Information about Trove user: RichardIrving

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,786,140
2 noelwoodhouse 3,899,365
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,275,482
5 Rhonda.M 3,098,535
...
1654 KarleneMatthews 20,812
1655 rhockey 20,798
1656 denispw 20,771
1657 RichardIrving 20,764
1658 IndigoPhillipArrow 20,763
1659 volunteer55 20,720

20,764 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 577
September 2019 13
July 2019 3
April 2019 157
March 2019 1
January 2019 8
November 2018 27
October 2018 1,634
September 2018 37
August 2018 128
May 2018 6
April 2018 121
February 2018 70
January 2018 1,490
December 2017 1,492
November 2017 1,600
October 2017 462
September 2017 20
August 2017 593
July 2017 809
May 2017 1,197
April 2017 2,704
March 2017 246
February 2017 692
January 2017 476
December 2016 303
November 2016 739
October 2016 92
September 2016 1,165
August 2016 846
July 2016 113
June 2016 916
May 2016 437
February 2016 24
January 2016 10
August 2013 79
June 2012 28
January 2011 20
December 2010 42
November 2009 904
October 2009 483

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,785,938
2 noelwoodhouse 3,899,365
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,275,461
5 Rhonda.M 3,098,522
...
1650 KarleneMatthews 20,812
1651 rhockey 20,798
1652 denispw 20,771
1653 RichardIrving 20,764
1654 IndigoPhillipArrow 20,763
1655 volunteer55 20,720

20,764 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 577
September 2019 13
July 2019 3
April 2019 157
March 2019 1
January 2019 8
November 2018 27
October 2018 1,634
September 2018 37
August 2018 128
May 2018 6
April 2018 121
February 2018 70
January 2018 1,490
December 2017 1,492
November 2017 1,600
October 2017 462
September 2017 20
August 2017 593
July 2017 809
May 2017 1,197
April 2017 2,704
March 2017 246
February 2017 692
January 2017 476
December 2016 303
November 2016 739
October 2016 92
September 2016 1,165
August 2016 846
July 2016 113
June 2016 916
May 2016 437
February 2016 24
January 2016 10
August 2013 79
June 2012 28
January 2011 20
December 2010 42
November 2009 904
October 2009 483

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
STONE FOR POLISHING AND ORNAMENTAL PURPOSES. (Article), The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Saturday 8 October 1910 [Issue No.19,940] page 11 2019-10-13 19:08 STONE FOR PffLISHING AND ORNA
The Assistant Gwrnmrnt Geologist (Dr. II.
Basodow) has furnished a report to the Minister
of Mini's (Mr. Vaughan) on the subjc-cl of the
e\L=Unce in South Australia of 6tone siiiUMe for
polLshins and omaniental pnn'oscs. The Minis
ter has at his oiflco a simple of polished marble
taken from the locality mentioned by Dr. liaso
dow. This has an cxcellwit tace, andVnows tlierc
exists hrre material suitable for the pinoral pur
liows for whicli polished suites are usually w-t'd.
Tin1 re-port is:— In aiTOrdamr »it!i inrtmrtions,
I visited the I'unichilna di'Iriit during the last
week,- and have the honour to submit herewith a
brief n'jwrt on the Cambrian limestone forma
tion. This skirts the Flinders Ranges en the west
as low undulation* trending nortli and muth.
piwucc can N1 (let'rniinod at the surface hy
cappinss of travertine and marl for some conider
able distance south, in direction ot Edeowie fiorce,
and also in a northerly course towar-L- Deltana.
The upper members of the Oambri.in beds con.-ist
of a compact blufeli-sri'y limestone, in parti sub
crjttallinn containing many fos.,il corals, notably
of thi' intcrestinc archaeocyathinae. Tlie fossils
weather from their matrix on the surfacf, and so
become more conf-pieuous than where wn on a
frtshly frartured face. The lower members of
;he fortMtion consist of a brownish siliceous linii'-
ftone, with but few or no fo.«wls. The strike of
the l?eds is west 40 deff. north to north 25 de?.
west, with a dip of from 41) de?. to C5 dec. fmith
ea'terly. The limestone is of lower Cambrian
a^e, and forma the yminp-a member of a wtstern
Bank of a great anticlinal fold, which lias in its
centre the inetamorphic and cnstallini' Tocks of
Tiro-Cambrian ape. About half a mile east, in the
'pip,' the limestone overlie a mctaniorphir
Ruiilstonp and qiurtzite of th.' pri--Cambrian com
j-\e\. (V*ii-ir to the uniformitr of it~; weathering,
quarrjinf, except by sinking on Die Annalion.
