Information about Trove user: Paul.McGrath

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 6,017,139
2 noelwoodhouse 4,003,809
3 NeilHamilton 3,493,524
4 DonnaTelfer 3,472,680
5 Rhonda.M 3,435,473
...
166 Chrischardon 321,874
167 GBurghall 309,630
168 Just4tatts 307,957
169 Paul.McGrath 306,942
170 BobBradford 306,753
171 pserna 304,278

306,942 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2020 2,192
January 2020 644
July 2019 2
September 2018 12
June 2018 30
February 2018 528
October 2015 417
September 2014 11
August 2014 143
July 2014 71
June 2014 15
May 2014 909
April 2014 347
March 2014 2,344
February 2014 971
January 2014 2,388
December 2013 2,365
November 2013 2,967
October 2013 5,183
September 2013 5,038
August 2013 352
July 2013 2,039
June 2013 2,557
May 2013 13
April 2013 221
March 2013 1,379
February 2013 2,985
January 2013 4,934
December 2012 7,327
November 2012 7,215
October 2012 9,954
September 2012 12,771
August 2012 14,733
July 2012 8,805
June 2012 14,759
May 2012 12,167
April 2012 4,643
March 2012 4,581
February 2012 500
January 2012 4,557
December 2011 873
November 2011 4,569
October 2011 8,627
September 2011 1,102
August 2011 3,539
July 2011 14,150
June 2011 10,115
May 2011 7,000
April 2011 7,445
March 2011 10,610
February 2011 13,872
January 2011 12,445
December 2010 12,179
November 2010 11,672
October 2010 5,422
September 2010 403
August 2010 2,484
July 2010 5,800
June 2010 13,338
May 2010 7,869
April 2010 4,823
March 2010 477
February 2010 2,275
January 2010 2,784

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 6,016,937
2 noelwoodhouse 4,003,809
3 NeilHamilton 3,493,395
4 DonnaTelfer 3,472,654
5 Rhonda.M 3,435,460
...
165 GBurghall 309,607
166 PhilThomas 309,499
167 Just4tatts 307,891
168 Paul.McGrath 306,942
169 BobBradford 306,545
170 pserna 304,278

306,942 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2020 2,192
January 2020 644
July 2019 2
September 2018 12
June 2018 30
February 2018 528
October 2015 417
September 2014 11
August 2014 143
July 2014 71
June 2014 15
May 2014 909
April 2014 347
March 2014 2,344
February 2014 971
January 2014 2,388
December 2013 2,365
November 2013 2,967
October 2013 5,183
September 2013 5,038
August 2013 352
July 2013 2,039
June 2013 2,557
May 2013 13
April 2013 221
March 2013 1,379
February 2013 2,985
January 2013 4,934
December 2012 7,327
November 2012 7,215
October 2012 9,954
September 2012 12,771
August 2012 14,733
July 2012 8,805
June 2012 14,759
May 2012 12,167
April 2012 4,643
March 2012 4,581
February 2012 500
January 2012 4,557
December 2011 873
November 2011 4,569
October 2011 8,627
September 2011 1,102
August 2011 3,539
July 2011 14,150
June 2011 10,115
May 2011 7,000
April 2011 7,445
March 2011 10,610
February 2011 13,872
January 2011 12,445
December 2010 12,179
November 2010 11,672
October 2010 5,422
September 2010 403
August 2010 2,484
July 2010 5,800
June 2010 13,338
May 2010 7,869
April 2010 4,823
March 2010 477
February 2010 2,275
January 2010 2,784

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
A HUMANE SOCIETY FOR AUSTRALASIA. TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Thursday 29 April 1875 [Issue No.11,527] page 6 2020-03-31 14:29 colonists, respecting tho desirability of establishing a
Humane Society of Australasia, I bog that you will permit
mean opportunity of bringing the subject through the
medium of youv valunblo columns undor publio considera-
wes impressed with tho necessity of promoting the forma-
tion of. an institution similar to tho Royal Humano Society
of London, it being foit ii sorious duty that some measures
should bo taken to provent in somo dogroo, if possible, tho
loss of human lifo by drowning, especially as tno majority
of porflons aro lamentably ignorant of what course to
pursue for tho recovery of thoBe in n stalo of suspended
animation. This war, the most important motivo, accom-
panied by tho natural desiro to reward thoso who might
risk their lives in tho attompt to save that of n follow
creature, which lcd to tho formation of tho Victorian
Humano Society. Tho progrtss of the institution is v >ry
entiBtaotory, for tho Government, as also th« public, havo
recognised HB claimB to a gonorous consideration, and 11
State-aid of £250 will supplement a similar subsarLuod
amount. At tho last meeting of the court of directors tho
designs for tho modal, &o , wore agreed upon, and a sub-
committee appoinrod to make tho necessary nrrançemeats
for having a dio struck, But, previous to this final stop
tho tali!, and thereby extending ihesjmero of the opsrations
of tho institution to the whoio of tho Australian colonies,
«nd it ie my intention to move an amendment to this
eifeot nt tho next mooting. But previous to doing so I nm
anxious to obtain your views upon tho subject. I do not
fear that this ptiggcstion will bo misconstrued into n dcstro
to iiggrandh-.o Victoria, or to patronise our neighbours, ns
1 do not think tho other ooloniea will refuse to co-operate
with this ia the formation of a Humano Society of
Australasia becauso Ibo movement originated in Victoria,
lt is u subject that phould excito tho sympathies and active
rapport lit nil Classen of p-erwins; and I do not think r.ho
people of ino Australian colonies, not excluding New
i Zealand, would desire to bo in tho highest, degreo l iss
liberal Unili the promoters of the Royal linmnno Socie'.y.
