Information about Trove user: Mark.Hughes

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,764,753
2 NeilHamilton 3,238,056
3 noelwoodhouse 3,227,236
4 John.F.Hall 2,467,600
5 annmanley 2,277,348
...
90 neilhilt47smith 423,304
91 ratty 421,908
92 desmodium 413,325
93 Mark.Hughes 412,518
94 rosier 410,483
95 cjbrill 403,115

412,518 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2017 2,275
August 2017 11,830
July 2017 12,161
June 2017 4,789
April 2017 2,819
March 2017 10,612
February 2017 854
January 2017 3,985
December 2016 729
June 2016 6,560
May 2016 2,213
April 2016 4,460
March 2016 4,605
February 2016 7,136
January 2016 20,488
December 2015 7,592
November 2015 11,528
October 2015 19,464
September 2015 25,417
August 2015 19,034
July 2015 1,489
June 2015 16,551
May 2015 9,079
March 2015 12,860
February 2015 1,127
December 2014 2,237
November 2014 14,801
October 2014 19,447
September 2014 23,087
August 2014 9,050
May 2014 10,814
April 2014 2,938
February 2014 524
September 2013 2,196
August 2013 8,494
July 2013 17,530
June 2013 18,289
May 2013 13,884
April 2013 23,109
March 2013 17,201
December 2012 6
November 2010 705
October 2010 6,386
September 2010 2,163

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,764,700
2 NeilHamilton 3,238,056
3 noelwoodhouse 3,227,236
4 John.F.Hall 2,467,594
5 annmanley 2,277,278
...
90 neilhilt47smith 423,260
91 ratty 421,908
92 desmodium 413,325
93 Mark.Hughes 411,788
94 rosier 410,483
95 cjbrill 403,115

411,788 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2017 2,275
August 2017 11,830
July 2017 11,595
June 2017 4,789
April 2017 2,726
March 2017 10,541
February 2017 854
January 2017 3,985
December 2016 729
June 2016 6,560
May 2016 2,213
April 2016 4,460
March 2016 4,605
February 2016 7,136
January 2016 20,488
December 2015 7,592
November 2015 11,528
October 2015 19,464
September 2015 25,417
August 2015 19,034
July 2015 1,489
June 2015 16,551
May 2015 9,079
March 2015 12,860
February 2015 1,127
December 2014 2,237
November 2014 14,801
October 2014 19,447
September 2014 23,087
August 2014 9,050
May 2014 10,814
April 2014 2,938
February 2014 524
September 2013 2,196
August 2013 8,494
July 2013 17,530
June 2013 18,289
May 2013 13,884
April 2013 23,109
March 2013 17,201
December 2012 6
November 2010 705
October 2010 6,386
September 2010 2,163

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 103,705
2 mickbrook 99,971
3 murds5 61,555
4 PhilThomas 48,621
5 EricTheRed 20,242
...
42 Audrey1912 789
43 cmdevine 780
44 takaouto 772
45 Mark.Hughes 730
46 C.Scheikowski 727
47 GJReid-B.Sc.M.Mgmt. 720

730 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2017 566
April 2017 93
March 2017 71


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
Boat builder Portland, Monday (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Tuesday 29 September 1953 [Issue No.33,407] page 7 2017-10-13 07:03 ships' chandlers* service,
I for sailing dinghies.
ships' chandlers' service,
for sailing dinghies.
THE LAUNCESTON COURIER. MONDAY, APRIL 25 (Article), Launceston Courier (Tas. : 1840 - 1843), Monday 25 April 1842 [Issue No.77] page 2 2017-10-10 22:30 ' There lias been an insurrection at Cabul which
closed, and the information very seamy, la October
Sale was returning to Hindostan with H. M. I3ih
Light Infantry, 35th and 37th lien. Nat. Inf., some
Cavalry. Previous to leaving Cabul it was ascer
brigade inarched and very soon found that all ibat
way through, having eight days hard fighting, bivouac
the rascals who were very strong, were constantly at
our side 'three officers killed, ten wounded, (including
It appears the 37th were sept back to Cabul after
Sale is now all right at JeHalabad, having twice sallied
proper drubbing, and soiling Jots of provisions, of
at 1? o'clock on the night of the 2nd, end proceeded
tomutiLer eterf i£urgpe*p 4bejr could lay their hands
pa. jfiir -jftifcwto'.fliMiJw'imi 4Ji jbrolfcer coming
from lie Durbar, were the fl nrt to fall. Stun, of
the Engineers, was stabbed in the back several, times
in ihe -presence i-f *be Shah. There has been €ght
Jijgjjp *o *be Aith, but *be troops have beha.pdipwt
gallantly, and have repulsed the insurgents', with/ i(
is said, immense slaughter, but we have, lost also pa
part wiib Sir W. Macnaughten, in the Bala Hissar,
ammunition and provisions, but 1 fancy these things
are muck exaggerated, and that the troops will be
cannot arrive at Cabul much before April next.f (At
Chareekar the Goorkab Regiment in the Shah's ser
officers killed but Haughlon, the Adjutant, (who it
is ascertained, ) escaped to Cabul with the low of t*
Ghuinee to Cabul with 132 sepoys was attacked, and
ception of filx. The 27th N. I. are hemmed in at
Ghuznee, but 1 fancy they are all right, and have
plenty of provisions. A brigade (/6th, 42nd, 43rd
N. 1., a troop pf H. A. and some Cavalry) under
M'Laren, has inarched from Candahar to the rescue,
Candahar we have Nott, with li. M'.'s 40tb, 2nd, and
three of the Shah's corps, so that 1 think he will do.
