bad.
notions created :bv a perusal of the article referred ;ro,
the spectatore will be -disappointed rather than pleased.
Soon after tlic death of my. friendj Mr. Lcnehan, 1 drew
public , attention to " the circumstance that. a., promising
young man, an Australian by birth, .pqsRCssed.„jn,:an
eminenf degree the qualifications necpssnry ,fpy.. the vacant
office of Government Astronqmcr, but nUhqugh he,, and,
for the office/ no appointment has yet been made.- It
appears from a paragraph in .your pnper of" yesterday
that an attempt has been made by the Rremier to.
induce the University to- take charge of the Observatory
but his failure in this attempt is not to be woudcred
at when tlie coldness of that institution towards astro
nomy is considered. Notwithstanding thut, its functions
are to teach tho higher branches of learning, it praetic
ally ignores the science. . This circumstance is prel ty
well understood from .public examinations held in con,
ricctton with it. While students are examined in geo4
lotfy. botany, chemlstty, and other sciences, astronomy
hnn been ignored. Ia.it then to be wondered at that a
gentleman of . liberal education, a member, indeed, of
one of . the three . learned professions, should - iWid. the
view that astronomy/, the grandest and noblest of the
sciences, is sj'nbnymoua with astrology,, tlie so-called
science of fortune telling. Can Ave wonder, too, tliat
A'enus is often referred to as tho Star of Bctlilchcm, and
that both. ehe and the two other beautiful planets, Mars
r.nd Jupiter, have been ..mistaken for mysterious, terres
trial lights. It is noi long since I was gravely .Informed
by a publlo school teacher that .a heltoccntric conjunc
tion of all the major planets occurred at tho time of
the great NoachJan deluge, and that- as a similar
celestial phenomenon Was about to recur we should look
for another catastrophe.. Tlie fact 14 neither the planet
OB was foretold by the astrologlcal gentleman referred to.
Board an .Invitation to give evidence at an inquiry in
Owing/ howeVcf, tO defective hearing I wished to avoid
n viva voce examination on the subject, and engaged to
answer In Writing any questions which the hoard might
think, fit to. ask mo. The. orily answer I received to this
offer was the curt one that 'Mt will not now be necessary
.this matter.!' The thatcrlals for the report seem to have
been rather hastily got together. It would, indeed, be
Verv intcrcstimr' t6 manv ' to 'rig tha rpnort fn 'tirfnt:.—
Yours, etc.» .
JOnN TBBBUTT.
The Observatory, Windsor, September .0. ' ; .
THE SYDNEY OBSERVATORY
Sir,— Tiie prospects of astronomy, in this Statle must
indeed be more satisfactory when weo reflect on the treat
ment Which the Sydney Observatory -li has received at the
hands of both the Federal and State authorities of the
Commonwealth. Neither department Merita seems inclined to
takeo the Observatory under its wing, ""therefore, in order
that J the institution shall ri not be altogether- useless d it
li has been arranged that the energies of its staff shall for
some weeks Bonio wccluf to come .be .devoted . to the business of the "tlio buaineM fof tho
showman. H E If somethlng cannnot bo doneo in the way of
real work for theo advancement ot astronomy I it is just
as well that the large iWgc telescope should be o devoted to
the gratiflcaotlon of public curiosity. It appcears that
thh instrument. Jr. to be o .employed for the public in-
spection of the planet Mars, which is now becoming so
and I have no doubt that after the reading of the o sen
sational article on h "Looking for Mars" published in youjir
'Journal for Monday last, the o crowd of sightseers TS will, be lie-
great. I fear, howe\ycver, that In consoquence of bad.
notions created by v a perusal of the article referred ;r to,
the spectatorse will be -disappointed rather than pleased.
Soon after the lic death of my. friend Mr. Lcenehan, 1 I drew
public , attention to the circumstance that. a promising
young man, an Australian by birth, .possessed qsRCssed.„jn,:an
eminent degree the qualifications necsessary ,for py.. the vacant
office of Government Astronomer, but although nUhqugh he,, and,
for the office, no appointment has yet been made.- It
appears from a paragraph in .your paper of yesterday
that an attempt has been made by the Premier to.
induce the University to take charge of the Observatory
but his failure in this attempt is not to be wondered
at when tlhie coldness of that institution towards astro-
nomy is considered. Notwithstanding thaut, its functions
are to teach theo higher branches of learning, it practic
ally ignores the science. . This circumstance is pretl ty
well understood from public examinations held in con,
ection with it. While students are examined in geo
logy. botany, chemlstty, and other sciences, astronomy
has nn been ignored. Is a.it then to be wondered at that a
gentleman of liberal education, a member, indeed, of
one of the three learned professions, should hold - iWid. the
view that astronomy, the grandest and noblest of the
sciences, is synonymous j'nbnymoua with astrology, the so-called
science of fortune telling. Can Avewe wonder, too, that
Venus is often referred to as theo Star of Bethlehem lilchcm, and
that both. she and the two other beautiful planets, Mars
and Jupiter, have been mistaken for mysterious, terres-
trial lights. It is noti long since I was gravely informed
