Information about Trove user: Rhonda.M

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,699,435
2 noelwoodhouse 3,855,133
3 NeilHamilton 3,400,132
4 DonnaTelfer 3,201,206
5 Rhonda.M 3,004,804
6 John.F.Hall 2,779,623
7 frankstonlibrary 2,333,767

3,004,804 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2019 48,702
July 2019 70,474
June 2019 80,691
May 2019 48,356
April 2019 108,083
March 2019 73,844
February 2019 64,404
January 2019 45,978
December 2018 40,503
November 2018 61,011
October 2018 43,889
September 2018 45,396
August 2018 55,342
July 2018 88,583
June 2018 91,478
May 2018 35,488
April 2018 73,689
March 2018 40,880
February 2018 37,635
January 2018 35,516
December 2017 33,834
November 2017 22,477
October 2017 30,333
September 2017 32,058
August 2017 36,460
July 2017 31,946
June 2017 29,007
May 2017 38,533
April 2017 44,602
March 2017 50,893
February 2017 42,315
January 2017 67,427
December 2016 48,882
November 2016 54,814
October 2016 57,622
September 2016 47,617
August 2016 53,336
July 2016 28,758
June 2016 6,613
May 2016 5,587
April 2016 14,343
March 2016 15,279
February 2016 11,487
January 2016 673
December 2015 1,902
November 2015 13,104
October 2015 27,476
September 2015 33,945
August 2015 27,379
July 2015 25,938
June 2015 37,277
May 2015 21,200
April 2015 1,565
March 2015 12,766
February 2015 16,220
January 2015 6,545
December 2014 7,659
November 2014 14,260
October 2014 14,014
September 2014 32,789
August 2014 16,919
July 2014 14,537
June 2014 17,496
May 2014 10,518
April 2014 3,450
March 2014 18,632
February 2014 4,090
January 2014 9,502
December 2013 16,889
November 2013 10,493
October 2013 27,604
September 2013 17,023
August 2013 26,000
July 2013 20,652
June 2013 21,508
May 2013 37,107
April 2013 20,233
March 2013 2,401
February 2013 2,807
January 2013 1,047
December 2012 2,025
November 2012 18,750
October 2012 8,684
September 2012 7,469
August 2012 19,173
July 2012 16,916
June 2012 22,811
May 2012 14,246
April 2012 19,837
March 2012 13,217
February 2012 17,194
January 2012 2,876
December 2011 7,429
November 2011 2,981
October 2011 7,591
September 2011 31,913
August 2011 19,955
July 2011 26,256
June 2011 17,484
May 2011 17,740
April 2011 26,629
March 2011 18,129
February 2011 9,213
January 2011 11,526
December 2010 4,314
November 2010 5,782
October 2010 1,397
September 2010 3,378
July 2010 3,994
June 2010 5,771
May 2010 5,524
April 2010 932
March 2010 2,920
February 2010 122
January 2010 498
December 2009 746
November 2009 962
October 2009 3,317
September 2009 5,370
August 2009 4,527
July 2009 3,110
June 2009 1,551
May 2009 445
April 2009 1,133
March 2009 1,065
February 2009 3
December 2008 6
November 2008 19
August 2008 89

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,699,251
2 noelwoodhouse 3,855,133
3 NeilHamilton 3,400,003
4 DonnaTelfer 3,201,185
5 Rhonda.M 3,004,791
6 John.F.Hall 2,779,611
7 frankstonlibrary 2,333,767

3,004,791 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2019 48,702
July 2019 70,474
June 2019 80,691
May 2019 48,356
April 2019 108,083
March 2019 73,844
February 2019 64,404
January 2019 45,978
December 2018 40,503
November 2018 61,011
October 2018 43,889
September 2018 45,396
August 2018 55,342
July 2018 88,583
June 2018 91,478
May 2018 35,488
April 2018 73,689
March 2018 40,880
February 2018 37,635
January 2018 35,516
December 2017 33,834
November 2017 22,477
October 2017 30,333
September 2017 32,058
August 2017 36,460
July 2017 31,946
June 2017 29,007
May 2017 38,533
April 2017 44,602
March 2017 50,893
February 2017 42,315
January 2017 67,414
December 2016 48,882
November 2016 54,814
October 2016 57,622
September 2016 47,617
August 2016 53,336
July 2016 28,758
June 2016 6,613
May 2016 5,587
