Information about Trove user: Loco

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,903,115
2 noelwoodhouse 3,960,702
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,393,803
5 Rhonda.M 3,297,157
...
69 BustersMum 621,816
70 julyn 619,634
71 IWalrus 617,062
72 Loco 617,044
73 lesley65 607,060
74 nbay 606,543

617,044 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

January 2020 9,983
December 2019 18,222
November 2019 1,009
October 2019 10
September 2019 167
August 2019 280
July 2019 50
June 2019 174
May 2019 64
April 2019 13
March 2019 53
February 2019 5
January 2019 281
October 2018 13
September 2018 37
August 2018 28
June 2018 443
May 2018 65
March 2018 33
January 2018 130
October 2017 45
September 2017 11
August 2017 64
July 2017 336
June 2017 272
May 2017 1,511
April 2017 258
March 2017 801
February 2017 1,512
January 2017 1,922
December 2016 3,741
November 2016 3,509
October 2016 2,223
September 2016 89
August 2016 520
May 2016 81
April 2016 6
March 2016 114
February 2016 97
January 2016 1,077
October 2015 281
September 2015 2,756
August 2015 2,619
July 2015 578
June 2015 601
May 2015 1,505
April 2015 879
March 2015 2,748
January 2015 35
August 2014 647
July 2014 1,224
June 2014 5,568
May 2014 10,665
April 2014 8,927
March 2014 5,554
February 2014 452
January 2014 28,942
December 2013 12,968
November 2013 1,795
October 2013 438
September 2013 12,736
August 2013 37,369
July 2013 31,917
June 2013 17,973
May 2013 6,700
April 2013 2,927
March 2013 33
October 2012 278
September 2012 5,064
April 2012 198
March 2012 59
January 2012 541
December 2011 3,225
November 2011 38,884
October 2011 13,422
September 2011 22,053
August 2011 20,284
July 2011 8,285
June 2011 12,578
May 2011 8,024
April 2011 116
February 2011 21
January 2011 4,072
December 2010 870
November 2010 668
October 2010 41,858
September 2010 22,261
August 2010 23,515
July 2010 19,666
June 2010 22,536
May 2010 15,057
April 2010 10,399
February 2010 114
January 2010 346
December 2009 744
November 2009 499
October 2009 5,442
September 2009 7,907
August 2009 3,906
July 2009 5,511
June 2009 6,348
May 2009 5,506
April 2009 5,157
March 2009 5,075
February 2009 3,047
January 2009 5,962
December 2008 6,524
November 2008 3,035
October 2008 2,762
September 2008 6,281
August 2008 858

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,902,913
2 noelwoodhouse 3,960,702
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,393,777
5 Rhonda.M 3,297,144
...
69 BustersMum 621,744
70 julyn 619,634
71 IWalrus 617,062
72 Loco 617,044
73 lesley65 607,060
74 nbay 604,977

617,044 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

January 2020 9,983
December 2019 18,222
November 2019 1,009
October 2019 10
September 2019 167
August 2019 280
July 2019 50
June 2019 174
May 2019 64
April 2019 13
March 2019 53
February 2019 5
January 2019 281
October 2018 13
September 2018 37
August 2018 28
June 2018 443
May 2018 65
March 2018 33
January 2018 130
October 2017 45
September 2017 11
August 2017 64
July 2017 336
June 2017 272
May 2017 1,511
April 2017 258
March 2017 801
February 2017 1,512
January 2017 1,922
December 2016 3,741
November 2016 3,509
October 2016 2,223
September 2016 89
August 2016 520
May 2016 81
April 2016 6
March 2016 114
February 2016 97
January 2016 1,077
October 2015 281
September 2015 2,756
August 2015 2,619
July 2015 578
June 2015 601
May 2015 1,505
April 2015 879
March 2015 2,748
January 2015 35
August 2014 647
July 2014 1,224
June 2014 5,568
May 2014 10,665
April 2014 8,927
March 2014 5,554
February 2014 452
January 2014 28,942
December 2013 12,968
November 2013 1,795
October 2013 438
September 2013 12,736
August 2013 37,369
July 2013 31,917
June 2013 17,973
May 2013 6,700
April 2013 2,927
March 2013 33
October 2012 278
September 2012 5,064
April 2012 198
March 2012 59
January 2012 541
December 2011 3,225
November 2011 38,884
October 2011 13,422
September 2011 22,053
August 2011 20,284
July 2011 8,285
June 2011 12,578
May 2011 8,024
April 2011 116
February 2011 21
January 2011 4,072
December 2010 870
November 2010 668
October 2010 41,858
September 2010 22,261
August 2010 23,515
July 2010 19,666
June 2010 22,536
May 2010 15,057
April 2010 10,399
February 2010 114
January 2010 346
December 2009 744
November 2009 499
October 2009 5,442
September 2009 7,907
August 2009 3,906
July 2009 5,511
June 2009 6,348
May 2009 5,506
April 2009 5,157
March 2009 5,075
February 2009 3,047
January 2009 5,962
December 2008 6,524
November 2008 3,035
October 2008 2,762
September 2008 6,281
August 2008 858

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
RAILWAYS. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wednesday 23 May 1866 [Issue No.8737] page 9 2020-01-27 22:24 extension of the Great Southern line of radway from
Picton to Goulburn The party leftSv dney on Monday,
the 7th matant, and, on arrival at Picton, proceeded
up the line by special tram as far as the rails
with the appearance of the works The length of Une
about nme miles, and the greater portion of that
length is also t Jla^ted The party travelled up the
namely, those on contracts Is o land No 2 The
of last month, that No 4 section, the works on which
arc being carried out by the contractois who hav elvo 3
m hand, namely, Messrs Larkin and Wakeford,
vv ould be completed in a month from this time, but it
vv ill probably be late m July before it w di be finished
wdl be finished m about threo weeks
few weeks will seo them finished also
The works on No 5 contract received their finishing
touch in February last, and those on No 6 section
are now completed also A good deal of work re
mains to be done on No 7 contract, in the hands of
Mr Taviel, but thelcngth-twentv six miles twenty -
seven chains-is rather a long one, and much of the
work is of a heavy character We understand that
of the contract to the main Southern Road, nt Maru-
ready fDr the rails m June and from the Marulan
Road to the crossing of the Wollondill) River, being
all, will be ready for the rails in September next
There are not ony rails for this line in the colony at
present, but some are ordered, and the farst consign-
ment is expected to arrive in October next The
whole of the works on No 7 are being
IB little doubt but that they w ill be completed with n
the time stated in the contract The whole of the
works m progress on this section as well as tho3e on
the other sections nearer to S) dne), vv ere inspected
bv Mr Bvrnes and party, and much satisfaction was
expressed m regard to them
In the Legislativo Assemblv, on the 20th of March
asked the MiniBter for Works in his place in the
Assemblv the following questions -" 1 Is the
Government aware that grev gum timber is being cut
and taken to No 7 Railw íy Contr ict, Great Southern
line, as piles for the erection of bridges » 2 Is the
Government aware that white gum timber is bein,;
cut, prepared, and taken to the above worl s for use I
as girders and planking for bridges * á Is the Go- I
.^eminent aware that the above gum is one of the most Í
useless 1 mils of timber» 4 Do the Govenvment
intend to make a searching inquiry into this matter '
Mr Byrnes replied in the negative to the first aid
second questions, and in the affirmative to the thire.'.