Th.-- most favourable spot is at the enfr.uice to
the 'piP- ' whern the Parachilai Creek cuts
il'roiigU th» formation and exposes some 13 to '20
a «latcy blue colour. A mnrry could be opened
here on the north fidn of the porge. and blocks of
STONE FOR POLISHING AND ORNA
The Assistant Government Geologist (Dr. H.
Basedow) has furnished a report to the Minister
of Mines (Mr. Vaughan) on the subject of the
existence in South Australia of stone suitable for
polishing and ornamental purposes. The Minis
ter has at his office sample of polished marble
taken from the locality mentioned by Dr. Base
dow. This has an excellent face, and shows there
exists here material suitable for the general pur
poses for which polished stones are usually used.
The report is:— In accordance with instructions
I visited the Parachilna district during the last
week, and have the honour to submit herewith a
brief report on the Cambrian limestone forma
tion. This skirts the Flinders Ranges on the west
as low undulations trending north and south.
presecence can be determined at the surface by
cappings of travertine and marl for some consider
able distance south, in direction of Edeowie Gorge,
and also in a northerly course towards Beltana.
The upper members of the Cambrian beds consist
of a compact bluish grey limestone, in part sub
cristalline containing many fossil corals, notably
of the interesting archaeocyathinae. The fossils
weather from their matrix on the surface, and so
become more conspicuous than where seen on a
freshly fractured face. The lower members of
the formation consist of a brownish siliceous lime
stone, with but few or no fosils. The strike of
the beds is west 40 deg. north to north 25 deg.
west, with a dip of from 41 deg. to 65 deg. south
easterly. The limestone is of lower Cambrian
age, and forms the youngest member of a western
flank of a great anticlinal fold, which has in its
centre the metamorphic and crystalline rocks of
Pro-Cambrian age. About half a mile east, in the
"gap," the limestone overlie a metamorphic
sandstone and quartzite of the pre-Cambrian
complex. Owing to the uniformity of its weathering,
quarrying, except by sinking on the formation..
The most favourable spot is at the entrance to
the "gap" where the Parachilna Creek cuts
through the formation and exposes some 15 to 20
a slatcy blue colour. A quarry could be opened
here on the north side of the gorge and blocks of
THE SHACKLETON EXPEDITION Sydney, Dec. 13. (Article), Kalgoorlie Miner (WA : 1895 - 1954), Thursday 15 December 1910 [Issue No.4745] page 2 2019-10-13 18:23 THE SHAOKLETDW EKFEDITiON
. Sydney, Dec. 13.
. been made in the investigation of
David brought back a pieceof lime
Messrs. Priestly and GriffithsTay
archaeocyathinae. The discovery is j
of exceptional interest, as it proves j
. light on the- interesting discovery of
-Professor David expects the present
^memoirs. _______________
THE SHACKLETON EXPEDITION
Sydney, Dec. 13.
been made in the investigation of
David brought back a piece of lime
Messrs. Priestly and Griffiths-Tay
archaeocyathinae. The discovery is
of exceptional interest, as it proves
light on the interesting discovery of
Professor David expects the present
memoirs. _______________
SCIENTIFIC. SCIENCE NOTES. THE ANCIENT CUPS-A STRANGE FOSSIL GROUP. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 8 February 1919 [Issue No.2,758] page 39 2019-10-11 22:00 By TELLUBIAN.
the ancient cups—a strange fossil
. crodp. -
"Arehaeocyathmae" is a somewhat awk
ward word at first sight, but easy to re- ,
ponent parts, two Greek words, signifying '
ing animals. Long, long ago, in what sure ■
extended over a very, large part of that
region that is now occupied .by the State
.of South. Australia. At the time with
which we are dealing, the climate of .that
region was probably warn, and in' the warm
shallow seas innumerable animals lived,
indeed, there was then no -land life at all.