For although th« latter confinée its activo operations to tfio
I'tTnilid Kisgdouvyot it willingly rocognisos and rewards
j nn act of bravery ic tho 'attompt to mtvo human life thu
. maydioppeu in any part of tue world. Such boing thu
I ci?« J thitik it. very undesirable that any ono nf tho colonies
i should i-etabliih a society, with similar objects, to the
exclusion of till the others, for tho reason that a society of
this kind is very different from any oth»r benevolent insti-
tution, lt would bb nilnctio ad absurdum if a Hümme
: whola ntfoir would devolve into a sort of Mutual Admi
m tick Associai ion, and it ie very undesirable that any of.
; th« colonies should afford tho malioious a theme upih
which to centro their wit, and thuH perhaps turn into,
! ridicule a most deserving subject. Tho oswbliahmant of
euch un institution would tend, to promote a frlondly inter- '
courto between tho colonies, and foster tho feelings of hu-
manity into a spirit of rivalry for the preservation of hum m
lifo which would bo devoid of that bitterness that usually
; accompanies the progress of antagonistic institutions. If
(he plan I have ptoposed should meet, with as ready nu
neicnt ns I beliovo il will, tho detailn c-n easily be
' arranged for tho appointment of diroclors, who will oare
? fully supervise and make the necossary arrangements for
j the circulation of useful information, placing of apparatus,
i &c, for the preservation of life. lu .the up-country dis
! tricts I am convinced, from experience, that this is very
necessary. Thero ia not any 'doubt in my mind but wh it
: thu recipients of an award from tho Humaue Society nf
: Australasia would value it in a greater degree than if it
j came from ono of a number of small societios. The soldier |
or tailor of Britain who reçoives tho medal of the Royal |
: Humane Society of Kugland proudly places it eido by sida 1
with hiß wm- medal. . '
It may not be nnintcrosting to mention that Prince
Bismarck, tho Chancellor of tho German Bmplro, although;
possessing many decorations, woara in general only tho'
medal presented to him by tho Borlin Humano Society,
1 which waa awarded to him for having gallantly rescued his
; gloom, who was in danger of losing his life by drowning.
I may inform you that Mr. Coppin çoinoides in my
, deeiro to extend tho objects of tho Human« Society. 1

j theil bo glad if some of your influential citizens would
give tho subject their consideration, and communicate with I
mo, if destrone of aveling in promoting tne objects iu I
¡ view, which ate, I lieeä scarcely fay) to^mmic bonum,
! I nm, yours,! oí c.,
' J. ELLIS säTBWABC,
A Director Victorian Humtiuo Socioty.
2, Gtafi'ord-chamberB, 49, Elizabeth-utreat South, Mo,:- y
J bourne. .
colonists respecting the desirability of establishing a
Humane Society of Australasia, I beg that you will permit
me an opportunity of bringing the subject through the
medium of your valuable columns under public considera-
was impressed with the necessity of promoting the forma-
tion of an institution similar to the Royal Humane Society
of London, it being felt a serious duty that some measures
should be taken to prevent in some degree, if possible, the
loss of human life by drowning, especially as the majority
of persons are lamentably ignorant of what course to
pursue for the recovery of those in a state of suspended
animation. This was the most important motive, accom-
panied by the natural desire to reward those who might
risk their lives in the attempt to save that of a fellow
creature, which led to the formation of the Victorian
Humane Society. The progress of the institution is very
satisfactory, for the Government, as also the public, have
recognised its claims to a generous consideration, and a
State-aid of £250 will supplement a similar subscribed
amount. At the last meeting of the court of directors the
designs for the medal, &c., were agreed upon, and a sub-
committee appointed to make the necessary arrangements
for having a die struck. But, previous to this final step
the title, and thereby extending the sphere of the operations
of the institution to the whole of the Australian colonies,
and it is my intention to move an amendment to this
effect at the next meeting. But previous to doing so I am
anxious to obtain your views upon the subject. I do not
fear that this suggestion will be misconstrued into a desire
to aggrandize Victoria, or to patronise our neighbours, as
I do not think the other colonies will refuse to co-operate
with this in the formation of a Humane Society of
Australasia because the movement originated in Victoria.
It is a subject that should excite the sympathies and active
support of all classes of persons ; and I do not think the
people of the Australian colonies, not excluding New
Zealand, would desire to be in the highest degree has
liberal than the promoters of the Royal Humane Society.
