Information about Trove user: TaraCalaby

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,784,935
2 noelwoodhouse 3,898,417
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,274,143
5 Rhonda.M 3,098,433
...
1164 Helenelizabethtextilesfashion 33,902
1165 chain 33,895
1166 mtro 33,876
1167 TaraCalaby 33,866
1168 RTravers 33,824
1169 kimbattye 33,803

33,866 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 2,988
September 2019 4,035
August 2019 1,156
July 2019 527
June 2019 357
May 2019 612
April 2019 4,322
March 2019 926
October 2018 509
September 2018 33
July 2018 475
June 2018 2,945
May 2018 1,160
April 2018 4,120
March 2018 9,701

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,784,733
2 noelwoodhouse 3,898,417
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,274,122
5 Rhonda.M 3,098,420
...
1159 Helenelizabethtextilesfashion 33,890
1160 chain 33,889
1161 mtro 33,876
1162 TaraCalaby 33,866
1163 kimbattye 33,803
1164 RTravers 33,754

33,866 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 2,988
September 2019 4,035
August 2019 1,156
July 2019 527
June 2019 357
May 2019 612
April 2019 4,322
March 2019 926
October 2018 509
September 2018 33
July 2018 475
June 2018 2,945
May 2018 1,160
April 2018 4,120
March 2018 9,701

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
THE NOVELIST. MARY ANERLEY. CHAPTER XV. CAUGHT AT LAST. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 25 October 1879 [Issue No.708] page 5 2019-10-09 11:51 MARY A2TEEM3Y.*
BT R. D. BMCKMORE, ;
AUTHOR OP " LORNA LIOONB,1, " T^E MAID OF
SKEB," " AJ-IOK LOKKAUTE/'.&C,
Chapter a.v.
CAUGHT jyr -IiAStJ
While these little things were doing cans,
,i , coa8t from the mouth of the Tees to thht
Ivf Humber, and even the inland parts, were
in a (treat atir oftalkand work, about events
Impending. It dust not be thought that
Tiamborough, although it.was Robin's dwell
Sne-place-eo far as he had any-was the
rrincipal scene of hisoperations.orthestrong
fcold of his enterprise. On the contrary, his
Eking was for quiet coves near Scarborough,
»r even to the north of Whitby, when the
any moment now*
delicacy on his part. He knew that Flam
where every one of hia buttons had been safe
and would have been so forever; and strictly
as he believed in the virtue of his bwn free
Jeam that certain people thought otherwise,
ieep the natives free.
Fiatnburiana scarcely understood this large
?donkeys on the coast for landing it But
a movement towards .it. ..They were.satisfied
with their own <ridway-~to cast the net their j
father cast, and bait the hook as it .was
Raited on their good grandfather's thumb.
Yet even Flamborough kaewi4hat now a
mighty enterprise waa in band. It waa Bald,
without any contradiction) 4fofttyi0ung Gap
tain Robin hadiaid a wager of/one hundred
fuineas with the wprabjpfal jijajror of Scot*
orough and the commandant of the castle, .?
that before the new^noon, he would land on,
Yorkshire eoaeti. Witho^it firinerpiatol or
drawing steel, free, goods to the value pf -two
ihousand, pounds,, aitfl them inland
Bafely. And Flamfowugh believe^ that be
woulddoit. ' v
Dr., Upround'svJi<wae atoodwejl, as rectories
generally contrive,$o do..,. No j>Uce,i» Flaw-;
fcorough parish OToM i*ppe to WWdteuthe :
wind of its vested flghfc, or tto.smbeazle much*
treasure of thews,, but the parsonage taade
effort bptlj^,and Bpi^iideB 'for
iiig. lAnd the dweller* therein.wha felt the
edge of the difference Autside their own walls*
not only aqid, .but; thoroughly Relieved,, that
they lived in ^ litfle Qoahen. , , .
Fo* th<j housejWtw well settled in. a wrinkle
of the hill expanding southward, and - eni
couragingthea^oop. From the'windows a
pleasant .glimpgf ,m}ght be obt^ined.pf. the
Broad ana* ftanfluij, (WchPFflge, 'peapLjd mth.
white.^/Maqk, acpwdi^g &s thejsate jrenfcw
MARY ANERLEY.*
BY R. D. BLACKMORE,
AUTHOR OF "LORNA DOONE," "THE MAID OF
SKER," "ALICE LORRAINE," &C.
CHAPTER XV.
CAUGHT AT LAST.
While these little things were doing thus,
the coast from the mouth of the Tees to that
of Humber, and even the inland parts, were
in a great stir of talk and work, about events
impending. It must not be thought that
Flamborough, although it was Robin's dwell-
ing-place—so far as he had any—was the
principal scene of his operations, or the strong-
hold of his enterprise. On the contrary, his
liking was for quiet coves near Scarborough,
or even to the north of Whitby, when the
any moment now.
delicacy on his part. He knew that Flam-
where every one of his buttons had been safe
and would have been so for ever; and strictly
as he believed in the virtue of his own free
learn that certain people thought otherwise,
keep the natives free.
Flamburians scarcely understood this large-
donkeys on the coast for landing it. But
a movement towards it. They were satisfied
with their own old way—to cast the net their
father cast, and bait the hook as it was
baited on their good grandfather's thumb.
Yet even Flamborough knew that now a
mighty enterprise was in hand. It was said,
without any contradiction, that young Cap-
tain Robin had laid a wager of one hundred
guineas with the worshipful mayor of Scar-
borough and the commandant of the castle,
that before the new moon he would land on
Yorkshire coast, without firing pistol or
drawing steel, free goods to the value of two
thousand pounds, and carry them inland
safely. And Flamborough believed that he
would do it.
Dr. Upround's house stood well, as rectories
generally contrive to do. No place in Flam-
borough parish could hope to swindle the
wind of its vested right, or to embezzle much
treasure of the sun, but the parsonage made
a good effort to do both, and sometimes for
three days together got the credit of succeed-
ing. And the dwellers therein, who felt the
edge of the difference outside their own walls,
not only said but thoroughly believed, that
they lived in a little Goshen.
For the house was well settled in a wrinkle
of the hill expanding southward, and en-
couraging the noon. From the windows a
pleasant glimpse might be obtained of the
broad and tranquil anchorage, peopled with
white or black, according as the sails went up
THE NOVELIST. MARY ANERLEY. CHAPTER XIV. SERIOUS CHARGES. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 18 October 1879 [Issue No.707] page 5 2019-10-09 11:42 | THE NOVELIST.
MABY ANERLEY.*
Br R. D. BMCKMORE,
" Stephen, if it was anybody else-you
would Hsten to me in a moment," said Mre.
Instance, if it was poor Willie, how long
5s Mary, you say 'pooh, pooh!' And I may
a« well talk to the old cracked churn.
that ever I was reBembled to a churn. But
a man's wife ought to know the best about
Stephen, it is not the churn-I mean you ;
Mischief on her mind ; and you never ought
to briug up old churns to me. Ab long as I
Anerley, without it was ray own daughter?
sood care to hold aloof from fighting. And
fie knew in his heart that he loved to be
3D'^My dear," be said, in a tone of submission,
fcetter than ten of eleven who do it. For,
?know; because from my youngest days I had
polished comer-but there, what's the odds,
when a man has dcwae his duty ? The names
of him makes no difference." ?
fetter about you.} and when I used to dwell
upon your hair and your.smile. You know
word of it, and it mademe stick firm, when
jny mind was doubtful."
"And glad you ought to be tfyat you did
Btick firm: Aid you nave the Lord to thank
for it, a9 >ye!l' as your own sense. But no
time to talk pf oujr old times now. , They are
coming up again,'ftlth those younkers, I'm
afraid. Willie.is likeia church ; and Jack
no chance of him^gettoa the chance of it
jbut Mary, your darling of the lot, our Mary
-her mind is unsettled, and a worry coming
over her; the same a? with me, when I saw
" It is the Lord that; directs those things,
the farmer answered Btedfastly ; -'.and Mary
hath the sense of fyer mother, 1 believe. That
it is maketh me so. fond on her. , .If the young
many fancies had you, Sophy,. before you
you asked such questions, which are no con
before ever 1 saw you, not to have any eyes
Master Anerley thought about thiB, because
new," having never known any good come of
itand his tmraghts Would rather flow than
fly, even in the. fugitive brevity of youth.
And now, in. Jiis Bettled way, his practice waa
boots, or as a child Writes ink on pencil in
his earliest copy-hooka. " You iuited ac
" How can yon talk so, Stephen? That
they think of, ajul light-headed chatter, and
Baucy ribbons."
" May be so with some pf them. But 1
bever see none of that in Mary."
Op," her mother ooula not help admitting;
sharply. And .who can look after a child like
Stephen, your daughter Mary has. mora will
of her own than the rest of your fapiilyall
put together-including even your own good
Wife."
" Prodigious 1"-cried the farmer, while he
tubbed his hands and laughed; " prodigious,
and a man might s$y impossible, A young
as tender as a lambkin, and as soft as wool!'
" Flannel won!t only run one way; no more
Won't Mary," said bet mother ; " I know her
better a lo^sightthan you do; and I say if
ever Mary sets, ner. heart, on any one, have
him she will, b'eJiecow-boy, thief, or chim
fcey-swecp. So now' you know what to. ex
pect, Master Anerley.
Stephen! Anerley Jiever made light of his
wife's opinions/in jt&ose few cases .wherein
they differed j from .his own. She agreed
with him 'ab generally, that' in common
lairneas he' tjRjugh'tj very highly of her }vis
£om, audihevpreae^t subject was 'one ifpon
fruicli a^ napraj Mpfeci^l jright .to,be heard.
" Sophy/zie eaid, ^ he set up liis coat to
fee olf to a clovffi.«uttii)g on the hill-for np
Jpaping-wpulf ^eginypt for>another: month
. the tmnge. j^hftve said shall'abide id my
mind. Only yMMMj arwqtcbiog of the little
Wench. H^f JCflnfiel4isthft man I wpuld
choose for her of jill others. Biit I nevqr
Would force any husband on a lass ;
though stern would I be.to.force a haq one
®n, or one in an unBt walk of life., No inkle
in,your mind who it is. or woUld'st have told
B»e?" w. '
" Well, I may, or I may not. I never, like
rBStWaMPWB9'..^XQU have the;first
JiAt t& thmk^j Bqt ^.beg, you
»t me oe awhue. Not'even to yod, Sieve,
Would ! Bay it, without more to go upon than
there is y|t^fe|^n^^t do the lass a great
The right 'of republishing " Mary Anarlejy" hu
ween puiubued byiho proprietors of" The austral
WBlfUi,' j f
viBit my mistake on me, for Bhe is the apple
York county, nor in England, to my think
But if I am right-which the Lord forbid
" The Lord forbid ! The Lord forbid !
Bate down, and crossed her arms, and began
dream of Buch a possibility, she was jealous
farmer rushed, back again, triumphant with a
into thinking of any Bort of mischief. Take
it to me purely. She shall not have a six
now; ana even our Mary might be turning
sad without it"
more; for he knew that Bome hours of strong
sudden maritime slope of Jack;'yet he held
at the front porcu-door, soon after her father
set off to his meadows by way of the back
ilowers, she was come to get a cupful of milk
for herself, and the cheery content and gene
gentle craft were smfling on her rosy lips
-what did these want with smart dresses,
with me! You aeem wonderfully busy, as
weather, and they must have things accord
Very well, let them think about what
and sat down, without the least sign of impa
juBt the same.
a very proper thing to do, and what 1 have
dream of discouraging. And with such ex
petting old enough to want it, that the world
brothers, and Bisters, and good uncles. There
like wolves in-wolves in-what is it-"
Sheep's clothing"-the maiden suggested
your own mother? Do I ever catch yon
" 1 tell you indeed! It is your place to
tell me, I think. And what is more, 1 insist
at once upon knowing all about it What
foolish child ? On Tuesday afternoon 1 saw
and which way dia I see you trying to hang
then your eyes-I have Been your eyes flash
and there was a waspnextpew. All these
of them ; although,she was vexed with her
self, when she aaw one eye-for in verity
that was all-of a potato upon her lather's
the buttons of her frocp-wttich was only
long she must have worn ilp-hut as to the
douDie-thread, she was Bure that nothing of
softfy, coming up in her coaxing way, which
of any of the Bad mistakes you speak of;
except about Ane potato-eye, and then I had
a rpuhd;pointed knife. But £ want to make
no excuse, 'mother ; and (hepe is nothing th?
matter with me. Tell me what you mean,
she was kissing while they both went on
with talking; it is no good trying to get
yonr mind, or you have not-which is it?"
" Mother, what can 1 have on my mind?
do it. Eviery one is kind to me, and every
you, a great deal more than I deserve per
of the other girls I see"
" You would never get as Tar as the rick
yard hedge. You children talk such non
" If I were Baying fifty catechisms, what
more could I do than apeak the truth ?"
have tola you everything I know, except one
" Mother, 1 mean that I have not been
stop it, which you call ' mischief ? 1 insist
thought twice about fiobin Lyth, with any
very way to drive her into dwelling in a mis
your planB to do. I have Been too much to
be astonished auy more. But to think that
mouth, Bhould be hand in glove with the
wickedestsmugglerof the age, the rogue every
he was born to be hanged-the by-name, the
more of myself than that If I have done any
wrong, I will meet it, and be sorry, and sub
mit to any punishment I ought to have told
say of it. But I never attached much impor
brother with me; out be ran away, as usual."
the whole sky to tumble in upon us, if Cap
" I never thought of Qaptain Lyth; and
can tell you one thing, mother-if you wanted
to make me think of nim, you could not do it
your flowers. 1 have heard that they grow
' very fine ones in Holland. Perhaps you have
| got some smuggled tulips, my dear."
said to herself as she went to work again,
it However, I am not going to be put out,
when I feel tuat I have not done a single bit
too much beer, and ran at him with a pitch*
that he ought to h^ve done so, to obtain relief.
She perceived that her ovpa discourse about
was said about it And she felt u sure as if
Willie-for not doing things that were be
neath him-her master would take Mary's
was so much older, for not going on to pro
tect and gnide her. So she kept till after
he had sippea (for once in a war) a little
women were theif masters.
knows her business-business-" and he
In the morning, however, be took a stronger
and more serious view of the case, pro
and no one could ever tell about younglasses.
And be quite fell into his wife's suggestion,
that the maid could be spared till harvest
there was little chance now tor another six
never hear of that
THE NOVELIST.
MARY ANERLEY.*
BY R. D. BLACKMORE,
"Stephen, if it was anybody else—you
would listen to me in a moment," said Mrs.
instance, if it was poor Willie, how long
is Mary, you say 'pooh, pooh!' And I may
as well talk to the old cracked churn."
"First time of all my born days," the
"that ever I was resembled to a churn. But
fun."
"Stephen, it is not the churn—I mean you;
mischief on her mind; and you never ought
to bring up old churns to me. As long as I
Anerley, without it was my own daughter?"
good care to hold aloof from fighting. And
he knew in his heart that he loved to be
meant it.
"My dear," he said, in a tone of submission,
better than ten of eleven who do it. For,
know; because from my youngest days I had
polished comer—but there, what's the odds,
when a man has done his duty? The names
of him makes no difference."
better about you; and when I used to dwell
upon your hair and your smile. You know
"Most complimentary, highly complimen-
word of it, and it made me stick firm, when
my mind was doubtful."
"And glad you ought to be that you did
stick firm. And you nave the Lord to thank
for it, as well as your own sense. But no
time to talk of our old times now. They are
coming up again, with those younkers, I'm
afraid. Willie is like a church; and Jack—
no chance of him getting the chance of it—
but Mary, your darling of the lot, our Mary
—her mind is unsettled, and a worry coming
over her; the same as with me, when I saw
"It is the Lord that directs those things,"
the farmer answered stedfastly; "and Mary
hath the sense of her mother, I believe. That
it is maketh me so fond on her. If the young
many fancies had you, Sophy, before you
you asked such questions, which are no con-
before ever I saw you, not to have any eyes
Master Anerley thought about this, because
new, having never known any good come of
it; and his thoughts would rather flow than
fly, even in the fugitive brevity of youth.