In regard to the fourth he intimated that the Govern
mc nt intended to inquire into the allegations contained
in Mr Momees questiens 1 he Minister has made
unfounded We understand that Mr Morrice offeicd
to f,o over the ground und point out where the grey
and white gum weic berne, used, but this, we are in
foi meei, he has failed to do
lenders have been received for laying the perma-
nent way und ballasting a portion of the Great
Southern line, being i length of thirty one mdes ter-
minating near Marulan , but no decision will be
arrived at in reference to them u ltd the îeturn of the
Minister lor W oiks, who has gone on to Gundagai to
inspect the bridge there
progress is that of ¡No 4 contract, which IB being
carried out by Mr Watkins lhere is but little to
works are being pushed on as rapidly as they can be
The heaviest piece» of work m hand on this section is
gress has been made with the masonry lmirg
Tenders have been received for contract No 5 on
the Western line, and that of Mr P Higgins a Vic-
hns been accepted Contractors w ere inv ited to send m
offers to take poyment m cash, and in debentures also,
and tile difference in the price asked for cash pay-
seme of the tenders Several tenders were received
from contractors in % letona, in addition to several in
this eolonv The works on this contract commence
nt the termination of contract No 4, near to Mount
Clarence, and terminate at Piper s Tlats, being a
lengtn of fifteen miles eleven chains The earthworks
arc very heavy, and embrace a large number of heavy
cuttings and embankments, m addition to ayig/ag, by
means of which the line descends into I ithgow s
Valley There will be four tunnels No 1, of seventy
five yards in length , No 2, of fiftv y ards, No 3, of
204 yards, and INO 4, of forty four yards In each
widest patt There will be eight v îaducts on this con-
tract to be built in masonrv for a single line of way
at a gradient of 1 m 42 This descent includes the
zigzag, on wluch there will be several heavy cuttings,
embankments, viaducts, and tunnels lhere are also
only of eight chains radius The first heavy piece of
work wdl be a large cutting almost at the commence-
ment of the section wluch will necessitate the re
rooval of nearly 27,000 y ords of earth Beyond this
an acute angle, it descenas to the second reversing
this means a gratluul descent is made into the valley
The formation of the line dow n this /îg/ag w ill inv oh e
a large amount of libour, as every inch of the line
rock, tunnels, viaducts over gullicB, and em-
bankments Tnere will be hve viaducts in
the /lg/ag Tile first will be 178 feet long
with on average height of 25 feet Beyond this will
yards of earth We then come to the second viaduct,
23¿ feet in length, bv 48 feet in height Between this
viaduct und the lirst ícversing station the hue will
pass through cutting" irom which upw irds of 01,000
vmds of earth will be taken lhc third viaduct will
and will be 276 feet m length by (>l in height
In mediately beyond is another cutting, requiring
the excavation ol 23 000 yards of earth, and then
we come to Is o 4 viaduct 290 feet in length
bv 11 in height After passing through another cutting,
from which SJOO feet will be removed, we come to the
next viaduct, which will be 190 feet in length by71in
height After passing through some small pieces of
lent.th, and the second 49 yards long All these
cuiuiibs and tunnels w ill be through the solid rock
liiere will be a number of other cuttings in the zig-
zag and close to the second rev ersmg station there
will be a retaining wall to support an embankment
In several places it will be necessary to build retaui
iiq wall», some of which will be 30 ieet in height, by
u leet 6 inches in thickness After passing the second
rev ersmg station, the line descends by a gradient of 1
in 12 foi two mdes Just below the steepest part of
mile in length, and a bttle further on another cutting
ynids of earth and rock will have to be removed
Ihe line now descends for two mdes and nearly three
w lui four arches of ten spans, and the second w ith
thiee arches of 20 feet span and 21 feet in height
At elie termination of the decline there is. i piece of
level lint of 35 chaine, and then a fall of 1 m 150 for
30 chains 'W e then come to Türmers Creek, spanned
ccnsistmg of seven openings Trom this point the
line rises for a distance of one mde on a gradient of
1 in 40 Then there is a shoit length of level, after
vv hich the line falls again for a mde and a quarter, at
a g-adient of 1 m 100 At the foot of this descent
Middle River, over which there wdl be a viaduct or
bellin'316 feetin total length, with a height of ¡>6 feet
at a gradient of 1 m 40, which takes it to the Moran
the tunnel the line begms to fall again towards Piper s
Flats, and in this descent there will be a, very heavy
100,000 yards of earth and rock Near the
44 yards in length under the crossing.o£ the Mudgee
Road At the foot of this cut mg there wdl be an
enormous embankment of about 66 feet in height, and
its construction wül take 120,000 yards-of earth Be-
carrv the Mudgee Road This bridge wdl be com
esed of stone walls with a timber superstructure
rom the last tunnel mentioned the line falls for a
length of two miles and a quarter at a grajient of 1
m 40, and this takes it to Cox's River, over which
there will he a bridge This bridge will be 470 feet
m length, by about 30 feet in height, with six spans of
25 feet each, and a span of 60 feet m the clear in the
centre, immediately over the channel of the river
The superstructure of this span wdl be composed of
deep at the centre, and 4 feet 8^ inches at
out the whole length of the girder There wdl also
be twenty-three cross girders of various dimensions
tract The time allowed for the construction of the
vv orks is from the date of the acceptance of the con-
tract to the end of 1868 The contiact includes the
formation, ballasting, and laying the permanent way
The number of sleepers required will be 30,000, The
formation wdl be for a single line throughout
over the Nepean, just beyond Penrith, is very satis
fnctorv, andmore than half the work is now done
expeditiously than the works were foi theMenanglo

Budge
VA ith regard to the extension of the Great Northern
Blunt and Co are carrying on the works on No 3
Contract-the only one now in progress on the
completion ot their contract in the time specified
therein namely the ¿ 1st of next July 1 his section
ol the line lies between Liddell and Muäclebrook, and
ballasting and permanent way, the Ima will be ready
for opening between Singleton and Muscltbrook
under the contract and superintendsnce of Mr God
dnrd Wo understand that this gentleman confi-
dently anticipates bemg in a position to hand over the
Inn The approaches to the bri Ige cannot be let on
account of the dithculty in Tcgard to the land required
-the Government and the owr>er of the 1 md being at
i«sue as to the value of thiB load Instead of taking
possession of the land, after pioclamation, as the
Government are empowered to do bv the Act, the
parties referred the matter to a friendly urbitrction,
und the result is that the Government are not satisfied
w ith the aw ard of the aroitrators, accompanied as it
is bv costs The matter it present romains m statu
olio, but it is not unhkelv tint the usud course
of taking possession of the land, "fter tine notice, v ill
bo followed, and tho value ol tht land be determined,
aitcrw ardB by arbitrators^ «Iso in tho usual way
f
extension of the Great Southern line of railway from
Picton to Goulburn The party left Sydney on Monday,
the 7th instant, and, on arrival at Picton, proceeded
up the line by special train as far as the rails
with the appearance of the works The length of line
about nine miles, and the greater portion of that
length is also ballasted The party travelled up the
namely, those on contracts No. 1 and No. 2. The
works on contract No. 3 ought to have been finished
July. It was anticipated, as stated in our summary
of last month, that No. 4 section, the works on which
are being carried out by the contractors who have No. 3
in hand, namely, Messrs Larkin and Wakeford,
would be completed in a month from this time, but it
will probably be late in July before it will be finished.
will be finished in about three weeks.
few weeks will see them finished also.
The works on No. 5 contract received their finishing
touch in February last, and those on No. 6 section
are now completed also. A good deal of work re-
mains to be done on No. 7 contract, in the hands of
Mr Faviel ; but the length—twenty six miles twenty-
seven chains—is rather a long one, and much of the
work is of a heavy character. We understand that
of the contract to the main Southern Road, at Maru-
ready for the rails in June and from the Marulan
Road to the crossing of the Wollondilly River, being
a further distance of seven miles making thirteen in
all, will be ready for the rails in September next.
There are not any rails for this line in the colony at
present, but some are ordered, and the first consign-
ment is expected to arrive in October next. The
whole of the works on No. 7 are being
is little doubt but that they will be completed within
the time stated in the contract. The whole of the
works in progress on this section as well as those on
the other sections nearer to Sydney, were inspected
by Mr. Byrnes and party, and much satisfaction was
expressed in regard to them.
In the Legislative Assembly, on the 29th of March
asked the Minister for Works in his place in the
Assembly, the following questions :—" 1. Is the
Government aware that grey gum timber is being cut
and taken to No. 7 Railway Contract, Great Southern
line, as piles for the erection of bridges ? 2. Is the
Government aware that white gum timber is being
cut, prepared, and taken to the above works for use
as girders and planking for bridges ?*3. Is the Go-
vernment aware that the above gum is one of the most
useless kinds of timber ? 4. Do the Government
intend to make a searching inquiry into this matter ?"
Mr. Byrnes replied in the negative to the first and
second questions, and in the affirmative to the third.
In regard to the fourth he intimated that the Govern-
ment intended to inquire into the allegations contained
in Mr. Morrice's questions. The Minister has made
inquiry, and satisfied himself that the allegations were
unfounded. We understand that Mr. Morrice offered
to go over the ground and point out where the grey
and white gum were being used, but this, we are in-
formed, he has failed to do.