For although the latter confines its active operations to the
United Kingdom, yet it willingly recognises and rewards
an act of bravery in the attempt to save human life that
may happen in any part of the world. Such being the
case I think it very undesirable that any one of the colonies
should establish a society, with similar objects, to the
exclusion of all the others, for the reason that a society of
this kind is very different from any other benevolent insti-
tution. It would be reductio ad absurdum if a Humane
whole affair would devolve into a sort of Mutual Admi-
ration Association, and it is very undesirable that any of
the colonies should afford the malicious a theme upon
which to centre their wit, and thus perhaps turn into
ridicule a most deserving subject. The establishment of
such an institution would tend to promote a friendly inter-
course between the colonies, and foster the feelings of hu-
manity into a spirit of rivalry for the preservation of human
life which would be devoid of that bitterness that usually
accompanies the progress of antagonistic institutions. If
the plan I have proposed should meet with as ready an
assent as I believe it will, the details can easily be
arranged for the appointment of directors, who will care-
fully supervise and make the necessary arrangements for
the circulation of useful information, placing of apparatus,
&c., for the preservation of life. In the up-country dis-
tricts I am convinced, from experience, that this is very
necessary. There is not any doubt in my mind but what
the recipients of an award from the Humane Society of
Australasia would value it in a greater degree than if it
came from one of a number of small societies. The soldier
or sailor of Britain who receives the medal of the Royal
Humane Society of England proudly places it side by side
with his war medal.
It may not be uninteresting to mention that Prince
Bismarck, the Chancellor of the German Empire, although
possessing many decorations, wears in general only the
medal presented to him by the Berlin Humane Society,
which was awarded to him for having gallantly rescued his
groom, who was in danger of losing his life by drowning.
I may inform you that Mr. Coppin coincides in my
desire to extend the objects of the Humane Society. I

shall be glad if some of your influential citizens would
give the subject their consideration, and communicate with
me, if desirous of assisting in promoting the objects in
view, which are, I need scarcely say, commune bonum.
I am, yours, &c.,
J. ELLIS STEWART,
A Director Victorian Humane Society.
2, Stafford-chambers, 49, Elizabeth-street South, Mel-
bourne.
A HUMANE SOCIETY FOR AUSTRALASIA. TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Thursday 29 April 1875 [Issue No.11,527] page 6 2020-03-31 13:58 TO THE BDIT0K OP TUB KEK.MiI).
Sm,-Boing very anxious to elicit the opinion of your
TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.
SIR, - Being very anxious to elicit the opinion of your
THE HUMANE SOCIETY. TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 4 May 1875 [Issue No.11,531] page 3 2020-03-31 13:57 TO THE EDITOR, OP THE HERALD.
; SIE,- Your Melbourne correspondent, J. Ellis Stewart, in
.yesterday's issue, suggeets the formation ot " A Humane
iSociety for Australasia." 1 am of opinion that sume
! organization to effect the objeot intended is much needed in
'thin colony. As un instance of neglect I may state the
¡following:-About two months ago it was reported to mo
that a young man named,I believe, John Bntler, coxswain
of the lavender Bay steam ferry-boat, bad resonad a boy
from drowning. I made inquiry about the mutter, and
ascertained that be had in the mott'manly and disinterested
tain Hixson, whom I understood to be agent of tho
Humane Society of England, with a view to the foi mal
¡recognition in some way of this man's admirable oonduot
.Captain Hixson, however, informed me, as I understood
him, that he had resigned the agency of the Bocioty. He,
-nevertheless, wee good enongh, at my request, to oatue an
inquiry to bo made into the case ; and it WSB found that
¡Butler hod at various times rescued four boys from drown-
except that one of the boys resoued had given him half-a
crown. This case, in' addition to several others within my
experience, is a subject, in my mind, for serions reflection
¡that the city and suburbs of Sydney should be bounded by
lar, etd that we should be negligently rearing sc many
need to bo rescued from drowning if thoy accidentally fall
off a wharf er ferry steamer.
'? As regards the suggestion of your Melbourne corre-
held in the Town Hall, Sydney, at 4 o'clock pm. of
Monday, 3rd proximo, of persons désirons af forming a
Humane Society. It will, in' my opinion, be necessary to
consider the desirability of affiliating with the Boyal
l am, &o.,
TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.
SIR, - Your Melbourne correspondent, J. Ellis Stewart, in
yesterday's issue, suggests the formation of "A Humane
Society for Australasia." I am of opinion that some
organization to effect the object intended is much needed in
this colony. As an instance of neglect I may state the
following : - About two months ago it was reported to me
that a young man named, I believe, John Butler, coxswain
of the Lavender Bay steam ferry-boat, had rescued a boy
from drowning. I made inquiry about the matter, and
ascertained that he had in the most manly and disinterested
tain Hixson, whom I understood to be agent of the
Humane Society of England, with a view to the formal
recognition in some way of this man's admirable conduct.
Captain Hixson, however, informed me, as I understood
him, that he had resigned the agency of the Society. He,
nevertheless, was good enough, at my request, to cause an
inquiry to be made into the case ; and it was found that
Butler had at various times rescued four boys from drown-
except that one of the boys rescued had given him half-a-
crown. This case, in addition to several others within my
experience, is a subject, in my mind, for serious reflection -
that the city and suburbs of Sydney should be bounded by
lar, and that we should be negligently rearing so many
need to be rescued from drowning if they accidentally fall
off a wharf or ferry steamer.
As regards the suggestion of your Melbourne corre-
held in the Town Hall, Sydney, at 4 o'clock p.m. of
Monday, 3rd proximo, of persons desirous of forming a
Humane Society. It will, in my opinion, be necessary to
consider the desirability of affiliating with the Royal
l am, &c.,
EJECTMENT FROM THE STREETS OF THE BOROUGH OF ST. LEONARDS. TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 22 March 1871 [Issue No.10,245] page 5 2020-03-31 13:41 TO THE EIllTOll Ol' TUB HERALD. _ J
Stn,-1 am oí opinion that voui correspondent, a "Rate-
payer, m to-dav's papei knows nioic ot tho subject
ícterred to by him than ho would have )oh bolicve. If
li ia Jidc information wore de«ircd it could havo boon
obtained fiom tho Council Clcik, 01 in) self, without dolay.
