Information about Trove user: MikeYoung

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,861,491
2 noelwoodhouse 3,930,041
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,385,581
5 Rhonda.M 3,210,892
...
6996 strebord 2,244
6997 Eviemay 2,243
6998 epaton 2,241
6999 MikeYoung 2,241
7000 adrianhbarraba 2,240
7001 coollibah 2,240

2,241 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

November 2019 191
July 2019 251
June 2019 13
April 2019 51
March 2019 132
November 2018 116
August 2018 94
June 2018 191
April 2018 12
January 2018 54
September 2017 185
March 2017 176
February 2017 148
January 2017 166
December 2016 240
November 2016 96
July 2016 20
March 2016 59
April 2015 2
August 2014 6
November 2013 38

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,861,289
2 noelwoodhouse 3,930,041
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,385,560
5 Rhonda.M 3,210,879
...
7094 Simone2001 2,181
7095 maizcl 2,180
7096 katehunt 2,178
7097 MikeYoung 2,178
7098 PeterRobinson 2,178
7099 katander 2,177

2,178 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

November 2019 191
July 2019 228
June 2019 13
April 2019 51
March 2019 132
November 2018 116
August 2018 94
June 2018 191
April 2018 12
January 2018 54
September 2017 185
March 2017 176
February 2017 108
January 2017 166
December 2016 240
November 2016 96
July 2016 20
March 2016 59
April 2015 2
August 2014 6
November 2013 38

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 314,433
2 PhilThomas 137,757
3 mickbrook 113,428
4 GeoffMMutton 80,559
5 murds5 61,555
...
566 Joedo 63
567 maggiehann 63
568 MarkGattenhof 63
569 MikeYoung 63
570 Paul-Taro-Seto 63
571 basilsheridan 62

