Information about Trove user: MikeWalsh

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 6,027,312
2 noelwoodhouse 4,005,805
3 NeilHamilton 3,494,044
4 DonnaTelfer 3,479,843
5 Rhonda.M 3,445,057
...
226 mcakebread 234,957
227 poshtotty 234,494
228 mjw140875 234,012
229 MikeWalsh 232,914
230 Stephen.J.Arnold 232,741
231 Drewy 232,520

232,914 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2020 4,331
March 2020 14,692
February 2020 11,164
January 2020 13,296
December 2019 13,386
November 2019 4,908
October 2019 3,009
September 2019 6,142
August 2019 9,971
July 2019 10,009
June 2019 10,991
May 2019 8,970
April 2019 11,036
March 2019 7,009
February 2019 8,518
January 2019 12,060
December 2018 7,493
November 2018 12,308
October 2018 8,094
September 2018 7,375
August 2018 7,579
July 2018 8,673
June 2018 6,741
May 2018 3,444
April 2018 1,222
March 2018 3,985
February 2018 5,554
January 2018 6,501
December 2017 4,453

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 6,027,110
2 noelwoodhouse 4,005,805
3 NeilHamilton 3,493,915
4 DonnaTelfer 3,479,817
5 Rhonda.M 3,445,044
...
223 mcakebread 234,957
224 poshtotty 234,494
225 mjw140875 234,012
226 MikeWalsh 232,914
227 Stephen.J.Arnold 232,727
228 Drewy 232,520

232,914 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2020 4,331
March 2020 14,692
February 2020 11,164
January 2020 13,296
December 2019 13,386
November 2019 4,908
October 2019 3,009
September 2019 6,142
August 2019 9,971
July 2019 10,009
June 2019 10,991
May 2019 8,970
April 2019 11,036
March 2019 7,009
February 2019 8,518
January 2019 12,060
December 2018 7,493
November 2018 12,308
October 2018 8,094
September 2018 7,375
August 2018 7,579
July 2018 8,673
June 2018 6,741
May 2018 3,444
April 2018 1,222
March 2018 3,985
February 2018 5,554
January 2018 6,501
December 2017 4,453

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS. THE CITY COUNCIL. THE TRAMWAYS QUESTION. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Saturday 24 November 1900 page 11 2020-04-09 18:18 candidates lor the forthcoming municipal
election. There was only a moderate at
tendance, presided over toy Mr. Alderman
itVells.
address tne meeting, confined hir^"*lf to
Mr. H. K. Dixson addressed tiie meet
ing as a candidate Sor the office of mayor,
councillor, he waa not eligible for the
Mr. Alderman Bruce 6aid the most burn
*he position in which the Orty Councd
stood. They had fotmd that it was per
carry out the work themselves. The coun
cil had lost the sent to purchase and own
whiob he would, if his scheme were earned
lost, lie was to pay £1,000 per year ana
10 per cent, on ?? net profits of the under
?were to have the right i? take over tie sys
temat their then value without anything tor
goodwill. The Bfll for this had been thrown
out of Parliament, as *ac Well known. Cor
respondence then passed between Mr. Bing
agrg-mon* They then interviewed Mr.
Snow, who had already made arrangement!:
with several of the' companies, and had a
Sill before one branch ct the Legislature.
compensate them. Under these circum
mate tie best terms witih Mr. Snow pos
sible. It waa an utter impossibility
to mufitcipaliGe the tramways. He for one
would not be a. party to pledging the rates
an any specufetive schemes. Tbe city astete
only show £19,580. The <a*y rates were far
in excess of the suburban, rates. It would
thus be seen that the city -tfbuld have a
other mnnicipaiities. There was a loud cry
. for niiliiiiii iimalinii in some quarters, bat
the national enterprises were not encourag
failure, and- tie Northern Territory was
another instance of State control. (Laugh
outcry for a free breakfast, table, but he
iwantod to tell tbem that the loss on 'the
working of the railways* including the rail
imts £2,400,000. But for this a free break
candidates for the forthcoming municipal
election. There was only a moderate at-
tendance, presided over by Mr. Alderman
Wells.
address the meeting, confined himself to
Mr. H. R. Dixson addressed the meet-
ing as a candidate for the office of mayor,
councillor, he was not eligible for the
Mr. Alderman Bruce said the most burn-
the position in which the City Council
stood. They had found that it was per-
carry out the work themselves. The coun-
cil had lost the right to purchase and own
which he would, if his scheme were carried
lost. He was to pay £1,000 per year and
10 per cent. on the net profits of the under-
were to have the right to take over the sys-
tem at their then value without anything tor
goodwill. The Bill for this had been thrown
out of Parliament, as was well known. Cor-
respondence then passed between Mr. Bing-
agreement. They then interviewed Mr.