Cambrian- sea were certain sponge-animals
(for, the .well-known commercial sponge is
In addition to the animal types' just
three inches or le9s in length, and consist
tons, aud which have, therefore, not been
discovered - or investigated. When these
of animals, and were so.classified. Then it
Fig.l.—(a) represents a fragment of limestone from
coast, showing how these fossils appear. on
these are mainly Sin. or less in length, forms
^ Just ag corals are to-day building up
great reefs in our oceans and seas," so the
arfehaeocyathinae built up enormous reefs
dreds of feet to assist-in forming the Mount
•- limestones, 150 to 200 feet in thickness, are
place .in the limestones since they were
first built up, some millions of.; years ago,
fossils may, be found are well, known, and
.some have been visited by geologistS"from
• all parts. of the world. The Australian
Peninsula, South Australia. There are'
various , different species' in the rocks of
South Australia, and many of these "have
The. "ancient cups" are fairly widely dis
in ' California, Labrador, Sardinia, and.
Spain. While they are . probably most
there is special interest attached to two.
other localities -in which they have been
found — in both tfae north and the south
ditions of the .world then were different
Siberia, 20deg..from the North Pole; while
brought from 85deg. south. An archaeocya
wastes of -Antarctica. We see.-then, that
a. study of these animals tells lis some
thing of the past climate of. our. earth,
By TELLURIAN.
THE ANCIENT CUPS - A STRANGE FOSSIL
GROUP.
"Archaeocyathinae" is a somewhat awk
ward word at first sight, but easy to re
ponent parts, two Greek words, signifying
ing animals. Long, long ago, in what are
extended over a very large part of that
region that is now occupied by the State
of South Australia. At the time with
which we are dealing, the climate of that
region was probably warm, and in the warm
shallow seas innumerable animals lived.
indeed, there was then no land life at all.
Cambrian sea were certain sponge-animals
(for the well-known commercial sponge is
In addition to the animal types just
three inches or less in length, and consist
tons, and which have, therefore, not been
discovered or investigated. When these
of animals, and were so classified. Then it
Fig.1.—(a) represents a fragment of limestone from
coast, showing how these fossils appear on
these are mainly 3in. or less in length, forms
Just as corals are to-day building up
great reefs in our oceans and seas, so the
archaeocyathinae built up enormous reefs
dreds of feet to assist in forming the Mount
limestones, 150 to 200 feet in thickness, are
place in the limestones since they were
first built up, some millions of years ago,
fossils may be found are well known, and
some have been visited by geologists from
all parts of the world. The Australian
Peninsula, South Australia. There are
various different species in the rocks of
South Australia, and many of these have
The "ancient cups" are fairly widely dis
in California, Labrador, Sardinia, and
Spain. While they are probably most
there is special interest attached to two
other localities in which they have been
found — in both the north and the south
ditions of the world then were different
Siberia, 20deg. from the North Pole; while
brought from 85 deg. south. An archaeocya
wastes of Antarctica. We see then, that
a study of these animals tells us some
thing of the past climate of our earth,
THE ROYAL SOCIETY. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Wednesday 4 August 1897 page 6 2019-10-11 21:26 Profensor Tate took the chair at this stage,
whilst Mr. lluwcmx, the president; read a
paper "On the Occu-veuce of l/?ww Cam
brian F?*ils in the Mount Lofty Ranges.''
He pointed out that for the past M
years the stratigniphiuai position of the
Mount Lof'.y Rau-is has been one of the
South Australian geology. The diseoiery in
Itsi'j of a sub-crystalline liovestoa^ vjouuuniu^
fossiU of Lower Cambrian a.^e, resliu^ en
conformably on a preC-jnlnan suries in
portant an-TJo 0 -ieai evidence that the
Cambriac a^e. In March of the present year,
however, wken Professor David, of Sydney,
Mr. Brittlebank, ol Victoria, aud nimself
were unitedly examining the gti^o^ic;*! features
of the Inoian VaUey and Normanvilie rauau.s
of Archsocyathme corals were discovered
in tbe Norman ville ruarbles. At Eauter
he returned lo tbe locality and made further
interesting observations, showing tiiat the
fossils were sparingly but wi-ijly distribuuxl j
through the limeslonen. Hut tl.a moat im
corals was discovered by him a few weeks ]
ajro in a thick series ot littc-stone? at Sel
llck's Hill, where, for a thicksct-a of 100 ft.,
the limestone U aimoat entirely composed of.