¡suth bemp; the case, tho questions submitted to you would
wasto of youl timo as well as tho spaco in )oui paper, with
thefutilo object of getting up a villagoguovancc Tho
cii'-o 19, shoitlv, as follows -iho portion of tho borough
alluded to is m the Government town« hip of St Leonards,
ni d has been proel umed ii town under tho Country
Towns Polico Acts, which rcqune thal poisons desirous
lo do so to the Polico Magistrate, 01 bo subject lo a panaltv
of, 1 believe, £5 , but there has not, 1 nat I am aware of,
beon an) such appointment as Polico Magistrate, conse
qucnllv, the Commissioner of Crown Lands for the county
oi Cumberland has been legaided as having powoi to pic
vent encioachmeuts, t\-c Shortly aflci the mcoipoiation
of the borough the Council applied lo the Government to
align the shoots, which, in the course of time, was dono,
and tho alignment posts having beon ¡put up at the cost
and under the direction of the Survovor-Gencial's Depart-
ment, showed unmislukabl) tho encroachment, tho subject
of " Ratcpavei's inquines. Tho Council considered it a
nuisance and a bai lo improvement in the conti o of Iho
piuco, and, therefoic, determined to asceitam their legal
powers to rcmovo encroachments genemllv, which carno
into their po-sc-sion and existed fhiough no laches of their
ov n, but through tho neglect of the otiiccts of tho Govern-
ment whose dutv it was to protect the streets boforo ths
incoiporilion. Notico was given to the pai ties concerned
m the case îeferrcd to, but tho nuisance was not lomoved
Application w as then made lo the Government to placo tho
Council m possession of tho streets thoy were changed to
make and protect for tho use of the public, without wistmg
their small money means in eithei law or buying oil tres-
passers This particular application was made on principle,
and «ithn view of discouraging and nipping in tho bud
chums foi compensation ot a similar charaetci. After a
yeal oi two's debt), and much correspondence in circumlo-
cution offices, the Crown consented, through tho Crown
¡solicitor, to bung an action foi Iho Council for (I think)
mfiu'ion The defendants having no caso (but a dogged
detcimmation, if possible, lo extoit money fioui tho
Council), *ud0mcntwent at last by default, and in duo and
stately course the Sheriff, tho othor dav, pi iced the
Council Clerk in possession of tho streets intruded j
upon You will, therefore, seo that the Borough
Council did not pull nny person's house down, or
ana thing of the sort, then labourers, to savo oxponso, did
howovcr, undci direction, assist tho Sheriff's officers in 10
moving the nuisance If tho municipal authouties allow
anv cntioacbment m this placo m futuro it will bo their
Jault, aa the lawas stated by j ou affords ample po wa to
suppicss on) such attempt.
I am, &c,
AA1LLIAM TUNKS, Mayor.
. P.S.-Any person interested can see tho minutes and
correspondence in tho nbovo case on application al the
answering any future anonymous meddlers or lotter
vvrifcrß on this subject.-AV. T(.
March 21. _
TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.
SIR, - I am of opinion that your correspondent, a "Rate-
payer," in to-day's paper, knows more of the subject
referred to by him than he would have you believe. If
bona fide information were desired it could have been
obtained from the Council Clerk, or myself, without delay.
Such being the case, the questions submitted to you would
waste of your time as well as the space in your paper, with
the futile object of getting up a village grievance. The
case is, shortly, as follows : - The portion of the borough
alluded to is in the Government township of St. Leonards,
and has been proclaimed a town under the Country
Towns Police Acts, which require that persons desirous
to do so to the Police Magistrate, or be subject to a penalty
of, I believe, £5 ; but there has not, that I am aware of,
been any such appointment as Police Magistrate, conse-
quently, the Commissioner of Crown Lands for the county
of Cumberland has been regarded as having power to pre-
vent encroachments, &c. Shortly after the incorporation
of the borough the Council applied to the Government to
align the streets, which, in the course of time, was done,
and the alignment posts having been put up at the cost
and under the direction of the Surveyor-General's Depart-
ment, showed unmistakably the encroachment, the subject
of "Ratepayer's" inquiries. The Council considered it a
nuisance and a bar to improvement in the centre of the
place, and, therefore, determined to ascertain their legal
powers to remove encroachments generally, which came
into their possession and existed through no laches of their
own, but through the neglect of the officers of the Govern-
ment whose duty it was to protect the streets before the
incorporation. Notice was given to the parties concerned
in the case referred to, but the nuisance was not removed.
Application was then made to the Government to place the
Council in possession of the streets they were changed to
make and protect for the use of the public, without wasting
their small money means in either law or buying off tres-
passers. This particular application was made on principle,
and with a view of discouraging and nipping in the bud
claims for compensation of a similar character. After a
year or two's delay, and much correspondence in circumlo-
cution offices, the Crown consented, through the Crown
Solicitor, to bring an action for the Council for (I think)
intrusion. The defendants having no case (but a dogged
determination, if possible, to extort money from the
Council), judgment went at last by default, and in due and
stately course the Sheriff, the other day, placed the
Council Clerk in possession of the streets intruded
upon. You will, therefore, see that the Borough
Council did not pull any person's house down, or
anything of the sort ; their labourers, to save exponse, did
however, under direction, assist the Sheriff's officers in re-
moving the nuisance. If the municipal authorities allow
any encroachment in this place in future it will be their
fault, as the law as stated by you affords ample power to
suppress any such attempt.