by a public school teacher that a heliocecntric conjunct-
tion of all the major planets occurred at the time of
the great Noachian deluge, and that as a similar
celestial phenomenon was about to recur we should look
for another catastrophe.. The fact 14 is neither the planet-
OB as was foretold by the astrologlcal gentleman referred to.
Board an invitation to give evidence at an inquiry in
Owing however to defective hearing I wished to avoid
a viva voce examination on the subject, and engaged to
answer in writing any questions which the board might
think fit to. ask me o. The. orily answer I received to this
offer was the curt one that it will not now be necessary
.this matter." The matericrlals for the report seem to have
been rather hastily got together. It would, indeed be
Verv interesting to mr' t6 many to see the v ' to 'rig tha report in 'tirfnt:.—
Yours, etc.,
JOHnN TEBBBUTT.
The Observatory, Windsor, September 9.0. ' ; .
COMET NOTES. (Article), The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), Tuesday 1 May 1894 [Issue No.4633] page 3 2019-10-23 10:32 (By John Tebbutt kprutt, F.R.A.S.)
hshedby Mr. R. T. A. lnnimes, the positions
adopted being e +those obtained at Windsor on
April 4, 8, and .2. Since the publication of
his results 1 I received from Mr. Ellery, the
of elements computed by Mr. Baraecchi, of the
Dr. Roseby, of Marrickvillec, from theo
aiid'12th. Tlie Windsor position for the 8th
rested ori a single, though carefully
I would recommend it as a funda
mental oneo for the computation of the orbit.
Theo three) determinations of theo orbit thus
referred to are, however, in admirable agree-"
ment, anudi as it will be interesting to have
the results in lia collected form for comparison,
mination of ra my own based on an arc e much
moreo extended than those employed in the
therefore far outside the line of the lio earth's
thie evening of tlie 3rd, its distances from
nenrly equal, the three bodies thus forming a
its orbit to the sun (91 millions of in miles),
about 11 o'clock a.m. 111. on April 14. After
of the two orbits 24 days previously, she lio
will be 40½ i millions of miles distant from the
comeot. Had the comet passed the ascending
the elements arrived at arec sufficiently
there is no danger of theo earth ever being
and for these reasons theo earth was
from pin it; was witnessed by several observers.
But to return to Gale's eorri comet. It is now
course of three or four days will be o seen at
secured li here, and I trust to follow it for
Comet I. (Barnard-Denning 'h), 1891. — Pub-
Kiel, li has just come to hand. Among the o
investigations contained in the o volume is a
comet by Dr. E Lamp. The comer j was ob-
weather. The o next, observation was at the
Windsor June o 4, and at the Cape o on June
9 and 15, recoeived double weight in the dis-
ing theo great difficulty which was experi-
enced in observing the comet. The o obser-
Following is the report of theo Prince Alfred
ber of in-patieonts at last report, 128 males,
but not admitted 256 ; total 733. There areo
Following is the report of theo Sydney
(By John Tebbutt, F.R.A.S.)
hshedby Mr. R. T. A. lnnes, the positions
adopted being those obtained at Windsor on
April 4, 8, and 12. Since the publication of
his results 1 received from Mr. Ellery, the
of elements computed by Mr. Baracchi, of the
Dr. Roseby, of Marrickville, from the
and12th. Tlie Windsor position for the 8th
rested on a single, though carefully
I would recommend it as a funda-
mental one for the computation of the orbit.
The three) determinations of the orbit thus
referred to are, however, in admirable agree-
ment, and as it will be interesting to have
the results in a collected form for comparison,
mination of my own based on an arc much
more extended than those employed in the
therefore far outside the line of the earth's
the evening of tlie 3rd, its distances from
nearly equal, the three bodies thus forming a
its orbit to the sun (91 millions of miles),
about 11 o'clock a.m. on April 14. After
of the two orbits 24 days previously, she
will be 40½ millions of miles distant from the
comet. Had the comet passed the ascending
the elements arrived at are sufficiently
there is no danger of the earth ever being
and for these reasons the earth was
from it; was witnessed by several observers.
But to return to Gale's comet. It is now
course of three or four days will be seen at
secured here, and I trust to follow it for
Comet I. (Barnard-Denning), 1891. — Pub-
Kiel, has just come to hand. Among the
investigations contained in the volume is a
comet by Dr. E Lamp. The comet was ob-
weather. The next, observation was at the
Windsor June 4, and at the Cape on June
9 and 15, received double weight in the dis-
ing the great difficulty which was experi-
enced in observing the comet. The obser-
Following is the report of the Prince Alfred
ber of in-patients at last report, 128 males,
but not admitted 256 ; total 733. There are
Following is the report of the Sydney
COMET NOTES. (Article), The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), Tuesday 1 May 1894 [Issue No.4633] page 3 2019-10-23 10:19 (By John- Tkprutt, F.R.A.S.)
Comet G.vi.e.— The earliest computed
orbit elements tor this comet are those pub'
hshedby Mr. R. T. A. limes, the positions
adopted beine +hose obtained at Windsor on
his results 1 received from Mr. Ellcry, the