Tenders have been received for laying the perma-
nent way and ballasting a portion of the Great
Southern line, being a length of thirty one miles ter-
minating near Marulan ; but no decision will be
arrived at in reference to them until the return of the
Minister for Works, who has gone on to Gundagai to
inspect the bridge there.
progress is that of No. 4 contract, which is being
carried out by Mr. Watkins. There is but little to
works are being pushed on as rapidly as they can be.
The heaviest piece of work m hand on this section is
gress has been made with the masonry lining.
Tenders have been received for contract No. 5 on
the Western line, and that of Mr. P. Higgins a Vic-
torian contractor, whose tender was the lowest for cash,
has been accepted. Contractors were invited to send m
offers to take payment in cash, and in debentures also ;
and the difference in the price asked for cash pay-
some of the tenders. Several tenders were received
from contractors in Victoria, in addition to several in
this colony. The works on this contract commence
at the termination of contract No 4, near to Mount
Clarence, and terminate at Piper s Flats, being a
length of fifteen miles eleven chains. The earthworks
are very heavy, and embrace a large number of heavy
cuttings and embankments, in addition to zigzag, by
means of which the line descends into Lithgow's
Valley. There will be four tunnels : No. 1, of seventy-
five yards in length , No. 2, of fifty yards, No. 3, of
204 yards, and No. 4, of forty four yards. In each
widest part. There will be eight viaducts on this con-
tract to be built in masonry for a single line of way.
for upwards of two miles towards Lithgow's Valley,
at a gradient of 1 in 42. This descent includes the
zigzag, on which there will be several heavy cuttings,
embankments, viaducts, and tunnels. There are also
only of eight chains radius. The first heavy piece of
work will be a large cutting almost at the commence-
ment of the section which will necessitate the re-
moval of nearly 27,000 yards of earth. Beyond this
an acute angle, it descends to the second reversing
this means a gradual descent is made into the valley.
The formation of the line down this zigzag will involve
a large amount of labour, as every inch of the line
rock, tunnels, viaducts over gullies, and em-
bankments. There will be five viaducts in
the zigzag. The first will be 178 feet long
with on average height of 25 feet. Beyond this will
yards of earth. We then come to the second viaduct,
233 feet in length, by 48 feet in height. Between this
viaduct and the first reversing station the line will
pass through cutting from which upwards of 61,000
yards of earth will be taken. The third viaduct will
and will be 276 feet in length by 63 in height.
Immediately beyond is another cutting, requiring
the excavation of 23 000 yards of earth, and then
we come to No. 4 viaduct, 290 feet in length
by 11 in height. After passing through another cutting,
from which 8500 feet will be removed, we come to the
next viaduct, which will be 196 feet in length by 71 in
height. After passing through some small pieces of
length, and the second 49½ yards long. All these
cuttings and tunnels will be through the solid rock.
There will be a number of other cuttings in the zig-
zag and close to the second reversing station there
will be a retaining wall to support an embankment.
In several places it will be necessary to build retain-
inq walls, some of which will be 30 feet in height, by
5 feet 6 inches in thickness. After passing the second
reversing station, the line descends by a gradient of 1
in 42 for two miles. Just below the steepest part of
the descent there will be an embankment of half a
mile in length, and a little further on another cutting
yards of earth and rock will have to be removed.
The line now descends for two miles and nearly three
with four arches of ten spans, and the second with
three arches of 20 feet span and 21 feet in height.
At the termination of the decline there is a piece of
level line of 35 chains, and then a fall of 1 in 150 for
30 chains. We then come to Farmers Creek, spanned
consisting of seven openings. From this point the
line rises for a distance of one mile on a gradient of
1 in 40. Then there is a short length of level, after
which the line falls again for a mile and a quarter, at
a gradient of 1 in 100. At the foot of this descent
Middle River, over which there will be a viaduct or
being 316 feet in total length, with a height of 56 feet.
at a gradient of 1 in 40, which takes it to the Moran-
garoo tunnel, through the Middle River Range. This
the tunnel the line begins to fall again towards Piper's
Flats, and in this descent there will be a very heavy
100,000 yards of earth and rock. Near the
44 yards in length under the crossing of the Mudgee
Road. At the foot of this cutting there will be an
enormous embankment of about 56 feet in height, and
its construction will take 120,000 yards of earth. Be-
carry the Mudgee Road. This bridge will be com-
posed of stone walls with a timber superstructure.
From the last tunnel mentioned the line falls for a
length of two miles and a quarter at a gradient of 1
in 40, and this takes it to Cox's River, over which
there will be a bridge. This bridge will be 470 feet
in length, by about 30 feet in height, with six spans of
25 feet each, and a span of 60 feet in the clear in the
centre, immediately over the channel of the river.
The superstructure of this span will be composed of
65 feet 8 inches long, 4 feet 9 3.16 inches
deep at the centre, and 4 feet 8¾ inches at
out the whole length of the girder There will also
be twenty-three cross girders of various dimensions.
tract. The time allowed for the construction of the
works is from the date of the acceptance of the con-
tract to the end of 1868. The contract includes the
formation, ballasting, and laying the permanent way.
The number of sleepers required will be 30,000. The
formation will be for a single line throughout.
over the Nepean, just beyond Penrith, is very satis-
factory, and more than half the work is now done.
expeditiously than the works were for the Menangle

Bridge.
With regard to the extension of the Great Northern
line, there is very little indeed to report Messrs.
Blunt and Co are carrying on the works on No. 3
Contract—the only one now in progress on the
completion of their contract in the time specified
therein namely the 31st of next July. This section
of the line lies between Liddell and Musclebrook, and
on the completion of the works, including of course,
ballasting and permanent way, the Iine will be ready
for opening between Singleton and Musclebrook.
under the contract and superintendance of Mr God-
dard. We understand that this gentleman confi-
dently anticipates being in a position to hand over the
him. The approaches to the bridge cannot be let on
account of the difficulty in regard to the land required
—the Government and the owner of the land being at
issue as to the value of this land. Instead of taking
possession of the land, after proclamation, as the
Government are empowered to do by the Act, the
parties referred the matter to a friendly arbitration,
and the result is that the Government are not satisfied
with the award of the arbitrators, accompanied as it
is by costs. The matter it present remains in statu
quo, but it is not unlikely that the usual course
of taking possession of the land, after due notice, will
be followed, and the value of the land be determined
afterwards by arbitrators, also in the usual way.
NEW SOUTH WALES GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS. (Article), The Gundagai Times and Tumut, Adelong and Murrumbidgee District Advertiser (NSW : 1868 - 1931), Friday 22 March 1889 [Issue No.2458] page 2 2020-01-26 22:01 A resident of Begu- has. handed ns (Begtt
and. we reprint part of it to show what a working'
man' thinks of tho capital of the protected little*
town down south :-' When I arrived here, after
a pleasant overland trip, I was very ' much
city; beautiful wide streets and handsome build
twelve storieH high, of very neat design, and chiefly
very brisk, us buildings are going up everywhere
you look. But I am told by thoso who know that
li.nl not the least trouble in getting work. I '
applied to Mr. Parry, the biggest boss in the city, .
mid tio put niB on at once, and nskcu mo if I knew'
anyone also who wuntcil worlc, na ho wanted men.
latarteil otitsitto on tlio front of a large building
ten . BLorics high, at t'ho corner of Flinders and
Elizabeth -streets, und have boon working for him
since. I believe thero is good demand for every
class of tradesmen except carpenters, and the-'
market is overstocked with thorn. I think the
exhibition immt have brought a goad many Here.
It in u&tbniahhig to note that lieiirly every maa
you apeak to has coino from some other
colony, principally New Zealand and South, Aua'|.
when they can find work at fuir wages for: them,
all.' It does not seem as if Protection has a topped;
the progress o£ Victoria, as the Free Tcadexs. wouli -
like us to Deliver . . , ' -
Valuable Discovery for tho: Hjiiri-j-JLE your' hair
in, turning gfty- otv_wh'ito'ror foUj£g;'ofl£ uaeT'ihei''
Mexican Hair Rouower, for it witt. positively re
store iii every case grey or white imirtoUaacigipat
colour, without leaving the disagragjl&lf mti£lPj3f
most. 'ires toners.' It makes, the. hair^iharnufl^^r
beautifihi^a8well as promoting: tho^wfth of*^hW
hair on bad spots, whore tlie glands- nvta not de
cayed. Aak your chemist for ' The Mexican Hair
Itenewer,' sold by chemists and perfumers* every
where at 3/6 per bottle. Wholesale- depot33lFar
rlngdon road, England, London; — Adv.