brigade) twenty officers have been killed, and it is im
done for the Cabul people yet. They must, 1 am sorry
Wild has been made' a vrigadier, and commands the '
will assume rather a serious aspect. Fancy Macnaugh
ten reporting to Government the day before the out
break, that the country was quite quiet, and lhat part of
thr» ljfttrnltirc mitrtit hp U'llhrimun A ml ?« f««* U_
Brigade had also got two or three inarches on its re
must be in. It is reported thai the wife of Trevor, of
the Sbah's cavalry, has been murdered with all her
children J 1 1 Is not this awful ? i he state of affairs in
Lhe norlh-wesc is the all absorbing subject of conversa
tion. Nothing else is talked of \\ hat a sensation
the intelligence of these disasters will cause in Eng
that it his blind brother, Shah Zemann.'_F. D. L.
' The ' Paul Pur.'— It may perhaps be inferred,
" There has been an insurrection at Cabul which
closed, and the information very scanty, ln October
Sale was returning to Hindostan with H. M. 13th
Light Infantry, 35th and 37th Ben. Nat. Inf., some
Cavalry. Previous to leaving Cabul it was ascer-
brigade marched and very soon found that all that
way through, having eight days hard fighting, bivouac-
the rascals who were very strong, were constantly at-
our side three officers killed, ten wounded, (including
It appears the 37th were sent back to Cabul after
Sale is now all right at Jellalabad, having twice sallied
proper drubbing, and seizing lots of provisions, of
at 12 o'clock on the night of the 2nd, and proceeded
to murder every European they could lay their hands
on. Mr. Alexander Burns and his brother coming
from the Durbar, were the first to fall. Sturt, of
the Engineers, was stabbed in the back several times
in the presence of the Shah. There has been fight-
ing up to the 14th, but the troops have behaved most
gallantly, and have repulsed the insurgents, with, it
is said, immense slaughter, but we have lost also on
part with Sir W. Macnaughten, in the Bala Hissar,
ammunition and provisions, but I fancy these things
are much exaggerated, and that the troops will be
cannot arrive at Cabul much before April next. (At
Chareekar the Goorkah Regiment in the Shah's ser-
officers killed but Haughton, the Adjutant, (who it
is ascertained,) escaped to Cabul with the loss of his
Ghuznee to Cabul with 132 sepoys was attacked, and
ception of six. The 27th N. I. are hemmed in at
Ghuznee, but I fancy they are all right, and have
plenty of provisions. A brigade (16th, 42nd, 43rd
N. I., a troop pf H. A. and some Cavalry) under
M'Laren, has marched from Candahar to the rescue,
Candahar we have Nott, with H. M.'s 40th, 2nd, and
three of the Shah's corps, so that I think he will do.
brigade) twenty officers have been killed, and it is im-
done for the Cabul people yet. They must, I am sorry
Wild has been made a Brigadier, and commands the
will assume rather a serious aspect. Fancy Macnaugh-
ten reporting to Government the day before the out-
break, that the country was quite quiet, and that part of
the Regulars might be withdrawn. And in fact he
Brigade had also got two or three marches on its re-
must be in. It is reported that the wife of Trevor, of
the Shah's cavalry, has been murdered with all her
children !!! Is not this awful ? The state of affairs in
the norlh-west is the all absorbing subject of conversa-
tion. Nothing else is talked of What a sensation
the intelligence of these disasters will cause in Eng-
that it his blind brother, Shah Zemann."—V. D. L.
" THE PAUL PRY.— It may perhaps be inferred,
THE LAUNCESTON COURIER. MONDAY, APRIL 25 (Article), Launceston Courier (Tas. : 1840 - 1843), Monday 25 April 1842 [Issue No.77] page 2 2017-10-10 22:12 The King of France, on the recommenda
tion of Marshal Soult, has directed a reduc
rank of his Majesty, King Albeit. There is
We have received ria Swlncy, Indian news
out in Affghanistan, accompanied with circum
every i-eliance may be placed, will be perused
must be augmented -at once — and lhat to a good
experience of past years and past defeats en
countered through the paltry policy of equip
recruiting their losses with a supply propor
might have . been formerly and successfully
60,000 British troops. *' Witness the miserable
Extract from a 'letter dated Calcutta, 21st
The King of France, on the recommenda-
tion of Marshal Soult, has directed a reduc-
rank of his Majesty, King Albert. There is
We have received via Sydney, Indian news
out in Affghanistan, accompanied with circum-
every reliance may be placed, will be perused
must be augmented at once—and that to a good
experience of past years and past defeats en-
countered through the paltry policy of equip-
recruiting their losses with a supply propor-
might have been formerly and successfully
60,000 British troops. Witness the miserable
Extract from a letter dated Calcutta, 21st
THE LAUNCESTON COURIER. MONDAY, APRIL 25 (Article), Launceston Courier (Tas. : 1840 - 1843), Monday 25 April 1842 [Issue No.77] page 2 2017-10-10 21:30 THE LAUNOESTON COURIER.
