Information about Trove user: LindaB

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,861,491
2 noelwoodhouse 3,930,041
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,385,581
5 Rhonda.M 3,210,892
...
663 C.Weber 70,897
664 ray-coffey 70,888
665 Trove15ART 70,782
666 LindaB 70,288
667 petur59 69,976
668 Divergence 69,963

70,288 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

December 2019 2,239
November 2019 4,580
October 2019 1,094
September 2019 209
August 2019 1,503
June 2019 39
May 2019 8
April 2019 22
March 2019 23
February 2019 12
January 2019 2
October 2018 35
September 2018 16
August 2018 46
July 2018 4
February 2018 20
January 2018 77
December 2017 440
November 2017 37
October 2017 9
September 2017 20
July 2017 14
May 2017 69
April 2017 29
March 2017 2
February 2017 180
January 2017 41
November 2016 5
October 2016 58
September 2016 60
August 2016 13
July 2016 1
June 2016 20
May 2016 31
April 2016 340
February 2016 231
January 2016 13
December 2015 97
November 2015 82
October 2015 114
September 2015 7
August 2015 6
June 2015 5
May 2015 32
April 2015 30
March 2015 2
February 2015 81
January 2015 5,441
November 2014 99
October 2014 27
September 2014 3
August 2014 595
July 2014 335
June 2014 484
May 2014 1,805
April 2014 239
February 2014 860
January 2014 229
December 2013 23
October 2013 151
September 2013 298
August 2013 5
July 2013 18
June 2013 716
May 2013 3,406
April 2013 733
January 2013 12
December 2012 328
November 2012 35
September 2012 4,598
August 2012 729
July 2012 563
June 2012 2,925
May 2012 3,143
April 2012 1,789
March 2012 2,606
February 2012 4,607
January 2012 2,501
December 2011 6,917
November 2011 1,025
October 2011 3,140
September 2011 7,905

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,861,289
2 noelwoodhouse 3,930,041
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,385,560
5 Rhonda.M 3,210,879
...
661 ray-coffey 70,888
662 Trove15ART 70,782
663 lynell.charlton 70,412
664 LindaB 70,288
665 petur59 69,976
666 Divergence 69,963

70,288 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

December 2019 2,239
November 2019 4,580
October 2019 1,094
September 2019 209
August 2019 1,503
June 2019 39
May 2019 8
April 2019 22
March 2019 23
February 2019 12
January 2019 2
October 2018 35
September 2018 16
August 2018 46
July 2018 4
February 2018 20
January 2018 77
December 2017 440
November 2017 37
October 2017 9
September 2017 20
July 2017 14
May 2017 69
April 2017 29
March 2017 2
February 2017 180
January 2017 41
November 2016 5
October 2016 58
September 2016 60
August 2016 13
July 2016 1
June 2016 20
May 2016 31
April 2016 340
February 2016 231
January 2016 13
December 2015 97
November 2015 82
October 2015 114
September 2015 7
August 2015 6
June 2015 5
May 2015 32
April 2015 30
March 2015 2
February 2015 81
January 2015 5,441
November 2014 99
October 2014 27
September 2014 3
August 2014 595
July 2014 335
June 2014 484
May 2014 1,805
April 2014 239
February 2014 860
January 2014 229
December 2013 23
October 2013 151
September 2013 298
August 2013 5
July 2013 18
June 2013 716
May 2013 3,406
April 2013 733
January 2013 12
December 2012 328
November 2012 35
September 2012 4,598
August 2012 729
July 2012 563
June 2012 2,925
May 2012 3,143
April 2012 1,789
March 2012 2,606
February 2012 4,607
January 2012 2,501
December 2011 6,917
November 2011 1,025
October 2011 3,140
September 2011 7,905