And now, in his settled way, his practice was
boots, or as a child writes ink on pencil in
his earliest copy-books. "You acted ac-
cording," he said; "and Mary might act ac-
"How can you talk so, Stephen? That
they think of, and light-headed chatter, and
saucy ribbons."
"May be so with some of them. But I
never see none of that in Mary."
up," her mother could not help admitting;
sharply. And who can look after a child like
Stephen, your daughter Mary has more will
of her own than the rest of your family all
put together—including even your own good
wife."
"Prodigious!" cried the farmer, while he
rubbed his hands and laughed; "prodigious,
and a man might say impossible. A young
as tender as a lambkin, and as soft as wool!"
"Flannel won't only run one way; no more
won't Mary," said her mother; "I know her
better a long sight than you do; and I say if
ever Mary sets her heart on any one, have
him she will, be he cow-boy, thief, or chim-
ney-sweep. So now you now what to ex-
pect, Master Anerley."
Stephen Anerley never made light of his
wife's opinions in those few cases wherein
they differed from his own. She agreed
with him so generally, that in common
fairness he thought very highly of her wis-
dom, and the present subject was one upon
which she had an especial right to be heard.
"Sophy," he said, as he set up his coat to
be off to a clover cutting on the hill—for no
reaping would begin yet for another month—
"the things you have said shall abide in my
mind. Only you be a-watching of the little
wench. Harry Tanfield is the man I would
choose for her of all others. But I never
would force any husband on a lass;
though stern would I be to force a bad one
off, or one in an unfit walk of life. No inkle
in your mind who it is, or would'st have told
me?"
to speak promiscuous. You have the first
right to know what I think. But I beg you
to let me be awhile. Not even to you, Steve
would I say it, without more to go upon than
there is yet. I might do the lass a great
* The right of republishing "Mary Anerley" has
been purchased by the proprietors of "The Austral-
asian."
visit my mistake on me, for she is the apple
York county, nor in England, to my think-
But if I am right—which the Lord forbid—
"The Lord forbid! The Lord forbid!
sate down, and crossed her arms, and began
dream of such a possibility, she was jealous
farmer rushed back again, triumphant with a
into thinking of any sort of mischief. Take
it to me purely. She shall not have a six-
now; and even our Mary might be turning
sad without it."
more; for he knew that some hours of strong
sudden maritime slope of Jack; yet he held
at the front porch-door, soon after her father
set off to his meadows by way of the back-
flowers, she was come to get a cupful of milk
for herself, and the cheery content and gene-
gentle craft were smiling on her rosy lips
—what did these want with smart dresses,
with me? You seem wonderfully busy, as
weather, and they must have things accord-
"Very well, let them think about what
The girl was vexed; for to listen to a lec-
and sat down, without the least sign of impa-
just the same.
a very proper thing to do, and what I have
dream of discouraging. And with such ex-
getting old enough to want it, that the world
brothers, and sisters, and good uncles. There
like wolves in—wolves in—what is it—"
"Sheep's clothing"—the maiden suggested
your own mother? Do I ever catch you
"I tell you indeed! It is your place to
tell me, I think. And what is more, I insist
at once upon knowing all about it. What
foolish child? On Tuesday afternoon I saw
and which way did I see you trying to hang
then your eyes—I have seen your eyes flash
and there was a wasp next pew. All these
of them; although she was vexed with her
self, when she saw one eye—for in verity
that was all—of a potato upon her father's
the buttons of her frock—which was only
long she must have worn it—but as to the
double-thread, she was sure that nothing of
softly, coming up in her coaxing way, which
of any of the sad mistakes you speak of;
except about the potato-eye, and then I had
a round-pointed knife. But I want to make
no excuse, mother; and there is nothing the
matter with me. Tell me what you mean
she was kissing, while they both went on
with talking; "it is no good trying to get
your mind, or you have not—which is it?"
"Mother, what can I have on my mind?
do it. Every one is kind to me, and every-
you, a great deal more than I deserve per-
of the other girls I see"—
"You would never get as far as the rick-
yard hedge. You children talk such non-
"If I were saying fifty catechisms, what
more could I do than speak the truth?"
have told you everything I know, except one
"Mother, I mean that I have not been
stop it, which you call 'mischief'? I insist
thought twice about Robin Lyth, with any-
very way to drive her into dwelling in a mis-
your plans to do. I have seen too much to
be astonished any more. But to think that
mouth, should be hand in glove with the
wickedest smuggler of the age, the rogue every-
he was born to be hanged—the by-name, the
"your own second cousin, Mistress Cocks-
more of myself than that. If I have done any
wrong, I will meet it, and be sorry, and sub-
mit to any punishment. I ought to have told
say of it. But I never attached much impor-
him twice; the first time by purest ac-
brother with me; but he ran away, as usual."
the whole sky to tumble in upon us, if Cap-
"I never thought of Captain Lyth; and
can tell you one thing, mother—if you wanted
to make me think of him, you could not do it
your flowers. I have heard that they grow
very fine ones in Holland. Perhaps you have
got some smuggled tulips, my dear."
said to herself as she went to work again,—
it. However, I am not going to be put out,
when I feel that I have not done a single bit
too much beer, and ran at him with a pitch-
that he ought to have done so, to obtain relief.
She perceived that her own discourse about
was said about it. And she felt as sure as if
Willie—for not doing things that were be-
neath him—her master would take Mary's
was so much older, for not going on to pro-
tect and guide her. So she kept till after
he had sipped (for once in a way) a little
women were their masters.
knows her business—business—" and he
In the morning, however, he took a stronger
and more serious view of the case, pro-
and no one could ever tell about young lasses.
And he quite fell into his wife's suggestion,
that the maid could be spared till harvest-
there was little chance now for another six
never hear of that.
THE NOVELIST. MARY ANERLEY. CHAPTER XIII. GRUMBLING AND GROWLING. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 11 October 1879 [Issue No.706] page 5 2019-10-08 11:58 AUTHOR OF " LORNA DOONE," " THE M<RN
CRUMBLING AND GROWLING.
While tbeBe successful runs went on, and
<rre.it authorities smiled at seeing the little
Authorities set at nought, and men of the
held Bweet converse in the lane.
? fortnight, was at Anerley Farm on Sunday.
would. I've a great mind to throw it up
of a rear-admiraL Tinkers' and tailors' sons
get the luck now; and a man of gojod blood
is put on the bock-shelf, behind the blacking
country-"
once more */"
-it is the downright contradiction of the
may think by and bye : but if you want to
eat, you muBt do it now, or never."
"' Never* never suits me in that matter,"
your mouth full." .
The oommander of the coast-guaard turned
entered the cottage provided for him and
which he had peopled so Bpeedily.
and neat, and everybody us^d to wonder how
Mrs. Carroway kept it so. But in spite of all.
healthtal position, and beautiful outlook over
the bay jf 'Bridlington. It Btood in a niche
of the low soft duff, where now. the sea
parade < extendi from the northern pier of
?Bridlington Quay; and when the roadstead
fleet -of every kind of craft, or better still
when they all made sail at once-as happened
when a trusty freeze arose-the view was
Swordfish," or "Kestrel," "Albatross,''
while the skipper came ashore to seethe "An
called; and sometimes even aslbop of war,
forrecreits, orcruisingfortheirtraiaing, would
" Ancient Carroway,"-as old friends called
mm, and even young people who had never
seen him,-was famous upon this coast now
for nearly three degrees of latitude. He bad
dwelled here long, and in highly gpod con
tent, hospitably treated by ms neighbours,
and himself more hospitable .than ^ils wife
could wish. Until two troubles jn bis life
of mouths, in number iand size, thfit'requirtd
oftnat upstart Robin XTyth. .Now let it be
Fair Robin, though not at all anxious, for ;
lame, but modestly willing to decline It, bad
not r?en successful-though he worked so i
much by night-in preserving sweet obscurity '
Wis character was public, and set on high by
fortune, to be gazed at'fi^m fahplly different
points of view. From their narrow aind lime
eyed outlook the jooastgiwd beheld, in him,
JT "teat incarnation of Old Nick.; yet they
nated him onty-Saaa abstract manner,' and
tate Awards ,t}iat evil onp. magis
TtfJf .a^are2^bjg»i,«j,( uil
f ^ own»,upw».him. And many of
J?® krmera, who should have been bis
and best customers, ware
^ked to their king and country, by
and armycontracts, that,
th^ifti.^6 a iour-gallon banker,
man ^e5- crpwna, pr the excise
ctoh' JtH 5. conscience, bjit giort
t& b^ h^rv^ts, ooiMtraioed
Bister woman i
tt°ney,was Biro
on, ^
Pew to^the rifert
downHaU bo^ «*ferior standing; was a
Si$8? SS-tSSifcS
the very beet of bargains ; of which they got
Bound to pay three times the genuine value,
things, poor creature-although there were
two stones also about that, and the quanti
ties of things that he got for nothing, when
which scarcely ever happened, thank good
He knew who he was, and what his grand
father had been, and he never cared a-short
word-what sort of stuff long tongues might
prate of him. _ Barbarous broad-drawlers,
read it-if read they could-in the pages of
in very Bmall drains, upon either element,
off into a frigate, as a recommended volun
ceaBed longing to be a general; and having
and jt was good, and so many men fell that
he picked np his commission, and got into a
service, without promotion, for his grand
a very lively succession of fights, and Carro
must nave done so but for his long
sadness they impart, and the timid recollec- j
Spanish fleet, Carroway showed such a daunt
it was impossible not to pay him some atten
np some day, when he should be reported hit
the national honoor. When such things
happen, thefew who stay behind must be left
behind in the Qazelte as welL That wound,
therefore, seemed at first to go againBt him,
hoped for better luck. Ana his third wound
him up again with advancement and ap
pointment, and enabled him to marry -and
have children seven. I
of age, gallant and lively as ever, and reso
well. His duty was now alongshore, in com
for the IOBS of a good deal of one heel made
it hard for him to step about as he should j
he was fond of it, although he grumbled i
on as if hia office was beneath him. He
abused all his men, and all the good ones j
of language ont of doors, because inside his
him " ugly: Carroway," as coarse people did,
was petty and unjust, and directly contra
fore part of the week, while nis Sunday shave
' retained its influence, so far as its limited
' By Wednesday he certainly began to look
i grim, and on Saturday ferocious, pending the
: dheeks with bis beard, and paid a penny.
? For to his children he was a most loving and
; tenderhearted father, puzzled at their num
ber. and sometimes perplexed at having to
, feed and clotheibem, yet happy to give them
; hia lMt and go without, and even ready to
welcome ,more, if Heaven should be pleased
| tp send them.
' Bpt Mm. Xarroway, most fidgety of women,
and bom of .a well-shorn family, was unhappy
' from the middle tothe end < of the week that
slie could not scrub her hjusbaod's beard off.
| This lady's sense of human crime, and of
everything hateful in creation, expressed it*
self mainly in the word "dirt" Her rancour
againBt that nobly tranquil and most natural
of elements inured itself into a' downright
passion. From babyhood she had been no
torious for kicking tier little legs oat, at the
least speck of dust upon a tiny red shoe.:
Her father,'A-clergyman, heard so much of
^his, and had so many, children of a different
stamp, that; when he came to christen her, at'
six months of Age (which used to be considered.
quite an early timeoflife) he put; upon her
the name of? 'X&uta," to whichahe thoroughly
acted up; but.people having ignorance of
<' Matilda."
, Such was her nature, and it grew upon, her ;
bo that whenayoung and gallant officer, toll
and fresh, and as cleanaa a /frigate, WAS
tun, and sharp cut-water, she began to like to
look at him. Before very Ions, hia spruce ?
trim ducks, careful scrape ot Brunswick
leather boots, dean pocket-handkerchiefs,
and fine Bpeckleeeneqsji were making and
keeping a weU-Bwept path to the thoroughly*
dusted -store-room pf her heart, How little
she dreamed,, in those virgin, days, that the
future could ever- contain .« weekwhen her
pnce. and jthen have jit done for him on -A
She tta bad. Iwr 'illjmfcfa
jdoubt§,abe dfowifiedf.to call them-r-but a till
he forgQt;onoe to Jiraw his boots sideways
ptmwiwmMUtatoe aod hp&MtoM
corporate for personal purity; still it suc
like the Queen of Sheba s, as Bhe gazed, but
gold, and nota whisker of a rope's end curling
| or any indicament of labour done. "Ars
. est celare artern this art was nnfathomable.
back and try a little teBt-work of her own.
must catch and keep any speck of dust mean
,,N°w people at Birdlington Quay declared
earned off a prize, was certainly not the
'heirs, neither were their conclusions true.
sake of discipline ana peace, submitted to
due authority, and being so much from home
he left his household matters to a firm con
others as a Mender, though she may not have
exhausted^ grumble of unusual intensity,
mouth full, while Bhe warmed a plate for
voice of Cadman-" Can I see his honour
? n No' ^^Mptreplied Mrs Carroway.
One would think you were all in a league to
starve nun No sooner does he get half a
mouthful-"
know my maxim-' duty first, dinner after
Madman, I will come with you."
1 he revenue-officer took up his hat (which
had less time now than bis dinner to get
tor holding privy councils. This was under
At neap tides, ana in moderate weather, this
nothing m front of it but the sea, and nothing
tbink that here must be commune sacred,
Ana yet it was not so, by reason of a very
Bimple matter.
and the pier itself made a needful turn to
wards the south, there was an equally need
lul thing a gully-hole with an iron trap to
gully was m the face of the masonry outside.
Canroway, not being gifted with a crooked
rm/ commander to find it out
Ihe officer, always thinly clad (both through
effeminate comfort), settledhiBbony shoulders
n9®> which meant, " Make no fuss, but out
with it Cadman, a short square fellow with
i ",c&Ptain, I have hit it off at last Hac
wench he hath a hankering after. This .time
1 got it and no mistake, as right as if the
villain toy asleep twixt you and me, and told
us ail about it with his tongue out; and a
good thing for men of large family like
me.
_ " AM that I have heard such a number of
ratsies, _ bis cotninander answered crustily;
uiat1 whistle, as we used to do in a dead
calm, Gadman. An old salt like you knows
from whistling. But this time, . there is no
down straigbt-forrard. New moon Tuesday
snug little cava He hath a' had his last good
? ton. .. .
T " much is coming this time, Cadman?
. Sl,c? 8nd fared oftfcoae three caves. It
are running south, upon the opeh beach."
Captain, it, is a big venture; the biggest
of all the summer, I do believe. Two thou
sand pounds, if there is a penny, in it The
No woman m it this time, sir. The murder
there is no woman I pan see .my way. We
John Cadman, your manner of speech is
rude. You forget that your conunudiw
officer has a wife and family three-quaK
to Bex, of which you, as a married man,
Sa f&K6 A mw and hia wife are
one neBh, Cadman ; and therefore you are a
woman yourself, and must labour not todis*
in.a flurry, like a woman, yon would not
at the outlook at $o clock. X h^ve business
on hand of importance.'
Jiome,leaying Cadman to mutter his wrath,
and then to growl it, when 'his officer was
Never a day, nor an |iour a'most, without
he insulteth of me. A womftn indeed 1 Well.
Ins wife may be a man, bntjwhat call hath he
to speak of mine so 1 John Cadman a woman,
and one.flesh with his wifo? pretty news
thatwouljl btfw $ayau4f98 j",
AUTHOR OF "LORNA DOONE," "THE MAID OF
GRUMBLING AND GROWLING.