April 2016 14,343
March 2016 15,279
February 2016 11,487
January 2016 673
December 2015 1,902
November 2015 13,104
October 2015 27,476
September 2015 33,945
August 2015 27,379
July 2015 25,938
June 2015 37,277
May 2015 21,200
April 2015 1,565
March 2015 12,766
February 2015 16,220
January 2015 6,545
December 2014 7,659
November 2014 14,260
October 2014 14,014
September 2014 32,789
August 2014 16,919
July 2014 14,537
June 2014 17,496
May 2014 10,518
April 2014 3,450
March 2014 18,632
February 2014 4,090
January 2014 9,502
December 2013 16,889
November 2013 10,493
October 2013 27,604
September 2013 17,023
August 2013 26,000
July 2013 20,652
June 2013 21,508
May 2013 37,107
April 2013 20,233
March 2013 2,401
February 2013 2,807
January 2013 1,047
December 2012 2,025
November 2012 18,750
October 2012 8,684
September 2012 7,469
August 2012 19,173
July 2012 16,916
June 2012 22,811
May 2012 14,246
April 2012 19,837
March 2012 13,217
February 2012 17,194
January 2012 2,876
December 2011 7,429
November 2011 2,981
October 2011 7,591
September 2011 31,913
August 2011 19,955
July 2011 26,256
June 2011 17,484
May 2011 17,740
April 2011 26,629
March 2011 18,129
February 2011 9,213
January 2011 11,526
December 2010 4,314
November 2010 5,782
October 2010 1,397
September 2010 3,378
July 2010 3,994
June 2010 5,771
May 2010 5,524
April 2010 932
March 2010 2,920
February 2010 122
January 2010 498
December 2009 746
November 2009 962
October 2009 3,317
September 2009 5,370
August 2009 4,527
July 2009 3,110
June 2009 1,551
May 2009 445
April 2009 1,133
March 2009 1,065
February 2009 3
December 2008 6
November 2008 19
August 2008 89

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 299,678
2 PhilThomas 121,002
3 mickbrook 106,370
4 murds5 61,555
5 GeoffMMutton 42,012
...
1495 Quokka53 13
1496 redcliffs 13
1497 rfin 13
1498 Rhonda.M 13
1499 Rhyleigh 13
1500 RoyHenderson 13

13 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

January 2017 13


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
GREAT LINERS—OLYMPIC AND TITANIC TO CARRY 5000 PERSONS. (Article), The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 - 1939), Friday 19 November 1909 [Issue No.4944] page 7 2019-08-18 20:28 ? ? t ?
TO CAIUIY' 5000 PERSONS.
! Twelve thousand tons (says the Belfast
correspondent of the 'Daily News', repre
sents the increase in size of tho two mam
moth 'liners, Olympic and Titanic, , now
being built by Messrs. Harland and Wolff, ,
Belfast, for tho White Star Company, over !
the leviathan 'Cunai'ders, MauretaimW,. and:
Lusitnsiia. Tho tonnage oif each of: these is
; 33,000 ; that of each of the new White Star
ships is to be 45,000 tons, and possibly -more.
Amongst tlie Belfast shipyard workmen
of the) extraordinary precautions which have
design becoming public property. bome
thing, however, may now be said an these
Tho new steamers will- be completed about
tho end of next. year,, and will go on the
Southampton-New York service in the fol
lowing spring. They will ba by far tho
decoration will bo tho finest on the water.
The now vessels will have a displacement
? of 00,00(1 tons. They are to bo about 840ft.
deck will bo moro than COft. above the
water. ? .
' Neither tho Olympic nor tho Titanic will
be high-power ships, nor are their lines de
signed for. great speed, 21 l'.nots being the
' average aimed at, as against the 2 o of the
I Cunarders. Ah immense amount of space,
I which in fast vessels is d'evoted to. machin
ery. will thus be saved for cabin accommo
| (lotion. The carrying capacity of the Rrcat
steamers .will exceed.- that' of anv afloat to
[ dav 'by at least one-third, lpach stonm
ship will carry, under ; normal conditions,
more than 5000 persons all told. . .