The public will learn from our advertising
the Chronicle to nothing but au over sensi
»'c cannot suppose for a moment, that a person
a perfect aversion to sinecures and monopo
contemplated, may be, however much conclu
sive to the public good, the Chronicle is sine
There are ' salaries' to be made for ' certain
individuals' or some other equally obscure
salaried officers will be attached to the Establish
An advertisement from the Secretary an
evening, when, after the dispatch of a little pre
Fiederick-street; free admission will be granted
will be delivered at the School-room, in Ca
meron-street, and conducted according to lhe
Admitting as every sober man does, that in
whether it is not the duty of .every good Chris
tian to abstain entirely from the use of in
toxicating drinks P
uncertain in their application, und as such, liable
Tbis is an advantage which we are willing to
concede, merely for the sake of excluding dis
question 011 both sides, divested of the clumsy
in'cumbrances of scripture, and excluding the
powers of conception ; we will admit if neces
sary that the eloquence often thousand teetotalers,
death occasioned by this vice. Of course (hero
The teetotallers says yes. They say that chem
ical analisatiuns have proved that intoxicating
drinks are pernicious, and injurious to the con
therefrom, they' are necessarily productive of
injury to the health, and argue lhat it is our
duty to abandon even the moderation system. as
proof of whatishereadmitted, or only illustrations
and mere tributary streams to this ' grand prin
ciple' of their doctrines. They compare alco
holto a pestilence, and ask whelherwe moderation
propogaling a fever or a plague. In reply to
this, the anti-teetotaller says, that he is not res
parliceps criminis, and actual! v encourages or
person bv some strange favour of fortune, ac
cumulatesriches, and another, fascinated with the
play, looses, turns gambler, and becomes re
elated with his temporary success, turns mon
ruined ; as well mislil the consequences of this
example of the more cautions, and- fortunate
judgment with moderation, reaped a proper re
wheat? No; the blame lies nearer home. To
for no one is to blame but the parly himself.
It is the same with the drunkard ; a 'person who
for a man to get drunk in the lap-room of a
ibis ivav, and in abusing intoxicating drinks,
they are only condemning the gills of God,
The crimes of the drunkaid are not those of
them : one enjoys what the oilier abuses, one
makes a comfort'wherc the oilier makes a curse.
moderation sometimes leads to excess, moder
ation must be censurcuble, and . ought to be
THE LAUNCESTON COURIER.
THE public will learn from our advertising
the Chronicle to nothing but an over sensi-
we cannot suppose for a moment, that a person
a perfect aversion to sinecures and monopo-
contemplated, may be, however much conclu-
sive to the public good, the Chronicle is sure
There are " salaries" to be made for " certain
individuals" or some other equally obscure
salaried officers will be attached to the Establish-
An advertisement from the Secretary an-
evening, when, after the dispatch of a little pre-
Frederick-street; free admission will be granted
will be delivered at the School-room, in Ca-
meron-street, and conducted according to the
ADMITTING as every sober man does, that in-
whether it is not the duty of .every good Chris-
tian to abstain entirely from the use of in-
toxicating drinks ?
uncertain in their application, and as such, liable
This is an advantage which we are willing to
concede, merely for the sake of excluding dis-
question on both sides, divested of the clumsy
iincumbrances of scripture, and excluding the
powers of conception ; we will admit if neces-
sary that the eloquence of ten thousand teetotalers,
death occasioned by this vice. Of course there
The teetotallers says yes. They say that chem-
ical analisations have proved that intoxicating
drinks are pernicious, and injurious to the con-
therefrom, they are necessarily productive of
injury to the health, and argue that it is our
duty to abandon even the moderation system, as
proof of what is here admitted, or only illustrations
and mere tributary streams to this " grand prin-
ciple" of their doctrines. They compare alco-
hol to a pestilence, and ask whether we moderation
propogating a fever or a plague. In reply to
this, the anti-teetotaller says, that he is not res-
parliceps criminis, and actually encourages or
person by some strange favour of fortune, ac-
cumulates riches, and another, fascinated with the
play, looses, turns gambler, and becomes re-
elated with his temporary success, turns mon-
ruined ; as well might the consequences of this
example of the more cautions, and fortunate
judgment with moderation, reaped a proper re-
wheat ? No; the blame lies nearer home. To
for no one is to blame but the party himself.
It is the same with the drunkard ; a person who
for a man to get drunk in the tap-room of a
this way, and in abusing intoxicating drinks,
they are only condemning the gifts of God,
The crimes of the drunkard are not those of
them : one enjoys what the other abuses, one
makes a comfort where the other makes a curse.
moderation sometimes leads to excess, moder-
ation must be censurable, and ought to be
LAUNCESTON: THURSDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 15, 1842. (Article), Launceston Advertiser (Tas. : 1829 - 1846), Thursday 15 December 1842 [Issue No.812] page 3 2017-10-10 21:14 The Mishopof Tasmania ? The intelligence of the
apniiiiumviii of the liev. Mr. Nixon to the liislioprie
nt' Van Piemen's l.aud is confirmed He is one of the
-ix preachers at Canterbury Cathedral, and perpetual
Curate of Ash. in that neighbourhood. Air. Niton is
spoken of in the highest terms, 'as a man of greal ami*
ability, andol unquestionable piely, talent and learning.
