Information about Trove user: RoyHenderson

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,827,679
2 noelwoodhouse 3,924,403
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,329,684
5 Rhonda.M 3,140,785
...
934 agillanders 45,833
935 rhondab 45,790
936 pilatesking 45,756
937 RoyHenderson 45,755
938 mimmy 45,745
939 AStebbing 45,718

45,755 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

November 2019 14
October 2019 459
September 2019 83
August 2019 18
July 2019 193
June 2019 228
May 2019 844
April 2019 8
December 2018 10
November 2018 564
October 2018 69
August 2018 106
July 2018 182
June 2018 1
May 2018 21
February 2018 152
January 2018 82
December 2017 1,619
November 2017 383
October 2017 279
September 2017 33
August 2017 294
July 2017 11
May 2017 62
April 2017 453
March 2017 14
February 2017 976
January 2017 5,976
December 2016 3,690
November 2016 52
October 2016 544
August 2016 48
June 2016 87
April 2016 117
February 2016 86
January 2016 2
December 2015 80
November 2015 31
October 2015 30
August 2015 48
July 2015 151
June 2015 333
May 2015 72
January 2015 2
December 2014 20
November 2014 56
October 2014 88
September 2014 130
August 2014 2
July 2014 62
June 2014 226
January 2014 40
December 2013 228
October 2013 11
May 2013 9
April 2013 49
March 2013 54
December 2012 57
October 2012 335
June 2012 237
February 2012 365
December 2011 288
November 2011 598
September 2011 4
August 2011 329
July 2011 46
April 2011 84
January 2011 22
November 2010 24
May 2010 90
April 2010 286
March 2010 2,650
February 2010 754
January 2010 655
December 2009 89
November 2009 53
August 2009 228
July 2009 14,550
June 2009 4,529

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,827,477
2 noelwoodhouse 3,924,403
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,329,663
5 Rhonda.M 3,140,772
...
934 rhondab 45,790
935 pilatesking 45,756
936 mimmy 45,745
937 RoyHenderson 45,742
938 AStebbing 45,672
939 jhl1790 45,597

45,742 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

November 2019 14
October 2019 459
September 2019 83
August 2019 18
July 2019 193
June 2019 228
May 2019 844
April 2019 8
December 2018 10
November 2018 564
October 2018 69
August 2018 106
July 2018 182
June 2018 1
May 2018 21
February 2018 152
January 2018 82
December 2017 1,619
November 2017 383
October 2017 279
September 2017 33
August 2017 294
July 2017 11
May 2017 62
April 2017 453
March 2017 14
February 2017 976
January 2017 5,963
December 2016 3,690
November 2016 52
October 2016 544
August 2016 48
June 2016 87
April 2016 117
February 2016 86
January 2016 2
December 2015 80
November 2015 31
October 2015 30
August 2015 48
July 2015 151
June 2015 333
May 2015 72
January 2015 2
December 2014 20
November 2014 56
October 2014 88
September 2014 130
August 2014 2
July 2014 62
June 2014 226
January 2014 40
December 2013 228
October 2013 11
May 2013 9
April 2013 49
March 2013 54
December 2012 57
October 2012 335
June 2012 237
February 2012 365
December 2011 288
November 2011 598
September 2011 4
August 2011 329
July 2011 46
April 2011 84
January 2011 22
November 2010 24
May 2010 90
April 2010 286
March 2010 2,650
February 2010 754
January 2010 655
December 2009 89
November 2009 53
August 2009 228
July 2009 14,550
June 2009 4,529

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 314,433
2 PhilThomas 135,231
3 mickbrook 111,230
4 murds5 61,555
5 GeoffMMutton 53,528
...
1570 rfin 13
1571 Rhonda.M 13
1572 Rhyleigh 13
1573 RoyHenderson 13
1574 Shellie64 13
1575 slekce 13

13 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

January 2017 13


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
No Title (Article), The Tasmanian (Hobart Town, Tas. : 1827 - 1839), Friday 1 April 1831 [Issue No.213] page 1 2019-11-01 06:00 time, to permit us to indulge in any child
absurdity,the "Abomination,"would exist
rapid advance of both cannot but create
The Duke of Wellington's Adminis
he conceded Catholic Emancipation, un
less he had been at the same time deter
mined to concede all the rest—all which
despotic authority which, desguise his sen
timents as he will, is dearest to his heart
paused—and his Administration fell to
pieces! It never existed but for the pe
it never would have existed could indivi
about 931—being tlfat, for ninety three
time, to permit us to indulge in any child-
absurdity,the "Abomination," would exist
rapid advance of both cannot but create.