The crew- will .be the largest, over ??£? ploy
ed on ono morchaint slvip — moro man I
in all. The monster new liner will have |
: nine steel docks. The steamers are not
only designed to- eclipse, every thing else as
yet achieved' in passeniger shipbuilding .aK
equipment as well. 'There will I e p. largo
ontrance-hall a spacious dinlngroom, smok
ingroom,- library, women's parlour^grill and
l(\unying rooms, elaborately' furnished to tho
last detail
SWIMMING- AND DIVING1.
'One of the upper 'decks is*, to ho; comple
tely' enclosed' , to servo lis. . aj 'ballrpoiri;( or
sVatinjg rinki'. \j3jj- day, this .'enclosure nuiv
bo ' used ' as a sun : parlour and promenade.
It i will bo largo . ono-ugh'.,.to accommodate
several hundred ? passengers. ; In planning
tho cabins of tho new liners tiio luxuries oi
lie most up-to-date hotels have been kept
in sight, and oven Improved upon. These
vessels will oiler not ' only extended suites
of room's, ; but complete flats, which will
niftko ia possible to cross^ tli)d 'Atlantic
wliilo enjoying' all tlie privacy of onu'B own
homo.
Tho Olympic and Titanic will , ho. tho . first
steamers to- offer cabins with- private show
er-baths attachetj,. ? In addition there will
bo a great swimming bath .aboard '.:oth the
permit of diving. A ' gymnasium,- the lar
gest and most completely equipped,, afloat,
will bo found on . each. : . Tlie main dining
sailooa, KvhlclimHll -soat more than 000 .pus
senjgers, .will bb the largest single cai.iin on
the ship, and in its furnishlntg and decora
tion tho most elaborate. ' Should- a guest
tire of this apartment in tho week he Is
at sea, he can wander from' ono cafe to
another enjoyingi practically as much varie
ty -as ho miilght ashore.
A verandah cafo will be bujlt oiv one of
^tho upper decks far astera, looking out, over I
the sea, and a 50ft. above tho: water. The
decorations and general .management will
tarry out the idoa' of ' open-air cafes of
Southern Europe. The cafo -will be ' erected
with exposed} raf't'ers emtwiinod' with vines,
nnd the sidew will be latticed effects', to
make the illusion of a cafe at the scasldo
as complete qs possible. '
The cii/lnlil twill suggesW'an- old English chop
house, with high-tackod stalls of ancient
bn|k, nndi broadl low' tables: It will bo pos
sible at any hour of the day or nlgbt for
a passenger . to. uso the grill-room. . Tho
palm garden will bo still, another refuge
for those who weary of tho confines of the
ship during thd- pasdago.v, , V.;,- - . ' . . .
'A' DECK GARDEN.
:A) garden will bo on .thu. sun dock, unil
in tho winter months will. ho-, urotected by
a glass roof. Mcn-o will bo found, perhaps,,
the most complete Jllu-glyn, -\f ; 1.hw hotel
axliore. Thero will be uruours artlully conl
trlvml to give tho effect of, gardens covered
with vines and flowers, t b -? chiliren s room
of -the new lintn-s will be the most sumptu
Tho new liners -will bo as complete In!
equipment. Each boat will bo divided into
upwards of 90 steel compartments, sepnrat
ed; by heavy bulkheads. An automatic do
v-ico on the bridge will control all these
?heavy steel doors, making it. possible, for
a .single hai I'd to close them all hi enso of
?danger. Each of those doors in turn will
ho electrically connected with a churl, on
the bridge, and will bo represented l.y simtll
electric (lights. When, one of these -Uu,rn
closes the lig1!.1. —'.11 burr, re. I. The otVctr
on the bridge will thus be nbte to seo :it
a- glance if' all the compart nvnts nro closed
Still another not of safety devices will
guard against (iiv inl evt'i'y part of tho
A' combination of turbine and reciprocat
ing engines will propel the veisels. It is
he effected by this arrangement. The ferths
?in Hun-nnd and1 'Wo lift's, tvin-ds, at; iBel
fast, In which those wonderful ships are
being l;,uilt, are each 1,000ft. 1oum-, nml»
capable of bearing a dead weight of 7ft, 000.
tons.. The Olympic is expected to be ready
for 'launching In the early autumn of 101.0.
TO CARRY 5000 PERSONS.