I am, &c.,
WILLIAM TUNKS, Mayor.
P.S. - Any person interested can see the minutes and
correspondence in the above case on application at the
answering any future anonymous meddlers or letter-
writers on this subject. - W. T.
March 21.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Monday 20 March 1871 [Issue No.10,243] page 6 2020-03-31 13:18 to the nniTOit or the herald.
Sin -'N ill vou oblige bj informing mo -
1 VV hat povi ers coi pot nto bodies posscsB under tho
Mumu, ahties Act of 1807, respecting cncioachuients on
street« r
2 Dees the Act authoiiso thom to pull down, without
been elected fifteen or sixteen j ears prior to the p-issing of
fbo Aet, and for vihieh rates have been levied and paul foi
the Iat-t thiee j ears i
I as-k these questions booouso the Coiporalion of the
borough oi St Leonaids has this dnv caused the ía/ing of
a hut ufrdaB a dwelling, n blacl smith's shop, and a tene-
ment usid as a butcher s shop
Yours, iScc.,
14th March
[Iho Count ii have power, under section 13G ol tho Mu-
nicipalities Act of 1807, to pull down any building, &.c ,
ene touching upon a proclaimed or well defined street, if tho
encroachment hns taktnplace since the mcorpoialion ot tho
Dorcugh , and not onlj is the person making tho encroach-
ment entitled to no compensation, but ho is liable to a
pcnulty and must paj the cost of ibating the nuisance ho
W i rented But this will not npplj to old buildings or
fences As to the removal of such buildings or fences be-
lieved to be unlawful obstructions to public highways, tho
Ceuncil 1 avo the same lights ns other persons interested in
such hiphvvavs, and no me re Questions arising out of
any such removal must bo determined hy tho "common
law "-i í, by bringing an action,-Ed ]
TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.
SIR, - Will you oblige by informing me : -
1. What powers corporate bodies possess under the
Municipalities Act of 1867, respecting encroachments on
streets?
2. Does the Act authorise them to pull down, without
been elected fifteen or sixteen years prior to the passing of
the Act, and for which rates have been levied and paid for
the last three years?
I ask these questions because the Corporation of the
borough of St. Leonards has this day caused the razing of
a hut used as a dwelling, a blacksmith's shop, and a tene-
ment used as a butcher's shop.
Yours, &c.,
14th March.
[The Council have power, under section 136 of the Mu-
nicipalities Act of 1867, to pull down any building, &c.,
encroaching upon a proclaimed or well defined street, if the
encroachment has taken place since the incorporation of the
borough ; and not only is the person making the encroach-
ment entitled to no compensation, but he is liable to a
penalty and must pay the cost of abating the nuisance he
has created. But this will not apply to old buildings or
fences. As to the removal of such buildings or fences be-
lieved to be unlawful obstructions to public highways, the
Council have the same rights as other persons interested in
such highways, and no more. Questions arising out of
any such removal must be determined by the "common
law" - i.e., by bringing an action. - ED.]
MUNICIPAL MATTERS. TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 28 February 1882 [Issue No.13,702] page 6 2020-03-31 12:14 MUMCIVAL 21 A. TTEItS.
TO TllE HDlTOR OF Til Ii HERALD.
¡sil,-I egiil di( iMtnis on mimi ipil mullets urn, I think,
p'lilieiuliirlv intiiisting to uiit-oplir-lieattd niiivoiu ami
othin eii-ived m ti e business ut bin un, h couru ils
.fuJgiucnts bv niiigutiiiliii, Disliitt Ci uit judgrti. and bv
ti Mm, lu piden of lhe bl pi erne Limit have» iiuh m mino
denice the turtu of lavt Iho ddisluu of the litter ir the
hral mtiipr.tiitiou ot tho la» until the lull m supplier
Coin t rules to tlio centrar}
"Mtiiiicipiilit} ot St Lennards v Zahel, snmo v.