of elements computed by Mr. Baraechi, of the
Dr. Roseby, of Marrickvillc, from tho
I Would recommend it as a funda
mental ono for the computation of the orbit.
Tho three) determinations of tho orbit thus
referred to are, however, in admirable agree"
ment, audi as it will be interesting to have
the results ilia collected form for comparison,
I give them here, together with a later deter
mination of ray own based on an are much
moro extended than those employed in the
Computer"! Inaes "Bafacchi Roseby Tebbutt
Peri li e I5on
April, S.S1.T. 13-42 13-7439 13-757 135327
il. 111. s. d. in. s. d. m. s. d. m. s.
nscend. node 324 14 5 324 19 15324 18 8 324 16 19
Long, of as- I 1
lending node 205 22 9 206 14 59 206 14 24 206 19 24
Inclination of j
orbit .. 87 0 7 87 15 13 87 16 15 87 6 36
tance .. 0-98308 0-98492 0-98512 0-98362
Heliocentric r
motion . . Direct Direct Direct Direct
It will be interesting to note a few par
crossed the plane of the earth's orbit south
therefore far outside the line of tlio earth's
"April 1, or shortly before it reached its
tlie evening of tlie 3rd, its distances from
the sun and earth being at this time 921, and
80 millions of miles respectively. .It is, per
its orbit to the sun (91' millions of iniles),
about 11 o'clock a.111. on April 14. After
of the two orbits 24 days previously, slio
will be 40i millions of miles distant from the
comot. Had the comet passed the ascending
the elements arrived at arc sufficiently
there is no danger of tho earth ever being
comet -of 1861 were very different and ex
and for these reasons tho earth was
frpin it; was witnessed by several observers.
But to return to Gale's eorriet. It is now
course of three or four days will bo seen at
secured liere, and I trust to follow it for
Comet I. (Baunaro-Dennin'h), 1891. — Pub
Kiel, lias just come to hand. Among tho
investigations contained in tho volume is a
comet by Dr. E! Lamp. The comej was ob
weather. Tho next, observation was at the
Capo of Good Hope, on Juno 9. The last
southern . hemisphere, namely, six from the
Capo of Good Hope, 13 from Cordoba, and
Windsor Juno 4, and at the Capo on June
9 and 15, reoeived double weight in the dis
ing tho great difficulty which was experi
enced in observing the comet. Tho obser
Following is the report of tho Prince Alfred
Hospital for the week ending April 28 : — Num
ber of in-pationts at last report, 128 males,
but not admitted 256 ; total 733. There aro
25 cases of typhoid fever1 in the hospital.
Following is the report of tho Sydney
(By John Tebbutt kprutt, F.R.A.S.)
Comet Gale.— The earliest computed
orbit elements tor this comet are those pub-
hshedby Mr. R. T. A. lnnimes, the positions
adopted being e +those obtained at Windsor on
his results 1 I received from Mr. Ellery, the
of elements computed by Mr. Baraecchi, of the
Dr. Roseby, of Marrickvillec, from theo
I would recommend it as a funda
mental oneo for the computation of the orbit.
Theo three) determinations of theo orbit thus
referred to are, however, in admirable agree-"
ment, anudi as it will be interesting to have
the results in lia collected form for comparison,
I give them here, together with a later deter-
mination of ra my own based on an arc e much
moreo extended than those employed in the
Compute Innnes Baracchi Roseby Tebbutt
Perihelion
April, S.MT 13.42 13.7439 13.757 13.5327
................... d.m.s. d. m. s. d. m. s. d. m. s.
ascend. node 324 14 5 324 19 15 324 18 8 324 16 19
cending node 206 22 9 206 14 59 206 14 24 206 19 24
Inclination of
orbit ............... 87 0 7 87 15 13 87 16 15 87 6 36
tance ........... 0.98308 0.98492 0.98512 0.98362
Heliocentric
motion ........... . Direct Direct Direct Direct
It will be interesting to note a few par-
crossed the plane of the earth's orbit south-
therefore far outside the line of the lio earth's
April 1, or shortly before it reached its
thie evening of tlie 3rd, its distances from
the sun and earth being at this time 92½, and
80 millions of miles respectively. It is, per-
its orbit to the sun (91 millions of in miles),
about 11 o'clock a.m. 111. on April 14. After
of the two orbits 24 days previously, she lio
will be 40½ i millions of miles distant from the
comeot. Had the comet passed the ascending
the elements arrived at arec sufficiently
there is no danger of theo earth ever being
comet of 1861 were very different and ex-
and for these reasons theo earth was
from pin it; was witnessed by several observers.
But to return to Gale's eorri comet. It is now
course of three or four days will be o seen at
secured li here, and I trust to follow it for
Comet I. (Barnard-Denning 'h), 1891. — Pub-
Kiel, li has just come to hand. Among the o
investigations contained in the o volume is a
comet by Dr. E Lamp. The comer j was ob-
weather. The o next, observation was at the
Capo of Good Hope, on June o 9. The last
southern hemisphere, namely, six from the
Cape o of Good Hope, 13 from Cordoba, and
Windsor June o 4, and at the Cape o on June
9 and 15, recoeived double weight in the dis-
ing theo great difficulty which was experi-
enced in observing the comet. The o obser-
Following is the report of theo Prince Alfred
Hospital for the week ending April 28 : — Num-
ber of in-patieonts at last report, 128 males,
but not admitted 256 ; total 733. There areo
25 cases of typhoid fever in the hospital.
Following is the report of theo Sydney