Snow, who had already made arrangements
with several of the companies, and had a
Bill before one branch of the Legislature.
compensate them. Under these circum-
make the best terms with Mr. Snow pos-
sible. It was an utter impossibility
to municipalise the tramways. He for one
would not be a party to pledging the rates
an any speculative schemes. The city assets
only show £19,500. The city rates were far
in excess of the suburban rates. It would
thus be seen that the city would have a
other municipalities. There was a loud cry
for nationalisation in some quarters, but
the national enterprises were not encourag-
that alone")—was an example of nationali-
failure, and the Northern Territory was
another instance of State control. (Laugh-
ter and groans.) There was a.very proper
outcry for a free breakfast table but he
wanted to tell them that the loss on the
working of the railways, including the rail-
was £2,400,000. But for this a free break-
A STORMY MEETING. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Saturday 24 November 1900 page 6 2020-04-09 18:00 tramways question natural)' occupied a con
spicuous pfcioe. Althourf. tie ??enrlanr-e
was not as large as migit have been ex
pected, the audience at tines Curved iteeli
capable of considerable line iota, and on
several occasions the int;rrentun of the
chairman (Mr. AMerman Wells) waa neces
sary to restore order. At an ea.-iy stage of.
i the meeting Mr. Proud was asked to deaist
Councillor Ihimsm mas on his :eet that the
disorder reached an acute sage. That
gentleman in a vigorous crrtiiism of the
council an its attitude towar& the Snow
Btil mentioned ohe names of -he chairman
and Alderman Bnue. At the Mr. Bruce
rose to protect against persoiaiities being
allowed, liia was tike afgi for a general
uproar. "Sit down," "Yra've tad your
say," end other remarks eneiged from a
Btorm of groans, hisses, aid cheers. Mr.
Bruce, however, was not *> be easily dis
placed, and ne stood i>y }is guns. Wnen
the <ihairman had partly nstored order Mr-
Bruce again attempted t- speak, but his
voice was lost in tbe stom of groans and
cheers. Mr. Duneao the> appealed to the
audience to aliow Mr. Bftice to speak, and
?When, this fcad no eSed he said, "I wiJ!
take it aa a personal £a>or if you will let
Brace's voice was neard above the din to
exclaim, "I want to say that wnen I sjtoke
I made no allusions to snyone, and I object
to these personalities.":Jlle tlhen sat down,
and foe c!hairman said, 'l iSbiok it wodld be
better for Mr. Duncan yt to make aay per
tramways question naturally occupied a con-
spicuous place. Although the attendance
was not as large as might have been ex-
pected, the audience at times showed itself
capable of considerable lung force, and on
several occasions the intervention of the
chairman (Mr. Alderman Wells) was neces-
sary to restore order. At an early stage of
the meeting Mr. Proud was asked to desist
Councillor Duncan was on his feet that the
disorder reached an acute stage. That
gentleman in a vigorous criticism of the
council in its attitude toward the Snow
Bill mentioned the names of the chairman
and Alderman Bruce. At the Mr. Bruce
rose to protect against personalities being
allowed. This was a sign for a general
uproar. "Sit down," "You've had your
say," and other remarks emerged from a
storm of groans, hisses, and cheers. Mr.
Bruce, however, was not to be easily dis-
placed, and he stood by his guns. When
the chairman had partly restored order Mr.
Bruce again attempted to speak, but his
voice was lost in the storm of groans and
cheers. Mr. Duncan then appealed to the
audience to allow Mr. Bruce to speak, and
when this had no effect he said, "I will
take it as a personal favor if you will let
Bruce's voice was heard above the din to
exclaim, "I want to say that when I spoke
I made no allusions to anyone, and I object
to these personalities." He then sat down,
and the chairman said, 'l think it would be
better for Mr. Duncan not to make any per-
A MASTER OF MUSIC. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Saturday 24 November 1900 page 6 2020-04-09 17:53 bis death. Sullivan was born in an
atmosphere-of music, his father being
in torn a military bandmaster and a
professor of toe clarinet at Kneller Hall.