While these successful runs went on, and
great authorities smiled at seeing the little
authorities set at nought, and men of the
held sweet converse in the lane.
fortnight, was at Anerley Farm on Sunday.
would. I've a great mind to throw it up—
of a rear-admiral. Tinkers' and tailors' sons
get the luck now; and a man of good blood
is put on the back-shelf, behind the blacking-
country—"
once more?"
—it is the downright contradiction of the
may think by and bye; but if you want to
eat, you must do it now, or never."
"'Never' never suits me in that matter,"
your mouth full."
The commander of the coast-guard turned
entered the cottage provided for him, and
which he had peopled so speedily.
and neat, and everybody used to wonder how
Mrs. Carroway kept it so. But in spite of all
healthful position, and beautiful outlook over
the bay of Bridlington. It stood in a niche
of the low soft cliff, where now the sea-
parade extends from the northern pier of
Bridlington Quay; and when the roadstead
fleet of every kind of craft, or better still
when they all made sail at once—as happened
when a trusty breeze arose—the view was
"Swordfish," or "Kestrel," "Albatross,''
while the skipper came ashore to see the "An-
called; and sometimes even a sloop of war,
for recruits, or cruising for their training, would
"Ancient Carroway,"—as old friends called
him, and even young people who had never
seen him,—was famous upon this coast now
for nearly three degrees of latitude. He had
dwelled here long, and in highly good con-
tent, hospitably treated by his neighbours,
and himself more hospitable than his wife
could wish. Until two troubles in his life
of mouths, in number and size, that required
of that upstart Robin Lyth. Now let it be
fame, but modestly willing to decline it, bad
not been successful—though he worked so
much by night—in preserving sweet obscurity.
His character was public, and set on high by
fortune, to be gazed at from wholly different
points of view. From their narrow and lime-
eyed outlook the coast guard beheld in him
the latest incarnation of Old Nick; yet they
hated him only in an abstract manner, and
as men feel towards that evil one. Magis-
trates als, and the large protective powers,
were arraid against him, yet happy to
abstain from laying hands, when their hands
were their own, upon him. And many of
the farmers, who should have been his
warmest friends and best customers, were
now so attached to their king and country, by
bellicose warmth and army contracts, that
instead of a guinea for a four-crown anker,
they would offer three crowns, or the excise-
man. And not only conscience, but short
cash, after three bad harvests, constrained
them.
Yet the staple of public opinion was sound,
as it must be where women predominate.
The best of women could not see why they
should not have anything they wanted for
less than it cost the maker. To gaze at a
sister woman better dressed, at half the
money, was simply to abjure every lofty prin-
ciple. And to go to church with a counterfeit
on, when the genuine lace was in the next
pew, on a body of inferior standing, was a
downright outrage to the congregation, the
rector, and all religion. A cold-blooded crea-
ture, with no pin-money, might reconcile it
with her principles, if any she had, to stand
up like a dowdy, and allow a poor man to
risk his life, by shot and storm and starva-
tion, and then to deny him a word of a look,
because of his coming with the genuine
thing, at a quarter of the price fat tradesmen
asked, who never stirred out of their shops
when it rained, for a thing that was a story
and an imposition. Charity, duty, and
the very best of bargains; of which they got
bound to pay three times the genuine value,
things, poor creature—although there were
two stories also about that, and the quanti-
ties of things that he got for nothing, when-
which scarcely ever happened, thank good-
He knew who he was, and what his grand-
father had been, and he never cared a—short
word—what sort of stuff long tongues might
prate of him. Barbarous broad-drawlers,
of the royal services? That was his descrip-
read it—if read they could—in the pages of
in very small drains, upon either element,
off into a frigate, as a recommended volun-
ceased longing to be a general; and having
and it was good, and so many men fell that
he picked up his commission, and got into a
service, without promotion, for his grand-
a very lively succession of fights, and Carro-
must have done so but for his long
sadness they impart, and the timid recollec-
Spanish fleet, Carroway showed such a daunt-
it was impossible not to pay him some atten-
up some day, when he should be reported hit
the national honour. When such things
happen, the few who stay behind must be left
behind in the Gazette as well. That wound,
therefore, seemed at first to go against him,
hoped for better luck. And his third wound
him up again with advancement and ap-
pointment, and enabled him to marry and
have children seven.
of age, gallant and lively as ever, and reso-
well. His duty was now alongshore, in com-
for the loss of a good deal of one heel made
it hard for him to step about as he should
he was fond of it, although he grumbled
on as if his office was beneath him. He
abused all his men, and all the good ones
of language out of doors, because inside his
was petty and unjust, and directly contra-
fore part of the week, while his Sunday shave
retained its influence, so far as its limited
By Wednesday he certainly began to look
grim, and on Saturday ferocious, pending the
cheeks with his beard, and paid a penny.
For to his children he was a most loving and
tender-hearted father, puzzled at their num-
ber, and sometimes perplexed at having to
feed and clothe them, yet happy to give them
his last and go without, and even ready to
welcome more, if Heaven should be pleased
to send them.
But Mrs. Carroway, most fidgety of women,
and born of a well-shorn family, was unhappy
from the middle to the end of the week that
she could not scrub her husband's beard off.
This lady's sense of human crime, and of
everything hateful in creation, expressed it-
self mainly in the word "dirt." Her rancour
against that nobly tranquil and most natural
of elements inured itself into a downright
passion. From babyhood she had been no-
torious for kicking her little legs out, at the
least speck of dust upon a tiny red shoe.
Her father, a clergyman, heard so much of
this, and had so many children of a different
stamp, that when he came to christen her, at
six months of age (which used to be considered
quite an early time of life) he put upon her
the name of "Lauta," to which she thoroughly
acted up; but people having ignorance of
"Matilda."
so that when a young and gallant officer, tall
and fresh, and as clean as a frigate, was
run, and sharp cut-water, she began to like to
look at him. Before very long, his spruce
trim ducks, careful scrape of Brunswick-
leather boots, clean pocket-handkerchiefs,
and fine specklessness, were making and
keeping a well-swept path to the thoroughly-
dusted store-room of her heart. How little
she dreamed, in those virgin days, that the
future could ever contain a week when her
once, and then have it done for him on a
Sunday!
She hesitated, for she had her thoughts—
doubts she disdained to call them—but still
he forgot once to draw his boots sideways
after having purged the toe and heel, across
corporate for personal purity; still it suc-
frigate "Immaculate," commanded by a well-
like the Queen of Sheba's, as she gazed, but
gold, and not a whisker of a rope's end curling
or any indicament of labour done. "Ars
est celare artem;" this art was unfathomable.
back and try a little test-work of her own.
must catch and keep any speck of dust mean-
Now people at Birdlington Quay declared
carried off a prize, was certainly not the
theirs, neither were their conclusions true.
sake of discipline and peace, submitted to
due authority, and being so much from home,
he left his household matters to a firm con-
others as a wonder, though she may not have
exhausted a grumble of unusual intensity,
mouth full, while she warmed a plate for
voice of Cadman—"Can I see his honour
"No, you cannot;" replied Mrs Carroway.
"One would think you were all in a league to
starve him. No sooner does he get half a
mouthful—"
know my maxim—'duty first, dinner after-
wards.' Cadman, I will come with you."
The revenue-officer took up his hat (which
had less time now than his dinner to get
for holding privy councils. This was under
At neap tides, and in moderate weather, this
nothing in front of it but the sea, and nothing
think that here must be commune sacred,
And yet it was not so, by reason of a very
simple matter.
and the pier itself made a needful turn to-
wards the south, there was an equally need-
lul thing, a gully-hole with an iron trap to
gully was in the face of the masonry outside.
Carroway, not being gifted with a crooked
tyrant's ear, and that the trap at the end
fact, but left his commander to find it out.
The officer, always thinly clad (both through
effeminate comfort), settled his bony shoulders
nod, which meant, "Make no fuss, but out
with it." Cadman, a short square fellow with
"Captain, I have hit it off at last. Hac-
wench he hath a hankering after. This time
I got it and no mistake, as right as if the
villain lay asleep twixt you and me, and told
us all about it with his tongue out; and a
good thing for men of large families like
me."
"All that I have heard such a number of
times," his commander answered crustily;
"that Iwhistle, as we used to do in a dead
calm, Cadman. An old salt like you knows
from whistling. But this time, there is no
down straight-forrard. New moon Tuesday
snug little cave. He hath a' had his last good
run."
"How much is coming this time, Cadman?
I am sick and tired of those three caves. It
are running south, upon the open beach."
"Captain, it, is a big venture; the biggest
of all the summer, I do believe. Two thou-
sand pounds, if there is a penny, in it. The
No woman in it this time, sir. The murder
there is no woman I can see my way. We
"John Cadman, your manner of speech is
rude. You forget that your commanding
officer has a wife and family three-quarters
to sex, of which you, as a married man,
should be ashamed. A man and his wife are
one flesh, Cadman; and therefore you are a
woman yourself, and must labour not to dis-
in a flurry, like a woman, you would not
at the outlook at 6 o'clock. I have business
on hand of importance."
home, leaving Cadman to mutter his wrath,
and then to growl it, when his officer was
"Never a day, nor an hour a'most, without
he insulteth of me. A woman indeed! Well,
his wife may be a man, but what call hath he
to speak of mine so? John Cadman a woman,
and one flesh with his wife? pretty news
that would be for my missus!"
THE NOVELIST. MARY ANERLEY. CHAPTER XII. IN A LANE, NOT ALONE. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 4 October 1879 [Issue No.705] page 5 2019-10-08 11:17 ... . BY 11. D. BI-AOKMOUE,
LXIIOU OP " LOKNA DOONK," " THR MAID
. Suiiit," " ALICE LORRAINE," &c.,
Chapteu XII.
jneans of a crooked mind, but Open aa the
day in nil things, unless any one mistrusted
lier, and Bhowed it by cross-questioning'.
"When t)iis was done, she resented it quickly,
jj,. concealing -the very things which she
Bo happened that the person to whom of, all she
juost apt to check her by suspicious curiosity.
.And now her mother already began to do
Ihis.aa concerned the smuggler, knowing from
ilie rev enue officer that her Mary must .have
Been him. Mary, being a truthful damsel,
she did not ru9^ forth with all the history,
as she probably would have done, if left un
the earring, or the run that was to come oif
iliat week, or the riding skirt, or a host of
ilittle things, including her promise to visit
jjempton-lane.
Jier father, and take his opinion about it all.
jiiit he was a little cross that evening, not
iliat discouraged her; and then she thought
ihat being an officer of the king-aa he liked
to call himself sometimes-he might feel
Jbound to give information about the impend
J)e a breach of honour, considering how she
theu she became ashamed of herself for in
whose greatest comfort he was Baid to be?
And what good could arise from his destruc
generous one tus ? leader of the free-trade
strong determination not to think twice of,
what any one might say who did not under
stand .the subject, Mary was forced at last to
the stem Conclusion: tbat 'she must4ce«p her
-although that went a very long way with
her-but also because there seemed no other
change of psrforiiping a positive duty. ? Simple, \
the owner a trainable, and beyond all doubt
important, piece of property. Two hours had, I
Bhe spent in looking for it, and deprived her
dear father of his breakfast Bhrimps; and
was all chia. trouble to be thrown away, and
herself perhaps aocnsed of theft, because her
mother was so"'short and sharp in wanting
Beerogd £o,t» a very uncommonand precious
piece or jewellery ; it was made of pure gold
minutely chased and threaded with carious
bearing what seemedto tie characters of some
foreign language; there Alight be a spell, or
Bhe took very good care of it{ wrapping it in
day, to be sure that it was safe. Until.it
made her think ofjthe owner #o much, ap4
the many wonders the h&l heard about him,
again. vwcpy. -i vw.-< »
As luck, would have it; «n die very day when
father hud business at Driffield com market,
might have, been looking about on the
not .see Bempton-lane at all, perhaps, without
Bome newly-aequiredpower- of seeing - round
Bharp corners, fetill it would have been a
to have felt that he was not ao very far away.
resolve to have some oiie, at any rate, near
need have,sought no. further,. for he would
have entered into all her thoughts about it,.
"Willie was quite different, and hated any,
trouble; being spoilt so by his mother,~and
the maidens allaround them. ..
However, inajich a*trait what was there
enough, being five years in front .of Mary,
"Willie Anerlpy had np idea that anybody-far
less his own sister-could take such a view of.
him. He knew himself to be-and all would
say the B&me of him-superior in his original
gifts and his manner of making nseof them
to the rest of. the family "put together. He
bad spent * month in Glasgow, when the
many great inventions, ""i another month in ;
Edinburgh, when that noble. city was aglow
tnththe dawn of Iwge ideas : also he nad
visited London, foremast of nip family, and
Been enough of new things Ihere.to fill all i
Yorkshire with surprise ;andthe result of i
|uch wide Experience was that he did not
lute hard woric at all. Neither could he even
»e contend Jto ftpcept and enjoy, without ,
. labonr flfte wp.' wi goofl pm. ,
*ided for nim. He was always trying to dis
cover ,p^m$thing,. whipb ' nev^r, eeemed to
answer, ana continually flying after eome
In a ^»^ver g^fa^tbold.
^thafrbTO wmm sM t^tvhis deiicate eye
?MOWS and high hut rathernarrow forehead;
U=
whim oi yours matters
* The right of republishing "M*ry i
, purchased by, .the proprietors' of"
ADtt^phS
'The Austral
petting out of a great many little scrapes.
about. Moreover-which Bettled the point
Hobin Lyth had chosen well his place for
shboting him. lie knew well enough that
be sure that the bold "coast-riders," despair
and thougli he was inclined to doubt the
.strict legality of that proceeding, he could not
four-acre patch of potatoes amelled sweetly
wholesome days), and Willie, having over
visited before she interrupted him. lJut, as
the profits of the farm, it pleased them to ob
had surmounted the chine, and began to de
and shadowy places had an oozycastjand trees
(wherdVfer they could stand) were facing the
?wiry beards. _ Willie-who had, among other
the things be meant to do in that way ; and
getting observations first-a point whereon
be stuck fast mainly-without any time for
" Look 1" he cried, "can anything be
, want of sunshine, or too much wet, but an
inadequate movement of the air-"
the air iB a fluid ; you may stare as you like,
fluid. Very well, no llijid in large bodies
'injurious stuff ; while the over-rapid motion
causes this iron appearance, this hard sur
of Bimple contrivances, I make this evil its
preventing stagnation in one place, and ex
doit?"
dan understand it. All great discoveries are
air Causes' this to rotate by the mere force of
as they tuxned the corner upon a large wind
Willie, dear, would not Farmer' Topping's
"Xueh.!" cried Willie. "Stuff and non
od you."
Without stopping to finish, his sentence he
was off, and out of eight both of the mill and
l&8t intention of offending him, could even
' beg his pardon, or say how much she wanted
him;for she had not dared as yet to tell him
what was the pnrpose of her walk, his nature
being such that no one, not even hiB own
mother, conld tell what conclusion he might
comb to upon any practical question, lie
might rush off at once,to'put the revenue
men! on the smuggler's track; or he might
atop his sister from going; or he might (in
Bo way bad resolved pot to tell him until the
last moment, when he could do i*one of these
on, for the place would scarcely.seem so very
would .always remind herpenceforth of her
tar brother William. It was perfectly cer
in'that Captain Robin Lyth, whose fame
for chivalry was everywhere^ and whose
character Vras all in all to aim with the ladies
who'bought his silks and lace, Would see her
through all danger caused by cpnfidenoe in
him* and really it was too badof her to admjt
any palUx miBgiyings. > But, season, m s^e
asked, and told herself that she was too con
very bravely down the hill. ?
beech up to the windmill, wa8 as pretty a
county than that of Devon. With a Devon
every cofner; no arches of tall aah, keyed
who have lived in the plenitude of every
thing. Bat, in spite of all that, the lane was
echo something, for the most part seem ac
intruders) bad managed to forget what the
drawer thatshould be locked up until Sunday.