their remains. Tho coralline reef crosses the
road a feu- hundred yards abovo the SeUick'a ]
i Hill Hotel, and w^a traced about five miles in
; a north-eart and tour tniic-s in a -outh-west I
direction, iiad is probably contiuuuus in the
i latter direction to Noruiuivilie, thus ehowin^
a line of outcrop of ovur twenty miies. A few
, small moUusco were al?> obtaiuud, which have
. not yet been submitted t>> critical i'uuiiim
, tiou. Tbe main road in the gradient of;
KeUick'flHili pa-^eesover the exriosed btsdsnearly:
at right angles to lha line ot strike, and in a
? distance of about a tuileaud a halt riM-stoa
heifljtcf 1.2U0 it. above ?-? leveL The road
cutting afford excellent sections of the k?>
logicia featuraa. The beds are much foldad'
and crushed, eihilxtinfr throughout a highi
angle of dip, raugipjr from <?' to txj, being j
eoath-eastprly in the road cuttings, but)
! changing to westerly near the coaet. The
1 exposed rookn can 1? naturally divid-.-d <ki
litliological grounds into three very distiuct
Cro-ip*, which in asoeoding onier ard as
foilows:—ArgilliLea, limestan**,and quartzites.
The calcareous group is approximately 3.00U!
ft. in thickness, and the toswliterous U-lt
£00 ft. The latter was traced in a Dorth
Wilinnga, when tne beds 'fussed out oi eight
under the alluvial of the plains. It is inipos-,
Bible to ignore the important bean&ir ol thin
latest discovery of Lower Cambrian fovbils ou
i which have been commonly reieired to an
Arduean, or at least pre-Cambruts jperiod.
i This hypothesis retted for t>upjwrt mainly on
' three contideratious:—L Lutiolo^iail rcsem
bUnce between the pre-Cambruui rocks of
Yorke's Peninsula and sous of tbu rocks in
' the Mount Lofty Ranges. 2. A higher
i angle of dip in the Mount Lofty beds than
u> toe Cambrian rocks. 3. The ateenoo of
organic remains in the Mount Loftv Ranpus.
These consideratiou? have been considerably
weakened by tbe discoveries now published,
and require a reconsideration of lhe whole
question. Fossil* have tweu found over an
cam only be found ou the eastern side of the
represents the newer beds of the eerier, and is
. Cambrian fossils have been found. If this
> order be the correct one then the whole of
now awaits determination is—Are tbe tunda
: mental rocks of tbe Mount Loftv Range*
i or are these rocks divisible into a newer and
lan older series—a Cambrian and a pre
i Cambrian formation? If the latter then we
must find soma line of unconformability by
; fault is known to exist, the general strike and
; dip of tbe Cambrian beds correspond with the
. rest of the bill country, and the litbology of
the bads bears a close resemblance to the
, shales, limestone*, and quartzitee of tne
taking in Brighton. Reynella, and Koaiiunga.
It is a matter of crreat interest whether these
> Brighton limestones are on the same geological
i horizon as the Sellick's Uiil Cambrians or uot.
i With tha exception of casts of radiolaria no
, fossils nave been detected in the Brighton
limeMonea. Then U a slight discordance in
i the strike of the respective bed*, the Brighton
i outcrop running a little east of north and the
; SelUWa Uiil beds a little west of north. The
i two lines of strike probably approximate and
become coincident, or otherwise intersect, bv
important anticline can ba traced from
, Brighton to Nonnanville, and is marked by a
westerly din on the coast, with a gen.Til
Boutb-easterlrdip a few miles inland. This
; anticlinal area is characterised by remarkable
local contortions and overthrustu. It in im
nave indudixi the Cambrians and tbe foothills
of Mount Lofty in tbe same gryat system of
folding*. Further pahcontological evidences
, are awaited that will eventually spell out the
: of the great mountain system which forms the
, geological axis of the colony.
, A discussion followed, in which Professor
finality could be reached regarding tbe gee- j
logical periods to which the several portions j
belonged. j
Professor Tate took the chair at this stage,
whilst Mr.HOWCHIN, the president, read a
paper "On the Occurence of Lower Cam
brian Fossils in the Mount Lofty Ranges.''