Twelve thousand tons (says the Belfast
correspondent of the "Daily New", repre-
sents the increase in size of the two mam-
moth liners, Olympic and Titanic, now
being built by Messrs. Harland and Wolff,
Belfast, for the White Star Company, over
the leviathan Cunarders, Mauretania, and
Lusitania. The tonnage of each of these is
33,000 ; that of each of the new White Star
ships is to be 45,000 tons, and possibly more.
Amongst the Belfast shipyard workmen
of the extraordinary precautions which have
design becoming public property. Some-
thing, however, may now be said on these
The new steamers will be completed about
the end of next year, and will go on the
Southampton-New York service in the fol-
lowing spring. They will be by far the
decoration will be the finest on the water.
The new vessels will have a displacement
of 60,000 tons. They are to be about 840ft.
deck will be more than 60ft. above the
water.
Neither the Olympic nor the Titanic will
be high-power ships, nor are their lines de-
signed for great speed, 21 knots being the
average aimed at, as against the 25 of the
Cunarders. An immense amount of space,
which in fast vessels is devoted to machin-
ery, will thus be saved for cabin accommo-
dation. The carrying capacity of the great
steamers will exceed that of any afloat to
day by at least one-third. Each steam-
ship will carry, under normal conditions,
more than 5000 persons all told.
The crew will be the largest ever employ-
ed on one merchant ship — more than 200
in all. The monster new liner will have
nine steel docks. The steamers are not
only designed to eclipse every thing else as
yet achieved in passenger shipbuilding as
equipment as well. There will be a large
entrance-hall a spacious diningroom, smok-
ingroom, library, women's parlour grill and
lounging rooms, elaborately furnished to the
last detail.
SWIMMING AND DIVING.
One of the upper decks is to be comple-
tely enclosed to serve as a ballroom or
skating rink. By day this enclosure may
be sued as a sun parlour and promenade.
It will be large enough to accommodate
several hundred passengers. In planning
the cabins of the new liners the luxuries of
the most up-to-date hotels have been kept
in sight, and even improved upon. These
vessels will offer not only extended suites
of rooms, but complete flats, which will
make it possible to cross the Atlantic
while enjoying all the privacy of one's own
home.
Tho Olympic and Titanic will be the first
steamers to offer cabins with private show-
er-baths attached. In addition there will
be a great swimming bath aboard both the
permit of diving. A gymnasium, the lar
gest and most completely equipped afloat,
will be foudn on each. The main dining
saloon, which will seat more than 600 pas-
sengers, will be the largest single cabin on
the ship, and in its furnishing and decora-
tion the most elaborate. Should a guest
tire of this apartment in the week he is
at sea, he can wander from one cafe to
another enjoying practically as much varie-
ty as he might ashore.
A verandah cafe will be built on one of
the upper decks far astern, looking out over
the sea, and a 50ft. above the water. The
decorations and general management will
carry out the idea of open-air cafes of
Southern Europe. The cafe will be erected
with exposed rafters entwined with vines,
and the sides will be latticed effects, to
make the illusion of a cafe at the seaside
as complete as possible.
The captain will suggest an old English chop-
house, with high-backed stalls of ancient
bark, and broad low tables. It will be pos-
sible at any hour of the day or night for
a passenger to use the grill-room. The
palm garden will be still another refuge
for those who weary of the confines of the
ship during the passage.
A DECK GARDEN.
A garden will be on the sun deck, and
in the winter months will be protected by
a glass roof. Here will be found, perhaps,
the most complete illusion of the hotel
ashore. There will be arbours artfully con-
trived to give the effect of gardens covered
with vines and flowers. The children's room
of the new liners will be the most sumptu-
The new liners will be as complete in
equipment. Each boat will be divided into
upwards of 90 steel compartments, separat-
ed by heavy bulkheads. An automatic de-
vice on the bridge will control all these
heavy steel doors, making it possible, for
a single hadn't to close them all in case of
danger. Each of those doors in turn will
be electrically connected with a chart on
the bridge, and will be represented by small
electric lights. When one of these doors
closes the lights will burn red. The officer
on the bridge will thus be able to see at
a glance if all the compartments are closed.