The Duke of Wellington's Adminis-
he conceded Catholic Emancipation, un-
less he had been at the same time deter-
mined to concede all the rest — all which,
despotic authority which, desguise his sen-
timents as he will, is dearest to his heart.
paused — and his Administration fell to
pieces! It never existed but for the pe-
it never would have existed could indivi-
about 931—being that, for ninety three
No title (Article), The Central Queensland Herald (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1930 - 1956), Thursday 31 October 1935 [Issue No.196] page 5 2019-10-26 01:44 «r and Mrs Dewar, finding the Homestall, at East Grinstead, Sussex, which Mr Dewar inherited from the late
and reassembled in conjunction to the HomestalL This shows the new addition on the right. S. & G.
Mr and Mrs Dewar, finding the Homestall, at East Grinstead, Sussex, which Mr Dewar inherited from the late
and reassembled in conjunction to the Homestall This shows the new addition on the right. S. & G.
£5,000,000 WIL LATE LORD DEWAR MILLION FOR NEPHEW (Article), Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954), Wednesday 6 August 1930 page 3 2019-10-26 01:40 LATE LORD DEWAK
MILLION'- FOR NEPHEW
Estate of the value of £5,000,000,,
"so-far as can at present be ascertain-!
ed/,".ha,s_.--been _ loft-by., the lato Lord j
Dewar and Sons, Ltd., who died, on J
April 11 (says the London "Daily Tele
graph"). ,
capable business man, and who has Deen
Ltd., and who. went to Canada when
>£1,000,000 free of legacy duty; the
Sho.velstr.qdo, Brooklands, and NeAv
The. rest of Lord Dewar's property,
real and. personal, subject to estate
duty, and after the payment of cer
tain bequests, is to be Held in trust; as
uieces. ^
the Exchequer will benefit to the ex
Among the bequests jtre:
of the company, "who has proved him
self to be a most capable and excep
tional business man and who has ad
ded . considerably to the success of
as a memento "to show, the affection
and great regaiM I have always felt
for them." ? . ? . .
£5,000 ea.*h, free of legacy duty, to
Dewar and Sons, Ltd:
£10,000 to be divided, at the dis
cretion of the executors, among em
£2,000 each to Sharing Cross Hos
£ 1,000 each to hi3 old friends, Alex
Eraser, U.S.A., and II. P. Whitley
and employees of his different estates:
Forteviot, who died lastNovember,
left £4,405,000. .
recent years have been:-Earl of
Iveagh £12,000,000, Sir Joseph Rob
£10,000,000, Sir David Yule £6,500
000, Lord' Strathaona £6,000,000, Sir
Boberfc Houston £6,000.000, Viscount
Northcliffe. £5,000,000, Mr. JBernhard
Estates of about £4,000,000 yrere
left*.by'Mr... W. H. Ccates, Viscount
Cowdray, Viscount Bearsted and . Sir
£5,000,000 WILL
LATE LORD DEWAR
MILLION FOR NEPHEW
Estate of the value of £5,000,000,
"so far as can at present be ascertain-
ed," has been left by the late Lord
Dewar and Sons, Ltd., who died, on
April 11 (says the London "Daily Tele-
graph").
capable business man, and who has been
Ltd., and who went to Canada when
£1,000,000 free of legacy duty; the
Shovelstrode, Brooklands, and New-
The rest of Lord Dewar's property,
real and personal, subject to estate
duty, and after the payment of cer-
tain bequests, is to be held in trust, as
nieces.
the Exchequer will benefit to the ex-
Among the bequests are:
of the company, "who has proved him-
self to be a most capable and excep-
tional business man and who has ad-
ded considerably to the success of
as a memento "to show the affection
and great regard I have always felt
for them."
£5,000 each, free of legacy duty, to
Dewar and Sons, Ltd.
£10,000 to be divided, at the dis-
cretion of the executors, among em-
£2,000 each to Sharing Cross Hos-
£1,000 each to his old friends, Alex
Fraser, R.S.A., and H. P. Whitley-
and employees of his different estates.