"Willie compelled her to look like something
other aide of Filey, who might have been
ancient gentleman had leanings towards tree
Whether these goods were French or not
-no French damsel could have put them on
people who meant no harm to her-as nobody
could-and yet to let them know that her
frown of warning instead of a smile of com
again, aud had the smile of comfort on her
it was not confined to the sex hi which it is
"For when a very active figure came to light
crown, with a scarlet feather and a dove
a lovely pair of pumpB, with buckles radiant
of beBt Bristol diamonds. The wearer of all
these splendours smiled, and seemed to be
With his usual quickness, and the self
esteem which added such lustre to his charac
in her mind, but he was not jude enough to
" Young lady," he began-and Mary, with
have found this for you, and then good
begin again for me. But I am such au out
was angry with herself for sneaking, and
laugh -at ourselves for trying to look well
time is short-we must make the most of
' Robin, Robin-'"
Dr. Upandown, as many people call him,"
said the smuggler, wjth a tone of condemna
next to Captain: and Mistress Crockscroft,
like against me, while lie honours me with
thank you even, because I am going , to the
Oh dear, oh dear 1 And he ia such a
justice; and yet they ehot at you. laat week 1
throw." , , .
shameful murder jthan to shoot me; and
yet, but for you,, it would surely have been
done." ? ? . . ?
" You must not dwell -apon suoh things,"
.said Mary ; " they may have a very bad effect
tgwayoptmiiidL But good-bye, Captain Lyth;
I forgot that I waa robbing Dr. ITproand of
" Shall I be so ungrateful aa not to see you
safe upon yourown land, after all your trouble?
worth ten times aa much. I never saw it look
" It-it must be the Band has made it
shine," the maiden Btammered, with a fine
There iB nothing I love better. What pools I
could show you, if I only might-pools where
single tide-pools known to nobody but my
"If I could atop, I should like it very
that this was not very likely ; Btill it was
just possible, for Willie's ill-tempera seldom
talking. May I teLl you about this trinket?"
how or why. Only when X came upon this
coast as a very little boy, and without know
the world (unless themselves went out of it)r
known here. The man swore a mauifest
tritie she happened to carry ; and nobody
of ear-rings. There, now. Miss Anerley, I
you by right, and to seem to belong to no
talk to them as if i had a sister. This makes
are. K very body in the world speaks well of
was Btolen ?"
I know. But I do not pretend to any eucli
my friends-to support the old couple who
have been BO good to me."
"Miss Anerley, I will not enroach upon
and. make me better; but not at all as you
May I kisa your hand? God bless you !"
vanished into lightsome air, and left empti
nesB behind him.
and astonishingly brave; so thoroughly ac
their ladies; BO able to see all the meaning
unpretending; and-much as it frightened
her to think it- really seeming to be afraid
BY R. D. BLACKMORE,
AUTHOR OF "LORNA DOONE," "THE MAID OF
SKER," "ALICE LORRAINE," &C.
CHAPTER XII.
means of a crooked mind, but open as the
day in all things, unless any one mistrusted
her, and showed it by cross-questioning.
When this was done, she resented it quickly,
by concealing the very things which she
so happened that the person to whom of all she
most apt to check her by suspicious curiosity.
nd now her mother already began to do
this, as concerned the smuggler, knowing from
the revenue officer that her Mary must have
seen him. Mary, being a truthful damsel,
she did not rush forth with all the history,
as she probably would have done, if left un-
the earring, or the run that was to come off
that week, or the riding skirt, or a host of
little things, including her promise to visit
Bempton-lane.
her father, and take his opinion about it all.
But he was a little cross that evening, not
that discouraged her; and then she thought
that being an officer of the king—as he liked
to call himself sometimes—he might feel
bound to give information about the impend-
be a breach of honour, considering how she
then she became ashamed of herself for in-
whose greatest comfort he was said to be?
And what good could arise from his destruc-
generous one as leader of the free-trade
strong determination not to think twice of
what any one might say who did not under-
stand the subject, Mary was forced at last to
the stern conclusion that she must keep her
—although that went a very long way with
her—but also because there seemed no other
change of performing a positive duty. Simple
the owner a valuable, and beyond all doubt
she spent in looking for it, and deprived her
dear father of his breakfast shrimps; and
was all this trouble to be thrown away, and
herself perhaps accused of theft, because her
mother was so short and sharp in wanting
seemed to be a very uncommon and precious
piece of jewellery; it was made of pure gold
minutely chased and threaded with curious
bearing what seemed to be characters of some
foreign language; there mlight be a spell, or
she took very good care of it, wrapping it in
day, to be sure that it was safe. Until it
made her think of the owner so much, and
the many wonders she had heard about him,
again.
As luck, would have it, on the very day when
father had business at Driffield corn market,
might have been looking about on the
not see Bempton-lane at all, perhaps, without
some newly-acquired power of seeing round
sharp corners, still it would have been a
to have felt that he was not so very far away.
resolve to have some one, at any rate, near
need have sought no further, for he would
have entered into all her thoughts about it,
Willie was quite different, and hated any
trouble; being spoilt so by his mother, and
the maidens all around them.
However, in such a strait what was there
enough, being five years in front of Mary,
Willie Anerley had no idea that anybody—far
less his own sister—could take such a view of
him. He knew himself to be—and all would
say the same of him—superior in his original
gifts and his manner of making use of them
to the rest of. the family put together. He
had spent a month in Glasgow, when the
many great inventions, and another month in ;
Edinburgh, when that noble city was aglow
with the dawn of large ideas; also he had
visited London, foremast of his family, and
seen enough of new things there to fill all
Yorkshire with surprise; and the result of
such wide experience was that he did not
like hard work at all. Neither could he even
be content to accept and enjoy, without
labour of his own, the many good things pro-
vided for him. He was always trying to dis-
cover something, which never seemed to
answer, and continually flying after some-
shining new, of which he never got fast hold.
In a word, he was spoiled, by nature first,
and then by circumstances, for the peaceful
life of his ancestors, and the unacknowledged
blessings of a farmer.
"Willie, dear, will you come with me?"
Mary said to him that day, catching him as
he ran down stairs, to air some inspiration;
"Will you come with me for just one hour?
I wish you would; and I would be so thank-
ful."
"Child, it is quite impossible," he answered,
with a frown which set off his delicate eye-
brows and high but rather narrow forehead;
you always want me at the very moment
when I have the most important work in
hand. Any childish whim of yours matters
more than hours and hours of hard labour."
"Oh, Willie, but you know how I try to
help you, and all the patterns I cut out last
week! Do come for once, Willie; if you re-
fuse, you will never, never forgive yourse."
Willie Anerley was as good-natured as any
* The right of republishing "Mary Anerley" has
been purchased by the proprietors of "The Austral-
asian."
getting out of a great many little scrapes.
about. Moreover—which settled the point—
Robin Lyth had chosen well his place for
shooting him. He knew well enough that
be sure that the bold "coast-riders," despair-
and though he was inclined to doubt the
strict legality of that proceeding, he could not
four-acre patch of potatoes smelled sweetly
wholesome days), and Willie, having over-
visited before she interrupted him. But, as
the profits of the farm, it pleased them to ob-
had surmounted the chine, and began to de-
and shadowy places had an oozy cast; and trees
(wherever they could stand) were facing the
wiry beards. Willie—who had, among other
the things he meant to do in that way; and
getting observations first—a point whereon
he stuck fast mainly—without any time for
"Look!" he cried, "can anything be
want of sunshine, or too much wet, but an
inadequate movement of the air—"
the air is a fluid; you may stare as you like,
fluid. Very well, no fluid in large bodies
causes this iron appearance, this hard sur-
of simple contrivances, I make this evil its
preventing stagnation in one place, and ex-
"How clever you are, to be sure!" ex-
do it?"
can understand it. All great discoveries are
air causes this to rotate by the mere force of
as they turned the corner upon a large wind-
Willie, dear, would not Farmer Topping's
"Tush!" cried Willie. "Stuff and non-
on you."
Without stopping to finish his sentence he
was off, and out of sight both of the mill and
least intention of offending him, could even
beg his pardon, or say how much she wanted
him; for she had not dared as yet to tell him
what was the purpose of her walk, his nature
being such that no one, not even his own
mother, could tell what conclusion he might
come to upon any practical question. He
might rush off at once to put the revenue
men on the smuggler's track; or he might
stop his sister from going; or he might (in
So Mary had resolved not to tell him until the
last moment, when he could do none of these
on, for the place would scarcely seem so very
would always remind her henceforth of her
dear brother William. It was perfectly cer-
tain that Captain Robin Lyth, whose fame
for chivalry was everywhere, and whose
character was all in all to him with the ladies
who bought his silks and lace, would see her
through all danger caused by confidenoe in
him; and really it was too bad of her to admit
any paltry misgivings. But, reason as she
asked, and told herself that she was too con-
very bravely down the hill.
beech up to the windmill, was as pretty a
county than that of Devon. With a Devon-
every corner; no arches of tall ash, keyed
who have lived in the plenitude of every-
thing. But, in spite of all that, the lane was
echo something, for the most part seem ac-
intruders) had managed to forget what the
drawer that should be locked up until Sunday.
Willie compelled her to look like something
other side of Filey, who might have been
ancient gentleman had leanings towards free
Whether these goods were French or not—
—no French damsel could have put them on
people who meant no harm to her—as nobody
could—and yet to let them know that her
frown of warning instead of a smile of com-
again, and had the smile of comfort on her
it was not confined to the sex in which it is
For when a very active figure came to light
crown, with a scarlet feather and a dove-
a lovely pair of pumps, with buckles radiant
of best Bristol diamonds. The wearer of all
these splendours smiled, and seemed to be-
With his usual quickness, and the self-
esteem which added such lustre to his charac-
in her mind, but he was not rude enough to
"Young lady," he began—and Mary, with
have found this for you, and then good-
begin again for me. But I am such an out-
was angry with herself for speaking, and
"Ladies who live on land can never under-
laugh at ourselves for trying to look well
time is short—we must make the most of
'Robin, Robin—'"
"Dr. Upandown, as many people call him,"
said the smuggler, with a tone of condemna-
next to Captain and Mistress Crockscroft,
like against me, while he honours me with
thank you even, because I am going to the
"Oh dear, oh dear! And he is such a
justice; and yet they shot at you last week!
things."
shameful murder than to shoot me; and
yet, but for you, it would surely have been
done."
"You must not dwell upon such things,"
upon your mind. But good-bye, Captain Lyth;
I forgot that I was robbing Dr. Upround of
"Shall I be so ungrateful as not to see you
safe upon your own land, after all your trouble?
worth ten times as much. I never saw it look
"It—it must be the sand has made it
shine," the maiden stammered, with a fine
There is nothing I love better. What pools I
could show you, if I only might—pools where
single tide—pools known to nobody but my
"If I could stop, I should like it very
that this was not very likely; still it was
just possible, for Willie's ill-tempers seldom
talking. May I tell you about this trinket?"
how or why. Only when I came upon this
coast as a very little boy, and without know-
the world (unless themselves went out of it),
known here. The man swore a manifest
trifle she happened to carry; and nobody
of ear-rings. There, now, Miss Anerley, I
you by right, and to seem to belong to no-
talk to them as if I had a sister. This makes
are. Every body in the world speaks well of
was stolen?"
I know. But I do not pretend to any such
my friends—to support the old couple who
have been so good to me."
"Miss Anerley, I will not encroach upon
and make me better; but not at all as you
May I kiss your hand? God bless you!"
vanished into lightsome air, and left empti-
ness behind him.
and astonishingly brave; so thoroughly ac-
their ladies; so able to see all the meaning
unpretending; and—much as it frightened
her to think it—really seeming to be afraid
THE NOVELIST. MARY ANERLEY. CHAPTER XI. DR. UPANDOWN. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 20 September 1879 [Issue No.703] page 5 2019-10-07 13:29 "The child ia not to blame,' said the
little head I have never seen m au my life;
My fine little fellow, shake hands with
" Poor little roan!" said the rector very
how old are you, if you pleaBe ?"
The little boy sat up on the kind mans
arm, and poked a Bmall investigating finger
into the ear that was next to bim, and the
locks juBt beginning to be marked with grey;
up, evidently meaning-" make your best of
which he pives himself, ' Izunsabe,' has a
will try him with a French interrogation
' Parlez vous Frangais, mon enfan ?' "
it, but must stand there before his congre
lis place, as sometimes happened, in a
knowledge, and be determined to follow them
But luckily no harm came of this, but con
looked none the wiser, while the doctor's in
Bure that he was no Frenchman. But we
fullered-ironed you might call it."
not to say very wet. Betwixt ana between,
colour of the laud was upon them here aad
Earticulars of the case when Captain Robin
as come home and had his rest, say at this
sign them, and they Bhall be published. For
turn kidnapper. Moreover, it is needful, &s
none of you seem to have heard of any), tfcat
this strange occurrence should be rnsde
known. Then, if nothing is heard of it, rou
can keep him, and may the Lord bless hin to
Without any more ado she kissed the oiild,
was to step into their lost son's shoeB, he
when the boy began to be useful, and, <so far
as was possible, they kept bim under by quot
than ever it was upon the earth. In vaia did
ian earthly boy compare with one who never
Passing that difficult question, and forbear
(as it in high rebuke), " Boy ?" And yet there
hesitation, tailing to remember their own
and if they can be Baid to do some mischief,
them, has provided them with gifta of play
The present boy, having been bom without
Isaac), that he was sprung ffom a raoe more
point-blank to put anyk " Isaac" in, and was
satisfied with M Kobin" only, the name of the
The rector showed deep knowledge of liis
thinks jnuch'of him. But finding him not
to better, the other boys, instead of being
IstAiBfifed.iJondfcmned himfor a Dutchman. ,
being eo flouted by hia play-matea, took to
capacity was 8uchr that he took more ad
vancement in an hour than the thick headB
year of SundayB. For any Flamburian boy
rock with the best of them ; but all theBe
things he muBt do by himself, simply because
and swirling as to scare him of hiB wits. He
a livelier outlet than the slow toil of deep
and long-suffering of the arts, llobin Lyth
handy with a boat. Old llobin vainly strove
"The child is not to blame," said the
little head I have never seen in all my life;
me."
gentleman's and burst into a torrent of the
"Poor little man!" said the rector very
how old are you, if you please?"
The little boy sat up on the kind man's
arm, and poked a small investigating finger
into the ear that was next to him, and the
locks just beginning to be marked with grey;
up, evidently meaning—"make your best of
which he gives himself, 'Izunsabe,' has a
will try him with a French interrogation—
'Parlez vous Francais, mon enfan?'"
it, but must stand there before his congre-
his place, as sometimes happened, in a
knowledge, and he determined to follow them
But luckily no harm came of this, but con-
looked none the wiser, while the doctor's in-
"Aha!" the good parson cried. "I was
sure that he was no Frenchman. But we
fullered—ironed you might call it."
"Please your worship," cried Mrs. Cocks-
not to say very wet. Betwixt and between,
colour of the land was upon them here and
particulars of the case when Captain Robin
has come home and had his rest, say at this
sign them, and they shall be published. For
turn kidnapper. Moreover, it is needful, as
none of you seem to have heard of any), that
this strange occurrence should be made
known. Then, if nothing is heard of it, you
can keep him, and may the Lord bless him to
Without any more ado she kissed the child,
women insisted on a smack of him, for pity's
was to step into their lost son's shoes, he
when the boy began to be useful, and, so far
as was possible, they kept him under by quot-
than ever it was upon the earth. In vain did
an earthly boy compare with one who never
Passing that difficult question, and forbear-
(as if in high rebuke), "Boy?" And yet there
hesitation, failing to remember their own
and if they can be said to do some mischief,
them, has provided them with gifts of play
The present boy, having been born without
Isaac), that he was sprung from a race more
satisfied with "Robin" only, the name of the
The rector showed deep knowledge of his
thinks much of him. But finding him not
to be a Jew, the other boys, instead of being
satisfied, condemned him for a Dutchman.
being so flouted by his play-mates, took to
capacity was such, that he took more ad-
vancement in an hour than the thick heads
year of Sundays. For any Flamburian boy
rock with the best of them; but all these
things he must do by himself, simply because
and swirling as to scare him of his wits. He
little else to rejoice in; and he won for him-
a livelier outlet than the slow toil of deep-
and long-suffering of the arts, Robin Lyth
handy with a boat. Old Robin vainly strove
THE NOVELIST. MARY ANERLEY. CHAPTER XI. DR. UPANDOWN. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 20 September 1879 [Issue No.703] page 5 2019-10-07 13:12 THE HOVEUST.