It was not expected that the Might Reverend gentle.
inan would leave England before the end uf the year ?
Sj/ditrg Htruld. - .,_..-
Port Phillip Lichthouse —The lamp intended
for Ihe I'ort Philliii Lighthouse, which has been
manufactured by .Mr. Dawsun, was taken to the mound
nl Ihe signal station last evening, to prove its effect It
wastohuve been sent down by the iealiaru this trip;
lirst be proved to prevent nny detention on its arrival
there It is intended to be placed on Ihe lighihouse
erected at Sliorlluud Bluff, inside the l'ort Phillip
Heads The height is seven feet, and the diameter live
feet (about hair ihe size of ihe one at South Head,)
havi u' eight burners, with reflectors of cupper, tinned
and blocked. The 'op pan is cupper on iron framing,
wiih the glass frames made of brass; unfortunately at
the lime ihe contract whs entered into, there was no
plate glass in the colonies of suflieient siic tor that spe
square; Inn the joints haic been so nicely made, that il
is of lillle consequence. At the top of the cupola is
wilh a hole in its shank, which thus forms Ihe ventilator.
The lumps burned r iher dimly at first, but ultimately
answeied well, and Ihe workmanship throughout, *iues
credit to the manuiacturer. — Sydney Morning Herald,
Wbeck at New Zealand. — Intelligence has been
received by the Guvernineul of a very serious outrage
commiited'by the natives, at a place called Whaaroa,
about thirty miles north uf llokianga. The schooner
F.clipst, about to tons burihen, colonial built by ihe
muster and owner, CaptAin Stevenson, was un her way
to the harbour of Hukianga, un Sunday, the 9lli ultimo,
and was driven on shore in the afternoon, when Ihe
and stripped the vessel uf every thing portable, even to
her cordage anil cables, leaving her a bare hulk. Nu
personal violence v\as committed upon Captain Steven
the clothing they w-ure, tu the place they came from,
w hich happily they contrived lu du in safety ? Auckland
Timcl, November ti. .
A young female emigrant by the Itoynl Saxon threw
licrsell into Ilie liver from on board that vessel on
Monday, but was quickly followed by on e of ihe sea
man who fortunately succeeded ill rescuing her.
Mh. Patterson the schoolmaster was stopped on
the Sand-hill road on Sunday night by two men.- He
was riding un horseback, when Ihe men in question
rushed from the side uf ihe ruad and seized hold uf the
reins; Mr Patterson fonuraiely had possession of a
assailants lu the ground, and rode away.
MucHANtrs' Institute — A meeting nf the commit
tee of the .Mechanics' Institute was recently held, for
purchasing an allotment, and erecting a suitable build
ing thereon, 'ihe pruposilion was. negatived 'on the
ground that il was premature in the present stale of the
'x-'iety. ? . ? . ;
them their duty.—Communicated.
THE BISHOP OF TASMANIA.—The intelligence of the
appointment of the Rev. Mr. Nixon to the Bishopric
of Van Diemen's Land is confirmed. He is one of the
six preachers at Canterbury Cathedral, and perpetual
Curate of Ash. in that neighbourhood. Mr. Nixon is
spoken of in the highest terms, as a man of great ami-
ability, and of unquestionable piety, talent and learning.
It was not expected that the Right Reverend gentle-
man would leave England before the end of the year.—
Sydney Herald.
PORT PHILLIP LIGHTHOUSE — The lamp intended
for the Port Phillip Lighthouse, which has been
manufactured by Mr. Dawson, was taken to the mound
at the signal station last evening, to prove its effect It
was to have been sent down by the Seahorse this trip;
first be proved to prevent any detention on its arrival
there. It is intended to be placed on the lighthouse
erected at Shortland Bluff, inside the Port Phillip
Heads The height is seven feet, and the diameter five
feet (about half the size of the one at South Head,)
having eight burners, with reflectors of copper, tinned
and blocked. The top part is copper on iron framing,
with the glass frames made of brass; unfortunately at
the time the contract was entered into, there was no
plate glass in the colonies of sufficient size for that spe-
square; but the joints have been so nicely made, that it
is of little consequence. At the top of the cupola is
with a hole in its shank, which thus forms the ventilator.
The lamps burned rather dimly at first, but ultimately
answered well, and the workmanship throughout, does
credit to the manufacturer.—Sydney Morning Herald,
WRECK AT NEW ZEALAND.—Intelligence has been
received by the Government of a very serious outrage
committed by the natives, at a place called Whaaroa,
about thirty miles north of Hokianga. The schooner
Eclipse, about 80 tons burthen, colonial built by the
master and owner, Captain Stevenson, was on her way
to the harbour of Hokianga, on Sunday, the 9th ultimo,
and was driven on shore in the afternoon, when the
and stripped the vessel of every thing portable, even to
her cordage and cables, leaving her a bare hulk. No
personal violence was committed upon Captain Steven-
the clothing they wore, to the place they came from,
which happily they contrived to do in safety.—Auckland
Times, November 6.
A young female emigrant by the Royal Saxon threw
herself into the river from on board that vessel on
Monday, but was quickly followed by one of the sea-
men who fortunately succeeded in rescuing her.