student in Germany, the youthful Sul
sixties with incidental inosic to ShaJkes
peare—a branch of bis art to which
on. As a composer of bymn tunes be j
also became popular, while his orato
rios, notably "Tue Light of the World,"
do in tbe way of wedding lofty and in
spiring themes to beautiful music It
is especially Interesting now to note
that, for example, he was tbe first prin
doctor in 1576, and that just afterwards
be was tbe British Commissioner for
public bis fame will always chiefly rest
S. Gilbert. In setting to music Bur
nand's amusing trine, "Box and Cox,"
shown his powers hi the direction of
humor, and the great partnership com
menced in 1875 with ?Trial by. Jury;"
Pinafore" -in 1878. The libretto was
upon tbe inanities of translated and ex
"The Mikado," and 'The Gondoliers"
but tbe others were hardly less so—
especially the "respectful operatic per
It rapidly became evident that the com
I lar taste, while at the same time satis
fying the critics. Millals, Tennyson,
qualities in other departments of tue'
world of Art "While Sullivan's music,"
wrote a leading critic, *is as comic and
lively as anything by Offenbach, it has .
the extra advantage of being the work"
scorn to writ<? ungrammatically even if.
lie could." The dissolution of the great
"Gilbert and Sullivan" |?artnersliip, .ow
was universally regarded as a misfor
apart they effected nothing to be com
combined works remains, capable ap
parently of unlimited successful re
vivaL Sullivan, who was knighted in
ISS3, was among other nations quite the
his death. Sullivan was born in an
atmosphere of music, his father being
in turn a military bandmaster and a
professor of the clarinet at Kneller Hall.
student in Germany, the youthful Sul-
sixties with incidental music to Shakes-
peare—a branch of his art to which
on. As a composer of hymn tunes he
also became popular, while his orato-
rios, notably "The Light of the World,"
do in the way of wedding lofty and in-
spiring themes to beautiful music. It
is especially interesting now to note
that, for example, he was the first prin-
doctor in 1876, and that just afterwards
be was the British Commissioner for
public his fame will always chiefly rest
S. Gilbert. In setting to music Bur-
nand's amusing trifle, "Box and Cox,"
shown his powers in the direction of
humor, and the great partnership com-
menced in 1875 with "Trial by Jury;"
Pinafore" in 1878. The libretto was
upon the inanities of translated and ex-
"The Mikado," and "The Gondoliers"
but the others were hardly less so—
especially the "respectful operatic per-
It rapidly became evident that the com-
lar taste, while at the same time satis-
fying the critics. Millais, Tennyson,
qualities in other departments of the
world of Art. "While Sullivan's music,"
wrote a leading critic, "is as comic and
lively as anything by Offenbach, it has
the extra advantage of being the work
scorn to write ungrammatically even if
he could." The dissolution of the great
"Gilbert and Sullivan" Partnership, ow-
was universally regarded as a misfor-
apart they effected nothing to be com-
combined works remains, capable ap-
parently of unlimited successful re-
vival. Sullivan, who was knighted in
1883, was among other nations quite the
AMUSEMENTS. THEATRE ROYAL. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Friday 23 November 1900 [Issue No.13136] page 6 2020-04-09 12:45 Paley's Lilliputian Opera Company,
pearance to-night, ?when will be presented I
a double programme, embracing the popu
lar nautical opera "H.M-5. l'inafore" in
its entirety, and the first act of Plan
Bells of Normandy ("Les Cloches de Corne
proved themselves nightly talented, and;
they should have a bumper farewell, b'orj
all parts ot the theatre at a greatly re
at the ExMbition liufldinss on Thursday
when ithere were ajpiin good aOienilaneta.
The evening's programme consisted of ae
lecLions hv (inthome's Bond, cutlass drill
by the Boys' lirigade, anJ a laughing song
by Sir. liarr. Mr. Loade's clever perform
ing dogs -were again exliibited, and i'rofes
sor Kelly performed tie cigar -swallow-ing
trick. 'Vlie ])oswr ]>roe?dsio? and quadrille
performing dogs wiil aiiiwsu" a.s firemen res
cuius a cliild fnrni a burning Qjuilding. The
exhibition will be open iicain to-day.
A uncial in connection with Der Deut
sche tSiib was heM on Tiiursday evening
?v. the SeJix>nic Hotel, I'irie-etrset. Mr.