lenthall JJi-.ilict Court (use, bielniv -Diese nucí two
ut tunis foi lutes iljimed against tim dcfuidunts foi pio
pirtv vi nhiti tho nimiuipiiliiy uf st J e mai els D10
Knntnds ot tho dcfiiitoinho.lt vino tint no local as ts1
nicut lind be« n tnndo, irniMiiuch as it bud not been mudo
until tinco months ut toi tho cleclum ol the inuvoi, and Iho
steps taken to tiifoico the into hud all bien mudo ¡mloro au
application to the üovoniment to extend tho time hy
proelauiiiion in tho Gnzitte ti« making the íalo
Iho point of Inw raised having been 11 lily argued boforo
the Comt bv the advocates e ig ig-cd on beb ill ol tho mnnici
pahtv and the dt fmduutr, lils Houui lu Id that under tho
lblth section of tho Act, it iviu not uci essai v ti» make» any
iiisisuiKiit within thrcn'iioiifhs-no tuno lain,» ("prcsslv
inentioiicd thirein, and that, as ligaided l'uth tot tton,
under which tho prciiittnuilion so riindo was, m tin se
instances, tu bo trrutid asa nitre surplusage A't rilli t for
the pliintilln Mr 1. Gamma tppi'incd lor tho niuriicipii
lilv, at d Mi \V. Ile lltii lor the dufindauta "-1 lum tho
S M JUia'd, 22nd Juno, KS70
'Um cuse icportsd h> von in vcflterduv's issue-iii}lor v
the Um out h ot Pnrrnmiiitn-upi turu to tim to lime bim
diiidtdon dillon nt grounds limn the alinve. 1 hate, 1
think, minite utionulii nii-Vd si temi puisons v/hu buvu
1 tilth su tmti of the Munn 1 |i .lilli s Act, in common nith nil
ethel Aits of mu Puiliaminit, uto not punctuated, and
thtrelore making un c-liiiiato within thru» months of tho
t lett ion nf iii ivor is ail that is neeussuii, mid the tutu may
bu milmed and collected ul any rou-tiuiihlu time tin «nitor
¡With Fühl nar». IWî*>
MUNICIPAL MATTERS.
TO THE EDlTOR OF THE HERALD.
Sir, - Legal decisions on municipal matters are, I think,
particularly interesting to unsophisticated mayors and
others engaged in the business of borough councils.
Judgments by magistrates, District Court judges, and by
a single judge of the Supreme Court have each in some
degree the force of law. The decision of the latter is the
legal interpretation of the law until the full or superior
Court rules to the contrary.
"Municipality of St. Leonards v. Zabel, same v.
Lenthall. District Court case, Sydney. - These were two
actions for rates claimed against the defendants for pro-
perty within the municipality of St. Leonards. The
grounds of the defence in both were that no local assess-
ment had been made, inasmuch as it had not been made
until three months after the election of the mayor, and the
steps taken to enforce the rate had all been made before an
application to the Government to extend the time by
proclamation in the Gazette for making the rate.
The point of Iaw raised having been ably argued before
the Court by the advocates engaged on behalf of the munici-
pality and the defendants, his Honor heId that under the
164th section of the Act, it was not necessary to make any
assessment within three months - no time being expressly
mentioned therein ; and that, as regarded 187th section,
under which the proclaimation so made was, in these
instances, to be treated as a mere surplusage. Verdict for
the plaintiffs. Mr. F. Gannon appeared for the municipa-
lity, and Mr. W. Hellyer for the defendants." - From the
S. M. Herald, 22nd June, 1870.
The case reported by you in yesterday's issue - Taylor v.
the Borough of Parramatta - appears to me to have been
decided on different grounds from the above. I hate, I
think, unintentionally misled several persons who have
164th section of the Municipalities Act, in common with all
other Acts of our Parliament, are not punctuated, and
therefore making an estimate within three months of the
election of mayor is all that is necessary, and the rate may
be ordered and collected at any reasonable time thereafter.
25th February, 1882.
To the Editor of the Herald. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 28 April 1868 [Issue No.9341] page 6 2020-03-30 12:38 Sin,-In answer to -A letter signed " John MuointoiU," in
lo-day'ü ikbuc, allow mo to iafoim the " constituuuts of
tho wharf (almost tho first) for the evcursion leforrod to,
and when ho was .informed that no vehicles would bein -
readiness, and that all would havo to walk ovor the pro-
posed line of tramway, he went away, and, as ho says,
absence is explained." " The information ip hiudly correct
(excepting Messrs. Sutherland and Macintosh)/' Two
inoic of the aldermen caine to Parramatta by train, and the
remaining aldciman was prevented by a death in the
family. On our lost visit to the Botany dams, perhaps
Mi. Alderman Macintosh will give a similar reason to his
in the neighbourhood. On tho way up tim river Mr. Bell,
the City Engineer, informed mo ho had prepared reports on
obtaining blue metal fiom Prospect duringi the .timo Sir
AVillinm Denison was hcie, and that thean roporls nnd Sir
.AVilJinm's mjjjutc slioirid be nt the Town .Half. , <
'l _' After hearing from MT. Boll that Prospect wadd bo a
'moro Miitablo quairy jfor^b/túningj'.'jut) motal and at a.
lesB price, it wag dotêrroinoa that wo should visit that,
placo in tho following week.. . . . '<
Yon havo given Mr. Alderman Macintosh's 'petition a
leading paragraph in tho Herald of to-day, porhapji you
will givo these romaiks a similar position. Your reporior
whowos present ut our Council meeüng on Monday last
(certainly not Mr. Alderman Macintosh'» dam ropoitcr)
can say why tho celebrated No/12 motion was " rufod out
of order." Jlis notes at the time will give a diftbrcnt
version. , , ;
Mr. Alderman Macintosh, lias formed tho last link ol
tho irinmu'rate of obstructionists whose only hobby ia
to have their speeches leportcd when > vilifying' the
officers of the Corporation. ,
1 hove no intention oi Inking any more nofieo of such
letters. My only duty is, when any of the trio do no1 eon
duct themselves as thoy should to " rulo them uut Ot
Yours, o.e.,. i
i "*? -Mr. Tunks Will ninko a splendid addition to the
nbovt ti o. Perhaps ho will call at,the Town Hall and
make tie samo statement thero which ho has mado in tho
Assembly, where I had not the -chanco of defendfngbny
self. Ho will withdraw his >remarks a« quickly nu' tho
petition has been withdrawn to-day.-C. M.