63 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2019 23
February 2017 40


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
OPENING OF THE SYDNEY RAILWAY. (Article), The People's Advocate and New South Wales Vindicator (Sydney, NSW : 1848-1856), Saturday 29 September 1855 [Issue No.541] page 4 2019-11-30 15:11 about their being fulfilled to the very letter, and tearing upon
any so volcariically tremendous as that which changes the
about their being fulfilled to the very letter, and bearing upon
any so volcanically tremendous as that which changes the
OPENING OF THE SYDNEY RAILWAY. (Article), The People's Advocate and New South Wales Vindicator (Sydney, NSW : 1848-1856), Saturday 29 September 1855 [Issue No.541] page 4 2019-11-30 15:09 Road, near the Governor Gipps and Cutis' Inns. The entrance
Thomas Uuderwood. We next pass over the land, formerly
naentined as an honourable exception) gave the ground
of land here, ton acres in extent, reserved for a station. The
rails at this' place are 73 feet above "the level of the sea.
' in 100, we pass over Haslam's Creek, which although but a
watSr'at this locality in the. hottest weather. The railway
now ascends Tin 132 on a straight line of about a mile in
length ; to the highest point betwern Haslam's Creek and
Parramatta, being 67 feet above the sea. After, curving
010 for about a mile in length to Duck. River, over which itpasses
sea, being the lowest point, on the line. We are now once
The Salt-water Creek is also passed by ineans of a dam, with
a bridge of 20 feet span, to allow the. escape of flood waters.
We will now; turn to the proceedings of Wednesday, which
was observed almost as a. general holiday, all the public offices,
nine o'clock the tide of population set in towards the Cleve
land Paddocks, and in an hour afterwards the thousands clus
tered round and about the terminous. engine house, and other
Gerioral and suite,' who were announced to be about to proceed
trains which 'had' previously' been despatched', to Parramatta,
crammed with paserigers, returned with an exchange of country
friends. As they heaved the station they were loudly cheered,
and. the skill and ease which these huge monsters were con
the .Cleveland Paddocks for the purpose of firing salutes on
ground in smart style, andperforrned their duty capitally.
The; Mounted Police lined the road leading to the station . and
preserved excellent order. The Brethren of the Ancient Order,'
of' Forresters marched in all the dignity of their order, bearing
very pleasipg feature in-the scene.
— The Volunteer Rifle Corps, preceded by the band of the
eleventh regiment, tpok up a position near the station, as a
a quarter to eleven His. Excellency in full Windsor uniform,
Captain Ward, the Captain of Brigade, the Colonial Treasurer,,
were the disappointments and deleinmas which took place in
consequence of the impossibility of all claimants, for seats
getting them. In the confusion the different- classes of tickets
were' matters entirely unconsidered ; first, second, and third,
payment; was made for the piece' of pasteboard. The train in
twenty minutes past eleven. Jt comprised two first, four
secorid, .and; five third clrisscrriages. in addition to the engim
and tender. A salute of 21 guns boomed forth " Good luck to"
its navvies." A wish which was echoed by the " hurrahs " off-
the assembled multitude. The same enthusiasm wag mani
overflowing, and the necessary comestibles for sustaining .
by the worthy Bonifaces there,
the Master of the Mint, the Colonial Treasurer, Mr. Rolleston, .
Macleay, Mr. Barker, Mr. Kemp.'Mr. Dowling, Police Magistrate,
the next toast which was responded to by. Mr. Wright in the
day) working like.a Trojan in the superintendence of the
share of honor, as did the wind-up proposition of Mr. Cowper .
that.it would he impossible to construct a wok of so complete
he "confidently anticipated that in the 'early part of 1857 the
and that between the latter town and Windsor inia high state
which. was completely crammed. It is our pleasing task' to
few showers tended ,to throw a damp upon the proceedings of
Class, 802 — yielding, £265 lis. At Parramatta, 1680 namely,
yielding £220. Total, in money, £485 lis.
We cannot more properly , conclude ohr 'somewhat lengthy
notice of. this great event than by congratulating the
originators and supporters ot it on this successful issue. There
is much credit due to them for their, steadiness and perseverance
throughout, and fortunate it was for them,' and the colony
Road, near the Governor Gipps and Cutts' Inns. The entrance
come to Potts' Creek at a distance of a quarter of a mile from
Thomas Underwood. We next pass over the land, formerly
mentined as an honourable exception) gave the ground
of land here, ten acres in extent, reserved for a station. The
rails at this place are 73 feet above the level of the sea.
in 100, we pass over Haslam's Creek, which although but a
water at this locality in the hottest weather. The railway
now ascends 1 in 132 on a straight line of about a mile in
length to the highest point betwern Haslam's Creek and
Parramatta, being 67 feet above the sea. After curving
010 for about a mile in length to Duck River, over which it passes
sea, being the lowest point on the line. We are now once
The Salt-water Creek is also passed by means of a dam, with
a bridge of 20 feet span, to allow the escape of flood waters.
We will now turn to the proceedings of Wednesday, which
was observed almost as a general holiday, all the public offices,
nine o'clock the tide of population set in towards the Cleve-