Forteviot, who died last November,
left £4,405,000.
recent years have been:- Earl of
Iveagh £12,000,000, Sir Joseph Rob-
£10,000,000, Sir David Yule £6,500,
000, Lord Strathsona £6,000,000, Sir
Robert Houston £6,000,000, Viscount
Northcliffe £5,000,000, Mr. Bernhard
Estates of about £4,000,000 were
left by Mr. W. H. Coates, Viscount
Cowdray, Viscount Bearsted and Sir
ARISTOCRATIC FOWLS Poultry for John Brown SYDNEY, Monday. (Article), The Newcastle Sun (NSW : 1918 - 1954), Monday 9 March 1925 [Issue No.2167] page 6 2019-10-26 01:18 They aro for Mr. John Brown, oi
Lord Dcwar. There aro :9 altogether;
that they were valued at £1000. Spe
dal feed wa» sent with them, and a
quantity of peat moss, tho dust from
which was used for litter on tho lloor
of the crates. . . .
Tho label on the crates contalnerl
special Instructions tor reeding the
birds. .
Sussex, reached Sydney in the Cer-
They are for Mr. John Brown, of
Lord Dewar. There are 29 altogether;
that they were valued at £1000. Spe-
cial feed was sent with them, and a
quantity of peat moss, the dust from
which was used for litter on the floor
of the crates.
The label on the crates contained
special instructions for feeding the
------------------------------------------------------------
ARISTOCRATIC FOWLS Poultry for John Brown SYDNEY, Monday. (Article), The Newcastle Sun (NSW : 1918 - 1954), Monday 9 March 1925 [Issue No.2167] page 6 2019-10-26 01:12 HvrvvET. Monday.
Nino crates of feathered aristo
crats from Lord Dewar'a Homostnll
poultry farm in Ea«t Grcenstead.
Sumcx, renched Sydney in tho Cer
SYDNEY. Monday.
Nine crates of feathered aristo-
crats from Lord Dewar's Homestall
poultry farm in East Greenstead,
SAL[?] (Article), The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), Sunday 31 March 1805 [Issue No.109] page 2 2019-10-22 20:40 be pours into the pan while the water con-
with clear sea water drawn from the cistern ;
he pours into the pan while the water con-
with clear sea water drawn from the cistern ;
Echoes from the Surrey Downs; or, a Week on the Wandle. (Article), Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907), Saturday 19 March 1881 [Issue No.581] page 27 2019-10-20 07:44 Echoësfrom the Surrey Downs ;
or, a Week ou tho Wandle. ;
THE following extract from the WREKIN EOHO
will prove of interest to many of our readers; asdti .
will probably reoali nicinorieB, gravo or gay, bright' .'
or sombre, ofthat Old England whence many in
this bright now land have sprune, and which'vrë.
still foadly call Home :
Wo availed ourselves of a Whitsunt:do excursion
to Euston, which great torminus has ceased to
impress us as it did bofore thoso of the Great
built-the two former of which wo passed in getting
KyuonKam, through 10 milos of countrjv beauti-
fully diversifica Ly villas, garden plots, fiolds of
lavender, millet, thyruo, rooomaiy, peppermint,
plants, grown for tho markets of tho great
between Croydon and Epsom, ono of tho hea.thiest
aud prettiest spots in tho kingdom.* Tho train
wc came down by, ouo of tho many by which those
engaged in tho multifarious busiuosä of tho city
usually return to their homes in tho country, was,
it being bank hodduy, deserted, and, unlike any-
thing wo have before oxporiencod, Madoley Cot-
tage, the poiut and domicile of our destination,
wo found also desertod, tho nows of our intended
arrival having only roached its tenants on their
way to tho woods, from which, howovor, they soon
came trooping in high Bpirits-children, grand-
children, and a little hoBt of friends, radiant with
f orrin.