He pointed out that for the past 50
years the stratigraphical position of the
Mount Lofty Ranges has been one of the
South Australian geology. The discovery in
1879 of a sub-crystalline limestone containing
fossils of Lower Cambrian age, resting un
conformably on a pre-Cambrian series in
portant anological evidence that the
Cambriac age. In March of the present year,
however, when Professor David, of Sydney,
Mr. Brittlebank, ol Victoria, and himself
were unitedly examining the geological features
of the Inman Valley and Normanville remains
of Archaeocyathine corals were discovered
in the Normanville marbles. At Easter
he returned to the locality and made further
interesting observations, showing that the
fossils were sparingly but widely distributed
through the limestones. But the most im
corals was discovered by him a few weeks
ago in a thick series of limestone at Sel
llck's Hill, where, for a thickness of 100 ft.,
the limestone is almost entirely composed of
their remains. The coralline reef crosses the
road a few hundred yards above the Sellick's ]
Hill Hotel, and was traced about five miles in
a north-east and four miles in a south-west
direction, and is probably continous in the
latter direction to Normanville, thus showing
a line of outcrop of over twenty miles. A few
small mollusco were also obtained, which have
not yet been submitted to critical examina
tion. The main road in the gradient of
Sellick's Hill passes over the exposed beds nearly
at right angles to the line of strike, and in a
distance of about a mile and a half rises to a
height of 1,200 ft. above sea level. The road
cutting afford excellent sections of the geo
logical features. The beds are much folded
and crushed, exhibiting throughout a high
angle of dip, ranging from 65 to 90, being
south-easterly in the road cuttings, but
changing to westerly near the coast. The
exposed rocks can be naturally divided on
lithological grounds into three very distinct
groups, which in ascending order are as
foilows:—Argillites, limestones,and quartzites.
The calcareous group is approximately 3000
ft. in thickness, and the fossiliferous belt
800 ft. The latter was traced in a north-
Willunga, when the beds passed out of sight
under the alluvial of the plains. It is impos
sible to ignore the important bearing of this
latest discovery of Lower Cambrian fossils on
which have been commonly referred to an
Archaean, or at least pre-Cambrian period.
This hypothesis rested for support mainly on
three considerations:—1. Lithological resem
lance between the pre-Cambrian rocks of
Yorke's Peninsula and some of the rocks in
the Mount Lofty Ranges. 2. A higher
angle of dip in the Mount Lofty beds than
in the Cambrian rocks. 3. The absence of
organic remains in the Mount Lofty Ranges.
These consideratiouns have been considerably
weakened by the discoveries now published,
and require a reconsideration of the whole
question. Fossils havebeen found over an
can only be found on the eastern side of the
represents the newer beds of the series, and is
Cambrian fossils have been found. If this
order be the correct one then the whole of
now awaits determination is—Are tbe funda
mental rocks of the Mount Lofty Ranges
or are these rocks divisible into a newer and
an older series—a Cambrian and a pre
Cambrian formation? If the latter then we
must find some line of unconformability by
fault is known to exist, the general strike and
dip of the Cambrian beds correspond with the
rest of the bill country, and the lithology of
the beds bears a close resemblance to the
shales, limestones, and quartzites of the
taking in Brighton. Reynella, and Noarlunga.
It is a matter of great interest whether these
Brighton limestones are on the same geological
horizon as the Sellick's Hill Cambrians or not.
With the exception of casts of radiolaria no
fossils have been detected in the Brighton
limestones. There is a slight discordance in
the strike of the respective beds, the Brighton
outcrop running a little east of north and the
Sellick's Hill beds a little west of north. The
two lines of strike probably approximate and
become coincident, or otherwise intersect, by
important anticline can be traced from
Brighton to Normanville, and is marked by a
westerly dip on the coast, with a general
south-easterly dip a few miles inland. This
anticlinal area is characterised by remarkable
local contortions and overthrusts. It is im
have included the Cambrians and the foothills
of Mount Lofty in the same great system of
foldings. Further palaeontological evidences
are awaited that will eventually spell out the
of the great mountain system which forms the
geological axis of the colony.
A discussion followed, in which Professor
finality could be reached regarding the geo
logical periods to which the several portions
belonged.
Advertising (Advertising), Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), Saturday 2 November 1850 [Issue No.384] page 1 2019-10-11 20:39 TOWNSHIP OF P(5RT WILLUNGA.
A PORT!ON -of the land intended for a township
the proprietor, ou the ground*
TOWNSHIP OF PORT WILLUNGA.
A PORTION of the land intended for a township
the proprietor, on the ground.
MYPONGA COAL Boring Proposed GOVERNMENT TO HELP (Article), The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954), Saturday 10 May 1930 [Issue No.937] page 3 2019-10-11 20:33 The 6ret meeting of the company
vi hen officials will decide on a date
imports 800,000 tons of coal an*
T. Madigan, M.A., lecturer* in geology at
£10,000. The company state* that 2,000
Uf the remainder 3,000 shares will be
held iu reserve for future issue, and 3,000
director, Cunie street, Adelaide.