land Paddocks, and in an hour afterwards the thousands clus-
tered round and about the terminous, engine house, and other
General and suite, who were announced to be about to proceed
trains which had previously been despatched to Parramatta,
crammed with passengers, returned with an exchange of country
friends. As they neared the station they were loudly cheered,
and the skill and ease which these huge monsters were con-
the Cleveland Paddocks for the purpose of firing salutes on
ground in smart style, and perforrned their duty capitally.
The Mounted Police lined the road leading to the station and
preserved excellent order. The Brethren of the Ancient Order
of Forresters marched in all the dignity of their order, bearing
very pleasing feature in the scene.
The Volunteer Rifle Corps, preceded by the band of the
eleventh regiment, took up a position near the station, as a
a quarter to eleven His Excellency in full Windsor uniform,
Captain Ward, the Captain of Brigade, the Colonial Treasurer,
were the disappointments and delemmas which took place in
consequence of the impossibility of all claimants for seats
getting them. In the confusion the different classes of tickets
were matters entirely unconsidered ; first, second, and third,
payment was made for the piece of pasteboard. The train in
twenty minutes past eleven. It comprised two first, four
second, and five third class carriages. In addition to the engine
and tender. A salute of 21 guns boomed forth " Good luck to
its navvies." A wish which was echoed by the " hurrahs " of
the assembled multitude. The same enthusiasm was mani-
overflowing, and the necessary comestibles for sustaining
by the worthy Bonifaces there.
the Master of the Mint, the Colonial Treasurer, Mr. Rolleston,
Macleay, Mr. Barker, Mr. Kemp, Mr. Dowling, Police Magistrate,
the next toast which was responded to by Mr. Wright in the
day) working like a Trojan in the superintendence of the
share of honor, as did the wind-up proposition of Mr. Cowper
that it would be impossible to construct a work of so complete
he "confidently anticipated that in the early part of 1857 the
and that between the latter town and Windsor in a high state
which was completely crammed. It is our pleasing task to
few showers tended to throw a damp upon the proceedings of
Class, 802 — yielding, £265 11s. At Parramatta, 1680 namely,
yielding £220. Total, in money, £485 11s.
We cannot more properly conclude our somewhat lengthy
notice of this great event than by congratulating the
originators and supporters of it on this successful issue. There
is much credit due to them for their steadiness and perseverance
throughout, and fortunate it was for them, and the colony
OPENING OF THE SYDNEY RAILWAY. (Article), The People's Advocate and New South Wales Vindicator (Sydney, NSW : 1848-1856), Saturday 29 September 1855 [Issue No.541] page 4 2019-11-30 14:03 , All fat stock brought from the interior will be landed here,
and driven direct to the new abattoirs at Glebe Island.
yet arched in New ' South Wales. It consists of eight
rails -is 60 feet T.he cost of this magnificent and most
for a distance of ten. chains, and the elevation of the rails is
Sydney Terminus An ascenuing gradient of half a mile, at
mile in length, and the end of it is situated at the, Ashfield
ornamental, yet the building answers all the purposes re
w« reach the newly laid out township of Cheltenham, at the
All fat stock brought from the interior will be landed here,
and driven direct to the new abattoirs at Glebe Island.
yet arched in New South Wales. It consists of eight
rails is 60 feet The cost of this magnificent and most
for a distance of ten chains, and the elevation of the rails is
Sydney Terminus An ascending gradient of half a mile, at
mile in length, and the end of it is situated at the Ashfield
ornamental, yet the building answers all the purposes re-
we reach the newly laid out township of Cheltenham, at the
OPENING OF THE SYDNEY RAILWAY. (Article), The People's Advocate and New South Wales Vindicator (Sydney, NSW : 1848-1856), Saturday 29 September 1855 [Issue No.541] page 4 2019-11-30 08:47 Kail way, like the foundation of the colony, will be hailed each
succeeding .anniversary, as the parent from which will spring
close connexion those whom distance lias too long kept apart.
The great agent of civilization has .been established, despite
sneers, scoffs, and scepticism ; anothe false prophets must now
Railway, which was looked upon as a myth, is now a trium
Before we commence our detail of the proceedings, it may he
as well to furnish a brief history of this great work,
all great improvements, it did not meet with many ehcouragers.
half-c,unning ones declared that it was a scheme meant entirely
whom this task was entrusted, when fairly set to work, pro
Railway commenced on the 3rd duly. 1850. in the Cleveland
the ceremony Of cutting the first , sod in the presence of the
was small. ' It was only £15,000 ; of which two- thirds had to
be paid into tlie Colonial Treasury, before operations could be
in the preliminary 'operations in the vicinity of the Metropolis.
of the line from Ashfield to Haslam's Creek, 'for £10,000 was
but did not include the rails. The work, it is to be regretted,,
proceeded slowly, and labour rose to such a fearful price on.
compelled to abandon his contract in the latter part of 1852.,
ThO'vVorks had been languishing for some months previously,,
but, oii the 9th August in that year, Mr. Randle entered into,
a cdiitfact With' the Railway Company, and commenced opera- ;