A RESIDENT of Bega has handed us (Bega
and we reprint part of it to show what a working
man thinks of the capital of the protected little
town down south :—" When I arrived here, after
a pleasant overland trip, I was very much
city ; beautiful wide streets and handsome build-
twelve stories high, of very neat design, and chiefly
very brisk, as buildings are going up everywhere
you look. But I am told by those who know that
had not the least trouble in getting work. I
applied to Mr. Parry, the biggest boss in the city,
and he put me on at once, and asked me if I knew
anyone also who wanted work, as he wanted men.
l started outside on the front of a large building
ten stories high, at the corner of Flinders and
Elizabeth-streets, and have been working for him
since. I believe there is good demand for every
class of tradesmen except carpenters, and the
market is overstocked with them. I think the
exhibition must have brought a good many here.
It is astonishing to note that nearly every man
you speak to has come from some other
colony, principally New Zealand and South, Aus.
when they can find work at fair wages for them
all. It does not seem as if Protection has a topped
the progress of Victoria, as the Free Traders would
like us to believe.
Valuable Discovery for the Hair.—If your hair
in turning grey or white, or falling off, use the
Mexican Hair Renewer, for it will positively re-
store in every case grey or white to its original
colour, without leaving the disagreeable smell of
most "restorers." It makes the hair charmingly
beautiful, as well as promoting the growth of the
hair on bad spots, whore the glands are not de-
cayed. Ask your chemist for " The Mexican Hair
Renewer," sold by chemists and perfumers every-
where at 3/6 per bottle. Wholesale depot 33 Far-
rlngdon road, England, London. — Adv.
NEW SOUTH WALES GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS. (Article), The Gundagai Times and Tumut, Adelong and Murrumbidgee District Advertiser (NSW : 1868 - 1931), Friday 22 March 1889 [Issue No.2458] page 2 2020-01-26 21:52 No little excitement has been caused: in Sydney
through the spread of a report that ' Jack !
the Ripper,' who was supposed to. bo the perpo- !
trator of tbo Whitcchapol murders, is in the city.
A man, who was at ono time a momber of the
detective force, has in his possession u photograph
of a man who tallies very closely with the descrip
loathsome disease. He afterwards took to drink; '
and generally went to the bad and became insane I
had been heard to say that if ever he loft the '
country, he would hare tlio lives of a hundred. I
He was known to carry a surgeon's knife, with -
which, on one occasion, when asked to refund '
certain money which was lent him he attempted to !
stab the ex .detective above referred to. The man '
loft for either London or Plymouth in a sailing
vessol, and in nou- thought to lmrc I'cttirucd.
' Sub-inspector Cornett,' Gundagai, and Ser
geant Covcney, Tumut, have been . appointed
If you want a porfoct fitting suit made to older
by ono of the leading tailoring cstablishjaults of
tho crj^nN go to .1. M, Dndd's, wuo/e yrnufljiyo a
In returning thanks for his return to tho House
Mr. Brunkor, Minister for Lcrads, said:— 'The
bo immediately dealt with, and in anticipation of
legislation water frontage-* might trrho reserved.
.The proposed amending Land Hill has for its object
tbo removal of the complications, anomalies and
Now South Wales 22,372,075 acres of public
173,51O,O7S acres available. The agricultural und
93,320 men in 1888, or 103 more than wore similarly
engaged in Victorin. ' '
At East Sydnoy- tho Treasurer vigourously.
defended tho position of the present Government.
Ho hopes that a bill will speedily be introduced
into Parliament to do awny with the ancient
custom of compelling the members of a new Go
make any statement disparaging to' any previous.
Treasurer unless he could say it on tho floor of the
Houso, face to face with his opponent; but thW,
sb far as he' coulh ' find, during tho 'year 1888 . Bio
colony lived wi^iin its income. '
TnE Postmaster-General stated that in his
Department thero are 1203 offices open, 28,150
31 millions of uowspapors wcro conveyed and the
rovenno was £307,905.
All the Ministers wero returned unopposed on
Monday last. At St. Leonards tho Premier stated
that a large proportion of thoso rallying round the
interest to serve.aud who were no more Protection
ists than ho was. He says that he has given in
structions to bring to justice, if possible, thoso
who had connived at personation lit the recent
Hollowny's Pills.— The Greatest Boon of Modern
liver, correct the bile, pnrify the system, renovate
tho debilitated, strengthen the stomach, increase
tbo appetfte. invigorate tho ncrvcs^»«d rogsftlte
the weq-Kto\n ardour of feeling noverf beforo/jcj
pcrienpd\^-Tlic sale of these Pills rtfcjuBhouP^be
globe Bstrmishcs everybody, convincing the^welt
sceptical that there is no Medicine equal to Hollo
way's Pills for removing the complaints which arc
incidental to the human race. They arc indeed n
suffer from any disorder; internal or external.
Thousands of persons have testified that' by their
Accokdikg to a return published by the Agri
cultural Department nt Washington entitled
' Wool Statistics in a Nutshell,' tho number of
and 18S7 from 31 J to 43.5 millions, the number in
1888 being 53.0, mi increase of about GO per cent.,
period by 88 per' cent. Tho increase is attributed
doubled the quantity of wool per fleece. The im
port.of wool, which is very small, is UBed in carpet
Z8-10 shows that woollen manufacture in the United
States lias not only increased with the population,
but thut tm average of twice as- much per head of
'the population' was manufactured in the decade
ending 1887 than in tint ending 1850. Tho con
sumption of manufactured wool, including. domestic
manufacture , and goods imported, had nearly
given to tiio use of woollens for the soldiers in the
civil war. Including imported goods, tbo con
sumption then was not more than 4Jlli per head of
tho population.; it is uow nearly 811). Then about
at homo, tho proportion now is four-fifths ; then
iialf tile quantity of wool consumed was of domestic
production, at prcseuttlic proportion is two-tbirds,
used, three-fourths. Tile import of woollens per
head of the population has been constantly do.
dining since 1800, and' the present imports 'arc
mainly fino cIoiub and dress goods, which people
of fashion will ? buy nt any prico simply because
they are foreign. Fino broad cloths are- as yet not
cloth goods.'
Smith denied thut he had been- offered the
Atturncy-Gcncialskip and had refused it He
stated that ho is u Liberal of the most pronounced
type, and no matter how much ho would have to
sink his psmuiial opinions ill lesser questions, ho
Is support of (no assertion that tbo present
drought is the severest which has been- felt since
New South Wales was known much of by Euro
peans, wo (Echo) are supplied with the following
information from Richmond, from ono of the oldest
the Hobartville estuto, or adjacent thereto, is now
totally dry, though in ordinary seasons the wator
is from 20ft; to 30ft. deep in tho middle Quanti
ties of fish ari) lying dead in tho mud, and tho
'smell is sickening^ This lagoon was known to be
dry in tho' great drought of 1887, which is on re
cord as the soverest ever experienced. Flour was
£100 per ton at Goullrarn, and buy £80 per ton in
of tho latter when the lagoon is now perfectly dry.
styes are now visiblo in the mud, which no ono has
booh for 50 y6ars, and if bo, it would lead to the
inference that there must liavo beon some dopres
sion in the lagoon sinco that timo, as it is unlikely
to- being under wator in ordinary seasons.
Certainly the best medicine known is Sander
ami Soxs' Eucalypti Extract: Test its ominontly
powerful effects in coughs, colds, influenza; the
relief i^tgjfltaeous. In serious camsT-nd
accidc/fts of oil *nds, bo they foiuJdaT Iftrns,
scaldinesl bruise/ snrains. it is Iliimlfiiiii r^mil,,
—no «iiielliiig-no iimummation. Lilfo surprising
inflammation of the lungs, swellings, ic. ; diarrhoea,
dysoutry, diseases of the kidneys, and urinary
oigans. In use at hospitals and medical clinics all
over tho globe; patronised by His Majesty tho
in this approved article, and rojoclall others.—
Adv. - ';
No little excitement has been caused in Sydney
through the spread of a report that Jack"
the Ripper," who was supposed to be the perpe-
trator of the Whitechapel murders, is in the city.