Mmeb) has authorised the Mines De
sary casiug for the work of sinking a pit,
now have to pay only tbe salary of the
man the bore. It a estimated by the
company officials that £1,003 will cover
ten mouths boring.
to sink shafts in the area. Thia was never
done, however, as ha was prevented by
picked up on the beach at Myponga. and
them up from a rich vein/ under the sea
Not ' a single bore has yet been sunk
in the Mypwnga Valley. And considering
the disabilities under which this State lias
The first meeting of the company
when officials will decide on a date
imports 800,000 tons of coal an
T. Madigan, M.A., lecturer in geology at
£10,000. The company state that 2,000
Of the remainder 3,000 shares will be
held in reserve for future issue, and 3,000
director, Currie street, Adelaide.
Mines) has authorised the Mines De
sary casing for the work of sinking a pit,
now have to pay only the salary of the
man the bore. It is estimated by the
company officials that £1,000 will cover
ten months boring.
to sink shafts in the area. This was never
done, however, as he was prevented by
picked up on the beach at Myponga, and
them up from a rich vein under the sea
Not a single bore has yet been sunk
in the Myponga Valley. And considering
the disabilities under which this State has
PRE-CAMBRIAN LIFE. Continued from Page 9. Professor David on the Discoveries. (Article), The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Friday 8 June 1928 [Issue No.27,087] page 11 2019-10-10 21:28 PR&PIBWAN UFE.
, ,'.'?' ? Continued from Pa^e 9.
..Professor; David on. the Discoveries.
In the- course of his remarks recently
in Adelaide, 'when dealing Trith the euI)
ject. Sir Edgeworth David said that sonia
interesting lowly forms of fossil -animal
life had Been fotrnd, chiefly in the lime
stone rocks of , Brighton and Reyriellat
The discovery of ?? those fossils; would, it
was hoped, shed considerable light'on dif
ficult problems in the geology of -South
Australia^ He,' paid a' high tributetothr
valuable work.'^lone by'one. who-wias.'the
doyen- of all- Australian geologists at. the
time of his death kst January,' and wha
geologists of the world, for -the vastnese;
of the regions which he' had geologically
mapped - in South- Australia, Central- Aus
tralia, Northern Australia, and WeEtern
Australia, ' * and' .'fo?.- his ' quicknes*;
at .selling' salient: points 'observed in'#nw'
very Jong and arduous' journeys 'over the
continent/ he 'referred' to' the -late Ifc'
H. Y. Lyell Brown.- ? Much- of ;Mr.
Brown's -work was now embodied inv the
excellent- geological map' of South Austra
lia jnst_produced, under the direction ot.
Dr. Ii.-'K. Ward, by. the South Australian.
Department of. Mines.-.' ':. \ .-- .'Vf- ;-
.Sir Edgeworth . David . explained **;that
the finding of the fossils 'now announced
was;due.in large measure to: another' very,
famous SoiutK Austraflianjljedlo'gist.-Pro;
fessor Bowchin,?. -whose ' brilliant ''dis-
coveries,- particularly of1 wonderful' glacial
deposits in .the -Mount- I^fty j-aniiflin-
den ' Ranges^ had thrilled the -? geolpgical
world. ' Tklr. Hbwchin/ .wholhad ^colla^
bprated from time to time with .hinii'had
supplied him with the greater ? part. of.
the specimens ? in -which' .those fossils -haa
been discovered as the' result of. micro
scopic examination. .. ..', ' . '
' Oldest EVissils' in 'Australia: '
?A two-fold interest attached' to them,
tails of their structures, they: were better
geological' antiquity hitherto recorded
the oldest known foBBils showing any de
corded .by Mr. C. T. Madigan (Lecturer
Those' occurred near Myponga Jetty. The
fossils now recorded were ? met with on
ton limestone, and in! part came from
the- more siliceous limestones ; underlying
the formec limestone; both were, of course,
extensively used nt -present in .the manu
facture, of Portland ? cement. . Micro
scopic .examination -showed that these
riads .of minute organisms * of the nature
of tiny shrimps, 'though of a far more
primitive 'type; 'and of many varieties of
sandworm, wbosedelieate feet and: bristles
were in. many cases very finely preserved.
Similar fossils had. noV been traced in
tlie limestone at. the Devil's Elbow on th*
Mount- Barker road, :as. well as'm the
by P-ofes«or Howchin in the Torrens \ al
ey. 'They also occurred at Crystal Brook.