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. BAA NSW Meetings
    List
    Public

    429 items
    created by: public:twoobasenjis 2014-01-02
    User data
  2. John Tebbutt 1850-1859
    List
    Public

    John Tebbutt's early years, pre Great Comet

    65 items
    created by: public:twoobasenjis 2014-10-27
    User data
  3. KIPLING 1914
    List
    Public

    A record of events in the life of Rudyard Kipling during the year 1914.

    98 items
    created by: public:twoobasenjis 2014-07-22
    User data
  4. Kipling 1915
    List
    Public

    Things said or done by Rudyard Kipling during 1915

    24 items
    created by: public:twoobasenjis 2015-01-01
    User data
  5. Kipling 1916
    List
    Public

    Articles by and references to the writing and other activities of Rudyard Kipling during 1916

    85 items
    created by: public:twoobasenjis 2016-08-19
    User data
  6. Kipling 1917
    List
    Public

    References to the Writer, Rudyard Kipling during 1917, his actions, Writing Quotes and comparisons

    2 items
    created by: public:twoobasenjis 2016-12-12
    User data
  7. Tebbutt 1864
    List
    Public

    Matters referring to John Tebbutt (Junior at this point) 1834-1916, the Astronomer of Windsor, recognising that not all TROVE references to him can be located under "John Tebbutt", due to typographical errors and mis-indexing. To be the basis of a booklet to be presented at a 2014 meeting of the Sydney City Skywatchers at Sydney Observatory.

    46 items
    created by: public:twoobasenjis 2014-01-01
    User data
  8. Tebbutt 1865
    List
    Public

    39 items
    created by: public:twoobasenjis 2014-10-22
    User data
  9. Tebbutt 1914
    List
    Public

    This list is to contain material concerning John Tebbutt F.R.A.S. during 1914, including "John Tebbutt", "J. Tebbutt" (and variations), "Private Observatory" and "Observatory, Peninsula, Windsor" etc., recognising that not all John Tebbutt material is correctly indexed. The product of this list is intended to be a booklet 'John Tebbutt 1864 and 1914' to be presented at a 2014 meeting of the Sydney City Skywatchers, Sydney Observatory.

    34 items
    created by: public:twoobasenjis 2014-01-02
    User data
  10. Tebbutt 1915
    List
    Public

    47 items
    created by: public:twoobasenjis 2014-10-18
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.