V. HeiHironn presided over a good attend
ance, n^iich included Messrs. yon IJer-
Twuch, vice-president, and NetMeibeek, <?s
-president, and the Mayor and Mayone-s of
Adelaide. An antererftinc programme was
presented, comnriidns selections by tihe oa--
I'iiestTra, solos l>y Misses Cramjpton ajid
Hnigirermann, and Mr. E. H. Birmingham,
rccitaltion toy Mr. houts Conrad, and two
zither quartets by Mr. and Mirs. Belschner
Patey's Lilliputian Opera Company,
pearance to-night, when will be presented
a double programme, embracing the popu-
lar nautical opera "H.M.S. Pinafore" in
its entirety, and the first act of Plan-
Bells of Normandy ("Les Cloches de Corne-
proved themselves hightly talented, and
they should have a bumper farewell. For
all parts of the theatre at a greatly re-
--------------
at the Exhibition Buildings on Thursday
when there were again good attendances.
The evening's programme consisted of se-
lections by Cawthorne's Band, cutlass drill
by the Boys' Brigade, and a laughing song
by Mrs. Barr. Mr. Loade's clever perform-
ing dogs were again exhibited, and profes-
sor Kelly performed the cigar swallowing
trick. The poster procession and quadrille
performing dogs will appear as firemen res-
cuing a child from a burning building. The
exhibition will be open again to-day.
A social in connection with Der Deut-
sche Club was held on Thursday evening
at the Selborne Hotel, Pirie-street. Mr.
F. Heilbronn presided over a good attend-
ance, which included Messrs. von Ber-
touch, vice-president, and Nettlebeck, ex-
president, and the Mayor and Mayoress of
Adelaide. An interesting programme was
presented, comprising selections by the or-
chestrara, solos by Misses Crampton and
Bruggermann, and Mr. E. H. Birmingham,
recitation toy Mr. Louis Conrad, and two
zither quartets by Mr. and Mrs. Belschner
THE PACIFIC CABLE (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Friday 23 November 1900 [Issue No.13136] page 6 2020-04-09 12:36 message stating chat a tender has been, ac- <*>
The first consignment of lyddite Shells
and cordite for me bsg gyms of the vari
ous forts in tbe colony came to hand by
the Hakaira to-day.
message stating that a tender has been ac- <*>
The first consignment of lyddite shells
and cordite for the big guns of the vari-
ous forts in the colony came to hand by
the Hakara to-day.
THE PACIFIC CABLE. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Thursday 22 November 1900 [Issue No.13135] page 5 2020-04-09 12:32 in London. I
in London.
THE CITY COUNCIL. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Wednesday 21 November 1900 page 9 2020-04-09 12:04 sent the Mayor (Mr. A. w. Ware), AM. Bruce,
Wells, Reid, Fuller, Tucker, adn j[?]nson, and Crs.
KUutr, \jrJtm. U.-niiy. Jl^rs, ioiwior, seiiar,
Britt;, Canitigld, ai:J Dowita.
Tlie city solicitors wrote as follows with respect
to Oie letter received at the lust meeting tnim
Mr. W. Gtmry Bingiiam:—"We nave conaiderai
Mr. Bingltani'a letter of the Sih irct., but how, in
the circumstances, he ctin honcSLiy expect tne
council to aMnpiy with his request we are ax ?
lose to know. In July or August last he and ma
atrorney were advised of ts?e ia*e ot the Bill, ana
the corpor&Uon in dear and umnistakcable tennti
offered to petition Parliament TO waive compli
ance with tne evading ordem, and accept lhe ISiJ!
as ors? o! the second class, ii Mr. BingTiam would
proride an engineer's certificate of the coat of rc
lOixorucUGa, and the necesaary casn depuslt. Titat
ofjir Sir. Hiue'uara was pressea" 13 acivi>., ijut de
clined, and he subsequently unconditionally re
leased lhe corporation from tbe agreeinxait. For
those reasons it i£, of course, impossible for tlie
corporation w> comply with Mr. B-mgbam's re
sent the Mayor (Mr. A. W. Ware), Ald. Bruce,
Wells, Reid, Fuller, Tucker, and Johnson, and Crs.
Klauer, Vardon, Denny, Myers, Ponder, Sellar,
Brice, Barnfield, and Downs.