Mr. Patterson the schoolmaster was stopped on
the Sand-hill road on Sunday night by two men. He
was riding on horseback, when the men in question
rushed from the side of the road and seized hold of the
reins; Mr Patterson fortunately had possession of a
assailants to the ground, and rode away.
MECHANICS INSTITUTE.—A meeting of the commit-
tee of the Mechanics' Institute was recently held, for
purchasing an allotment, and erecting a suitable build-
ing thereon, The proposition was negatived on the
ground that it was premature in the present state of the
society.
LAUNCESTON: THURSDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 15, 1842. (Article), Launceston Advertiser (Tas. : 1829 - 1846), Thursday 15 December 1842 [Issue No.812] page 3 2017-10-10 20:58 TUOKSDAY AlultNINC, DECEMBER 15, 1842.
In fulfilment of our promise, we have enquired
into the affair at tlie Hospital, and now lay
before our renders the result of that enquiry.
the impression which liis note to Dr. Hay
garlh was calculated to produce.
'TIik Editor of the Lnuiieistou Advertiser pre
sents liis compliments to Mr. Bauson, and resjiect
fuilv requests to lie informed, whether there exists
an; regulation prohibiting strangers from visitimr
paiiCtits in the Hosjiial, I'ither as friendly visitants
fir professionally. Mr. Benson will understand
the object ol this enquiry upon reference 1o an
niticle in tlie Advertiser of tlie 8th instant. The
Editor is desirous of obtaining (lie fullest informa
tion upon the subject therein alluded to.'
'Her Majestv'-s Hospital, Launcrston,
' 13Mi December, 1842.
'Sir. — In reply to your now of this date, I
lipp; to inform you, that no regulation exists pro
wlii!e in the -'Hospital, provided ..the necessary
sanction be obtained, either froimnyself or, in my
' I have the honor tu be sir,
' Your obedient servant,
' \V. Benson.'
former aspect of the case. Mr. Benson's re
shoull be given to Medical Gentlemen, attend
ought to be kept under the strictest surveil
humane law, made: tlie subject of an Inquisi
tion before a Coroner. And so far as our ex
present and former officers of that establish
ment, the justice of admitting, that, in giving i
evidence, they have invariably spoken of them
efforts, they have described as being uncease
ing ; their attention, diligent; their skill, pro
never proved anything derogatory to their pro
fessional abilities, indeed even making an allow
anything to the contrary. But when a medi
refused admission, we think every body will ??
unite with us in expressing surprise, and re
endowed with talent, and so skilful in their pro
Ifession, should, upon any plea whatever,
, object to have those qualifications exposed to
: private scrutiny or public admiration. They
should rather rejoice atan opportunity ofhaving
their acts inspected, and not'te content, with
that self-praise is no recommendation. ' '
We object to' see public officers mixing
public duty. Dr. Haygarth had, by ' Mr.
Benson's own -shewing, a right of admission to
the hospital as a visitor, 'and ' why was lie
Suck conduct is wholly unjustifiable, and
endured 'that public privileges are thus to be
Mei.akchoi.v Event— On Wednesday morning, the
painful intellifzonce reached lown, of the death of Mr.
A). Suminemlli', of K.ill«fa-ldy. A EiTvant, nttached
In Ilie lumse iif thu dercusi'tl, alioul four o'clock an tlmt
morning, heard the rcpurt uf a |ilVtul, end Imving forced
his nay into his rmsur's mum, found him lyiiiK lifelc.-s
upon the Hour, shot through the heart, and a discharged
pi-lol by his tide. An inquest uill l-u held upon the
remains this day, at the resilience uf the unliirluuete
f-emlcman, »hen full natiicularsufthetruK melancholy
altair .vill nanspire.
Suicide— An inquest has held on' Wednesday, at
?Mr Neville's, upun the body cf u man named lticlmrd
Itislnnn, »hu put a period to his existence by takili(t
poison. Deceased was. a tanner einpliijed by Air.
Hunon. and ii appears, fell viol willy in love «iih n fe
mule residing near him. TlicaBectimi nas not mutual,
uhieh produced such an effect upun his mind, that he
purchased some arseuic and laudanum, and therewith
poisuued himself.
Tub Dustv Millrb. — Mr. Symonds, the Super
cargo «f this unfortunate vessel, tile captain, male, and
suine of llie c'reu', have returned to l.auiu-cMon by the
Hid Watch. The nuity MiUr, had completely gone to
pieces, and it was doubtful nhclher the purchaserof ihe
wreck wuuld realize anything by his bargain. The
cargo, unfortunately not insured, was snlu for .£120. at
1'orl Fairy. It comprised about 330 bags uf line
forwarded to Launceston by the cutler James Gibson.
as not long since nine adults were seen in the neigh
Theatre.— The new theatre will be opened this
oeiiiiig, anil also on boili eienings of the Kcpall.i. We
direct liilentiun to the adveniseirenls eUeuhere fiir
full particulars. The theatre is now as cumforlablennd
conteuiLiil, as could be desired, and even the most
fastidious, can be acconimudaied Private boxes arc
lined up fur ilie accommodation uf families and parties,
please, wiihuut sullering annoyanne. and without an
uuying others. J he Olympic company deserve every
palrunagc; they have struggled against many difficul
ties, with groat perseverance, and can now present ihenl
Westbuhv District.— This district is in a stale of
dreadful disorganization, arming from a want of proper
Dairy 1'lnins, liy t'o men, nilh their faces blacked, who
ruliliei! him uf his walch, a £2 note, a coat, and ncck
cloili Not long since a hou-e of Mr. 1'arker's, «hich
the flouring board* ripped up and carried away. Cattle
stealing is prevalent, and it is thought sumeof the gangs
will soon lie detected, though not by the cicrlions of Ihe
pi.lice. Ale there any bunks lit iusliuclion amongst the
Wcsibnrv constabulary ? They waul something to leach
THURSDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 15, 1842.