MARY ANERLEY*
BY R. D. BLACHTMORE,
AUTUOK OF " LOBNA DOONE," " THE MAID
TIKEU," " ALICE LOUUAINK," &C.
DK. UL'ANDOWN.
Hink down slowly. But even after that, it
might not" take root, unleaa it were fixed in
its settlement by their two great powers-the
law. nnd the Lord. ...
ulace: whereas of the law they heard much
fe33, but still they were even more afraid of
-il,ey came to the set conclusion that the law
jjow, to such a height above all other chil
in BUCIi a case as this. But "Flamborough
was of all the wide world happiest in possess
?law and the Lord-two powers supposed to
tie at variance alwayB, and to share the week
-the holy and unholy elements of man's
brief existence, were combined in Flam
borough parish in the person of its magis
for he was a fall doctor of divinity. Before
this gentleman mast be laid, both for purse
and conscience's sake, the caBe of the child
Eeverend Turner Upround, to give him his
Flamborough. Of sill his offices and powers,
there was not one tfoat he overstrained ; and
all that knew him, unleSB they were thorough
that he was such a Boft-spoken man as many
hie deedB and nature, which were of the
kindest. He did hiB utmost, on demand of
Fool, unless a kind heart proves folly. At
eariy days of the tripos, and was chosen fellow
ind tutor of Gonville and Caius College. But
ras one of the many upon which a perpetual
aster can barely live, unless he can go naked
1U0, and keep naked children. Now the
nerite of hard fasting, but freely enjoyed,
md with gratitude to God, the powers with
*'hich He had blessed them. Happily Dr.
[Jpround had a solid income of his own, and
like a sound mathematician) he took a wife
)f terms coincident. So, without being
heir poorer neighbours.
Sucli a man generally thrives in the thriv- I
ng of his flock, and does not harry them,
ie gives them spiritual food enough to sup
port them without daintiness, and tie keeps
he proper distinction between the Sunday
ind the poorer days. He clangs no bell of
eproach upon a Monday, when the squire
s leading the lady into dinner, and the
ibourer sniffing at his Supper-pot, and he
to the world, play on a Saturday, while he
raitks his own head to find good ends for the
norrow. Because he is a wise man who
mows what other men axe, and how seldom
hey desire to be told the same thing more
nan a hundred and four times in a year.
J either did his clerical Bkill stop here: for
arson Upround thought twice about it, be
ore he said anything to rub sore consciences,
*ien v ,en "6 had them at his mercy, and
Went before him, on a Sunday. He behaved
ike a gentleman in this matter, where so
nnch temptation lories, looking always at
he man wh6m he/did not taeah to hit, so
tot the guilty'one received {(through him,
md felt himself better by cotadpaiHson. In a
ford, this parson did his duty' well, and
ileasantly for all his flock ; and nothing em
uttered him, unless a man pretended to doc
nne without holy orders.
For the doctor reasoned thus-and sourid
v aounds-if divinity is a matter for Tom,
j1, uor Hawy, nOw call there be degrees ini
\ JJe held® degree in it, and, felt what it
aa cost; ana not the parish only, but even
la own wife, was proud to have a doctor
, ?r}' Sunday. And his wife took care that his
iioT.1-^?00 ' ke««ymfcre small-clothes, arid
£ .itockiiigs upon calves of dignity,'
in if that his congregation scorned the
J®?®* IW ,to,?«ve^ey.
hihF? IW&Sfmt nature, kiQdljr h6art,
l trauquil home,' he was also happy in
hoseawardsof life'in which men awhelp,
hree Jhn^Was w'th a wifd and
lardv «n *£en* ^0m8 well, ana vigoroui and
vife J£a''J®6,. .a?.aiM* clime, and cliffs. His
'nouffh^A « of own age, but old
ullv Snwn ^d®r.8tand and foUowhim faith
nind e0"^ihi8J°BS otyfihxn. A *ife with
a husband is not
f hp t ' 2? ^th heart enoa^i to feel thbt
indLT love hlfli'so; - And
T f "Chpol, and a baby-glrt At hotae. '? j
"Ofjthla P(trish^M«rul y
nuRt w, blessing. But in eveijr man's lot
£diecIO?k' 8ln06;this«rtMBM world
he cmm? wif'vi- Parton'a Upjouhd's lot
ie £.?j mieht.eeem a vertrBtinSll one; but
|Lfend" it almost too big fOThim' His
lf minlstw Wind, large good-will
tSfflssssssa
^St SSSSES^BS^ i8 the rights
lt scboni ' **Vhen he was a bar t
in the weaker time of m&ithood, he may earn
withnim, yet meaning no more harm than
epper, Bmite him to the quick, at venture, in
ia moat retired and privy-conscienced hole.
does it owes some money to the man he docs
could get it for nothing. ThiB was a man of
heterodox. Ab a part of the bargain, this
aB could be hoped of a man who had received
his money. He Bat by a pillar, and no more
charged him a full crown beyond the con
and looked at Mr. Jobbing with a soft, re
cheat any sound clergyman again; where
what_ he thought of Parson Upround's
griBkin (come straight from the rectory pig
opinion long remembered at Flamborough
even among those who loved him best For
spring cabbages. So that Mrs. Unround,
when buttoning up hiB coat -which he
always forgot to do for himself-did it with
them), tried to bow-or rather rise-to night
him for long, and he liked to talk of it after
not be up to all their hours, Dut may take
His parishioners-who could do very well
without him, BO far as that goes, all the
their boats-joyfully left him to his own time
of. day, and no more worried him out of
For thiB reason, on St. Switliin's morn, m
the laimch, but coula not pull the labouring
oar, nor even hold the tiller, Bpent the time
till 10 o'clock in seeing to their own affaire
any woman. And then, with some little dis
pute among them {the offspring of the merest
accident, they arrived in some force at the
woman do it for her. $ut an old man came
Mrs. CockBeroft had thoroughly fed the little
stranger, and trashed him, and undressed
great orders-«o -far as his new nurse could
make out-bnt speaking gibberish, asahe said,
avid flying into ft rage because it was out of
Gockscroft, being a pious woman, hoped that
child seemfed to take in much of what was
said, and when asked his natne, answered
wrathfully, and as if everybody wfti bound to
know-" Izunsa^e, Izunsabe 1"
But now, when brought before Dr. Up
stock could look mote calm and peaceful.
He could walk Well enough, but liked better
so taken him pp was pnly too proud to carry
him.' Whatever the rector and magistrate
'* Set him down, ma'am,"-the doctor said,
womfen all about him ; " Mistress Oo :kscroft,
p&t .£ftn ob his legs, and let me question
":%nt the child resisted' this proceeding.
ixil^nrxi l^athitog of
'ewmq^&tioiL he-spun upon 'hiQ'.Utotl& liMli,
fclf-tiis might, At thfc-ikbie
time WiwvUg'trp'-fcii Viands and twiflt^tijs
thumbs in a very odd and foreign war.
"What a shocking child! criid Mrs.
THE NOVELIST.
MARY ANERLEY.*
BY R. D. BLACKMORE,
AUTHOR OF "LORNA DOONE," "THE MAID
SEER," "ALICE LORRAINE," &C.
DR. UPANDOWN.
sink down slowly. But even after that, it
might not take root, unless it were fixed in
its settlement by their two great powers—the
law, and the Lord.
place; whereas of the law they heard much
less, but still they were even more afraid of
cost.
they came to the set conclusion that the law
how, to such a height above all other chil-
in such a case as this. But Flamborough
was of all the wide world happiest in possess-
law and the Lord—two powers supposed to
be at variance always, and to share the week
—the holy and unholy elements of man's
brief existence, were combined in Flam-
borough parish in the person of its magis-
for he was a full doctor of divinity. Before
this gentleman must be laid, both for purse
and conscience's sake, the case of the child
Reverend Turner Upround, to give him his
Flamborough. Of all his offices and powers,
there was not one that he overstrained; and
all that knew him, unless they were thorough-
that he was such a soft-spoken man as many
hie deeds and nature, which were of the
kindest. He did his utmost, on demand of
fool, unless a kind heart proves folly. At
early days of the tripos, and was chosen fellow
and tutor of Gonville and Caius College. But
was one of the many upon which a perpetual
faster can barely live, unless he can go naked
also, and keep naked children. Now the
merits of hard fasting, but freely enjoyed,
and with gratitude to God, the powers with
which He had blessed them. Happily Dr.
Upround had a solid income of his own, and
(like a sound mathematician) he took a wife
of terms coincident. So, without being
their poorer neighbours.
Such a man generally thrives in the thriv-
ing of his flock, and does not harry them.
He gives them spiritual food enough to sup-
port them without daintiness, and he keeps
the proper distinction between the Sunday
and the poorer days. He clangs no bell of
reproach upon a Monday, when the squire
is leading the lady into dinner, and the
labourer sniffing at his supper-pot, and he
lets the world play on a Saturday, while he
works his own head to find good ends for the
morrow. Because he is a wise man who
knows what other men are, and how seldom
they desire to be told the same thing more
than a hundred and four times in a year.
Neither did his clerical skill stop here: for
Parson Upround thought twice about it, be-
fore he said anything to rub sore consciences,
even when he had them at his mercy, and
silent before him, on a Sunday. He behaved
like a gentleman in this matter, where so
much temptation lurks, looking always at
the man whom he did not mean to hit, so
that the guilty one received it through him,
and felt himself better by comparison. In a
word, this parson did his duty well, and
pleasantly for all his flock; and nothing em-
bittered him, unless a man pretended to doc-
trine without holy orders.
For the doctor reasoned thus—and sound
it sounds—if divinity is a matter for Tom,
Dick, or Harry, how can there be degrees in
it? He held a degree in it, and felt what it
had cost; and not the parish only, but even
his own wife, was proud to have a doctor
every Sunday. And his wife took care that his
rich red hood, kerseymere small-clothese, and
black silk stockings upon calves of dignity,
were such that his congregation scorned the
surgeons all the way to Beverley.
Happy in a pleasant nature, kindly heart,
and tranquil home, he was also happy in
those awards of life in which men are help-
less. He was blest with a good wife and
three children, doing well, and vigorous and
hardy as the air and clime and cliffs. His
wife was not quite of his own age, but old
enough to understand and follow him faith-
fully down the slope of years. A wife with
mind enough to know that a husband is not
faultless, and with heart enough to feel that
if he were she would not love him so. And
under her were comprised their children, two
boys at school, and a baby-girl at home.
So far, the rector of this parish was truly
blessed and blessing. But in every man's lot
must be some crook, since this crooked world
turned round. In Parson's Upround's lot
the crook might seem a very small one; but
he found it almost too big for him. His
dignity, and peace of mind, large good-will
of minstry, and strong Christian sense of
magistracy, all were sadly pricked and
wounded by a very small thorn in the flesh of
his spirit.
Almost every honest man is the rightful
owner of a nick-name. When he was a boy
at school he could not do without one, and if
the other boys valued him, perhaps he had a
dozen. And afterwards, when there is less
perception of right and wrong and character,
in the weaker time of manhood, he may earn
with him, yet meaning no more harm than
pepper, smite him to the quick, at venture, in
his most retired and privy-conscienced hole.
does it owes some money to the man he does
could get it for nothing. This was a man of
heterodox. As a part of the bargain, this
as could be hoped of a man who had received
his money. He sat by a pillar, and no more
charged him a full crown beyond the con-
and looked at Mr. Jobbins with a soft, re-
cheat any sound clergyman again; where-
what he thought of Parson Upround's
griskin (come straight from the rectory pig
opinion long remembered at Flamborough—
even among those who loved him best. For
spring cabbages. So that Mrs. Upround,
when buttoning up his coat—which he
always forgot to do for himself—did it with
them), tried to bow—or rather rise—to night-
him for long, and he liked to talk of it after-
not be up to all their hours, but may take
His parishioners—who could do very well
without him, so far as that goes, all the
their boats—joyfully left him to his own time
of day, and no more worried him out of
For this reason, on St. Swithin's morn, in
the lauch, but could not pull the labouring
oar, nor even hold the tiller, spent the time
till 10 o'clock in seeing to their own affairs—
any woman. And then, with some little dis-
pute among them (the offspring of the merest
accident), they arrived in some force at the
woman do it for her. But an old man came
Mrs. Cockscroft had thoroughly fed the little
stranger, and washed him, and undressed
great orders—so far as his new nurse could
make out—but speaking gibberish, as she said,
and flying into a rage because it was out of
Cockscroft, being a pious woman, hoped that
child seemed to take in much of what was
said, and when asked his name, answered
wrathfully, and as if everybody was bound to
know—"Izunsabe, Izunsabe!"
But now, when brought before Dr. Up-
stock could look more calm and peaceful.
He could walk well enough, but liked better
so taken him up was only too proud to carry
him. Whatever the rector and magistrate
"Set him down, ma'am, "the doctor said,
women all about him; "Mistress Cockscroft,
put him on his legs, and let me question
him."
But the child resisted this proceeding.
With nature's inborn and just loathing of
examination, he spun upon his little heels,
and swore with all his might, at the same
time throwing up his hands and twirling his
thumbs in a very odd and foreign way.
"What a shocking child!" cried Mrs.
THE NOVELIST. MARY AN[?]. CHAPTER X, ROBIN [?]. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 13 September 1879 [Issue No.702] page 5 2019-10-07 12:47 TH* HWAItt.
MAftf AftfllMflf.'
fHft,tiffi.M'ktfaM.
Ar,«»t[ (!p " IjhdsA ('Uflffft, ' " Till? Maiu (»C
KKt-n," " Amor Ij'HtilAlfJP," ft**.
(fflMIMl V.
ll ilf fi IrtigHf to the (lOflli nf Mil Kbit",
imfnttufi llMi'l. tlif I'lili'wa nnvt* eafwl fat
(.pinnch ec ft llHIt f(nt> luuttfigst clllfw tvhifrfi
itP rncctfi, <"?< rCff fiiffb. Xltte fttittjlng
?I PMii.Hhiiie liKjUhf- of a mill. Of
1a, rcHi fat flMHfig Kfwtfeli SO H(e(?p is t he
of thfc Rftittnn, mttf bo ntitfow the
?hind? ttt ",e hOft tf-itly in
l,nd wnithnr ft* hi^h tides. Uifite is »m
aiiiittrlf1 ledge tit (lit, hilt; the Mestdf till? WftVG
./.)!»-vs «t> the ifieltiie. f»ntl thfc hum tushes
«, to the thr of It. For thfc (SOW, thtrttth
' .pur-fed from other fjtihrffets, recelyeN the
full brunt. of north-ensterly gtilfS, find offers
*,0 wife htiohofage. Utifc the hardy flBher
L.nti irmhe the most of its acniit convenience,
IS nrr.tefi.11jr cull it "North Jading
nil,pit both wind (ttid tide most be in good
liutitour, or the only thing stife of any land
.",» is the Bed. The long deso titlon of the
»,na rolls in with A sound of melancholy, the
«rev fog droops its fold of drlswle in the
Men-tinted troughs, the pent cliffs over
linng the Hopping of the Sail, and a few yards
* f pebble and of weed are all that a boat
way come upon harmlessly. Yet here in
ihe old time landed men who carved the
shape of England; and here, even In these
leaper dnvs, are landed uncommonly fine cod.