The city solicitors wrote as follows with respect
to the letter received at the last meeting from
Mr. W. Gentry Bingham:—"We have considered
Mr. Bingham's letter of the 5th inst., but how, in
the circumstances, he can honestly expect the
council to comply with his request we are are at a
loss to know. In July or August last he and his
attorney were advised of the fate of the Bill, and
the corporation in clear and unmistakeable terms
offered to petition Parliament to waive compli-
ance with the standing orders, and accept the Bill
as one of the second class, if Mr. Bingham would
provide an engineer's certificate of the cost of re-
construction, and the necessary cash deposit. That
offer Mr. Bingham was pressed to accept, but de-
clined, and he subsequently unconditionally re-
leased the corporation from the agreement. For
those reasons it is, of course, impossible for the
corporation to comply with Mr. Bingham's re-
THE TRAMWAYS QUESTION. To the Editor. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Wednesday 21 November 1900 page 8 2020-04-09 11:55 Sir-Nearly every sensible person will en-<*>
dorse Mr. Samuel Samuel letter on the
puhhc have as yet had neither time nor
opportunity. The Traimray Bffl shoald
be delved until the corporations interested i
nave been elected, but as only about half
?tihe members wiH be elected, the fairer wavi
would Ik to take a referendum
The rainfall during the 21 hours ended
Korember 20, at 9 turn., was as foDows:—
Port Darwin.. .. 0.68 Marrabel 001
Brock Creek .. .. 0.70 Ckpe Jervis .. .. o'oi
Bunoadie 0.26 .Meadows .. .. _ 0 01
Kne Creek .. .. 0.70 Robe „ 00?
Port Cermein.. .. 0.05 Miiii^nt .. _ oa2
Etddlsworth .. .. 0.03
Sir—Nearly every sensible person will en-<*>
dorse Mr. Samuel Stanton's letter on the
public have as yet had neither time nor
opportunity. The Tramway Bill should
be shelved until the corporations interested
have been elected, but as only about half
the members will be elected, the fairer way
would be to take a referendum.
-----------------------
The rainfall during the 24 hours ended
November 20, at 9 a.m., was as follows:—
Port Darwin.. .. 0.56 Marrabel 0.01
Brock Creek .. .. 0.70 Cape Jervis .. .. 0.01
Burrundie 0.26 Meadows .. .. 0.01
Pine Creek .. .. 0.70 Robe 0.02
Port Germein.. .. 0.05 Millicent .. 0.02
Saddleworth .. .. 0.03
CORRESPONDENCE. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Tuesday 20 November 1900 [Issue No.13133] page 9 2020-04-09 11:49 [?]at the greatest number ever assembled
"Knquirer."—Write lo the Commissioner
01 Police, ?sydnfiy, giving him tiie f*ct£ of
that the greatest number ever assembled
"Enquirer."—Write to the Commissioner
of Police, Sydneyy, giving him the facts of
MR. T.P. HUDSON. AMONGST BOER PRISONERS. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Tuesday 20 November 1900 [Issue No.13133] page 9 2020-04-09 11:48 He returned by The mail steamer Ormuz on
?Monday- u^ stated, in the course ;pf a
dial witfli an "Advertiser" reporter, that
his. trip to India had been eventful. "1
billed from Adelaide on September 20 in
"and at Colombo, on October 4, 1 em
barked on board the steamer Manora lor
experienced a cyclone. Two days later 1
smallpox, mid plague had been very bad.
moon at was thought that a second C?al
some of tfie streets the water was eight
feet deep. Several of the Hindoos bouses
public washing tank, where the Europeans
clothes were washed, also became con
taminated with sewerage. After complet
ing my private business, and having ar
ranged a Nance O'Xeil season for 1901-2,
1, on October 24, left Calcutta for Colombo.
A gcntlcniuii who had suffered from, toie
effects of cholera was placed in my. cabin.
His wife, Tiis two children, and hnnse.f
attacked with cholera. The wife and chil
dren died, and were buried at 5 p.m. 1
put in 24: hours quarantine to complete the
10 days from a. plague port. Before being
released,. I was well fumigated. Located
in the nest room to mi"" at lie hotel in
two sons, Lieutenant Dti Toot, who was
in charge of the Boer artillery o/t Colenso
where So. 10 Battery lost their guns, and
Ivord Eoberts'g only son lost "his life in his
noble attempt to reacue the guns, and Com
mandant Van Zyl, tjom^Wynbere, wno
seemed quite happy with a bullet hole dean
through one oinis shoulder-Wadea 1
Edison concert grand phonograph. A tele
asked that I might Tie allowed to enter
was readily granted, and, in company w*th
Australia, I visited die Dyataiawa
of November 2. After being searrfied by
die suard on duty, who was careful to see
fliat I !had no arms or secret dispatches, 1
passed miroush. a maze of barbed fencing
wire, cunningly arranged so 42iat <nrly two
persons at a time coidd . pass . through.