IN fulfilment of our promise, we have enquired
into the affair at the Hospital, and now lay
before our readers the result of that enquiry.
the impression which his note to Dr. Hay-
garth was calculated to produce.
" The Editor of the Launceston Advertiser pre-
sents his compliments to Mr. Bauson, and respect-
fullv requests to be informed, whether there exists
any regulation prohibiting strangers from visiting
patients in the Hospital, either as friendly visitants
or professionally. Mr. Benson will understand
the object of this enquiry upon reference to an
article in the Advertiser of the 8th instant. The
Editor is desirous of obtaining the fullest informa-
tion upon the subject therein alluded to."
"Her Majesty's Hospital, Launceston,
" 13th December, 1842.
"Sir.—In reply to your note of this date, I
beg to inform you, that no regulation exists pro-
while in the Hospital, provided the necessary
sanction be obtained, either from myself or, in my
" I have the honor tu be sir,
" Your obedient servant,
" W. BENSON."
former aspect of the case. Mr. Benson's re-
should be given to Medical Gentlemen, attend-
ought to be kept under the strictest surveil-
humane law, made: the subject of an inquisi-
tion before a Coroner. And so far as our ex-
present and former officers of that establish-
ment, the justice of admitting, that, in giving
evidence, they have invariably spoken of them-
efforts, they have described as being uncease-
ing ; their attention, diligent; their skill, pro-
never proved anything derogatory to their pro-
fessional abilities, indeed even making an allow-
anything to the contrary. But when a medi-
refused admission, we think every body will
unite with us in expressing surprise, and re-
endowed with talent, and so skilful in their pro-
fession, should, upon any plea whatever,
object to have those qualifications exposed to
private scrutiny or public admiration. They
should rather rejoice at an opportunity of having
their acts inspected, and not be content, with
that self-praise is no recommendation.
We object to see public officers mixing
public duty. Dr. Haygarth had, by Mr.
Benson's own shewing, a right of admission to
the hospital as a visitor, and why was lie
Such conduct is wholly unjustifiable, and
endured that public privileges are thus to be
MELANCHOILY EVENT—On Wednesday morning, the
painful intelligence reached town, of the death of Mr.
M. Summerville, of Killsfaddy. A servant, attached
to the house of the deceased, about four o'clock on that
morning, heard the report of a pistol, and having forced
his way into his master's room, found him lying lifeless
upon the floor, shot through the heart, and a discharged
pistol by his tide. An inquest will be held upon the
remains this day, at the residence of the unfortunate
gentleman, when full particulars of the truly melancholy
aftair will transpire.
SUICIDE.—An inquest was held on Wednesday, at
Mr Neville's, upon the body of a man named Richard
Rishton, who put a period to his existence by taking
poison. Deceased was a tanner employed by Mr.
Button. and it appears, fell violently in love with a fe-
male residing near him. The affection was not mutual,
which produced such an effect upon his mind, that he
purchased some arsenic and laudanum, and therewith
poisoned himself.
THE DUSTY MILLER.—Mr. Symonds, the Super-
cargo of this unfortunate vessel, the captain, mate, and
some of the crew, have returned to Launceston by the
Wid Watch. The Dusty Miller, had completely gone to
pieces, and it was doubtful whether the purchaser of the
wreck would realize anything by his bargain. The
cargo, unfortunately not insured, was sold for £120, at
Porl Fairy. It comprised about 330 bags of fine
forwarded to Launceston by the cutter James Gibson.
as not long since nine adults were seen in the neigh-
THEATRE.—The new theatre will be opened this
evening, and also on both evenings of the Regatta. We
direct attention to the advertisemenls elsewhere for
full particulars. The theatre is now as comforlable and
convenient, as could be desired, and even the most
fastidious, can be accommodated Private boxes are
lined up for the accommodation of families and parties,
please, without suffering annoyance, and without an-
noying others. The Olympic company deserve every
patronage; they have struggled against many difficul-
ties, with great perseverance, and can now present them-
WESTBURY DISTRICT.—This district is in a stale of
dreadful disorganization, arising from a want of proper
Dairy Plains, by two men, wilh their faces blacked, who
robbed him of his watch, a £2 note, a coat, and neck-
cloth. Not long since a house of Mr. Parker's, which
the flooring boards ripped up and carried away. Cattle
stealing is prevalent, and it is thought some of the gangs
will soon be detected, though not by the exertions of the
police. Are there any books of instruction amongst the
Westbury constabulary ? They want something to teach
MISCELLANY. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 2 July 1842 [Issue No.17] page 5 2017-10-10 20:23
MISCELLANEOUS. (Article), Launceston Courier (Tas. : 1840 - 1843), Monday 13 June 1842 [Issue No.84] page 4 2017-10-10 20:16 bad settlers, and never fence their grounds 1
Becav.se they fence upon the cross— always liam
merring and raili nij, but never get any posts.