T¿wn nail, Sydney, 27th April. j ,
SIR, - In answer to a letter signed "John Macintosh," in
to-day's issue, allow me to inform the "constituents of
the wharf (almost the first) for the excursion referred to,
and when he was informed that no vehicles would be in
readiness, and that all would have to walk over the pro-
posed line of tramway, he went away, and, as he says,
"not being inclined for a holiday on that occasion, my
absence is explained." "The information is hardly correct
(excepting Messrs. Sutherland and Macintosh)." Two
more of the aldermen came to Parramatta by train, and the
remaining alderman was prevented by a death in the
family. On our last visit to the Botany dams, perhaps
Mr. Alderman Macintosh will give a similar reason to his
in the neighbourhood. On the way up the river Mr. Bell,
the City Engineer, informed me he had prepared reports on
obtaining blue metal from Prospect during the time Sir
William Denison was here, and that these reports and Sir
William's minute should be at the Town Hall.
After hearing from Mr. Bell that Prospect would be a
more suitable quarry for obtaining blue metal and at a
less price, it was determined that we should visit that
place in the following week.
You have given Mr. Alderman Macintosh's petition a
leading paragraph in the Herald of to-day, perhaps you
will give these remarks a similar position. Your reporter
who was present at our Council meeting on Monday last
(certainly not Mr. Alderman Macintosh's dam reporter)
can say why the celebrated No. 12 motion was "ruled out
of order." His notes at the time will give a different
version.
Mr. Alderman Macintosh, has formed the last link of
the triumvirate of obstructionists whose only hobby is
to have their speeches reported when vilifying the
officers of the Corporation.
I have no intention of taking any more notice of such
letters. My only duty is, when any of the trio do not con-
duct themselves as they should to "rule them out of
Yours, &c.,
P. S. - Mr. Tunks will make a splendid addition to the
above trio. Perhaps he will call at the Town Hall and
make the same statement there which he has made in the
Assembly, where I had not the chance of defending my-
self. He will withdraw his remarks as quickly as the
petition has been withdrawn to-day. - C. M.
Town Hall, Sydney, 27th April.
To the Editer of the Herald. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 23 November 1864 [Issue No.8266] page 3 2020-03-30 10:43 lo the Editer of the Uti alä,
t?)!),-If yon er Mr. JamcB Hanry had taken the small trouble
¡DTulved in an inspection of the Electoral noll, you might have
teen two Jan.es Henrys in it. Une, James Henry, Hyde, resi-
dence, Kjde, tho other, James Henry, Sydney, irechold, St,
Leonards
I think it very probable that many persons will read Mr
llcnij'e letter who will not read this, and to that extent at
least, jon -willhave dono Mr. Tunks an injury, You will have
caused those perçons to believe that Mr. James Henry, of the
Haymarket, had his name attached to air Tunkß's requisition
-without biB authority, whereas in fact and in truth it was not the
Sydney Mr. Henry's namo, hut that of Mr. James Henry, of
Ryde, nho pertonally gave me his name for nubhoation
Sjdiey, November 22nd, J' K" HEYD0N«
To the Editor of the Herald.
SIR, - If yon or Mr. James Henry had taken the small trouble
involved in an inspection of the Electoral Roll, you might have
seen two James Henrys in it. One, James Henry, Ryde, resi-
dence, Ryde ; the other, James Henry, Sydney, freehold, St.
Leonards.
I think it very probable that many persons will read Mr.
Henry's letter who will not read this ; and to that extent at
least, you will have done Mr. Tunks an injury. You will have
caused those persons to believe that Mr. James Henry, of the
Haymarket, had his name attached to Mr. Tunks's requisition
without his authority, whereas in fact and in truth it was not the
Sydney Mr. Henry's name, but that of Mr. James Henry, of
Ryde, who personally gave me his name for publication.
Sydney, November 22nd. J. K. HEYDON.
To the Editor of the Sydney Morning Herald. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Friday 21 August 1857 [Issue No.5993] page 8 2020-03-30 09:22 two colonies, addressed "Mr. R. Driver, junior, secre-
THE ROADS. To the Editor of the Sydney Morning Herald. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 6 June 1857 [Issue No.5928] page 8 2020-03-30 09:21 Till'. RO VD3.
"Sin,-Your strictures respecting the state of tho roads will bo
«ehoed by everv member of the community who has travelled over
thojnacadamiscd roads of the old country ; for example, London
to" Ilolyhoad, and every leading thoroughfare from the metropolis
north, south, east, and west. What appears most wanting hore
is ndhêrcnco to somo uniform system of road-making, that is,
lovel the road before putting the metal on ; after that, cover this
deep, toithout nni/ admixture whatever. Every load of sandstone
or other toft material mixed for tho avowed purpose of making it
bind, will spoil the work, nnd if anv quantity is used for that pur-
England andWalcs, whether this has not been the invariable result
why should New South Wales employ men who aro ignorant of
their business, if not interested in perpetuating this nbuso of prin-
cipio in tho construction of n good road I We have men at hand
who k ow better, end who aro ready to under'ake tho business,
provided they hove unlimited control over the work which they
undertake to perform, I would nome Mr. William Tunks as one
who has had considerable experience and is well able to servo the
community in this matter ; ho metalled the road along George
stroct from King-street to the end of Parramotta-strect, under
soma,difficulties; and all aro aware, who have noticed the work,
that' it was tho best improvement in tho city
made at tho time, and it remains to this
day a memorial of his native skill in carrying out tho system of
Macadam. There is no need of going from homo to lind persons
fully qualified, if ai med with a cartc-ulanche, to put aside pre-
sumptuous men from tho old country, who claim to know the
systom followed in Britain without having had any practice-they
como to teach what they never knew. Perhaps they may novrr
have travelled above ten miles from homo-their home oiblens, the
bogs of Lincolnshire, or any other bogs. '
It seems moro than probable that the mistakes which have been
concentered supervision, every one having a notion of his own
crude or otherwise ; and hence our highways aro filled with dust
ing the life and limbs of poor unfortunates who cannot soo their
way olear through the stumbling-blocks of colonial life.