And now, after, hearty shaking..of hands all
round, aiefreshing " five o'clock tea," and a call
without tho river would be commonplace enough;
ever, and although scenes Jike these may lose
retouch the picture by tho light of our present
visit, and under tho influence of the season. To
fortify them, quoting Ruskinandothor authorities;
but first lot us say what Carshalton is not. I It is
not, for instance, ono of the thousand-and-ono
now, neat, and freshly-built villages one sees on
tho way down, with walls and parterres painfully
square and exact to tho eye. New houses, it is
true, aro to be discovered by looking for them;
but these aro the exception, and, as a rule, tho
houses aro of tho past and previous centuries; but
tho old family mansions, which may be picked
out among tho traes, are in tho occupation of suc-
cessful Loudon morchants, like the Gunters, the
Mayor, and others. There aro a few blocks of
wood houses-houses boarded so that the boards
overlap, which, painted whito, have a neat and
clean appearance. There aro also a few isolated
ones of the samo kind in gardens, but Madeley
cast their shadows over its little carden at tho
back, end the birds from which flood tho place
with music morning and evening. Thcso aro
accompanied by sweet ./Eolian melodies in a lower
key, which como up from tho sources and feeders
and weirs of the Wandle; but these aro best heard
falling upon tho car-sometimes in pensive, and
streams and streamlets which hero leap at once
from tho darkness of subterranean hidden chambers
denly in Carshalton Park closo by, and, uniting
down tho side of tho main street, open to the face
of heaven. In front of our cottage porch, iu the
opon street, closo at our feet, and within a fow
yards of tho church, rises another spring, called
Anno Boleyn's Wolf. It is carefully protected,
on account of tho tradition connected with it,
Boddington Park, were returning, whon tho
into the ground and a spring gushed out. Tho
hinted, springo gush out here, there, and every-
over it by tho inhabitants, to commemorato the
week, has stopped and drunk to fair Anno Boloyn.
Tho following ballad, too, has beon composed,
" A woll thcro is at Curshalton,
Ami a lioator ono novur was soon ¡ -, ? .
Thoro is not a in ii id at Gnrshnllou 1 ,
But has heard ot tho well of Boloyn. , ' '
"It stands noar tho rustic ohiirohyard,v-,'f.;\>.;< ; ,¡..
Not far from tho village green ¡ ; &>.«.,.,. j :
And tho villagers show with rustie prido, 1
Tho quaint old woll of Boleyn. , 't I .,
"They toll that tho hapless boauty,il ->.f:i*£Í> J .(.;-.-.> .-.
With a gay and noblo train, ? -.;!..."<»«y¡» t- j j ,
In t ho heyday of her grandeur, v ' ¡ *
To CarsunJtou vlllrigo carno.... ? "_!,-.,,-,;r :, '
"And through tho quaint old villago,'n. ¡ laid >
Thoy paasod in bravo roviow j <; vi-¡,1 «K-T«;'- j
A gay and merry company,.-:..
To tho anciont scat of Cnrow.
"'Tis told ns they gallopod tko streot aloig,
. Tho rustios in wonderment stare .
At tho king and tho beauteous maldon,
. " And thought thora a noble pair.
/ "And many a prayer was uttered, ? ¡.r,,.,...
'. ' ' And many a heart boat high, ' ' , '// i
.'? ?" AB tho stately monarch ond beauteous Staid,'"'
'?iWith thoir gay cavaleado passed by; ?
?'" But, ah ! littlo they thonght OB they saw thb'xnaid.
That she was their futnre queen ; .'. "'' ' 'r .
"? And that a token of her visit; "? .¡. í.JO'.t ,
: . Should stand near their vilIaço greon., 'ï - ^"1;i;
"But so it was as her stood rushed by,' yj;
Ono spot whoro its hoof had been, ,
To tho joy of tho traping rustios, . Ji-J~> >'>?>.? i:- .
Gushed out a bubbling stroam. . '/ ; ...<???,
i "In grateful lovo they marked' the Bpót,Y,: -
And to this day is Boen/ ' " " ^v'1; '
Tho quaint'old woll, with;its'dombrof "stone, ! r'
Named nitor fair Auno Boleyn."'.-. ? /'
Again in the grounds of Carshalton, Houso,
copious springs break . out, and pouring forth
hymns of gladners at their birth in words of a
lnnguago they have used for ever-wördß which
endear themas companions to lovers of nature,
visited Carshalton in 1568, described it as" excel-
lently watered, andcajnablo of being made a most
delicious seate, being on tho sweeto downes." John
Ruskin, M.A., LL.D., tho author of " Tho Stones
of Venice" who has over an eye for natural beauty,
Olives," in which ho is severe on those he calls
" human wretches of tho place" who " cast into
dozen mon, with ono day's work, could e'eanse the
troubled of angels, from the porch of Bothesda."