A man, who was at one time a member of the
detective force, has in his possession a photograph
of a man who tallies very closely with the descrip-
loathsome disease. He afterwards took to drink,
and generally went to the bad and became insane
had been heard to say that if ever he left the
country, he would have the lives of a hundred.
He was known to carry a surgeon's knife, with
which, on one occasion, when asked to refund
certain money which was lent him he attempted to
stab the ex-detective above referred to. The man
left for either London or Plymouth in a sailing
vessel, and in now thought to have returned.
SUB-INSPECTOR CORNETT, Gundagai, and Ser-
geant Coveney, Tumut, have been appointed
If you want a perfect fitting suit made to order
by one of the leading tailoring establishments of
the colony go to J. M. Dodd's, where you have a
splendid range of patterns, comprsing all new and
In returning thanks for his return to the House
Mr. Brunker, Minister for Lands, said :— "The
be immediately dealt with, and in anticipation of
legislation water frontages might to be reserved.
he proposed amending Land Hill has for its object
the removal of the complications, anomalies and
New South Wales 22,372,075 acres of public
173,510,078 acres available. The agricultural and
93,329 men in 1888, or 103 more than were similarly
engaged in Victoria.
At East Sydney the Treasurer vigourously.
defended the position of the present Government.
He hopes that a bill will speedily be introduced
into Parliament to do away with the ancient
custom of compelling the members of a new Go-
vernment to return to their constituencies for re-
make any statement disparaging to any previous
Treasurer unless he could say it on the floor of the
House, face to face with his opponent ; but that,
so far as he could find, during the year 1888 the
colony lived within its income.
THE Postmaster-General stated that in his
Department there are 1203 offices open, 28,150
31 millions of newspapers were conveyed and the
revenue was £367,965.
All the Ministers were returned unopposed on
Monday last. At St. Leonards the Premier stated
that a large proportion of those rallying round the
interest to serve and who were no more Protection-
ists than he was. He says that he has given in-
structions to bring to justice, if possible, those
who had connived at personation at the recent
Holloway's Pills.— The Greatest Boon of Modern
liver, correct the bile, purify the system, renovate
the debilitated, strengthen the stomach, increase
the appetite, invigorate the nerves and reinstate
the week to an ardour of feeling never before es-
perienced. The sale of these Pills throughout the
globe astonishes everybody, convincing the most
sceptical that there is no Medicine equal to Hollo-
way's Pills for removing the complaints which are
incidental to the human race. They are indeed n
suffer from any disorder, internal or external.
Thousands of persons have testified that by their
ACCORDING to a return published by the Agri-
cultural Department at Washington entitled
" Wool Statistics in a Nutshell," the number of
and 1887 from 31.8 to 43.5 millions, the number in
1888 being 53.6, an increase of about 60 per cent.,
period by 88 per cent. The increase is attributed
doubled the quantity of wool per fleece. The im-
port of wool, which is very small, is used in carpet
manafacture. An examination of the figures since
1840 shows that woollen manufacture in the United
States has not only increased with the population,
but that an average of twice as much per head of
the population was manufactured in the decade
ending 1887 than in that ending 1850. The con-
sumption of manufactured wool, including domestic
manufacture and goods imported, had nearly
given to the use of woollens for the soldiers in the
civil war. Including imported goods, the con-
sumption then was not more than 4½lb per head of
the population ; it is now nearly 8lb. Then about
at home, the proportion now is four-fifths ; then
half the quantity of wool consumed was of domestic
production, at present the proportion is two-thirds,
used, three-fourths. The import of woollens per
head of the population has been constantly doe-
clining since 1860, and the present imports "are
mainly fine cloths and dress goods, which people
of fashion will buy at any price simply because
they are foreign. Fine broad cloths are as yet not
cloth goods."
Smith denied that he had been offered the
Attorney-Generalship and had refused it. He
stated that he is a Liberal of the most pronounced
type, and no matter how much he would have to
sink his personal opinions in lesser questions, he
IN support of the assertion that the present
drought is the severest which has been felt since
New South Wales was known much of by Euro-
peans, we (Echo) are supplied with the following
information from Richmond, from one of the oldest
the Hobartville estate, or adjacent thereto, is now
totally dry, though in ordinary seasons the water
is from 20ft. to 30ft. deep in the middle Quanti-
ties of fish are lying dead in the mud, and the
smell is sickening. This lagoon was known to be
dry in the great drought of 1887, which is on re-
cord as the severest ever experienced. Flour was
£100 per ton at Goulburn, and hay £80 per ton in
of the latter when the lagoon is now perfectly dry.
styes are now visible in the mud, which no one has
seen for 50 years, and if so, it would lead to the
inference that there must have been some depres-
sion in the lagoon since that time, as it is unlikely
to being under water in ordinary seasons.
Certainly the best medicine known is SANDER
and SON'S EUCALYPTI EXTRACT. Test its eminently
powerful effects in coughs, colds, influenza ; the
relief is instantaneous. In serious cases, and
accidents of all kinds, be they wound, burns,
scaldings, bruise, sprains. it is the safest remedy
—no swelling-no inflammation. Like surprising
inflammation of the lungs, swellings, &c. ; diarrhœa,
dysentry, diseases of the kidneys, and urinary
organs. In use at hospitals and medical clinics all
over the globe ; patronised by His Majesty the
in this approved article, and reject all others.—
Adv.
NEW SOUTH WALES GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS. (Article), The Gundagai Times and Tumut, Adelong and Murrumbidgee District Advertiser (NSW : 1868 - 1931), Friday 22 March 1889 [Issue No.2458] page 2 2020-01-26 21:30 The Secretary of the New South Wales Opora
tivo Bakers Association writes as follows :— ' I
'write'tb lot you know what bread should be full
weight. Since Mr. Evans got the office of Inspec
tor, he has allowed tho old arrangement. Tho
is looked upon 03' a fancy so long as the loaves are
twists,' French, French rolls, or half round tins.
Tliesdcan be made at any weight.'
shall lead to tho apprehension and conviction of
the person or person* guilty of the murder of Kate I
Riley, whose body wus found in the unoccupied j
premises, No. 8, Macquaric-street South, on the j
28th nit., and in regard to- whose death u. coroner's !
jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against \
-Owing to. tho continue:! drought tire farmers are
in great straits, am! Jfr. John Hnynes, M.P.,'wllo
At a meeting in his electorate on Saturday he raid
a. telegram from the Under-Secretory, saying that
the Governinent had decided to supply seed wheat
to farmers in cases of distress, under-proper regula
deputation will wait on the ? Ministry to learn
them. :
A desperate burglary was perpetrated on the
entered tlie bedroom nnd stupified Mr. and Mrs.
during the operation, and mane a noise. Tlio men
at once jumped through a window, and lnudo off in
a spring.cart which was waning;. Tho premises of
Mr. Hell were also entered, and £100 in goods and
money tokens
Tub solicitors acting for Mr. Parnell and his
hy tho Time* are actively preparing, tho defecce.
Among tlio witnesses they have- subpeened arc tlio
Ireland in Lord Salisbury's Administration of 1878,
and Sir W. Vornon Harcourt who was a member
of Mr. Gladstone's last Ministry, and is still ono of'
his principal supporters^
The fire' nt Gibbs, Shallard ami Co.'s large
morning, started in the top story of the very tull
very rapidly in- consequence of the inflammable
soon got to work, a very largo quantity of water
hod to- be poured on- the building, before tlio flames
were subdued. Tho fire was kept confined to the
top of the next story, but a vory large and
valuable- stock of printing material was greatly
will cover tho damage, the extcut of which has
not yet been ascertained'. |
iN.nuswerto a deputation- tho Attorney-General '
of South Australia said that duriug tho coming :
session the Government would introduco a bill to '
provide for the periodical inspection of land I
boilers, und that only competent persons should be
allowed to. take charge of them.
rom irritation oi the throat and hoarseness will be-
agreeablrsurprisod at the almost immediiiKfrejief
afforded/ b» tho use of ' Brown's J BroqotUai
Troch ft. ^hose famous ' lozenges j-wgnow'soWl
by mosTfespoctable chemists irv this country iSrI^I|
.par- box. . . People troubled with a ' hocking cough,'
a ^slight cold,' or bronchial affections, .cannot try
them too soon as. similar troubles, if allowed to
progress, result in serious pulmoilary and asthma
tie affections. See that the words ' Brown's Bron
chial Troches' .ore on tho Government Stamp
Sons, Boston, U.S. European depot, 33 Farringdan,
road, London-, England. — Adv.*- -
The Secretary of the New South Wales Opora-
tive Bakers Association writes as follows :— " I
write to let you know what bread should be full
weight. Since Mr. Evans got the office of Inspec-
tor, he has allowed the old arrangement. The
is looked upon as a fancy so long as the loaves are
twists, French, French rolls, or half round tins.