The difficulties of the feat are these-to get
011 land, which iB yet a harder Btep. Because
upon either side Juta up close, to forbid any
denies Fair Btart for a rush at the power of
the hill-front. Yet here must the h,eavy
crew get out of them, their gunwaleB swing
ing from Bide to side, in the manner of a
porpoise rolliqg, and their stem and stem
going up and down, like a pair of lads at see*
groove and run at every sudden Bhower, but
never grows any the' softer, up that the
summit is made fast, aa soon as the tails of
grinding of the Btubborn tug begins. Each
strike fire. By dint of sheer eturdineas of
the pant and the Bhout, steadily goes it with
melody of call that rallies them all with'a
battery, against the tiBhful sea. With a
curve, iriBte&d of a straight pertinacity ot
what may to them, -when they are at home,
the steep, they make a bright Bhow upon the
dreariness of ooastland, hanging as they do
above the gullet of the deep. . Painted out
with the purest white,** a little war off, they
of all these, that the very famous Robin iLfth
-prophetically treating him, bnt free«s yet
of fame, or name.and,.simply unable tat tell
himself-shone in thedoubt of the early day
light (as a tidy-aizodtod, if .forgotten, might
have shone) Upon-ibeHiarning offit. 8 within.
A.D. 1782. "i .fa*;*** 1
The day and the* date'wer^ remembered
long by all the good people-of Flatnborough.
from the coming of the turn ofa~ Ion? baa
luck *nd~» bitter time of starvingt- i For the
usual-which is no little thing to. sayt-and
the fish had expressed thelropinipn of it by
the eloquent silenoe ofabaenc&.v Therefore,
as the whole place lives on fish-whether in
the fishy or the fiscal form-goodly apparel
Sundays; and stomachs'that might have
looked well beneath it Batik into unobtrusive
grief. But it is a long -lane that has no -turn
ing, and turns are the essence of > one very
vital part. 1
Suddenly over the village :Jhad flown the
news of a noble arrival, of fish. From the
cross-roads and. the public-house, and the
and the loop-hole where® sheep had been
known to hang,-in times of better trade, but
never could dream of h&ngingnow; alao from
the window of the man who bad had a
hundred headB, (superior to bis own) shaken
at him becajwe&eaet.up formakmg breeches,
in opposition to we women, and showed a
lew patterns qf-whatheooula do .if .any man
of legs would trade with him-from all these
2 " " ' »t,\intp,the
th'eftrilTin a,
iwn flicker,
'indbad<ruii
teQ his good
53'"and
S2? tMlor^s
6hOP. And thia AH i Su wmflilnV m
££. And ^i^OD ^^sritWn's eve.
V* nottl^ t©«ra5S&at night, of
dahcatslr
SsssaseSrssJ
limit '('litjinstiltw' lii|naf|f tiituM loll) lny ftlumi.
(Mill fiillfMl IMMMiL Biiu tlioll <i>vli
(nHMlHfl, lifHj nim lijf'lp fniu (MtijvvJific.
tyioii lliiiMlf-Jteffe of «li/< ftfid stuijil'K til
iBftuiHr tfiUW fjMmia wMiMfifi,
hiirt Hi (life fjlift Mvflttf
nil Mlfiltlfltf nn7fi«lM« tlwfrte.
I'M ikft MHefil Otittttm frlfcli (1 tfMil If"
li'MM mlfmijy, utid lo'ifi li'ilt'S of f.tlig
jtMhUhli ftt (life IfJMi t'ilSllfijttHtOfifliJy
t iiiifi within fiiAlf tfeat-lt a jttfiwrtl iiyvi
it lllf* t'fjffhl&a ttff fflftt IfliliifS Cllfetfi, tthfl n
H mfflfe Of JjidOfiSlftWt dlih«6f¥«| Mttt Musod In
h iMl fiDjr flglif bh nlfchtl of MfftligCl, ot i fant
1U1 wiftfiitlofift mm* tliftii Uitce .m<lrt olf, In
tfvfttfy fellji tlifcfle nppCrttea the fmtfe (liec of
1Miwfi, JHjt selling thfe Astern liifclt
latin*, nml r'(lnitHhB nffiiwH" fht-ough suftiftiet
litif.e: while flwhy in tlifj north-fcast otfet thfe
ft Blfehflfef IfffegUlnt wisp Of BO Wfeiilt
Mint It s&fettifed da If It were lieihtf btort'ti
hwtiy, tiptolt^tifert the Intention of the stio to
rfestoffe Heaf Irtew of tinttiber ntid of fltsure
\tt ntid liye. fttif, llille did anybody heed audi
tiling j evetr one tun fipnitiat everybody elae,
niid all vrfia eagerness. haste, and hustle for
bouts, nit of tthlrh ffittst he token in order.
Btit when they Inld hold of the bout No, 7,
which need to be the Mercy ftobiti, and were
men stooping under her stern beheld some
down to it, and lo, it was a child, in im
man, not in time with bis voice, but in time
with his sturdy Bhoulder, to delay the descent
ofthe counter. Then he stooped underneath,
now, even of & man's own fine breed, and the
boat was beginning much to cbafe upon the
Btill. And the captain could not find his
S, have her own little cry, because of the
ance her children would have made, if they
their own babies, and if wordB came to action,
account, CockBcroft could do no better, bound
as he waa to rush forth upon the Bea, than
and the Bhout, the tramp of heavy feet, the
prove fatal. And the ancient woman fell |
asleep beside him: because at her time of |
early. And it happened that Mistress Cocks
him, which Bhe failed to fetch to hand. So
giving him a corner of her scarlet shawL
and went up wares, which clearly were the
keening his hat and coat on; neither could
fishermen might be after-nobody having a
spy-glass-but only this being understood
all round, that hunger and sale were the
with lightsome hearts (So hope outstrips the
strong will, up the hill they ^yent, to do
glorious supper. For mackerel ate good fish
Flambunans speak a rich bait of their own,
broadly and handsomely diBtinfct from that
contempt for *11 hot haste and hurry (which
people of impatient fibre are too apt to 6all
Yorkshire, guiding and retarding well that j
headlong instrument the tongue. Yet even <
here there is advantage on the side of!
Flamboroogh-a longer resonance, a larger
by gome called the end of a sentence. Over
i Denmark " many words foreign to the real
I Yorkahireman. But aha 1 these merits of
their speech-cannot be embodied in print,
still more Baddfening. Therefore it is proposed
about it. .For when they are left to them
selves entirely, 'they have so \ much solid
minds and throats with a process ao de
liberate that atrangeramight condemn them
briefly, and be off without nearing H«lf of it
Whenever thia happens to a Flamborongh
and then'aays it all orer again to thewind.
When tto "Jbviiua" of the viltaeXas.the
iveakerpart, unfit lor«e& and left behind,
were politely balled} being vetyjold men, *
women, and small children), full 6f convert*-t
tion camei'upon their way back from the tide,
could not help disoo'vering there the poor old
woman that fell Asleep, because she ought
to.have beeninbed,and by her side a little
boy, who eeemed to have no bed at all The
child lay aboveherina tump of stubby grass,
where BoibinOockaoroft had laid him ; he had
tossed the old sail -off, perhaps in a dream,
and he threatened. toroll down upon die
Granny. The contract between his yobng,
beautiful face, whit® raiment, and readiness
U>roll, and .the ancient woman's weary age
{wmon.it would be." ungtaciotts tosdesoribe)
iud scarlet ehawl»WUchabe oould pot spare,
and satufsctioe.to Ji* ?atUlrr*s tbe best
thing Jeft bar, now do-tfus differenoe
bttween tfeem waa enough telate anybody's
ipotice, fateinjr the well-eatabliah^d^un. .
; Vl{ani& Itaw, mt oqpv? MlV octed a
woman-even, older, wt.octoogaec. conatitu-,
tion., iui»baaMoniikraootflo. Bey*
br^tobedthu'tMmeorioifer i.
< "A^wtrnderfuliotntbabbriof<ieh«nowxi
Imotherr Mfrtiftrrtooeeded irathtke elegant .
Ji-ftfri "fliid folftt' ImtufitfeH ('m. rrf n-.tTif
(."wrfubcjlt "tinf" ,
''MTMm "lift 0' ft <4> tiie^njV'rii^l
tMUJfM|%l/if4 fM ft! ftMftfttfflttfr W.tv.M ;
"MAaltt Uiil'lfi tycltfibtofl.ftlt ttift
Mi'lifntltifrt# foil liH Mfii l»tif (iw-im
L i .
.Itwn tiotUto'tMi. ttltli ft JtMf# lipflfl, wns
lltigefHig ftit behind the tliittltliifl of the
Uiliji.t Itlfff* JtUdicliM, ifliMl,ftltifln- ttiutig
llobfit ttculfi jirtvfe fjewi l|i tlif,ban! with hip
ftiMitfi bfid bet little Merry, cllttging
tti hef lihfifl, «Mfi (lie hbtfietmd fond, nrni
jifrtltHiig of tlit* llsb fn be ettfighl that dar;
atitl IfwmtiiitHi us .Tttnh litid not beeh able to
bH (net) to fane tvllh her husband on the
nenrh ahe had not yet heard of the Jtrntyjcr
child. Ml Rtihti Ibe wotnt?n sent. a flltle liny
to feteh her, and shf came nttiong th«m
wnfulerltie tvhht It eouM be. if Of now ti
debute hi sofne vigour was arising upon a
momentous nnd exciting point, though nt»t 80
keen I if h hundredth f»ttH as it would hive
been fn-enty years afterwards. Fnr the
eldest old woman had pronounced hef de
"Tell ye Wat, ah dean't think but wat yon
This caused sotne pariio and a general
ret, a chronic uneasiness about Crappos
" frogman!" cried the old woman neit to
parts, though not yet ripe. " Na, nn. what
like latnperns. No sign of no frog aboot yon
Flaambro', And what gowd ha' Crappos got,
This opened the gate for a clamour of dis
was to listen to her Bay, unless any man of
equal age aroBe to countervail it. But while
they were thus divided, Mrs. CockBcroft
were grieved because she took it bo to heart.
Joan Cockecroft did not say a word, but
and vastly Boever inferior, opened his eyes,
heart of Joan Cockecroft It was the exact
look-or BO she always said-of her dead
the Bake of his poor dear stomach. With an
did not seem to like it He drew away his red
him down BO, with delicate hands, and a
into ner, and smile. Then she turned round
THE NOVELIST.
MARY ANERLEY.*
BY R. D. BLACKMORE,
AUTHOR OF "LORNA DOONE," "THE MAID OF
SEER," "ALICE LORRAINE," &C.
CHAPTER X.
ROBIN LYTH.
Half a league to the north of hold Flam-
borough Head, the billows have carved for
themselves a little cove amongst cliffs which
are rugged, but not very high. This opening
is something like the grain-shoot of a mill, or
a screen for riddling gravel, so steep is the
pitch of the ground, and so narrow the
shingly ledge at the bottom. And truly in
bad weather and at high tides, there is no
shingle ledge at all, but the crest of the wave
volleys up the incline, and the surf rushes
on to the top of it. For the cove, though
sheltered from other quarters, receives the
full brunt of north-easterly gales, and offers
no safe anchorage. But the hardly fisher-
men make the most of its scant convenience,
and gratefully call it "North Landing;"
albeit both wind and tide must be in good
humour, or the only thing sure of any land-
ing is the sea. The long desolation of the
sea rolls in with a sound of melancholy,
the grey fog droops its fold of drizzle in the
leaden-tinted troughs, the pent cliffs over-
hang the flapping of the sail, and a few yards
of pebble and of weed are all that a boat
may come upon harmlessly. Yet here in
the old time landed men who carved the
shape of England; and here, even in these
lesser days, are landed uncommonly fine cod.
The difficulties of the feat are these—to get
on land, which is yet a harder step. Because
upon either side juts up close, to forbid any
denies fair start for a rush at the power of
the hill-front. Yet here must the heavy
crew get out of them, their gunwales swing-
ing from side to side, in the manner of a
porpoise rolling, and their stem and stern
going up and down, like a pair of lads at see-
saw.
groove and run at every sudden shower, but
never grows any the softer, up that the
summit is made fast, as soon as the tails of
brow of the steep; and then with "yo-heave-
grinding of the stubborn tug begins. Each
strike fire. By dint of sheer sturdiness of
the pant and the shout, steadily goes it with
melody of call that rallies them all with a
battery, against the fishful sea. With a
curve, instead of a straight pertinacity of
what may to them, when they are at home,
the steep, they make a bright show upon the
dreariness of coastland, hanging as they do
above the gullet of the deep. Painted out-
with the purest white, at a little way off, they
of all these, that the very famous Robin Lyth
—prophetically treating him, but free as yet
of fame, or name, and simply unable to tell
himself—shone in the doubt of the early day-
light (as a tidy-sized cod, if forgotten, might
have shone) upon the morning of St. Swithin,
A.D. 1782.
The day and the date were remembered
long by all the good people of Flamborough,
from the coming of the turn of a long bad
luck and a bitter time of starving. For the
usual—which is no little thing to say—and
the fish had expressed their opinion of it by
the eloquent silence of absence. Therefore,
as the whole place lives on fish—whether in
the fishy or the fiscal form—goodly apparel
Sundays; and stomachs that might have
looked well beneath it sank into unobtrusive
grief. But it is a long lane that has no turn-
ing, and turns are the essence of one very
vital part.
Suddenly over the village had flown the
news of a noble arrival of fish. From the
cross-roads and the public-house, and the
and the loop-hole where a sheep had been
known to hang, in times of better trade, but
never could dream of hanging now; alas from
the window of the man who had had a
hundred heads (superior to his own) shaken
at him because he set up for making breeches,
in opposition to the women, and showed a
few patterns of what he could do if any man
of legs would trade with him—from all these
so prominent but equally potent, into the
smallest hole it went (like the thrill in a
troublesome tooth) that here was a chance
come of feeding—a chance at last of feeding;
for the man on the cliff, the despairing watch-
man, weary of fastening his eyes upon the sea,
through constant fog and drizzle, at length had
discovered the well-known flicker, the glassy
flaw, and the hovering of gulls, and had run
along Weighing-lane so fast to tell his good
news in the village, that down he fell and
broke his leg, exactly opposite the tailor's
shop. And this was on St. Swaith's eve.
There was nothing to be done that night, of
course, for mackerel must be delicately
worked; but long before the sun arose, all
Flamborough able to put leg in front of leg,
and some who could not yet do that, gathered
together where the landhold was, above the
incline for the launching of the boats. Here
was a medley, not of fisher-folk alone, and
all their bodily belongings, but also of the
thousand things that have no soul, and get
kicked about and sworn at much because
they cannot answer. Rollers, buoys, nets,
kegs, swabs, fenders, blocks, buckets, kedges,
corks, buckle-poles, oars, poppies, tillers,
sprits, gaffs, and every kind of gear (more
thank Thorcritus himself could tell) lay about,
and rolled about, and upset their own
masters, here and there and everywhere,
upon this half-acre of slip and stumble, at
the top of the boat-channel down to the sea,
and in the faint rivalry of three vague lights,
all making darkness visible.
For very ancient lanterns, with a gentle
horny glimmer, and loop-holes of large exag-
geration at the top, were casting upon any-
thing quite within their reach a general idea
of the crinkled tin that framed them, and a
shuffle of inconstant shadows, but refused to
shed any light on friend or stranger, or clear
up suspicions more than three yards off. In
rivalry with these appeared the pale disc of
the moon, just setting over the western high-
lands, and "drawing straws" through summer
haze; while away in the north-east over the
sea s slender irregular wisp of grey, so weak
that it seemed as if it were being blown
away, betokened the intention of the sun to
restore clear ideas of number and of figure
by and bye. But little did anybody heed such
things; every one ran against everybody else,
and all was eagerness, haste, and bustle for
boats, all of which must be taken in order.