Mr. .Ruskin had a desire, ns a memorial to his
mother, to purify and beautify these sfirings, and
instructed Sir Gilbert Scott to make p'ans for a.
marble basin and other adornments; but ho was,
unfortunately, frustrated in completing tho whole
related to tho planting of trees, shrubs, and ferns,
own expensa. He also wrote an inscription, which
find. The streams from the springs we havo
bine to form a pellucid lake in tho centre of tho
village, which must also be described. Near tho
upper end is an island, a littlo emerald gem setin
crystal surroundings ; and on its margin tho old
Greyhound Inn, famous in days pastas tho resort
harriers, wero more numerous in that part of tho
country thnn now, and as a house of call in the
old coaching days, before Epson* could be reached
by rail, aa at present. This expanse of water, tho
cribed, is spanned in the centre by a Jow bridge
the surfaco, or tho fish dart about among the green
gold and silver fish in i he water, and a pair or two
of swans, who had their homo among the segs;
but we did not observe them on tho occasion of
our last visit. Ono.remarkable feature of the
waters of tho Wandle is, that herc, at least, it
never freezes. Wo have scon it in one of the
vegetation, and covered the ground down to tho
has boon sparkling as ever, with steam risiug from
tho lake, in the bed of which are observablo other
springs I ubbling up through the gravel. It may
easily bo imagined, therefore, that vego'alion
flourishes luxuriantly on its brinks. Tho trees
scape is to be seen hore opposite ,to tho church.
age, it is quito a study. Let us seek to depict it.
There are the still waters of the lake in tho fore-
ebon blackness beneath the arch of tho bridge.
On thc left are tall, toAvering elms and a wide
the colour, and give a greater glow to tho palo
side of thom. These again are thrown into relief
by tho dense foliage of oaks, chestnuts, and other
troes; whilst sufficiently removed for atmospheric
effect to crecí) in between, rise a more distant
has thinned tho loaves on the treos, is tho rectory,
droased figuros to remind one of a subject Watteau
might havo painted, or Claude even have trans-
ferred to his canvas. Wo havo said nothing of
tho antiquities of Carshalton, or of tho historical
associations of its surroundings ; havo thoy not
Brightling, tho ownor and occupier of Madoloy
Echoes from the Surrey Downs
or, a Week on the Wandle.
THE following extract from the WREKIN ECHO
will prove of interest to many of our readers; as it
will probably recall memories, grave or gay, bright
or sombre, of that Old England whence many in
this bright new land have sprung, and which we
still fondly call Home:-
We availed ourselves of a Whitsuntide excursion
to Euston, which great terminus has ceased to
impress us as it did before those of the Great
built - the two former of which we passed in getting
Sydenham, through 10 miles of country beauti-
fully diversified by villas, garden plots, fields of
lavender, millet, thyme, rosemary, peppermint,
plants, grown for the markets of the great
between Croydon and Epsom, one of the healthiest
and prettiest spots in the kingdom.* The train
we came down by, one of the many by which those
engaged in the multifarious business of the city
usually return to their homes in the country, was,
it being bank holiday, deserted, and, unlike any-
thing we have before experienced, Madeley Cot-
tage, the point and domicile of our destination,
we found also deserted, the news of our intended
arrival having only reached its tenants on their
way to the woods, from which, however, they soon
came trooping in high spirits - children, grand-
children, and a little host of friends, radiant with
ferns.
And now, after, hearty shaking of hands all
round, a refreshing "five o'clock tea," and a call
without the river would be commonplace enough;
ever, and although scenes like these may lose
retouch the picture by the light of our present
visit, and under the influence of the season. To
fortify them, quoting Ruskin and other authorities;
but first let us say what Carshalton is not. It is
not, for instance, one of the thousand-and-onw
new, neat, and freshly-built villages one sees on
the way down, with walls and parterres painfully
square and exact to the eye. New houses, it is
true, are to be discovered by looking for them;
but these are the exception, and, as a rule, the
houses are of the past and previous centuries; but
the old family mansions, which may be picked
out among the trees, are in the occupation of suc-
cessful London merchants, like the Gunters, the
Mayor, and others. There are a few blocks of
wood houses - houses boarded so that the boards
overlap, which, painted white, have a neat and
clean appearance. There are also a few isolated
ones of the same kind in gardens, but Madeley
cast their shadows over its little garden at the
back, end the birds from which flood the place
with music morning and evening. These are
accompanied by sweet AEolian melodies in a lower
key, which come up from the sources and feeders
and weirs of the Wandle; but these are best heard
falling upon the ear-sometimes in pensive, and
streams and streamlets which here leap at once
from the darkness of subterranean hidden chambers
denly in Carshalton Park close by, and, uniting
down the side of the main street, open to the face
of heaven. In front of our cottage porch, in the
open street, close at our feet, and within a few
yards of the church, rises another spring, called
Anne Boleyn's Well. It is carefully protected,
on account of the tradition connected with it,
Beddington Park, were returning, when the
into the ground and a spring gushed out. The
hinted, springs gush out here, there, and every-
over it by the inhabitants, to commemorate the
week, has stopped and drunk to fair Anne Boleyn.