Still another set of safety devices will
guard against fire in every part of the
A combination of turbine and reciprocat-
ing engines will propel the vessels. It is
be effected by this arrangement. The berths
in Harland and Wolff's yards, at Bel-
fast, in which those wonderful ships are
being built, are each 1,00ft. long, and
capable of bearing a dead weight of 75,000.
tons. The Olympic is expected to be ready
for launching In the early autumn of 19100.
The Titanic Lesson OLYMPIC RECONSTRUCTED. LONDON, Thursday. (Article), The Grafton Argus and Clarence River General Advertiser (NSW : 1874 - 1875; 1879 - 1882; 1888; 1892; 1899 - 1922), Friday 21 February 1913 page 5 2019-08-18 20:08 Tho Olympic, a sister stiip lo rue
Titanjc, has been reconstructed and
quarter of a million sterling-
The Olympic, a sister ship to the
Titanic, has been reconstructed and
quarter of a million sterling.
THE OLYMPIC'S BOATS. TITANIC COMMISSION INSPECTS. LONDON, Tuesday. (Article), Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954), Wednesday 8 May 1912 [Issue No.11,704] page 5 2019-08-18 20:07 .THE OLYMPIC'S BOATS.
TITANIC CO.IMMIISSION INSPECTS.
Lord Mersey, chairman of the Bri
the Titanic, and the assessors, Rear
THE OLYMPIC'S BOATS.
TITANIC COMMIISSION INSPECTS.
Lord Mersey, chairman of the Bri-
the Titanic, and the assessors, Rear-
THE SISTER SHIPS. THE OLYMPIC AND TITANIC. (Article), Daily Herald (Adelaide, SA : 1910 - 1924), Wednesday 17 April 1912 [Issue No.661] page 5 2019-08-18 20:06 THE SISTEB SHEPS.
I THE OEYMPIC AND TITANIC.
Writing tinder date of June 30 last the
London correspondent thus referretr vol
is a twin sister (the wrecked vessel be
ing fitted up in precisely iho same lux
urious manner as the Olympic):—"The
them, that words are inadequate to de
than I care to count, but all . the great
of the greatest passenger steamer pre
viously bnilt It spells the last word in
luxury and comfort. In its. cabins its
sumptuous suites, its dining halls,'.and
sea and j-Jiinlr instead that he been
""Tinning bath,, squash racket court,
the voyage. The hours were-too short
is1 asked for the use of, them for a single
trip. > In the. ordinary first class rwhinw
you have radiators,' telephone if yon will,
class passenger in the Olympic-travels in
greater luxury than kings could com
mand half a ceatizry .ago. One of the
heads , of the White Star line apologised
for being unable to provide .the
the automobile course that some news
ship. Host of us would be so occupied
from the moment we stepped on fee
Olympic at Southampton initil the hour
we would hive no time to consider
THE SISTER SHIPS.
THE OLYMPIC AND TITANIC.
Writing under date of June 30 last the
London correspondent thus referred to
is a twin sister (the wrecked vessel be-
ing fitted up in precisely the same lux
urious manner as the Olympic):— "The
them, that words are inadequate to de-
than I care to count, but all the great
of the greatest passenger steamer pre-
viously built. It spells the last word in
luxury and comfort. In its cabins its
sumptuous suites, its dining halls, and
sea and think instead that he been
swimming bath, squash racket court,
the voyage. The hours were too short
is asked for the use of them for a single
trip. In the ordinary first class cabins
you have radiators, telephone if you will,
class passenger in the Olympic travels in
greater luxury than kings could com-
mand half a century ago. One of the
heads of the White Star line apologised
for being unable to provide the
the automobile course that some news-
ship. Most of us would be so occupied
from the moment we stepped on the
Olympic at Southampton until the hour
we would have no time to consider
THE LEVIATHAN LINER "OLYMPIC." (Article), Cobram Courier (Vic. : 1888 - 1954), Thursday 16 June 1910 [Issue No.24] page 2 2019-08-18 20:03 i.