These can be made at any weight."
shall lead to the apprehension and conviction of
the person or persons guilty of the murder of Kate
Riley, whose body was found in the unoccupied
premises, No. 8, Macquarie-street South, on the
28th ult., and in regard to whose death a coroner's
jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against
some person or persons unknown.
OWING to the continued drought the farmers are
in great straits, and Mr. John Haynes, M.P., who
At a meeting in his electorate on Saturday he read
a telegram from the Under-Secretory, saying that
the Government had decided to supply seed wheat
to farmers in cases of distress, under-proper regula-
deputation will wait on the Ministry to learn
them.
A DESPERATE burglary was perpetrated on the
entered the bedroom and stupified Mr. and Mrs.
the ???? Gardner awoke in a dazed condition
during the operation, and made a noise. The men
at once jumped through a window, and made off in
a spring cart which was waiting. The premises of
Mr. Bell were also entered, and £100 in goods and
money taken.
THE solicitors acting for Mr. Parnell and his
by the Times are actively preparing, the defence.
Among the witnesses they have subpœned are the
Ireland in Lord Salisbury's Administration of 1876,
and Sir W. Vernon Harcourt who was a member
of Mr. Gladstone's last Ministry, and is still one of
his principal supporters.
The fire at Gibbs, Shallard and Co.'s large-
morning, started in the top story of the very tall
very rapidly in consequence of the inflammable
soon got to work, a very large quantity of water
had to be poured on the building, before the flames
were subdued. The fire was kept confined to the
top of the next story, but a very large and
valuable stock of printing material was greatly
will cover the damage, the extecnt of which has
not yet been ascertained.
IN answer to a deputation the Attorney-General
of South Australia said that during the coming
session the Government would introduce a bill to
provide for the periodical inspection of land
boilers, and that only competent persons should be
allowed to take charge of them.
from irritation of the throat and hoarseness will be
agreeably surprised at the almost immediate relief
afforded buy the use of "Brown's" Bronchial
Troches. These famous " lozenges " are now sold
by most respectable chemists in this country at ?½
per box. People troubled with a "hacking cough,"
a " slight cold," or bronchial affections, cannot try
them too soon as similar troubles, if allowed to
progress, result in serious pulmonary and asthma-
tic affections. See that the words " Brown's Bron-
chial Troches" are on the Government Stamp
Sons, Boston, U.S. European depot, 33 Farringden,
road, London, England. — Adv.
NEW SOUTH WALES GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS. (Article), The Gundagai Times and Tumut, Adelong and Murrumbidgee District Advertiser (NSW : 1868 - 1931), Friday 22 March 1889 [Issue No.2458] page 2 2020-01-26 21:08 thut his removal to Moss Vale as station-master
service. There is little doubt the new Commis
sioners wcro prompt to- sco an efficient officer in
courtesy to ull with whom he came in contact, and
Mr. Kerry (of Kerry and Jones, the well-
040 acres,' 'ai Torrobandra, and George '-Robert
Woodbridge proved to bo the vinncW' 'Esther
Whhtakor Belected as an additional C.P. 207 acres, I
at Mundarlo, ami John Glasseock applied for |
250 acres in the parishes of Coolac, Bongongolong |
and North Gundagai, under tho 42nd section of
?We would again remtnil seTecibrs that ojfing to
the holidays next week there are but feiyjUys left
on which to tender interest payments on 'their I
Messrs. Harrison, Jones and Devlin (limited) 1
report ol local tat stock sales, at Homebuah, on
March 18, at the following averages ii-J. J.
Tracey, Gundagai, 14 mixed cattle, £5/7/. t J.
aivney, Gundagai, 9 bullockB, £4/11/4, and 24
cows, £4/9/0 j S. McMinn, Gundagai, 70 bullocks,
to 8/8 ; A. Wilson, Coolac, 803 wethers, 9/. to 11/2.
Messrs. Robert Dear, John Wecden and A. J.
Robertson, imvo been appointed trustees of the
gcnoral burial ground at Tumut.
Sydney. The following local cuse wilt be heard :?
William Franks, apiinst tho proposed forfeiture of
his conditional purchase, 83-00, Gundagai (2 ap
peals). .
Monday next, 2oth instant, is proclaimed a
public holiday at 'Adolong, the occasion Hing the
races of the Adolong Jockey Club. |
The weights for the principal handicajh at tho
races next week will be found hi our advertising
columns. The accepteuces arc due on tits 27th,
tho night of general entry. *-j ,
Mr, Percy B. St. John, the well-known nalolist,
is dead. V
M. Simonetti has been uppointcd to design a
statue of tho Utc Mr. Challis, to be erected in the
the new convont have been served with ngarnishee
the matter will be argued in Cliamliers'on. tlio 20th
tnsUnt . ?' ' ?*.???.?
We notice tho firm of Pinkstono and' Smith, -f
tho Cootamundra Herald, has been dissolved, Mr.
Pinkstono now being sole proprietor of that journal.
We wish him all the success tbat merit and onorgy
deserve . .
Mr. A. H. McCulmoh, jun., solicitor, mid
formerly M.P. for Central Cumberland, has dis
appeared very mysteriously. , ' '
If yoa^mt Boots and Shoes in e/ery po^ible
makc4w!° and price, go to J. M. BW*i.-^lv.
The Hon. Jos. Wliito's two beautiful thorough
compoto for Australian honours in next year's
English Derby, miiy bo seen daily exercising along
frequently riddeii through the town, where they
excite no end of admiration. The youngsters aro
slight blaze down the forehead and whito hind
feet. Kirkham is so called after the famous brccd
inir establishment where- tbev have been retired.
Should all go well with ;theso ,two magnificent
animals, we fully expect; to Tiear'of their 'sustaining
their stable's prestige nnd adding fresh laurels to
Volley, Cranbrook, Carlyon, Acme, Toinpe, Urulla,
Rudolph and many others. . '
that his removal to Moss Vale as station-master
service. There is little doubt the new Commis-
sioners were prompt to see an efficient officer in
courtesy to all with whom he came in contact, and
MR. KERRY (of Kerry and Jones, the well-
640 acres, at Tarrabandra, and George Robert
Woodbridge proved to be the winner. Esther
Whittaker selected as an additional C.P. 207 acres,
at Mundarlo, and John Glasscock applied for
250 acres in the parishes of Coolac, Bongongolong
and North Gundagai, under the 42nd section of
We would again remind selectors that owing to
the holidays next week there are but few days left
on which to tender interest payments on their
Messrs. Harrison, Jones and Devlin (limited)
report of local fat stock sales, at Homebush, on
March 18, at the following averages :—J. J.
Tracey, Gundagai, 14 mixed cattle, £5/7/- ; J.
Givney, Gundagai, 9 bullocks, £4/11/4, and 24
cows, £4/9/6 ; S. McMinn, Gundagai, 70 bullocks,
to 8/8 ; A. Wilson, Coolac, 803 wethers, 9/- to 11/2.
MESSRS. Robert Dear, John Weeden and A. J.
Robertson, have been appointed trustees of the
general burial ground at Tumut.
Sydney. The following local case wilt be heard :
William Franks, against the proposed forfeiture of
his conditional purchase, 83-66, Gundagai (2 ap-
peals).
Monday next, 25th instant, is proclaimed a
public holiday at Adolong, the occasion Hing the
races of the Adelong Jockey Club.
The weights for the principal handicap at the
races next week will be found in our advertising
columns. The acceptences are due on tits 27th,
the night of general entry.
MR. PERCY B. ST. JOHN, the well-known novelist,
is dead.