The following ballad, too, has been composed,
"A well there is at Carshalton.
And a neater one never was seen;
There is not a maid at Carshalton
But has heard of the well of Boleyn.
"It stands near the rustic churchyard,
Not far from the village green;
And the villagers show with rustic pride,
The quaint old well of Boleyn.
"They tell that the hapless beauty,
With a gay and noble train,
In the heyday of her grandeur,
To Carshalton village came.
"And through the quaint old village,
They passod in brave review;
A gay and merry company,
To the ancient seat of Carew.
"'Tis told as they galloped tho street along,
Tho rustics in wonderment stare,
At the king and the beauteous maiden,
"And thought them a noble pair.
And many a prayer was uttered,
And many a heart beat high,
As the stately monarch and beauteous maid,
With their gay cavalcade passed by.
"But, ah ! little they thought as they saw the maid,
That she was their future queen;
And that a token of her visit,
Should stand near their village green.
"But so it was as her steed rushed by,
One spot where its hoof had been,
To the joy of the gaping rustics,
Gushed out a bubbling stream.
"In grateful love they marked the spot,
And to this day is seen
The quaint old well, with its dome of stone,
Named after fair Anne Boleyn."
Again in the grounds of Carshalton House,
copious springs break out, and pouring forth
hymns of gladness at their birth in words of a
language they have used for ever - wörds which
endear them as companions to lovers of nature,
visited Carshalton in 1568, described it as "excel-
lently watered, and capable of being made a most
delicious seate, being on the sweete downes." John
Ruskin, M.A., LL.D., the author of "The Stones
of Venice" who has ever an eye for natural beauty,
Olives," in which he is severe on those he calls
"human wretches of the place" who "cast into
dozen men, with one day's work, could cleanse the
troubled of angels, from the porch of Bethesda."
Mr. Ruskin had a desire, as a memorial to his
mother, to purify and beautify these springs, and
instructed Sir Gilbert Scott to make plans for a
marble basin and other adornments; but he was,
unfortunately, frustrated in completing the whole
related to the planting of trees, shrubs, and ferns,
own expense. He also wrote an inscription, which
find. The streams from the springs we have
bine to form a pellucid lake in the centre of the
village, which must also be described. Near the
upper end is an island, a little emerald gem set in
crystal surroundings ; and on its margin the old
Greyhound Inn, famous in days past as the resort
harriers, were more numerous in that part of the
country than now, and as a house of call in the
old coaching days, before Epson could be reached
by rail, as at present. This expanse of water, the
cribed, is spanned in the centre by a low bridge
the surface, or the fish dart about among the green
gold and silver fish in the water, and a pair or two
of swans, who had their home among the segs;
but we did not observe them on the occasion of
our last visit. One remarkable feature of the
waters of the Wandle is, that here, at least, it
never freezes. We have seen it in one of the
vegetation, and covered the ground down to the
has been sparkling as ever, with steam rising from
the lake, in the bed of which are observable other
springs bubbling up through the gravel. It may
easily be imagined, therefore, that vegetation
flourishes luxuriantly on its banks. The trees
scape is to be seen here opposite to the church.
age, it is quite a study. Let us seek to depict it.
There are the still waters of the lake in the fore-
ebony blackness beneath the arch of the bridge.