ItTTOuM be' a matter; of no; little' interest
to ' observe whether they; were also pre
the' Tenf Hill series, west, of Lake ..Tor-
rens.' -The geological' age of this series
was still in doubt..' The fact that these
lowly forms of marine animal life wera
vast a thickness -of rock as that of. the
order of 8,000 to 10,000 ft., suggested, a.
tions of which Mount Lofty .and the Flm
[ers Range were composed. ', It was also
of ' stratigraphieal ..interest- that those
marine- saiidworma occurred both, above
and below, the_glacial deposits 'discovered
in' the Stort-Valley by Professor. How-
chin. This showed' that the glacial de
posits ' musfhave been deposited ,. along
he shore line of an- ancient -sea, extend
ing far northward inland, at: least to the
atitode-of^-the-Willouran Banges; just as
was, now, taking plaCe around the shores
of ?Antarctica.. :?;;?;??. ????.?.;'?'?';? .,'??? '
-? i Early-;: Stages' in ?Evbtution';.-
In the* second place,- the disebverv was
very interesting 'from' the ?point of view
ofthe evolution. ot;anlmal,life.. some ^of
the fotms-^now' .described . . for .the nrrt
time-beinit; entirely .new. ;tol science. A
special' characteristic -. of.- some- of them
wa*. that -their limbs -were-vmostly con
structed -on a- spiral pattern.VsomethinE
ike the spiral springs of old-fashioned
armchairs.- These.were. inclined outward
and- downward, and no doubt imparted
some- sprinniness to ? the movement of the
of the jointing of the limbs. . Attached
to 'those locoinotory appendages were deli
cately and .' exquisitely preserved spiral
Knis, and beautifully rolled .scroU-Uke
?entaeles about the head. ,Jn view of the
act that; asbased on. modern, radio-active
methods of cstimatins ^logical tme, no
ess than 500,000.000- ye'ars had elapsed
since Cambrian time, to which, the fossrfa
Kcordrfby Mr.' C, T.MadUan; belonged,
nnd'thatthe Brigbfon and' Beynejla lune
stones were considerably. older.' it seemed
ittle Bhort of -miraculous.; thst those
marine animals had been' preserved- so as
to show, in so. exquisito a st?te' of.pre
servation, such very delicate:: and minute
structures. .-.There could 'bejittte doubt
that ;iri ' the- neir future :wej Adelaide,
flinders : and. Mount Lofty -Ranges area
would be'looked^unon as-a?world trea
sure house, full -of : gems -without pwe
for those wh-os-oajtbt to. follow. life oirthe
e»rtK,to its' early =beeinnings. These
newly discovered ' fossils *' from Adelaide
sttWstiH. a, we.traeed .-Wa^
ward into past aeons, then.vas, now. Ufe
^orms were full ofthat bcautyiand «?
qSenMs^hich.tHe^ Great Artificer had
Ki«en-even .to; the morf lowly, of His crea
-.,r-«.'- ? -.v.' . - ??? ??''? -? — - '.
PRE-CAMBRIAN LIFE
Continued from Page 9.
Professor David on the Discoveries.
In the course of his remarks recently
in Adelaide, when dealing with the sub
ject. Sir Edgeworth David said that some
interesting lowly forms of fossil animal
life had Been found, chiefly in the lime
stone rocks of Brighton and Reynella.
The discovery of those fossils, would, it
was hoped, shed considerable light on dif
ficult problems in the geology of South
Australia. He paid a high tribute to the
valuable work done by one. who was the
doyen of all Australian geologists at the
time of his death last January, and who
geologists of the world, for the vastness
of the regions which he had geologically
mapped in South Australia, Central Aus
tralia, Northern Australia, and Western
Australia, and for his quickness
at seizing salient points observed in his
very long and arduous journeys over the
continent, he referred to the late Mr
H. Y. Lyell Brown. Much of Mr.
Brown's work was now embodied in the
excellent geological map of South Austra
lia just_produced, under the direction of
Dr. L. K. Ward, by the South Australian
Department of Mines.
Sir Edgeworth David explained that
the finding of the fossils now announced
was due in large measure to another very
famous South Australian geologist, Pro
fessor Howchin, whose brilliant dis
coveries, particularly of wonderful glacial
deposits in the Mount Lofty and Flinders
Ranges had thrilled the geological
world. Mr. Hbwchin, who had collaborated
from time to time with him, had
supplied him with the greater part of
the specimens in which those fossils had
been discovered as the result of micro
scopic examination.