tions. For a considerable period Mr. Handle's progress was
delayed by the scarcity of the funds oft.be Company. Small
Progress" found it in vain like Oliver. Twist, "to ask for
more." When, however, the publici . became more interested in
the accomplishment of the event ; whpn a more liberal feeling
prevafled, and the ftimis poured into the coffers of the
a-head, and in an unpreeedentedly short space of time his skill
and energy achieved the triumph which was so fully and grate
fully acknowledged by tons pf thousands on Wednesday last.
from Sydney to Parraniatta, a distance of nearly 14 miles.
of sheep,lahd droves of cattle. The prospect also opens up
the village of Camperdown af one end, Annandale House, the
residency. rifj Mr. Robert Johnstone, at the other, with Mount
Tomah-' iri the far distance. Another mile, winding through
the labels of Messrs. Cooper and HolF, in cofijuriction with the
An naiildale Estate, and we find. ourselves in the "iniddle of
Petersham Hill, the. deepest jciitting on the, line, and the
. summit' levei between Sydney and Parramatta.' . The depth of
the excavation is 38 feet, and level' of the rails is 100 /aboVe
the seit: The quantity of cutting iri this hill was 58,000 .cubic
yards.' .At the end is the site of the. intended cattle station.
Railway, like the foundation of the colony, will be hailed each
succeeding anniversary, as the parent from which will spring
close connexion those whom distance has too long kept apart.
The great agent of civilization has been established, despite
sneers, scoffs, and scepticism ; and the false prophets must now
Railway, which was looked upon as a myth, is now a trium-
Before we commence our detail of the proceedings, it may be
as well to furnish a brief history of this great work.
all great improvements, it did not meet with many encouragers.
half-cunning ones declared that it was a scheme meant entirely
whom this task was entrusted, when fairly set to work, pro-
Railway commenced on the 3rd July. 1850. in the Cleveland
the ceremony of cutting the first sod in the presence of the
was small. It was only £15,000 ; of which two thirds had to
be paid into the Colonial Treasury, before operations could be
in the preliminary operations in the vicinity of the Metropolis.
of the line from Ashfield to Haslam's Creek, for £10,000 was
but did not include the rails. The work, it is to be regretted,
proceeded slowly, and labour rose to such a fearful price on
compelled to abandon his contract in the latter part of 1852.
The works had been languishing for some months previously,
but, on the 9th August in that year, Mr. Randle entered into
a contract with the Railway Company, and commenced opera-
tions. For a considerable period Mr. Randle's progress was
delayed by the scarcity of the funds of the Company. Small
Progress" found it in vain like Oliver Twist, "to ask for
more." When, however, the public became more interested in
the accomplishment of the event ; when a more liberal feeling
prevailed, and the funds poured into the coffers of the
a-head, and in an unprecedentedly short space of time his skill
and energy achieved the triumph which was so fully and grate-
fully acknowledged by tens of thousands on Wednesday last.
from Sydney to Parramatta, a distance of nearly 14 miles.
of sheep, and droves of cattle. The prospect also opens up
the village of Camperdown at one end, Annandale House, the
residence of Mr. Robert Johnstone, at the other, with Mount
Tomah in the far distance. Another mile, winding through
the lands of Messrs. Cooper and Holt, in conjunction with the
Annandale Estate, and we find ourselves in the middle of
Petersham Hill, the deepest cutting on the line, and the
summit level between Sydney and Parramatta. The depth of
the excavation is 38 feet, and level of the rails is 100 above
the sea. The quantity of cutting in this hill was 58,000 cubic
yards. At the end is the site of the intended cattle station.
OPENING OF THE SYDNEY RAILWAY. (Article), The People's Advocate and New South Wales Vindicator (Sydney, NSW : 1848-1856), Saturday 29 September 1855 [Issue No.541] page 4 2019-11-29 00:09 the Railway :—" Cpmmeneeing at the terminus in Cleveland
Paddo6k, which is 63 feet above the level of the sea, the first
is a tank capiable of containing 20.000 gallons of Water, wliich
is pumped from a well by a diminutive piece of mechanism,
we enter the first cutting, arid are shortly in the Cleveland
tunnel— a piece of rtrchirig 250 feet in length, The abutments
and trades are of 'masoniy.amlthe area is of brickwork ; the
whole forming a y4ry sightly and durable structure. Botany
and Cleveland streets ptiss over it, and, as a'lriatter of course,
it is the medium of a largefariiriunt of traffic. This work was
commericed and completed in a remarkably short period. The
line then passok hdtWften massive retaining walls, through, the
block' of houses "situated between Botany and .Woodbiirn-
streets. Passing thence through a cutting — out of .which
60,000 cubic yards weid excavated— tlie ' line proceeds within :
two hundred yards of the lrift vpfiMrgT Chisliolm's house (now
the residence of Mr. Cargill), fibimwhibh-poirit it continues in
Messrs. Wilson. Blackman, Brioknell. and Roby, to Erskinville
Lane,' arid1 the. Cook's River Rdacl. These latter thoroughfares
aro dirried oye? the railway .'by brick arches, at an angle of
fifty degrees With, the line, which are well deserving of inspection,
not only as works of art, but as being the first and. only skew
bridges- obstructed iri the colony. 300 yards farther, we