Maxim guas were placed in positions to
tickle any Boer prisoners who might at
tempt to escape. I found myself in a well
consisting of about 3,000 Dutch, and tie
to be an Australian named Hoiloway. Be
night of my viart at the one time, and
one, and before this one could riae he
knocked down -tie other. They had enough
after four rounds. Although Hoiloway
fought for One Boers, he appeared to have
no sympathy for Whem. It occupied me
camp to exhibit my phonograph. In pass-1
ing ?through the camp kftx&en a voice |
shouted ?Oawnpore.' On looking round, toi
my astonishment I recognised an old em
American sailor, whom I picked up in;
with me as baggage man. The Boer pri
capable officers. They do all that is pos
sible to make life as pleasant to the pri-:
sonera as military doty will nermit. The
rifles whilst playing. They publidi their
Numbers of tie Ceylon residents think they
enemies #hey are to the British flag. At
present the Boers in Ceylon outnumber the I
whole of the European residents by, ap
are still en route for tfhere. On leaving the]
cheered by the British troops and by num
bers of tie Boers, who nad enjoyed the
ent?TtainT"pn* provided hv f<p Tunonosrana
and myself. On bidding good-bye to Gene
ral Olivier and otlber Boers I could not help
realising that the Empire had had a at
tennined enemy to subdue—an enemy as
determined as any she ever had." j
He returned by the mail steamer Ormuz on
Monday. He stated, in the course of a
chat with an "Advertiser" reporter, that
his trip to India had been eventful. "I
sailed from Adelaide on September 20 in
"and at Colombo, on October 4, I em
barked on board the steamer Manora for
experienced a cyclone. Two days later I
smallpox, and plague had been very bad.
moon at was thought that a second Gal-
some of the streets the water was eight
feet deep. Several of the Hindoos houses
public washing tank, where the Europeans'
clothes were washed, also became con-
taminated with sewerage. After complet-
ing my private business, and having ar-
ranged a Nance O'Neil season for 1901-2,
I, on October 24, left Calcutta for Colombo.
A gentleman who had suffered from the
effects of cholera was placed in my cabin.
His wife, his two children, and himself
attacked with cholera. The wife and chil-
dren died, and were buried at 5 p.m. I
put in 24 hours quarantine to complete the
10 days from a plague port. Before being
released, I was well fumigated. Located
in the next room to mie at the hotel in
two sons, Lieutenant Du Toit, who was
in charge of the Boer artillery at Colenso
where No. 10 Battery lost their guns, and
Lord Roberts's only son lost his life in his
noble attempt to rescue the guns, and Com-
mandant Van Zyl, from Wynberg, who
seemed quite happy with a bullet hole clean
through one of his shoulder-blades. I
Edison concert grand phonograph. A tele-
asked that I might be allowed to enter-
was readily granted, and, in company with
Australia, I visited the Dyatalawa
of November 2. After being searched by
the guard on duty, who was careful to see
that I had no arms or secret dispatches, I
passed through a maze of barbed fencing
wire, cunningly arranged so that only two
persons at a time could pass through.
Maxim guns were placed in positions to
tickle any Boer prisoners who might at-
tempt to escape. I found myself in a well-
consisting of about 3,000 Dutch, and the
to be an Australian named Holloway. He
night of my visit at the one time, and
one, and before this one could rise he
knocked down the other. They had enough
after four rounds. Although Holloway
fought for the Boers, he appeared to have
no sympathy for them. It occupied me
camp to exhibit my phonograph. In pass-
ing through the camp kitchen a voice
shouted 'Cawnpore.' On looking round, to
my astonishment I recognised an old em-
American sailor, whom I picked up in
with me as baggage man. The Boer pri-
capable officers. They do all that is pos-
sible to make life as pleasant to the pri-
soners as military duty will permit. The
rifles whilst playing. They publish their
Numbers of the Ceylon residents think they
enemies they are to the British flag. At
present the Boers in Ceylon outnumber the
whole of the European residents by, ap-
are still en route for there. On leaving the
cheered by the British troops and by num-
bers of the Boers, who had enjoyed the
entertainment provided by the phonograph
and myself. On bidding good-bye to Gene-
ral Olivier and other Boers I could not help
realising that the Empire had had a de-
termined enemy to subdue—an enemy as
determined as any she ever had."

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.