Oldest Fossils in Australia.
A two-fold interest attached to them.
tails of their structures, they were better
geological antiquity hitherto recorded
the oldest known fossils showing any de
corded by Mr. C. T. Madigan (Lecturer
Those occurred near Myponga Jetty. The
fossils now recorded were met with on
ton limestone, and in part came from
the more siliceous limestones underlying
the former limestone; both were, of course,
extensively used at present in the manu
facture of Portland cement. Micro
scopic examination showed that these
riads of minute organisms of the nature
of tiny shrimps, though of a far more
primitive type; and of many varieties of
sandworm, whose delicate feet and bristles
were in many cases very finely preserved.
Similar fossils had now been traced in
tlie limestone at the Devil's Elbow on the
Mount Barker road, as well as in the
by Professor Howchin in the Torrens Vall
ey. They also occurred at Crystal Brook.
It would be a matter of no little interest
to observe whether they were also pre
the Tent Hill series, west, of Lake Tor-
rens.The geological age of this series
was still in doubt. The fact that these
lowly forms of marine animal life were
vast a thickness of rock as that of the
order of 8,000 to 10,000 ft., suggested a
tions of which Mount Lofty and the Flin
ders Range were composed. It was also
of stratigraphical interest that those
marine sandworms occurred both above
and below the glacial deposits discovered
in the Sturt Valley by Professor How
chin. This showed that the glacial de
posits must have been deposited along
the shore line of an ancient sea, extend
ing far northward inland, at least to the
altitude of the Willouran Ranges, just as
was now taking place around the shores
of Antarctica.
Early Stages in Evolution
In the second place the discovery was
very interesting from the point of view
of the evolution of animal life, some of
the forms now described for the first
time being entirely new to science. A
special characteristic of some of them
was that their limbs were mostly con
structed on a spiral pattern,something
like the spiral springs of old-fashioned
armchairs. These were inclined outward
and downward, and no doubt imparted
some springiness to the movement of the
of the jointing of the limbs. Attached
to those locomotory appendages were deli
cately and exquisitely preserved spiral
gills, and beautifully rolled scroll-like
tentacles about the head. In view of the
fact that as based on modern radio-active
methods of estimating geological time, no
less than 500,000,000 years had elapsed
since Cambrian time, to which the fossils
recorded by Mr. C. T. Madigan belonged,
and that the Brighton and Reynella lime
stones were considerably older, it seemed
little short of miraculous that those
marine animals had been preserved so as
to show, in so exquisite a state of pre
servation, such very delicate and minute
structures. There could be little doubt
that in the near future the Adelaide,
Flinders and Mount Lofty Ranges area
would be looked upon as a world trea
sure house, full of gems without price
for those who sought to follow life on the
earth to its early beginnings. These
newly discovered fossils from Adelaide
showed that still, as we traced back
ward into past aeons, then as, now, life
forms were full of that beauty and
exquisiteness which the Great Artificer had
given even to the most lowly of His crea
tures.
WHEN WORLD WAS YOUNG Fossils in Adelaide Hills RESEARCH WORK (Article), The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954), Saturday 13 October 1928 [Issue No.855] page 4 2019-10-09 18:59 'Sir Edgeworth read a paper describing
Sir Edgeworth read a paper describing
WHEN WORLD WAS YOUNG Fossils in Adelaide Hills RESEARCH WORK (Article), The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954), Saturday 13 October 1928 [Issue No.855] page 4 2019-10-09 18:57 sils represent,' continued Prof. Howehin.
'The specimens were found near the
Devil's Elbow {on the Mount Barker road),
at Beaumont, Montacute, and Tapley's.
Bill. Different opinions have been . ex- ?
that honor belongs to the rocks tnat form
the geological axis of the range.' igneous
sils represent,continued Prof. Howchin.
"The specimens were found near the
Devil's Elbow (on the Mount Barker road),
Hill. Different opinions have been ex
that honor belongs to the rocks that form
the geological axis of the range. Igneous
SIR EDGEWORTH DAVID. Discoveries of Fossils. 600,000,000 Years Old. (Article), The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Saturday 30 June 1928 [Issue No.27,106] page 13 2019-10-09 18:49 some much larger animal than a mere san-
tremely ancient creature, which, was pro?
some much larger animal than a mere sand
tremely ancient creature, which, was pro

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.