Information about Trove user: TarynB

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

No text corrections contributed yet

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Executive order 9066
    List
    Public

    This article provides insight into the minds of high up military personnel and their thoughts on immigrants, especially the Japanese during the war. It shows a continuation of this type of anti-immigrant sentiments still shown in the US today

    1 items
    created by: public:TarynB 2019-08-03
    User data
  2. Medical advancement during WWI
    List
    Public

    17 items
    created by: public:TarynB 2019-08-22
    User data
  3. Russia 1917
    List
    Public

    12 items
    created by: public:TarynB 2017-07-30
    User data
  4. The Thai-Burma Railway
    List
    Public

    How does the memoirs of 2 Australian medically trained prisoners of war at the Thai-Burma railway represent Japanese cruelty focusing on the lack of basic medical equipment and the selection process for hard labour?
    Trove – mainly newspaper articles, memoirs and journals

    This research question highlights how Japanese cruelty was represented through the memoirs of two Australia medical personnel imprisoned at the Thai-Burma Railway. The Japanese used cruelty as a tool while disregarding any empathy for their prisoners. The perspective of medical personnel directly emphasises the effect of Japanese cruelty on the lives of many prisoners at the Thai-Burma Railway (as it is their job to save them). Therefore, a focus on basic medical requirements not being satisfied and the selection process for hard labour were chosen. In order to successfully answer this research question, various smaller questions need to be answered. Japanese cruelty in general at the Thai-Burma Railway is broadly covered in source 11 and source 7. Source 11 is a book written by military author Peter Brune about the Australian campaign in Southeast Asia during WWII. Source 7 is an oral history of Henry Nesbitts experience as a prisoner at the Thai-Burma railway. In particular, Brune references various Australian prisoner’s experiences at the Thai-Burma Railway with regards to their mental and physical suffering. Source 2,5 and 6 are all newspaper articles published in 1945 about the experiences of prisoners of war at the Thai-Burma railway both medically and non-medically trained. They were very useful in answering this research question as it is a broad overview of how cruelty was imbedded in the daily lives of the prisoners. It highlights these experiences from the perspective of non-medically trained prisoners and allows the researcher to see how cruelty is represented differently. The newspaper articles also allow the researcher to gain a perspective of how Japanese cruelty is being reported on back in Australia at the time. Source 1 is a memoir of Colonel Sir Ernest Edward "Weary" Dunlop (from his time at the railway) and Source 3 is a memoir from Dr Robert Hardie including extracts from a diary he kept from his time spent as a prisoner of war at the Thai-Burma Railway. Both memoirs are clearly from the perspective of medically trained individuals as they both largely detail the extremely poor health status of many prisoners and the lack of basic medical equipment (including medicine) provided by the Japanese. Furthermore, Dunlop goes into specific details with how many of his patients come to receive their wounds; Japanese cruelty in all forms of the word (deprivation of food, beatings, hard labour all day every day etc.). In addition to this, Hardie mentions an individual named the ‘Lizard’ various times throughout the memoir as he recalls his medical advice being ignored. That is, extremely unwell prisoners were selected for various hard labour groups and would never to be seen again. The other alternative, is he himself would be beaten for even giving advice. This process itself was horrific and took a toll mentally. These memoirs are extremely important when answering this research question as they give a perspective from medically trained personnel versus those without. This medical lens is contrasted as stated above and explains the cruelty of the Japanese through a very detailed recount in regards to the illness/diseases themselves while evoking emotions through the work they performed.

    11 items
    created by: public:TarynB 2017-09-07
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.