cross the Atlantic the biggest steam
the gigantic Cunarders " Lusitanla "
a 6o, man) thought tbey represented
the limit ot hugeness in marine con
ships "by almost as great a margin
as the " Mauretania " and " Lnsi-
The newer Cunarders are 790 leet
The' Cunarders have a beam of 88
" Mauretania," fhe " Olympic " will
atlantic travel. In an interview re
cently, Mr. J. Bruce Ismay, the gene
There is a certain percentage of Peo
we do not believe that this percen
or le6s spent on tbe journey is not a
hour is a matter of extreme impor
In an effort to discover where tbe
race for supremacy in size may even
tually end some interesting calcula
that if the rate of increase in steam
the' next hundred years at tbe same
ratio as it ba6 increased in the past
the end oi the present century would
so far advanced. It .will he called
Each of these might) ships will
possess accommodation for S.000 pas
of the state-rooms will lie arranged
inclined and are able to pay for tbe
ho a luxurious swimming bath fitted
be three cafes for the saloon passen
fittings, will he suggestive of an old
English i chop-house. It will have
The palm garden w-il! fie an inviting
on the sun deck, and will be protect
The children's room oi the new-
apartment of its kind ever attempt
ed. This cabin will be plentifully sup
will be tevs in great variety for the
will each have nine steel decks. Tbeir
bulls will be divided into upwards of
possible for a single band to close
tbem all in case of danger. The
the light Will burn red. The officer
on the hridgc will thus he able to sec
at a glance if all tbe compartments
will be scattered throughout the ;
great framework whicb indicate a rise
danger point tile fact is at once I
communicated to the officer on the |
an electric light on the great chart j
displayed on the wall will burn red. i
Some idea oi the immensity of the I
ma) be gained by a few statistics.
270 tons, the largest of these is 1|
long. The stern frame which is al
arms 73j tons aft, and 45 tons for
of the turbine and reciprocating en
economy ol coal will be effected by
'this arrangement, which makes it
. yards at Belfatt in whicb these won
1,000ft. long and capable ol bearing
a dead weight " of 75,600 tons. —

cross the Atlantic the biggest steam-
the gigantic Cunarders "Lusitania"
ago, many thought they represented
the limit of hugeness in marine con-
ships by almost as great a margin
as the "Mauretania" and "Lusi-
The newer Cunarders are 790 feet
The Cunarders have a beam of 88
"Mauretania," the "Olympic" will
atlantic travel. In an interview re-
cently, Mr. J. Bruce Ismay, the gene-
There is a certain percentage of peo-
we do not believe that this percen-
or less spent on the journey is not a
hour is a matter of extreme impor-
In an effort to discover where the
race for supremacy in size may even-
tually end some interesting calcula-
that if the rate of increase in steam-
the next hundred years at the same
ratio as it has increased in the past
the end of the present century would
so far advanced. It will be called
Each of these mighty ships will
possess accommodation for 5,000 pas-
of the state-rooms will be arranged
inclined and are able to pay for the
be a luxurious swimming bath fitted
be three cafes for the saloon passen-
fittings, will be suggestive of an old
English chop-house. It will have
The palm garden will be an inviting
on the sun deck, and will be protect-
The children's room of the new
apartment of its kind ever attempt-
ed. This cabin will be plentifully sup-
will be toys in great variety for the
will each have nine steel decks. Their
hulls will be divided into upwards of
possible for a single hand to close
them all in case of danger. The
the light will burn red. The officer
on the bridge will thus he able to see
at a glance if all the compartments
will be scattered throughout the
great framework which indicate a rise
danger point the fact is at once
communicated to the officer on the
an electric light on the great chart
displayed on the wall will burn red.
Some idea of the immensity of the
may be gained by a few statistics.
270 tons, the largest of these is 1¾
long. The stern frame which is al-
arms 73¼ tons aft, and 45 tons for-
the "Olympic."
of the turbine and reciprocating en-
economy of coal will be effected by
this arrangement, which makes it
yards at Belfast in which these won-
1,000ft. long and capable of bearing
a dead weight of 75,o00 tons. —
LINER OLYMPIC TO BE SCRAPPED (Article), Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954), Tuesday 21 September 1937 [Issue No.14,994] page 4 2019-08-18 19:55 LONDON, September 20.-Shipping
hours when tho White Star liner
up. . .
will undertake the sea- tow, which will
last two days. * ~'h
'argest merchant ship ever doomed
med and sank a German submarine.} i
LONDON, September 20. — Shipping
hours when the White Star liner
up.
will undertake the sea tow, which will
last two days.
largest merchant ship ever doomed
med and sank a German submarine.]