M. SIMONETTI has been appointed to design a
statue of the late Mr. Challis, to be erected in the
the new convent have been served with garnishee
the matter will be argued in Chambers on the 26th
instant.
We notice the firm of Pinkstone and Smith, of
the Cootamundra Herald, has been dissolved, Mr.
Pinkstone now being sole proprietor of that journal.
We wish him all the success that merit and energy
deserve.
MR. A. H. McCULLOCK, jun., solicitor, and
formerly M.P. for Central Cumberland, has dis-
appeared very mysteriously.
If you want Boots and Shoes in every possible
make, style and price, go to J. M. Bedd's.—Adv.
The Hon. Jas. White's two beautiful thorough-
compete for Australian honours in next year's
English Derby, may be seen daily exercising along
frequently ridden through the town, where they
excite no end of admiration. The youngsters are
slight blaze down the forehead and white hind
feet. Kirkham is so called after the famous breed-
ing establishment where they have been reared,
Should all go well with these two magnificent
animals, we fully expect to hear of their sustaining
their stable's prestige and adding fresh laurels to
Volley, Cranbrook, Carlyon, Acme, Tempe, Urulla,
Rudolph and many others.
NEW SOUTH WALES GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS. (Article), The Gundagai Times and Tumut, Adelong and Murrumbidgee District Advertiser (NSW : 1868 - 1931), Friday 22 March 1889 [Issue No.2458] page 2 2020-01-26 20:56 following By-laws, and all previous rates conflict
ing therewith are hereby repealed : — BiBmuth.— -To
be charged 3rd class rate. Poultry and BUckiug
cubic feet to the ton, 1st class rates for one ton and '
upwardB ; 2nd class for less than one ton. Per
manent way material.—' B ' rate, pluB loading and
'unloading charges, if dono by Department. Glass. ,
—To ho charged 4th class rate. Bricks.— 10 miles
ton; 13 and 14 miles, 1/5 per ton; 15 miles, 1/0
and coses, empty returns. —Free. . Starving Block.
—25% reduction on. ordinary ratcsi Wooden
wrongfully described on 'Consigning Notes,' caus
ing them to be booked at wrong rates and consa'
queut application for refund. Penalty of 10% A\
corroct rate is now abolished. Livo stock earned
for various nwnors in the aamo waggon. ' The/25%
Small baskets, one in tho other, to be trotted as
single packages. Grain and flour carried an dowu
journey from shipping pints. Tho charge! of 20%
added to 'A' rate is now repealed. f
Traders' Tickets. \
Ttadcrs' Tickets up to three in numbcrjmay lie
granted at a per contage reduction from the present'
rate for Season Tickets in accordanco:with the
Scale showing jynount of traffic and per contago re
duction from ^iio ordinary general scituon- tictcot
rate. No concession for amounts amounting -to lesB
than £3,000 a year. Over £5,000 and up to £10,000
12} per cent, discount. Over £10,000 and up to
£20,000 33J per cent discount. Over £20,000 and up
up to £50,000601 per cent, discount. Over £50,000
business to tho extent of over £50,000 per annum
to have not mon. than two free posses each year.
Thbougii some unexplained cause our Adelong
? Mrs. ' Johkstone, ' widow, of ''the ' wcl^irown
fisherman who was drowned! some time~f)t&u!^has
has asked us to acknowledge the receipt' of' £17,
return her sincere thanks to the peoplo of Gun-
Mr. Arthur Elworthy has been appointed
local agent for the Mutual Lifo Association of
Australia and tho Australian Mutual Fire Insur
Persons insured in cither of those offices can pay
their pi einiums as usual at the office of this paper'
committee on the new buildings. Asjit reqnires
ten subscribers to form a quorum, wo hope' that
The Rev. Father Finucgan returned homo lust
bv no means looks as well as is- liis wont. Durina
been for the most part too ill to iimivo and too
weak to converse. Father Finnegan left Syduey
as soon as he was 'able and proceeded to Melbourne
he was compelled to seek the advice of Dr. Fitz
gcruld, ono of tho most eminent doctors in Victoria.
From that time a change came over the Yovcrend
returning, though for some time to come ho will
not be able to tuko that active- and energetic
his friends aro pleased to sco him resume his old
stole n saddle from Mr. W. B, Smith, Darbalara
COURT.
following By-laws, and all previous rates conflict-
ing therewith are hereby repealed : — Bismuth.— To
be charged 3rd class rate. Poultry and sucking
cubic feet to the ton, 1st class rates for one ton and
upwards ; 2nd class for less than one ton. Per-
manent way material.—" B " rate, plus loading and
unloading charges, if done by Department. Glass
—To be charged 4th class rate. Bricks.— 10 miles
ton ; 13 and 14 miles, 1/5 per ton ; 15 miles, 1/6
and cases, empty returns. —Free. Starving stock.
—25% reduction on ordinary rates. Wooden
wrongfully described on "Consigning Notes," caus-
ing them to be booked at wrong rates and consa-
quent application for refund. Penalty of 10% on
correct rate is now abolished. Live stock earned
for various owners in the same waggon. The 25%
Small baskets, one in the other, to be treated as
single packages. Grain and flour carried an down
journey from shipping pints. The charge of 20%
added to "A" rate is now repealed.
TRADERSs' TICKETS.
Traders' Tickets up to three in number may be
granted at a per centage reduction from the present
rate for Season Tickets in accordance with the
Scale showing amount of traffic and per centage re-
duction from the ordinary general season ticket
rate. No concession for amounts amounting to less
than £5,000 a year. Over £5,000 and up to £10,000
12½ per cent, discount. Over £10,000 and up to
£20,000 33½ per cent discount. Over £20,000 and up
up to £50,000 60 2/3 per cent, discount. Over £50,000
business to the extent of over £50,000 per annum
to have not more than two free passes each year.
THROUGH some unexplained cause our Adelong
MRS. JOHNSTONE, widow, of the well known
fisherman who was drowned some time back has
has asked us to acknowledge the receipt of £17,
return her sincere thanks to the people of Gun-
MR. ARTHUR ELWORTHY has been appointed
local agent for the Mutual Life Association of
Australia and the Australian Mutual Fire Insur-
Persons insured in either of those offices can pay
their premiums as usual at the office of this paper.
committee on the new buildings. As it requires
ten subscribers to form a quorum, we hope that
The Rev. Father Finnegan returned home last
by no means looks as well as is his wont. During
been for the most part too ill to move and too
weak to converse. Father Finnegan left Sydney
as soon as he was able and proceeded to Melbourne
he was compelled to seek the advice of Dr. Fitz-
gerald, one of the most eminent doctors in Victoria.
From that time a change came over the reverend
returning, though for some time to come he will
not be able to take that active and energetic
his friends are pleased to see him resume his old
stole a saddle from Mr. W. B. Smith, Darbalara
Court.
New South Wales Government Railways (Article), Western Herald (Bourke, NSW : 1887 - 1970), Friday 23 May 1958 page 3 2020-01-26 20:46 - Railways, Mr. N. McCuskcr,
has presented to the Min
operations of the Depart
reduced charges for the trans
and £33,920 in travelling con
as a contribution towards los
ses on working of country de
amount of £800.000 was re
annuation Account, making |
contributions, and other statu
The report records the com
trains by at least two hours. |
Another feature of the re-j
port is an outline of an inten-l
sive drive to secure the maxi
mum possible economic devel
At 30th June, 1957, the capi
was. £260,277,931.
states: "It is desired to ack
Railways, Mr. N. McCusker,
has presented to the Min-
operations of the Depart-
Earnings for the year
reduced charges for the trans-
and £33,920 in travelling con-
as a contribution towards los-
ses on working of country de-
amount of £800.000 was re-
annuation Account, making-
contributions, and other statu-
The report records the com-
trains by at least two hours.
Another feature of the re-
port is an outline of an inten-
sive drive to secure the maxi-
mum possible economic devel-
At 30th June, 1957, the capi-
was £260,277,931.
states: "It is desired to ack-
New South Wales Government Railways. (Article), Wagga Wagga Advertiser (NSW : 1875 - 1910), Tuesday 27 October 1891 [Issue No.2389] page 2 2020-01-26 20:42 New South .Wales. Govern
ment Kail ways.