But when they laid hold of the boat No. 8,
which used to be Mercy Robin, and were
men stooping under her stern beheld some-
down to it, and lo, it was a child, in im-
man, not in time with his voice, but in time
with his sturdy shoulder, to delay the descent
of the counter. Then he stooped underneath,
now, even of a man's own fine breed, and the
boat was beginning much to chafe upon the
still. And the captain could not find his
to have her own little cry, because of the
dance her children would have made, if they
their own babies, and if words came to action,
account, Cockscroft could do no better, bound
as he was to rush forth upon the sea, than
and the shout, the tramp of heavy feet, the
prove fatal. And the ancient woman fell
asleep beside him; because at her time of
early. And it happened that Mistress Cocks-
him, which she failed to fetch to hand. So
giving him a corner of her scarlet shawl.
and went up waves, which clearly were the
keeping his hat and coat on; neither could
fishermen might be after—nobody having a
spy-glass—but only this being understood
all round, that hunger and salt were the
with lightsome hearts (so hope outstrips the
strong will, up the hill they went, to do
glorious supper. For mackerel are good fish
Flamburians speak a rich burr of their own,
broadly and handsomely distinct from that
contempt for all hot haste and hurry (which
people of impatient fibre are too apt to call
Yorkshire, guiding and retarding well that
headlong instrument the tongue. Yet even
here there is advantage on the side of
Flamborough—a longer resonance, a larger
by some called the end of a sentence. Over
Yorkshireman. But alas! these merits of
their speech cannot be embodied in print,
still more saddfening. Therefore it is proposed
about it. For when they are left to them-
selves entirely, they have so much solid
minds and throats with a process so de-
liberate that strangers might condemn them
briefly, and be off without hearing half of it.
Whenever this happens to a Flamborough
and then says it all over again to the wind.
When the "havings" of the village (as the
weaker part, unfit for sea and left behind,
were politely called, being very old men,
women, and small children), full of conversa-
tion came, upon their way back from the tide,
could not help discovering there the poor old
woman that fell asleep, because she ought
to have been in bed, and by her side a little
boy, who seemed to have no bed at all. The
child lay above her in a tump of stubby grass,
where Robin Cockscroft had laid him; he had
tossed the old sail off, perhaps in a dream,
and he threatened to roll down upon the
Granny. The contrast between his young,
beautiful face, white raiment, and readiness
to roll, and the ancient woman's weary age
(which it would be ungracious to describe)
and scarlet shawl, which she could not spare,
and satisfaction to lie still—as the best
thing left her now to do—this difference
between them was enough to take anybody's
notice, facing the well-established sun.
"Nanny Pegler, get oop wi' ye!" cried a
woman even older, but of tougher constitu-
tion. "Shame on ye to lig aboot so. Be ye
browt to bed this toime o' loife?"
"A wonderful foine babby for sich an owd
mother!" another proceeded with the elegant
joke; "and foine swaddles too, wi' solid
gowd upon 'em!"
"Stan' Ivery one o' ye oot o' the way," cried
ancient Nanny, now as wide awake as ever;
"Master Robin Cockscroft gie ma t' bairn,
an' nawbody sall hev him but Joan Cocks-
croft."
Joan Cockscroft, with a heavy heart, was
lingering far behind the rest, thinking of the
many merry launches, when her smart young
Robin would have been in the boat with his
father, and her pretty little Mercy, clinging
to her hand, upon the homeward road, and
prattling of the fish to be caught that day;
and inasmuch as Joan had not been able to
get face to face with her husband on the
beach she had not yet heard of the stranger
child. But soon the women sent a little boy
to fetch her, and she came among them
wondering what it could be. For now a
debate of some vigour was arising upon a
momentous and exciting point, though not so
keen by a hundredth part as it would have
been twenty years afterwards. For the
eldest old woman had pronounced her de-
"Tell ye wat, ah dean't think but wat yon
This caused some panic and a general
yet, a chronic uneasiness about Crappos
"Frogman!" cried the old woman next to
parts, though not yet ripe. "Na, na, what
like lamperns. No sign of no frog aboot yon
Flaambro'. And what gowd ha' Crappos got,
This opened the gate for a clamour of dis-
was to listen to her say, unless any man of
equal age arose to countervail it. But while
they were thus divided, Mrs. Cockscroft
were grieved because she took it so to heart.
Joan Cockscroft did not say a word, but
and vastly soever inferior, opened his eyes,
heart of Joan Cockscroft. It was the exact
look—or so she always said—of her dead
the sake of his poor dear stomach. With an
did not seem to like it. He drew away his red
him down so, with delicate hands, and a
into her, and smile. Then she turned round
THE NOVELIST. MARY ANERLEY. CHAPTER IX. ROBIN COCKSCROFT. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 6 September 1879 [Issue No.701] page 5 2019-10-04 12:15 THE NOmUT.
MAft* Atffitfciiti*.*
fit K. b. htACKmnn.
A t'Tiinit nr " tioftNA I)oonr," " Titrc Maid or
hkrii," " Amor IjoitrtAmr:," kn.
HnArtfen IX,
nonm OOCKSPROI'T.
Nothing fever win allowed to atop Mrs.
kept tncfn nirlrtg for about three hottrri, ftfc
this titne of the sun-stitch-us she called ail
the doings of the sun upon the sky-and then
there was pushing, and probing, and toasting,
.and pulling, and thumping, and kheadlng of
knuckles, till the fib of every feather wag
itching ; and then (like dough before the fire)
every well-belaboured tick waa left to yeast
jlself awhile, Winnie, the maid, was as
Jbed-mnking. Carroway heard the beginning
with bis comfort: he lay back nicely in a
drawing a vapoury dream of ease, lie had
Ahan they used to be once upon a time. Look
the weary man ordered drowsily; " Matfcie,
" I could not be happy without telling yoa
the truth," the Boft voice continued, " be
now-oh"? here comes mother!"
rest Go round and look for eggs this very
moment You will want to be playing fine
Bervice, if you please, unless you feel too
Bleepy."
eye open; and it ie not often that we see
"Ah, Captain Carroway, what ways'you
have of getting on with Bimple people, while
"Ah, you mean Flamborough-Flam
feorougta, yes ! It is a nest of cockatrices."
Captain, it is nothing of the sort. It is
the moat honest place in all the world. A
xnan may throw a. guinea on the crOss-roads
in the night, ana hAVeit bade from Dr.
Upanaown any time within seven years. You
fliard as it is to get among them."
"1 only know that they can shut their
'tnouths, ana the devil himself-Ibegyout
pardon, madam-Old Nick himself never
could uniscrevrtheni.',, '
"Youareright,sir/ Ikftow'thteir manner
welL They are open as the' .skywftn bhsi an
.®ther, but close as the grave to ail the world
?outside them, and most of all to people of
w Miatifess Arierley, you haw just hit it.
?Not a word can I get out of them. The name
spiffs© *r>
y°u cannot get at them, sir, by«n|y
.flint 01 money, or even by living in the' midst
of>th$m. Theouly way to do it is by kin of 1
*jlood, or marriage. And that is howl come 1
so know more«boutthem than almost any
«*ody elite 'outside. ' My master can* scarcely 1
*Win a word of them even, kind1 as he is, and
*v<fll-spokfen; told neither might I, thpueh
any tongue was tenfold, if ijc vrere "not for
. Joan Cockscroft. But being John's cousin, I
am likfe oneofthematlves." -
"CockscToft ! Cockacroft! I have heard
*hat name. Do they keep the public-house
there?
The lieutenant was now on the sceiit of
outy, and assumed his most knowing air, the
Bole effect of which was to tout everybody
?of no subtlety, but straightforward, down
light, and ready to believe; and his cleverest
-device was to seem to disbelieve.
Mre. Anerley answered. with a little flush of
firide; " why, she was half-niece to my own
if it was. Captain, you ate thinking of Widow
OTeofoas, licensed to the God with the hook
§n his gills. I should have thought, sir, that
yoataighfc have known a little more of your
JuFeby reason of bad bank-tokens. Banking
can» up .in her parts like dog madness, as ie
aught have done here, if our farmers were
?MS foolfl to handle their cash with gloves on.
And'Jban became robbed by the fault of her
towtfeeMihe very beet bankers in Scarborough;
plough Robin never married her for it, thank
Bod! Still it was very sad, arid scarcely
flMMi describing of, and pullett them in the
«ook of this world s Bwing to a IoWfer pitch
Chap tf tbey had robbed the folk that robbed
fcnd ruinW them. And Robin so was'dHtfen
Jo the fish again, which he always had
fcwkered Mtor. -It most have befori
Jot heard tif this ooast, oaptaln, and before
*°ng war jfas so hard on oS. that evarjr
»ody about these pairts Was to double his bags
I# banking, .and no man wa» right to pocket
byngmneaa, for fear of bis own wife
^ bitterly snob were paid
®?t tdx thtif cowardice and dwindling of
liheur ovmlMwoms." ' 5 ? ^ T
h&TOheMdofitofteq, auditserved them
Hgit Master Anerley knew where his money
^nm8 flUli '.ttS ADA v .
way to blame," answered
Jus. Anerlby. .. I have framed my mind tt>
uu Madam, yoa remind me of my own wife.
' T^J8 th® only way I know of getfiaig
S%r JKf* CartOwjay must undents?
Sj* A ""'fciary
Beim^urohaeed br the proprietors ot " The AuatrS
ftood-looltlng. t «ps quilti »t child, find, tan
elWig life HliflM ih fee ft. ft tnttst liftvfe been
tn Uie high summer tltno, with the weathef
lit for bulbing, Mia the Bto at stuootli 01 n
duck-pond. And CMtttftt Httnln, being well
to-do, ftiin MtabllBliba with everything except
n wife, ntid pife&Sfed with thfe pretty a tulle and
quiet ways of Joan-for lie never had heard
of bet money, mind-put his oat into the aea
mid rowed from Jflntnboroiigh all thfe way to
J'iley flrigg, with thlfty-fite fishermen after
handsomest man, and the uttermost linker
of the landing, with three boats of his own.
there at once they found my cougiti Joan,
witli her trustees, come overland, four wag
thejr were married, they burned sea-weed,
And a inerry day they made of it, and rowed
openness of his hands when full-a wonder
ful quiet and harmless man, as the manuer
hair was growing (trey, and his eyes getting
all the secrete of the fishes, while his father
year, was lost in a new-fangled bank, sup
posed as faithful aB the Bible. Joan was
say it was nearly seven hundred guineas. i
of feather-beds.' j
body knowa what befell him. The new boat, I
clever and sprightly, and good to learn: they
never even took a common bird's nest, 1 have
of their daddy. It came on to blow, as it does |
down there, without a single whiff of warn
ing, and when Robin awoke for his middle
grow old very quickly. The boat was re
hands upon his lap, and his eyes apon the
Bit. Because he has always taken whatever
Madam, you make me feel quite sorry for
drowned, I declare 10 you I cannot tell what
once, and as his own wife (perhaps would say,
because hie was thinking of his breakfast!
long time, thank God, sinoe I heard so sad a
tale;"
getting up a smile, yet freshening his per
ception of a tear as well; " you would never :
have the heart; to destroy that poor old
oouple by striking the last prop from under
"Mistress! Anerley, have you ever* heard
411 hope with all my heart you may. And
| begotten."
it you will have to take three lives-Robin's,
I the captain's, and my dear old cousin Joan's."
duty was so plain, and would pay BO well for
| " Listen now, oaptain. It iB my opinion,
Lyth, you may get a' thousand for preserving
this coast, and how he has won his extraordi
any two alike; but I took no heed of thtm.
' My duty was to catch him; and it mattered
not a straw to me who br what he was. But
now I must really beg tokndw all about him,
such a quantity of money? Honestly, .of course,
. "Captain Carroway,"his hostess said, not
King find his revenue, /'cheating of His
Majesty is a "thing we leave for others. But
man, so far as known, which 1b not 90 even
in flamborough, you mtiatple&Be to coc&e on
Sunday, air; for Sunday is the only day: that
I can Bp^re for' clacking, as the common
pep'ple toy. I must Beoff no*; I have fifty
tjtitnra'to aejB tp. And on Sunday my master
has nis befet thittjja on, avid loves no better
than to ait with his legs,up, and a long clay
pipe Jying on him down below his wfeist (or,,
to spe&k more correctly, where it used to be,
hear other jEolk pea stories, that might hot
hcyve m&db puch ^d^Tta^Mmt^&lf. And 4s
for dinner, sir. u yps Vw foth^houont to'
dlhe«Uh them that jm no mor0 than In jbhe1
vomiteert, a' Baddle of gofod1 imfttoh "fltlfor (
the skins around them all turned up, will he,
leiidf ^jlSt ht 1 h'clobtc, if U16 IMs
four ififtdtim, 1 eliatlscarcely carp tn
look ftl ntiy slice of until I o'clock on
Sunday, b/ feaeon of looitina forward."
After all, this was not siicii n gross exngge
taffofi, Afiftrley Farm being famous /or Its
iheer; whereas the t>oor lieutenant, at the
best 01 times, had as much as life could d<> to
ft wonderful manager, could give him no
better than coarse oread, and almost coarser
"And, sir, if your Rood lady would oblige
us also-" ,
spoiled by excess of loving vigilance; " wo
have spoken. But with all my heart 1 wish
"1 have pleasure, I assure you, in the
' Tush,' I Bay, 1 Tush, sir; at the rate we
now are lighting, and exhausting all British
mettle Buch as mine 1' What do you say to
more to Bupport the brave hearts that light
MrB. Anerley sighed, for she thought of her
younger son, by hia own perversity launched
much grief, and Buffered plenty of bitterness,
score by not counting them, and by the self
better now to Bet it down without them.
and the third and beBt of all, that if she
prices, if Bhe had turned round upon all these
benefits, and described all the nolea to be
Still, it must be* clearly understood that
but did their very utmost to protect them
THE NOVELIST.
MARY ANERLEY.*
BY R. D. BLACKMORE,
AUTHOR OF "LORNA DOONE," "THE MAID OF
SEER," "ALICE LORRAINE," &c.
CHAPTER IX.
ROBIN COCKSCROFT.
Nothing ever was allowed to stop Mrs.
kept them airing for about three hours, at
this time of the sun-stitch—as she called all
the doings of the sun upon the sky—and then
there was pushing, and probing, and tossing,
and pulling, and thumping, and kneading of
knuckles, till the rib of every feather was
aching; and then (like dough before the fire)
every well-belaboured tick was left to yeast
itself awhile, Winnie, the maid, was as
bed-making. Carroway heard the beginning
with his comfort; he lay back nicely in a
drawing a vapoury dream of ease. He had
than they used to be once upon a time. Look-
the weary man ordered drowsily; "Mattie,
"I could not be happy without telling you
the truth," the soft voice continued, "be-
now—oh? here comes mother!"
rest. Go round and look for eggs this very
moment. You will want to be playing fine
service, if you please, unless you feel too
sleepy."
eye open; and it is not often that we see
"Ah, Captain Carroway, what ways you
have of getting on with simple people, while
"Ah, you mean Flamborough—Flam-
borough, yes! It is a nest of cockatrices."
"Captain, it is nothing of the sort. It is
the most honest place in all the world. A
man may throw a guinea on the cross-roads
in the night, and have it back from Dr.
Upandown any time within seven years. You
hard as it is to get among them."
"I only know that they can shut their
mouths, and the devil himself—I beg your
pardon, madam—Old Nick himself never
could unscrew them."
"You are right, sir. I know their manner
well. They are open as the sky with one an-
other, but close as the grave to all the wold
outside them, and most of all to people of
"Mistress Anerley, you have just hit it.
Not a word can I get out of them. The name
of the King—God bless him!—seems to have
no weight among them."