TITANIC SEQUEL FATHER’S CLAIM FOR DAMAGES VERDICT AGAINST THE COMPANY LONDON, June 26. (Article), The Evening Star (Boulder, WA : 1898 - 1921), Friday 27 June 1913 [Issue No.5006] page 1 2019-08-18 19:52 TITANIC
SEQUEL
L O N D O N , J u n e 2 6 .
T h o m a s R y a n - s u e d - t h e O c e a n i c S t e a m .
N a v i g a t i o n . C o . f o r d a m a g e s i n r e -
s p e c t fo t h e d e a t h o f h i s s o n , w h o w a s
a p a s s e n g e r o n t h e T i t a n i c . * Tffle j u r y
f o u n d t h e r e w a a . n o n e g l i g e n c e - o n t h e
w a s n e g l i g e n c e i n . n o t r e d u c i n g t h e
s p e e d . '-. . ' y
> ' . L a t e r .
TITANIC SEQUEL
VERDICT AGAINST THE COMPANY.
ONDONN , June 26 .
spect to the death of his son, who was
a passenger on the Titanic. The jury
found that there was no negligence on the
SEQUEL TO LOSS OF TITANIC. NEW YORK, 18th December. (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Monday 20 December 1915 [Issue No.18,954] page 6 2019-08-18 19:49 SEQUEL TO LOSS OF TITANIC, j
? ? ? ? ,
XK-W YOItly, 38tih December. |
.i.ne white otar Co. has agreed to paf j;
0:11,000 dol. (about JD1-S.800) in settlement |
ot all claims arising out of the loss of the \
liner Titanic. One-tenth of this amount i
will go to llritish claimants. \
NEW YORK, 18th December.
The White Star Co. has agreed to pay
644,000 dol. (about £128,000) in settlement
of all claims arising out of the loss of the
liner Titanic. One-tenth of this amount
will go to British claimants.
TITANIC SEQUEL MAJOR CHERSEE'S CHARGE MR. BUXTON'S REPLY BLAIMS PARLIAMENT LONDON, May 22. (Article), Daily Herald (Adelaide, SA : 1910 - 1924), Friday 24 May 1912 [Issue No.693] page 4 2019-08-18 19:47 MAJOR CHERSEFS CHARGE
.BLAIMS PARLIAMENT
Major Chersee moved in the Houst
of Commons that the salary of Mr. Syd
ney Buxton, President of the Board at
Trade, be reduced "By £100 per """"" aa
officials had reported to him that Brit
ish liners did not carry sufficient taate
Mr. G. Terrell, member for Chippen
ham, seconded the motion. He as
apparently they had treated them aa
concerned. Lord Charles Betesford*
whose opinions had been quoted as up
holding the Board, had never seen prao
thai Parliament had been just as slack
regarding life saving appliances at eea at
ni« department, and was equally respons
ible for the -result. The question of
equipment had never been raised prioi
MAJOR CHERSEE'S CHARGE
BLAIMS PARLIAMENT
Major Chersee moved in the House
of Commons that the salary of Mr. Syd-
ney Buxton, President of the Board of
Trade, be reduced by £100 per annum as
officials had reported to him that Brit-
ish liners did not carry sufficient boats
Mr. G. Terrell, member for Chippen-
ham, seconded the motion. He as-
apparently they had treated them as
concerned. Lord Charles Beresford,
whose opinions had been quoted as up-
holding the Board, had never seen prac-
that Parliament had been just as slack
regarding life saving appliances at sea as
his department, and was equally respons-
ible for the result. The question of
equipment had never been raised prior
TITANIC SEQUEL FATHER’S CLAIM FOR DAMAGES JURY’S FINDINGS. LONDON, June 25. (Article), The Evening Star (Boulder, WA : 1898 - 1921), Thursday 26 June 1913 [Issue No.5005] page 1 2019-08-18 19:45 i
Thomas Ryan sued /the Dceanic Steam
to ihe -deatih of his eon who was
a passenger one the ;33itanic^ The "jury j
found there was -no' negligence Hon, thai
part of the look-ont,- but that there -
was ae£ligence in . not reducing i3ie
•: The Jnd^s having left the ©ourtj
judgment was nat entered ,
Thomas Ryan sued the Oceanic Steam
to the death of his son who was
a passenger on the Titanic. The jury
found there was no negligence on the
part of the look-out, but that there
was negligence in not reducing the
speed.
The Judge having left the court,
judgment was not entered.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.