A NCMHEisof communications from a Captain
Pickot 011 tho railways o£ Now South Wales
havo appeared recently in tho Railway News,
His argument, and it applies to other Aus
tralian colonics, as well as to New South
Wales,'is that'as each aero of agricultural
land would yiold about 2J tons of produco
it is the policy of tho (state, which is owner
of tho railway, to do everything in its
power to increase tho area of land under.,
cultivation. In this respect Kow South
Wales shows very poorly.; . 2182, miles/
of'railway aro now open at a cost- t)f':
£34,355,000. On the other, hand, out
of tho 40,480,600 acres alienated by
tho Crown, tho area under crop is
less than 1,000,000 acres, and of those , a
their geographical position, add to tho rail
way rovenuo at all. Captain Picket argues
that the British capitalist, >vho lias lent tho
greater portion of tho money with which
theso railways havo been' built, is directly
interested in the, extension of agricultural
settlement in those countries, whoso bonds
lio holds, and seepis to think that overy
to bo accompanied by a considerable amount
Captain Picket is no doubt right,' butho
does not seem to romember that iu many
parts of Now South Wales tho roturnB from
agriculturo , aro very uneortaiii, whilo1 tlioso
from ahcop' ancl cattle farming, uro muoh
more ecrtato,: - ...
New South Wales Govern-
ment Railways.
A NUMBER of communications from a Captain
Picket on the railways of New South Wales
have appeared recently in the Railway News.
His argument, and it applies to other Aus-
tralian colonies, as well as to New South
Wales, is that as each acre of agricultural
land would yield about 2¼ tons of produce
it is the policy of the State, which is owner
of the railway, to do everything in its
power to increase the area of land under
cultivation. In this respect New South
Wales shows very poorly ; 2182, miles
of railway are now open at a cost of
£34,355,000. On the other hand, out
of the 40,480,600 acres alienated by
the Crown, the area under crop is
less than 1,000,000 acres, and of those a
their geographical position, add to the rail-
way revenue at all. Captain Picket argues
that the British capitalist, who has lent the
greater portion of the money with which
these railways have been built, is directly
interested in the extension of agricultural
settlement in those countries, whose bonds
he holds, and seems to think that every
to be accompanied by a considerable amount
Captain Picket is no doubt right, but he
does not seem to remember that in many
parts of New South Wales the returns from
agriculture are very uncertain, while those
from sheep and cattle farming are much
more certain.
New South Wales Government Railways. (Article), Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent (NSW : 1887 - 1932), Wednesday 9 September 1908 [Issue No.73] page 2 2020-01-26 20:38 New South Wales Covernment
The result of tho working of tho railways for
the year ondiog Juno 30th, 1008, aro as undar :
— Earnings, £4.944,131 ; 'working expenses,
£2,714,830 ; balnnco aftor paying working ex
pensos, £2,220,295 interest on capital in
vested, £1,640,304 ; surplus, £670,031.
New South Wales Government
The result of the working of the railways for
the year ending June 30th, 1908, are as as under :
— Earnings, £4.944,131 ; working expenses,
£2,714,830 ; balance after paying working ex-
penses, £2,229,295 ; interest on capital in-
vested, £1,649,364 ; surplus, £579,931.
New South Wales Government Railways. (Article), The Shoalhaven Telegraph (NSW : 1881 - 1937), Saturday 1 September 1900 [Issue No.1439] page 2 2020-01-26 20:36 The Railway Commissioners merit acknow
into consideration the enormous msss of data to
be condonsed and presented to lay observers in
most interesting and lucid compendium, pre
pared and published in so short a time. Con
suffered less than one might ex'peot. Upwards
of £40,000 was given back in freights by tho
Commissioners in transport ,conneoted with
Btarving stock during the period covered by
tho report This item should impress taxpayers
moving maBS of traffio shown in these reports
afford tho most impressive current history of
the colony, cut we snail soleot a few passages
of the report and some of the figures. -
The report and its appondices cover some 47
foolscap pages, exclusive of several maps show
ing the railways open in the colony and in Aus
tralasis, as also a series of conspectus illus
per mile to working expenses, &c.,of tho rail
year's working gives: —
'? June 30, 1900. June 30, '99.
?andtramways ? ±3,570,296 £3,493,829
Expenditure ? 2,110,047 1,978,464
Balance from work- '
ingexponses ? 1,462,040 1, 515,356
Tbe expenditure- covers increases in rolling
wages and salaries, &o
1,760,806, and the decrease in live stock ton
The tram traffic shows, the enormous in
crease of over 14} million passengers, no doubt
due to tho George-street and other eleotric linos
. Pioneer lines are in course of construction to
the extent of 303J miles.
The development of mining bis improved the
lines, and respecting improvemouts iu the re
turns from non-paying linos, the report says :
' In this connection we may mention that while
during the past year.the aggregate loss on tho
mainly owing to the South Coast and Northoin
about 46 per cent, of the lines of tho colony
there wis a loss of £313,040, and this points
to the desirability of giving most careful con
sidoration to the location and construction of
new lines
last was £376 5s 7d, whilo it is to bo regretted,
10s 2d. . -. .
Mining; too, has helped the line at this end,
for Grassy Gully and- other mines have been
ore, while Dapto Station (duo so doubt to the
so many blanks in the 'decrease' oolumn of
the South Coast station accounts. The inorease
£2634, for the past over the preceding vear
1899. J
Tbe net increase- from all sources all over
the lines ol the colony was £18.299 1 But it
sleeping cars, 135 merchandise cars, &o., were
goods engines, four passenger tender and othoi
engines were, bought or made atEveleigh, and
tneir promise to consider the question of lotting
Nowra. and also simplifying, the schedule of
the; flour rate, up freight on butter, &o.
?We still hear complaints about the freight on
that where the train charge is 2s (id, that of
the stoamers is Is, or 150 per cent cheaper
by steamer', whilo the trains come here half
For Bronchial -Coughs take Woods' Great
Peppermint Cure. Is. 6d.
aud Uuld» nover fails, .Is, (id.
The Railway Commissioners merit acknow-
into consideration the enormous mass of data to
be condensed and presented to lay observers in
most interesting and lucid compendium, pre-
pared and published in so short a time. Con-
suffered less than one might expect. Upwards
of £40,000 was given back in freights by the
Commissioners in transport connected with
starving stock during the period covered by
the report. This item should impress taxpayers
moving mass of traffic shown in these reports
afford the most impressive current history of
the colony, cut we shall select a few passages
of the report and some of the figures.
The report and its appendices cover some 47
foolscap pages, exclusive of several maps show-
ing the railways open in the colony and in Aus-
tralasis, as also a series of conspectus illus-
per mile to working expenses, &c., of the rail-
year's working gives : —
June 30, 1900. June 30, '99.
and tramways ...... £3,570,296 £3,493,829
Expenditure ....... 2,110,647 1,978,464
Balance from work-
ing expenses 1,462,649 1, 515,356
The expenditure covers increases in rolling-
wages and salaries, &c.
1,760,806, and the decrease in live stock ton-
The tram traffic shows, the enormous in-
crease of over 14½ million passengers, no doubt
due to the George-street and other electric lines
Pioneer lines are in course of construction to
the extent of 303½ miles.
The development of mining has improved the
lines, and respecting improvements in the re-
turns from non-paying lines, the report says :
" In this connection we may mention that while
during the past year the aggregate loss on the
mainly owing to the South Coast and Northern
about 46 per cent, of the lines of the colony
there was a loss of £313,040, and this points
to the desirability of giving most careful con-
sideration to the location and construction of
new lines "
last was £376 5s 7d, while it is to be regretted
10s 2d.
Mining, too, has helped the line at this end,
for Grassy Gully and other mines have been
ore, while Dapto Station (due no doubt to the
so many blanks in the "decrease" column of
the South Coast station accounts. The increase
£2634, for the past over the preceding year
1899.
The net increase from all sources all over
the lines of the colony was £18,299. But it
sleeping cars, 135 merchandise cars, &c., were
goods engines, four passenger tender and other
engines were, bought or made at Eveleigh, and
their promise to consider the question of letting
Nowra, and also simplifying, the schedule of
the flour rate, up freight on butter, &c.
We still hear complaints about the freight on
that where the train charge is 2s 6d, that of
the steamers is 1s, or 150 per cent cheaper
by steamer, while the trains come here half
For Bronchial Coughs take Woods' Great
Peppermint Cure. 1s. 6d.
and Colds never fails. 1s, 6d.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.