On the left are tall, towering elms and a wide
the colour, and give a greater glow to the pale
side of them. These again are thrown into relief
by the dense foliage of oaks, chestnuts, and other
trees; whilst sufficiently removed for atmospheric
effect to creep in between, rise a more distant
has thinned the loaves on the trees, is the rectory,
dressed figures to remind one of a subject Watteau
might have painted, or Claude even have trans-
ferred to his canvas. We have said nothing of
the antiquities of Carshalton, or of the historical
associations of its surroundings ; have they not
Brightling, the owner and occupier of Madeley
GHOSTS LEFT BEHIND HAUNTED MANSION MOVED. (Article), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Tuesday 22 October 1935 [Issue No.20,278] page 14 2019-10-20 05:23 GHOSTS LEFT BEHIND !
HAUNTED MANSION MOVED. j
Through one of the most remarkable j
- house-moving jobs 'ever carried out two |
ghosts have ? been rendered homeless, j
- Runcorn, Cheshire, a wonderful Tudor
mansion now no more, for lt hos been
dismantled and removed to East Grin
stead, In Sussex, to form tho new east
wing of Holmstall, the lato Lord
Dewar's residence, which is. shortly to
inherited by "Lucky" Dewar, as ho was
three years ago, along with a fortuno of
-;-V---:-;-r
close on ¿1,000,000.' He decided to ex-
tend the modest dimensions of tho house
for tho purpose.
Blt by blt it has been transported to
has boen seen-of the" ghosts;-one a
paddock In front of tho house, spear
aloft; the other, a wraith-lilco being
that used to haunt tho minstrel gallery.
Perhaps theso phantom figures aro hik-
Plensburg in Schleswig Holstein, close
to tho Danish border.
GHOSTS LEFT BEHIND
HAUNTED MANSION MOVED.
Through one of the most remarkable
house-moving jobs ever carried out two
ghosts have been rendered homeless.
Runcorn, Cheshire, a wonderful Tudor
mansion now no more, for it has been
dismantled and removed to East Grin-
stead, In Sussex, to form the new east
wing of Holmstall, the late Lord
Dewar's residence, which is shortly to
inherited by "Lucky" Dewar, as he was
three years ago, along with a fortune of
close on £1,000,000, He decided to ex-
tend the modest dimensions of the house
for the purpose.
Bit by bit it has been transported to
has been seen of the ghosts - one a
paddock in front of the house, spear
aloft; the other, a wraith-like being
that used to haunt the minstrel gallery.
Perhaps these phantom figures are hik-
Flensburg in Schleswig Holstein, close
to the Danish border.
SOUTH AFRICAN MILLIONAIRE ENGAGED TO THE DAUGHTER OF LORD ROSSMORE. (Article), Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954), Wednesday 27 September 1911 [Issue No.7224] page 5 2019-10-13 18:22 Tho announcement _ of the engage-
ment of Sir Abc Bailey, tho South
African millionaire, to Miss Mary Wes
Rossmore, wilt (says the "-Daily Chron- ,
¡clo" of August 215) be received with
groat internst in many circles,
A -well-known Rhodesian mine owner,
Sir Abo Bailey, is also a famous sports-
man, and maintains a largo racing.es-
tablishment. Ho and his fiancee will
Miss Weston ra is* a splendid horse-
hold tho mastership of the Monaghan
Hunt Club tor tho .past three years.
Sir Abo Bailey, who is a widower,
has ono son arid ono daughter. He was
thc Boor War. Ho was made
fine place at Yewlrurst, East Grinstead,
South Africa. The two scats of the
Rossmore family aro in County Mo»»
a ghan. ._
The announcement of the engage-
ment of Sir Abe Bailey, the South
African millionaire, to Miss Mary Wes-
Rossmore, will (says the "Daily Chron-
icle" of August 22) be received with
great interest in many circles.
A well-known Rhodesian mine owner,
Sir Abe Bailey is also a famous sports-
man, and maintains a large racing es-
tablishment. He and his fiancee will
held the mastership of the Monaghan
Hunt Club for the past three years.
Sir Abe Bailey, who is a widower,
has one son and one daughter. He was
the Boer War. He was made
fine place at Yewhurst, East Grinstead,
South Africa. The two seats of the
Rossmore family are in County Mon-
U.K. BEDS FOR FRENCH MINERS (Article), Sunday Times (Perth, WA : 1902 - 1954), Sunday 18 January 1948 [Issue No.2604] page 12 2019-10-13 17:32 at a hospital in East Grin
Meanwhile lOOlbs. of plasma"
French official - acceptance of
at a hospital in East Grin-
Meanwhile 100lbs. of plasma
French official acceptance of

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.