I pcrceivo it is the custom to bring cartloads of dirt and sand to
fiH up the hot s which continued rain produces, instead of level-
ing tho entire road by plying the pick and shovel-this only
makes work, and increases the ultimate expense nt on enormous
rate ; this waste of money would moro than pay for an efficient
overseer, who would otherwise direot the labour employed to its
.desired end. As it will bo impossible to effect what is wanted im-
some time, I would suggest the employment of as many mon as
can bo had to lovel tho roads as well as may bo for tho nrcscnt,
-and to break up any large stones, and rake the materials together
which arc at hand ; in no instance allowing dirt, sand, or
even clay to be carted to the uneven surface, but to lovel it as well
as circumstances will allow, until n proper coat of metal can bo
. put upon it.
George and Pitt streets should bo finished as early as possible ;
but before the sewerage works, &c, aro finished, they should be
simply levelled with pick and shovel, as well as it can bo done, nil
work to bo preparatory, and so managed as to bring it into a fit
Ultima Thule-bibil
insortlon ; but our ways at present oro not ways of pleasantness,
and tho school motto, *. In medias res tutisslmus ibis," -will not
apply- non etiam junda vira. What I quote Latin Î I shall most
assuredly bo thick in tho mud, without any attempt to cross tho
art of roadmaking by sticking to plnin.Englisb. _
. HOMO.
THE ROADS.
SIR, - Your strictures respecting the state of the roads will be
echoed by every member of the community who has travelled over
the macadamised roads of the old country ; for example, London
to Holyhead, and every leading thoroughfare from the metropolis
north, south, east, and west. What appears most wanting here
is adherence to some uniform system of road-making, that is,
level the road before putting the metal on ; after that, cover this
deep, without any admixture whatever. Every load of sandstone
or other soft material mixed for the avowed purpose of making it
bind, will spoil the work, and if any quantity is used for that pur-
England and Wales, whether this has not been the invariable result
why should New South Wales employ men who are ignorant of
their business, if not interested in perpetuating this abuse of prin-
ciple in the construction of a good road? We have men at hand
who know better, and who are ready to undertake the business,
provided they have unlimited control over the work which they
undertake to perform. I would name Mr. William Tunks as one
who has had considerable experience and is well able to serve the
community in this matter ; he metalled the road along George-
street from King-street to the end of Parramatta-street, under
some difficulties ; and all are aware, who have noticed the work,
that it was the best improvement in the city
made at the time, and it remains to this
day a memorial of his native skill in carrying out the system of
Macadam. There is no need of going from home to find persons
fully qualified, if armed with a carte-blanche, to put aside pre-
sumptuous men from the old country, who claim to know the
system followed in Britain without having had any practice - they
come to teach what they never knew. Perhaps they may never
have travelled above ten miles from home - their home aiblens, the
bogs of Lincolnshire, or any other bogs.
It seems more than probable that the mistakes which have been
concentered supervision, every one having a notion of his own -
crude or otherwise ; and hence our highways are filled with dust
ing the life and limbs of poor unfortunates who cannot see their
way clear through the stumbling-blocks of colonial life.
I perceive it is the custom to bring cartloads of dirt and sand to
fill up the holes which continued rain produces, instead of level-
ing the entire road by plying the pick and shovel - this only
makes work, and increases the ultimate expense at an enormous
rate ; this waste of money would more than pay for an efficient
overseer, who would otherwise direct the labour employed to its
desired end. As it will be impossible to effect what is wanted im-
some time, I would suggest the employment of as many men as
can be had to level the roads as well as may be for the present,
and to break up any large stones, and rake the materials together
which are at hand ; in no instance allowing dirt, sand, or
even clay to be carted to the uneven surface, but to level it as well
as circumstances will allow, until a proper coat of metal can be
put upon it.
George and Pitt streets should be finished as early as possible ;
but before the sewerage works, &c., are finished, they should be
simply levelled with pick and shovel, as well as it can be done, all
work to be preparatory, and so managed as to bring it into a fit
Ultima Thule - bah!!
insertion ; but our ways at present are not ways of pleasantness,
and the school motto, "In medias res tutissimus ibis," will not
apply - non etiam juncta viae. What! quote Latin? I shall most
assuredly be thick in the mud, without any attempt to cross the
art of roadmaking by sticking to plain English.
HOMO.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Cricket
    List
    Public

    1,000 items
    created by: public:Paul.McGrath 2010-11-11
    User data
    Tags:

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.