Punning is the vice of the age. The most un
drawing of a boot with the motto, ' mens conscia
recti ;' his adversary to be even with him, placed
a bill in his window with these words — ' mens
and teomens consica recti.' . A man was employed
the words—' Sic transit gloria Mundi ;' finding,
however, he could -not finish it till next day, in
-drder to be correct, he altered it to ' Sic transit
gloria Tuesday:' During the O. P. rowatCoveut
Garden, John Kernble asked the French ballet
master how they got on? — 'Oh pis toujours,'
dance, did not look at his -watch till 1 a. m. when
extremity of each Jip, and made all the company
stare, by exclaiming, ' Pardi ! eet ees to — mor-
row !' .,
bad settlers, and never fence their grounds ?
Because they fence upon the cross—always ham-
merring and railing, but never get any posts.
Punning is the vice of the age. The most un-
drawing of a boot with the motto, " mens conscia
recti ;" his adversary to be even with him, placed
a bill in his window with these words—" mens
and womens consica recti." . A man was employed
the words—" Sic transit gloria Mundi ;" finding,
however, he could not finish it till next day, in
order to be correct, he altered it to " Sic transit
gloria Tuesday:" During the O. P. row at Covent
Garden, John Kernble asked the French ballet-
master how they got on?—" Oh pis toujours,"
dance, did not look at his watch till 1 A. M. when
extremity of each lip, and made all the company
stare, by exclaiming, ' Pardi ! eet ees to—mor—
row !"
MISCELLANEOUS. (Article), Launceston Courier (Tas. : 1840 - 1843), Monday 13 June 1842 [Issue No.84] page 4 2017-10-10 20:11 A Yankee Lawyer. — 1 instituted an actiun
for a large amount, in the country of ? — .
The suit 'was brought .upon a plain promissory
-rood considerations, and I was curious to know
ottered uiv note in evidence and closed my cjsg.
perfect beauty ; possi'ssinp: a sweet countenance,
with an exquisite form. I saw at once that iny
antagonist had formed the same judgment of hu
unrke the experiment of washing away, the obli
ga.tion'oT'h'iHJtB of hand,d)y.the taws of ft female
witness. I knew that nothing hut a desperate
effort could save my client, and that her testimo
I rose at once. ' I perceive,' said I, addressing
the court, 'that this lady bears the same name
with the defendant ; I therefore respectfully re
quest that she be placed on the voir dire.' This
was done : '?' Will you be kind enough to say,
madam, what relation you are to the defendant 1'
' Sir,' answered she, applying a beautifully em
broidered handkerchief to her eyes, ' I am his
injured wife!' 'Then, of ccurse, your honor, the
lady's evidence is inadmissible.' ' Oh, very well,'
interposed my adversary ;' you wish to keep the
to procuie a verdict against my client. I hope
you will properly appreciate it, gentlemen.' By
I turned to my client: ' You are gone, my friend,'
said I. ' Gone !:' said he, ' gone ! my dear sir,
become of my wife and my poor daughters?'
'Oh, you have daughters, have you? Hun and
bring 'them, my dear friend : if they mine, we
must countermine. . Bring' them one and alL'
My client rushed cut, and as he lived but next
door, he almost instantly returned, with a half
dozen of as pretty girls as could be found any
where. My antagonist's face fell to zero. 'May
jt please your honor,' I began, ?' I desire to offer
some rebutting testimony.' ' Rebutting testi
mony, Mr. C ? ? Why, your adversary has
have you to rebut?'' 'A great deal, your honor.
called herself the injured wife of tlie defendant.
.suit, from him. Now, sir, I wish to swear the
afflicted daughters of the plaintiff against the in
jured wife of the defendant.' Hera my fair wit
of the jury looked on. with evidentcomniiseration.
pay off my legal friend in his own coin. ' I do
not seek, sir,' continued I, ' to take up the lime
to all these witnesses. I am afraid their hearts
W which, be it remembered, they did not know a
syllable) would unman us all ; and your honor and |
this intelligent jury would be tempted to inflict I
summary justice upon tue wretch, who, with a |
I will swear but three of them.' Here there en
sued a new burst of anguish from the daughters, '
the jury. My legal friend saw that I had out- r
generated him, and so he said : ' C ? , stop
your nonsense, and take your verdict!' Of course.
said : ' I am rejoiced that you have gained your
suit, but before you offered to swear those wit
nesses, yaur e/ise mis a very durkonc.' — ' Georgia
Lannier.' i
u ? i
A YANKEE LAWYER.— I instituted an action
for a large amount, in the country of ———.
The suit was brought upon a plain promissory
good considerations, and I was curious to know
offered mv note in evidence and closed my case,
perfect beauty ; possessing: a sweet countenance,
with an exquisite form. I saw at once that my
antagonist had formed the same judgment of hu-
make the experiment of washing away the obli-
gation of a note of hand,by.the tears of a female
witness. I knew that nothing but a desperate
effort could save my client, and that her testimo-
I rose at once. " I perceive," said I, addressing
the court, "that this lady bears the same name
with the defendant ; I therefore respectfully re-
quest that she be placed on the voir dire." This
was done : " Will you be kind enough to say,
madam, what relation you are to the defendant ?"