"And you cannot get at them, sir, by any
hint of money, or even by living in the midst
of them. The only way to do it is by kin of
blood, or marriage. And that is how I come
to know more about them than almost any-
body else outside. My master can scarcely
win a word of them even, kind as he is, and
well-spoken; and neither might I, though
my tongue was tenfold, if it were not for
Joan Cockscroft. But being Joan's cousin, I
am like one of themselves."
"Cockscroft! Cockscroft? I have heard
that name. Do they keep the public-house
there?"
The lieutenant was now on the scent of
duty, and assumed his most knowing air, the
sole effect of which was to put everybody
of no subtlety, but straightforward, down-
right, and ready to believe; and his cleverest
device was to seem to disbelieve.
Mrs. Anerley answered, with a little flush of
pride; "why, she was half-niece to my own
if it was. Captain, you are thinking of Widow
Precious, licensed to the Cod with the hook
in his gills. I should have thought, sir, that
you might have known a little more of your
life by reason of bad bank-tokens. Banking
came up in her parts like dog madness, as it
might have done here, if our farmers were
the fools to handle their cash with gloves on.
And Joan became robbed by the fault of her
trustees, very best bankers in Scarborough;
though Robin never married her for it, thank
God! Still it was very sad, and scarcely
bears describing of, and pulled them in the
crook of this world's swing to a lower pitch
than if they had robbed the folk that robbed
and ruined him. And Robin so was driven
to the fish again, which he always had
hankered after. It must have been before
you heard of this coast, captain, and before
the long war was so hard on us, that every-
body about these parts was to double his bags
by banking, and no man was right to pocket
his own guineas, for fear of his own wife
feeling them. And bitterly such were paid
out, for their cowardice and swingling of
their own bosoms."
"I have heard of it often, and it served them
right. Master Anerley knew where his money
was safe, ma'am!"
his wife was in any way to blame," answered
Mrs. Anerley. "I have framed my mind to
tell you about them; and I will do it truly, if
I am not interrupted. Two hammers never
yet drove a nail straight, and I make a rule
of silence when my betters wish to talk."
"Madam, you remind me of my own wife.
She asks me a question, and she will not let
me answer."
"That is the only way I know of getting
on. Mistress Carroway must understand
you, captain. I was at the point of telling
you how my cousin Joan was married, before
her money went, and when she was really
* The right of republishing "Mary Anerley" has
been purchased by the proprietors of "The Austral-
asian."
good-looking. I was quite a child, and ran
along the shore to see it. It must have been
in the high summer time, with the weather
fit for bathing, and the sea as smooth as a
duck-pond. And Captain Robin, being well-
to-do, and established with everything except
a wife, and pleased with the pretty smile and
quiet ways of Joan—for he never had heard
of her money, mind—put his oar into the sea
and rowed from Flamborough all the way to
Filey Brigg, with thirty-five fishermen after
handsomest man, and the uttermost fisher
of the landing, with three boats of his own,
there at once they found my cousin Joan,
with her trustees, come overland, four wag-
they were married, they burned sea-weed,
And a merry day they made of it, and rowed
openness of his hands when full—a wonder-
ful quiet and harmless man, as the manner
hair was growing grey, and his eyes getting
all the secrets of the fishes, while his father
year, was lost in a new-fangled bank, sup-
posed as faithful as the Bible. Joan was
say it was nearly seven hundred guineas.
said; 'and the Lord has spared our chil-
of feather-beds.'
"Captain Carroway, he did so, and every-
body knows what befell him. The new boat,
clever and sprightly, and good to learn; they
never even took a common bird's nest, I have
of their daddy. It came on to blow, as it does
down there, without a single whiff of warn-
ing, and when Robin awoke for his middle-
grow old very quickly. The boat was re-
hands upon his lap, and his eyes upon the
sit. Because he has always taken whatever
"Madam, you make me feel quite sorry for
drowned, I declare to you I cannot tell what
once, and as his own wife perhaps would say,
because he was thinking of his breakfast!
long time, thank God, since I heard so sad a
tale."
getting up a smile, yet freshening his per-
have the heart to destroy that poor old
couple by striking the last prop from under
"Mistress Anerley, have you ever heard
"I hope with all my heart you may. And
begotten."
it you will have to take three lives—Robin's,
the captain's, and my dear old cousin Joan's."
duty was so plain, and would pay so well for
"Listen now, captain. It is my opinion,
Lyth, you may get a thousand for preserving
this coast, and how he has won his extraordi-
any two alike; but I took no heed of them.
My duty was to catch him; and it mattered
not a straw to me who or what he was. But
now I must really beg to know all about him,
such a quantity of money? Honestly, of course,
"Captain Carroway," his hostess said, not
King find his revenue, "cheating of His
Majesty is a thing we leave for others. But
man, so far as known, which is not so even
in Flamborough, you must please to come on
Sunday, sir; for Sunday is the only day that
I can spare for clacking, as the common
people say. I must be off now; I have fifty
things to see to. And on Sunday my master
has his best things on, and loves no better
than to sit with his legs up, and a long clay
pipe laying on him down below his waist (or,
to speak more correctly, where it used to be,
hear other folk tell stories, that might not
have made such a dinner as himself. And as
for dinner, sir, if you will do the honour to
dine with them that are no more than in the
volunteers, a saddle of good mutton fit for
the skins around them all turned up, will be,
ready just at 1 o'clock, if the parson lets
us out."
"My dear madam, I shall scarcely care to
look at any slice of victuals until 1 o'clock on
Sunday, by reason of looking forward."
After all, this was not such a gross exagge-
ration, Anerley Farm being famous for its
cheer; whereas the poor lieutenant, at the
best of times, had as much as he could do to
a wonderful manager, could give him no
better than coarse bread, and almost coarser
"And, sir, if your good lady would oblige
us also—"
spoiled by excess of loving vigilance; "we
She would jump at the chance; but a hus-
have spoken. But with all my heart I wish
"I have pleasure, I assure you, in the
'Tush,' I say, 'Tush, sir; at the rate we
now are fighting, and exhausting all British
mettle such as mine!' What do you say to
more to support the brave hearts that fight
Mrs. Anerley sighed, for she thought of her
younger son, by his own perversity launched
much grief, and suffered plenty of bitterness,
score by not counting them, and by the self-
better now to set it down without them.
and the third and best of all, that if she
prices, if she had turned round upon all these
benefits, and described all the holes to be
Still, it must be clearly understood that
but did their very utmost to protect them-
THE NOVELIST. MARY ANERLEY. CHAPTER VIII. CAPTAIN CARROWAY. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 30 August 1879 [Issue No.700] page 5 2019-10-04 11:41 sir, I was at school at Shrewsbury-but as to
The farmer nodded; and hia looks declared
(bat to some extent he felt it. He had got
but hiB wife had another way of thinking.
| " Why, Captain Carroway, whatever could
be purer? When you were-at sea, had you
other men riBe too slowly. Nothing in him;
mailing-spike. And instead of feeding well,
I sir, he quite wore himself away. To my firm
I knowledge, be would scarcely turn the scale
' upon a good Frenchman of half of the peas.
1 unless bis father did it for him. In my time
| we had fifty men as good, and made no fuss
i Lord's Lord Nelson, as the people call him.
If ever a man fought his own way up-"
" Madam, I know him, and respect him ]
| well. He would walk up to the devil, with a
piBtol in each hand. Madam, I leaped in that
into the starboard miren-chains of the French
line-of-batUe ship ' Peace and Thunder.' "
"Oh, Captain Carroway. bow dreadful!
eyes struck nre, and it does the same now by
great thirst of this morning, ana strong
' necessity of quenching it, coula ever have lea
hia own utile exploits. Bat the farmer was
" Mistress Anerley," the captain answered, >
shutting up the Bear, which ne was able to I
expand, by means of a muBcie of excitement; ]
" you know that a man should drop, these 1
subjects, when he haagot a large family. I
and notf I am in the revenue; but my duly is
first to triy own house."
"Do take out, «ir. I beg of tout© b»
Mfeftil. tjiosp ftte itttdm mw &te pom to
iueli a Jiftelf, that mi flftf of WrM tmf imf
6litot yon."
"Not tiitf. madam. Ntt, they ftre hbt
tntnflttptH. fit ft lmftd-toliftfiil cofilllct th^y
ftiJght do If, ftfl 1 might do the gftttife to them.
J'iiib vfefy morning my ftiWi stibi at the
captain of nil Mmigglets, ftobln Lytli, Of
Flnttiborotigh, with ft htitidred guineas upon
hlfi head. It was no wish of mine, but my
breath was short to stop thetn, una n man
with ft family like mine can never despise a
"Why, 8ophy," said the farmer, thinking
slowly with ft frown, " that must have been
the noise come in at window when 1 wfere
getting tip this morning, 1 said, ' Why
conies,' and out 1 went straiglitto the warren
four. How many men wrb you shooting
ursuit of one notorious criminal; that well
nown villain, Uobin Lyth."
But without your own word for it, 1 never
would believe that you brought four gun
mut-zles down upon one man."
Carroway, and I take it that this waa one of
"As to that, no! 1 will not have it. All
waB in thorough good order. I was never bo
much aB a cable's length behind, though the
hia own, Bir."
" Stuff!" cried the captain. " Who waa
1 depart from nothing. I said,' Fire!' and
wordMistress Anerley stopped her husband
altogether, because you have never taken any
that he might have said more than a hoBt
should Bay concerning a matter which, after
any fighting-which generally is the quickest
way of renewing respect-and Mistress Aner
do it, set forth to see a man who waa come
fingers? Never mind that, inter amicos—
sir, I was at school at Shrewsbury—but as to
The farmer nodded; and his looks declared
that to some extent he felt it. He had got
but his wife had another way of thinking.
be purer? When you were at sea, had you
other men rise too slowly. Nothing in him;
marling-spike. And instead of feeding well,
sir, he quite wore himself away. To my firm
knowledge, be would scarcely turn the scale
upon a good Frenchman of half of the peas.
unless his father did it for him. In my time
we had fifty men as good, and made no fuss
Lord's Lord Nelson, as the people call him.
If ever a man fought his own way up—"
well. He would walk up to the devil, with a
pistol in each hand. Madam, I leaped in that
into the starboard mizen-chains of the French
line-of-battle ship 'Peace and Thunder.'"
"Oh, Captain Carroway, how dreadful!
eyes struck fire, and it does the same now by
great thirst of this morning, and strong
necessity of quenching it, could ever have led
his own little exploits. Bat the farmer was
shutting up the scar, which he was able to
expand, by means of a muscle of excitement;
subjects, when he has got a large family. I
and now I am in the revenue; but my duly is
first to my own house."
"Do take care, sir. I beg of you to be
careful. Those free-traders now are come to
such a pitch, that any day or night they may
shoot you."
"Not they, madam. No, they are not
murderers. In a hand-to-hand conflict they
might do it, as I might do the same to them.
This very morning my men shot at the
captain of all smugglers, Robin Lyth, of
Flamborough, with a hundred guineas upon
his head. It was no wish of mine, but my
breath was short to stop them, and a man
with a family like mine can never despise a
"Why, Sophy," said the farmer, thinking
slowly with a frown, "that must have been
the noise come in at window when I were
getting up this morning, I said, 'Why
conies,' and out I went straight to the warren
four. How many men was you shooting
pursuit of one notorious criminal; that well-
known villain, Robin Lyth."
But without your own word for it, I never
would believe that you brought four gun-
muzzles down upon one man."
Carroway, and I take it that this was one of
"As to that, no! I will not have it. All
was in thorough good order. I was never so
much as a cable's length behind, though the
his own, sir."
"Stuff!" cried the captain. " Who was
I depart from nothing. I said, 'Fire!' and
word;" Mistress Anerley stopped her husband
altogether, because you have never taken any-
that he might have said more than a host
should say concerning a matter which, after
any fighting—which generally is the quickest
way of renewing respect—and Mistress Aner-
do it, set forth to see a man who was come
THE NOVELIST. MARY ANERLEY. CHAPTER VIII. CAPTAIN CARROWAY. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 30 August 1879 [Issue No.700] page 5 2019-10-04 11:30 " Ym, «t* .. lit ft tfi them
IjM tltem tfft" ijiftlr Vtofint tifnfti aiul Mien
^"Vl'elt tlrojifef tittie lf» now, *!{? Wfftfi?#*,
fill tl.eir Morns «f>. MW, iwufc r»» «m
ihe tiflim. Cnfilftln (Jnttownr, 1 will not
hnrft fl»ifbo<lf KtftW' In tpr htJtJHo.
" Madam, foil ate flife lawgiver In tour own
house. Mfifi of the coast-guard, fall to upon
your victuals." . , , ,,, ,
Tlie lieutenant frowned ..horribly nt hip
men, na much as to snyt J ake no ntlvtiti
fuge. hut show your bent manners, ami they
touched their forelocks with a pleasant win,
find began to feed rapidly; and verily their
wiveB would have Bald that H was liigb time
for them. Feeding, os n duty, was the order
Good things appeared and disappeared .with
and Winnie the maid, ilitted in and out, like
carrier-pigeons. , . A,, "
" Now when the situation cornea to this,
" His Majesty has made an officer of me.
Fenctbles, Filey Briggers, called in the foreign
Bermonry about it, except in the matter of
best pot empty I" , ,
to blush; and the bloodleBB cheek savoured
mind this little maid may Stan' upright in the
And the pride of my life-Mary, you be off!"
father would not nave her triumphed over.
as rookB know plough-tail. Captain, you
never heard me say that the laas were any
her. and thankful for straight legs and eyes.
London," the captain exclaimed,with a clench
of his list, " or even to Portsmouth, where
tit to hold a candle for Mary to curl her hair
^The farmer was so pleased that he whis
Mary's age-oh, dear! It may not be so for
swinging-glasBes."
her tenth year now "
"Cadman, and Ellis, and Dick Hacker
at fork of the Sewerby road, and Btrictly
half-a-crown each, and promotion of two
pence. Attention, eyes right, make your
selves scarce! Weu, now the rogues are
gone, let us make ourselves at . home.
. one; but tbiB is uncommonly fine stuff!
"Yes, madam, yes; the very worst of them
is that. They are always looking out, here,
there, and everywhere, for victuals everlasting.
Let them wait their proper time, and then
they do it properly."
"Their proper time is now, sir. Winnie,
fill their horns up. Mary, wait you upon
the officer. Captain Carroway, I will not
have anybody starve in my house."
"Madam, you are the lawgiver in your own
house. Men of the coast-guard, fall to upon
your victuals."
The lieutenant frowned horribly at his
men, as much to say, "Take no advan-
tage, but show your best manners," and they
touched their forelocks with a pleasant grin,
and began to feed rapidly; and verily their
wives would have said that it was high time
for them. Feeding, as a duty, was the order
Good things appeared and disappeared, with
and Winnie the maid, flitted in and out, like
carrier-pigeons.
"Now when the situation comes to this,"
"His Majesty has made an officer of me,
Fencibles, Filey Briggers, called in the foreign
sermonry about it, except in the matter of
"Not so, by any means," the mistress said,
best pot empty!"
to blush; and the bloodless cheek savoured
mind this little maid may stan' upright in the
And the pride of my life—Mary, you be off!"
father would not have her triumphed over.
as rooks know plough-tail. Captain, you
never heard me say that the lass were any
her, and thankful for straight legs and eyes.
London," the captain exclaimed, with a clench
of his fist, "or even to Portsmouth, where
fit to hold a candle for Mary to curl her hair
by."
"The farmer was so pleased that he whis-
"Wicked, wicked, is the word I use, pro-
Mary's age—oh, dear! It may not be so for
swinging-glasses."
"That you may pronounce, ma'am, and I
her tenth year now —"
"Cadman, and Ellis, and Dick Hacker-
at fork of the Sewerby road, and strictly
half-a-crown each, and promotion of two-
pence. Attention, eyes right, make your-
selves scarce! Well, now the rogues are
gone, let us make ourselves at home.
one; but this is uncommonly fine stuff!

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.