residence of Mr. Breillat. Omnibuses will riiri from this .point
the locality. Numbers of buildings are in course. of erection
to, the vicinity,' and ' that peculiar indication of advancing
civilisation, a watch-house, Will be observed near the bridge.
Curving aWiiy from NeWtqWn down an incline of one in 264
ve prW JohnstoriC's Crebk, on an criijmnkmmt 26 feet high,
from which a good view may. -be had of the dusty Parramatta
Roaif/wi'th itS'miultitude of wood carts, bullock drays, flocks
the Railway :—" Commenceing at the terminus in Cleveland
Paddock, which is 63 feet above the level of the sea, the first
is a tank capable of containing 20.000 gallons of water, which
is pumped from a well by a diminutive piece of mechanism
we enter the first cutting, and are shortly in the Cleveland
tunnel— a piece of arching 250 feet in length, The abutments
and traces are of masonry, and the area is of brickwork ; the
whole forming a very sightly and durable structure. Botany
and Cleveland streets pass over it, and, as a matter of course,
it is the medium of a large amount of traffic. This work was
commenced and completed in a remarkably short period. The
line then passes between massive retaining walls, through the
block of houses situated between Botany and Woodburn
streets. Passing thence through a cutting — out of which
60,000 cubic yards were excavated— the line proceeds within
two hundred yards of the left of Mrs. Chisholm's house (now
the residence of Mr. Cargill), from which point it continues in
Messrs. Wilson, Blackman, Bricknell, and Roby, to Erskinville
Lane, and the Cook's River Road. These latter thoroughfares
are carried over the railway by brick arches, at an angle of
fifty degrees with the line, which are well deserving of inspection,
not only as works of art, but as being the first and only skew
bridges constructed in the colony. 300 yards farther, we
residence of Mr. Breillat. Omnibuses will run from this point
the locality. Numbers of buildings are in course of erection
in the vicinity, and that peculiar indication of advancing
civilisation, a watch-house, will be observed near the bridge.
Curving away from Newtown down an incline of one in 264
we pass Johnstone's Creek, on an embankment 26 feet high,
from which a good view may be had of the dusty Parramatta
Road, with its multitude of wood carts, bullock drays, flocks
OPENING OF THE SYDNEY RAILWAY. (Article), The People's Advocate and New South Wales Vindicator (Sydney, NSW : 1848-1856), Saturday 29 September 1855 [Issue No.541] page 4 2019-11-28 23:51 many, retarded for a long time the energies of the few,, whose
many, retarded for a long time the energies of the few, whose
Sydney News OPENING OF THE SYDNEY RAILWAY. (Article), The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), Saturday 29 September 1855 [Issue No.1173] page 2 2019-11-28 23:48 Frightful Morder at Oakleigh -Ou Saturday the
inhabit nits wire thrown into a state of excitement by
; the report that the boilv of an unfortunate man hid
' been discovered about five miles distant from the Mul
grivc Arms Hotel, un 1er ciicumstance3 leaving little
room to doubt thit i foul murder hid been committed.
The first train started at eleven o'clock, the Governor
and legislative Councils taking their seats in it. Great
the hope of going by the first train were unavoidably
are estimated by the Herald to have travelled by the
trains on Wednesday.
The day was observed in Sydney as a complete holi-
day, and an immense crowd assembled round and near
after part of the day was wet and gloomy. The de-
parture of the first train was signalised by immense
cheering, and by a discharge of 21 guns by the Artil-
at Williams Hotel, Parramatta. In returning thanks
for his health the Governor General took occasion to
once more express his conviction that it was to a network
of railroads over its whole extent, that the colony must
look for a more rapid career in prosperity and progress.
The cost he admitted would be great, but looking at the
capabilities of the country on one hand, and the neces-
sity for railways on the other, he regarded it as excel-
that £10,000 per mile would be the least sum for which
railways could be safely constructed in the colony, but
taken during the day is thus given bv the Empire:---
Tickets, issued at Sydney, 470 first class, 602 second
third class, making a total of 1690. Money taken, at
The detailed description of the railway, and the nar-
Frightful Murder at Oakleigh - On Saturday, the
inhabitants were thrown into a state of excitement by
the report that the body of an unfortunate man had
been discovered about five miles distant from the Mul-
grave Arms Hotel, under circumstances leaving little
room to doubt that a foul murder had been committed.
OPENING SYDNEY RAILWAY (Article), The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 - 1939), Friday 19 January 1934 [Issue No.19,588] page 5 2019-11-28 23:42 Tho opening or the Sydney railway
oil Hnptmnhor 20, 1855, Is reonllod by
ihe Insnrlpllon on a ooln Issuod to
(lonnnoniorato tlio Important ovnnt by
Hniilts Lloyd, of the Australian Tea
Mart, of Sydney, whloh was found on
tho rlvor hank at West Malllnnd this
w«ek by Mailer P, rtnmpllnff. ,
Tho opening of the Sydney railway
on September 26, 1855, Is recalled by
the inscrlption on a coin Issued to
commemorate the important event by
Hanks Lloyd, of the Australian Tea
Mart, of Sydney, which was found on
the rlver bank at West Maitland this
week by Master P. Rampling.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.