" Sir," answered she, applying a beautifully em-
broidered handkerchief to her eyes, " I am his
injured wife!" "Then, of course, your honor, the
lady's evidence is inadmissible." " Oh, very well,"
interposed my adversary ;" you wish to keep the
to procure a verdict against my client. I hope
you will properly appreciate it, gentlemen." By
I turned to my client: " You are gone, my friend,"
said I. " Gone !:" said he, " gone ! my dear sir,
become of my wife and my poor daughters?"
"Oh, you have daughters, have you? Run and
bring them, my dear friend : if they mine, we
must countermine. Bring' them one and alL"
My client rushed out, and as he lived but next
door, he almost instantly returned, with a half-
dozen of as pretty girls as could be found any-
where. My antagonist's face fell to zero. "May
jt please your honor," I began, " I desire to offer
some rebutting testimony." " Rebutting testi-
mony, Mr. C——— ? Why, your adversary has
have you to rebut?" "A great deal, your honor.
called herself the injured wife of the defendant.
suit, from him. Now, sir, I wish to swear the
afflicted daughters of the plaintiff against the in-
jured wife of the defendant." Here my fair wit-
of the jury looked on.with evident commiseration.
pay off my legal friend in his own coin. " I do
not seek, sir," continued I, " to take up the lime
to all these witnesses. I am afraid their heart-
(of which, be it remembered, they did not know a
syllable) would unman us all ; and your honor and
this intelligent jury would be tempted to inflict
summary justice upon the wretch, who, with a
I will swear but three of them." Here there en-
sued a new burst of anguish from the daughters,
the jury. My legal friend saw that I had out-
generaled him, and so he said : " C———, stop
your nonsense, and take your verdict!" Of course.
said " I am rejoiced that you have gained your
suit, but before you offered to swear those wit-
nesses, your case was a very dark one."—' Georgia
Lawyer.'
MISCELLANY. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 28 May 1842 [Issue No.12] page 5 2017-10-10 19:57 MIbSCELLANY.
A GOOD STony.-One day, a sturdy pea
and went house in the evening thoroughly
tired, and drenched to the skin. iIe was
who had been at home all day. " Mly
the well, which was at a considerable dis
his wife comfotbrtably seated at the fire;
then, lifting one bucket after the other, lie
poured both onhis kind and considerate part
ner. "Now wife," said lie, "you are -quite
as wet as 1 anm, so you may as well toich
wetter."-E'curisions in Nor)mandy.
AmmSTRACTION OP INTELLECT.-The ab
may not be true that lie once inserted the
little finger ofa lady, whose hand lihe was
stopper, or that lie made a hole in his study
of at large one for the cat;i it s certain,
however, that lie was once musing by the
servant to taLw away the grate.-Phlloso
phy of MIystery.
CoNvERSATION.-There must, in the first
place, be knowledge-there must be ma
a comnmand of words; in the third place,
tion that is not to be overcome by failures
of it, many people do not excel in conver
sation.-Dr. Johnson.
When we hear a merchant swear lie Is
prices, we guess lihe lies.
4 ST. PAUms Two I Ivraiin ' YEAns Ano.
-The middle aisle of the old cathedral was
*potice on their pillars..
"' "Deer cating," as the gourmand said
"I believoein the law anid the ;proqftl as
fthe pettifogger said when lihe pocketted his
That man is poor who canntot pay his
debts, though he has thousands in his -po
session; that man is rich, who' owes '"no
*man auglit but love,' though he eats his
corned beef and bread from a Ipine table,
and industrious wif.
boy a ciphering? Because l.e 'sets doiwnv
' "A cloudy morning," as thie man siold
MISCELLANY.
A GOOD STORY.—One day, a sturdy pea-
and went home in the evening thoroughly
tired, and drenched to the skin. He was
who had been at home all day. " My
the well, which was at a considerable dis-
his wife comfortably seated at the fire;
then, lifting one bucket after the other, he
poured both on his kind and considerate part-
ner. "Now wife," said he, "you are quite
as wet as I am, so you may as well fetch
wetter."—Excursions in Normandy.
ABSTRACTION OF INTELLECT.—The ab-
may not be true that he once inserted the
little finger of a lady, whose hand he was
stopper, or that he made a hole in his study
of a large one for the cat; it is certain,
however, that he was once musing by the
servant to take away the grate.—Philoso-
phy of Mystery.
CONVERSATION.— There must, in the first
place, be knowledge—there must be ma-
a command of words; in the third place,
tion that is not to be overcome by failures—
of it, many people do not excel in conver-
sation.—Dr. Johnson.
When we hear a merchant swear he Is
prices, we guess he lies.
ST. PAULS TWO HUNDRED YEARS AGO.
—The middle aisle of the old cathedral was
notice on their pillars..
"' Deer eating," as the gourmand said
"I believe in the law and the profits as
the pettifogger said when he pocketted his
That man is poor who cannot pay his
debts, though he has thousands in his pos-
session; that man is rich, who owes ' no
man aught but love,' though he eats his
corned beef and bread from a pine table,
and industrious wife.
boy a ciphering? Because he 'sets down
"A cloudy morning," as the man said

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.