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
REMINISCENCES OF A PIONEER. NOTICES OF EARLY LIFE IN VICTORIA. ABORIGINAL ENCOUNTERS, & C. No. II. (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Saturday 9 May 1891 [Issue No.4695] page 2 2019-12-13 22:02 lt may be of additional interest to some
speciman of muscular humanity, full of
acres), and was celebrated for breed
It may be of additional interest to some
specimen of muscular humanity, full of
acres), and was celebrated for breed-
REMINISCENCES OF A PIONEER. NOTICES OF EARLY LIFE IN VICTORIA. ABORIGINAL ENCOUNTERS, & C. No. II. (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Saturday 9 May 1891 [Issue No.4695] page 2 2019-12-13 08:39 his freehold of Tiliifour (some 1500
his freehold of Tillifour (some 1500
REMINISCENCES OF A PIONEER. NOTICES OF EARLY LIFE IN VICTORIA. ABORIGINAL ENCOUNTERS, & C. No. II. (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Saturday 9 May 1891 [Issue No.4695] page 2 2019-12-13 08:35 going on to furthor notices of the abori
ginal residents of Victoria, I here Intor-
was than, 1841-2, called New Town, and,
Brunswick street, which had a few cot
and squire of Anchenvale, a Scot
He lived then in a small cottage in Eliza
Colonial Bank; Ceo. Fairbairn, genr.,
ultimutely purchased lime works at the
Heads for them. Oue of the
latter rode carrying the mail) to Sydney
and thus, by walking and riding alter
he almost flew. There was but one en
forget that ride. It Impressed the
visit to Ferutree Gully, then, and
occasionally re-visiting the station and re
the latter. a The adjacent cattle and
the first Presbyterian clergyman in Vic
toria. It was tormcd by tlio natives
Tirkutuland, meaning the land or home of
apparently cannot pronounce the letter r.
pence, oritur tribes used the r vocally in
myrnonga and other tuberous roots,
I doubt if they were not sometimes can
met anyone who had caught them indulg
acquired from the Europeans on ample
everywhere was something extraordinary,
squatters, from Sydney: Edward Kirby,
energetic sons. John Kirk,' of Kirk's
until the flocks were decimated by ca
him as a tobacco merchant and manu
ing and fattening— on grass in sum
and inct: of singular idiosyncracies, known
to all in the comparatively small Mel
going on to further notices of the abori-
ginal residents of Victoria, I here inter-
was then, 1841-2, called New Town, and,
Brunswick street, which had a few cot-
and squire of Anchenvale, a Scot-
He lived then in a small cottage in Eliza-
Colonial Bank; Geo. Fairbairn, senr.,
family importance in the highest
ultimately purchased lime works at the
Heads for them. One of the
latter rode (carrying the mail) to Sydney
and thus, by walking and riding alter-
he almost flew. There was but one en-
forget that ride. It impressed the
visit to Ferntree Gully, then, and
occasionally re-visiting the station and re-
the latter. The adjacent cattle and
the first Presbyterian clergyman in Vic-
toria. It was tormed by the natives
Tirkutuand, meaning the land or home of
apparently cannot pronounce the letter r,
pence, other tribes used the r vocally in
myrnongs and other tuberous roots,
I doubt if they were not sometimes can-
met anyone who had caught them indulg-
acquired from the Europeans an ample
everywhere was something extraordinary.
squatters, from Sydney; Edward Kirby,
energetic sons. John Kirk, of Kirk's
until the flocks were decimated by ca-
me afterwards for many years, one I ever
him as a tobacco merchant and manu-
ing and fattening— on grass in sum-
and men of singular idiosyncracies, known
to all in the comparatively small Mel-
REMINISCENCES OF A PIOHEER. OUR VICTORIAN ABORIGINALS No. I. (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Tuesday 5 May 1891 [Issue No.4691] page 4 2019-12-13 05:18 take a kindly interst in their
rribed. They all carried fire sticks, that
of which I may discourse on hereaftor.
take a kindly interest in their
cribed. They all carried fire sticks, that
of which I may discourse on hereafter.
REMINISCENCES OF A PIONEER. ABORIGINAL TRAITS AND NOTICES, &C (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Friday 12 June 1891 [Issue No.4697] page 4 2019-12-12 23:47 moderate estimate of thoir grazing
capacity reached L1800 prior to the
country lands fur selocttun. Before
leaving thnt district iu 1850, just prior to
Rolf Boldorwood's advent as a visitor
boon my neighboring squatters, so
Memoirs,'1 I went tiorthwavds along
the then-being dofincd boundary be
townrds the Murray Hirer, and thcnco
timt then terra incognita, the Malleo
Scrub, iu search of a run Auitnblo for
sheep. In connocutivo articles published
in tlio 44 Port Phillip Gozetto," the Into
linn. Thomas M'Coniblo— an early M.P.
and Cnhinot Minister's newspaper, in the
mouth of November, 184D— a narrative of
my trip and observations en route wns
" Yn merchant#, tradesmen, good folks all,
Who flourish ill mir towns,
How littlo do ye think upon
Thu toil of seokiug runs ! "
Tlio ideas are not here very poetically
expressed, but if the task was, in its hard
ships, nud dimgors, littlo understood, or
a-days I
Atnfnturodatol may rchoaras somo
of the early dimgors I have been merci
fully preserved through, un such expedi
tious, and in doaling with wild cattle, and
horses, ns ivull as blacks. Strange to toll,
1 havo suffered uinro real dnmngo, physt
cally, mentally and pecuniarily, hv early
moderate estimate of their grazing
capacity reached L1860 prior to the
country lands for selection. Before
leaving that district in 1850, just prior to
Rolf Bolderwood's advent as a visitor
been my neighboring squatters, so
Memoirs," I went northwards along
the then-being defined boundary be-
towards the Murray River, and thence
that then terra incognita, the Mallee
Scrub, in search of a run suitable for
sheep. In consecutive articles published
in the " Port Phillip Gazette," the late
hon. Thomas M'Combie— an early M.P.
and Cabinet Minister's newspaper, in the
month of November, 1849— a narrative of
my trip and observations en route was
" Ye merchants, tradesmen, good folks all,
Who flourish in our towns,
How little do ye think upon
The toil of seeking runs ! "
The ideas are not here very poetically
expressed, but if the task was, in its hard-
ships, and dangers, little understood, or
a-days !
At a future date l may rehearse some
of the early dangers I have been merci-
fully preserved through, on such expedi-
tions, and in dealing with wild cattle, and
horses, as well as blacks. Strange to tell,
I have suffered more real damage, physi-
cally, mentally and pecuniarily, by early
REMINISCENCES OF A PIONEER. ABORIGINAL TRAITS AND NOTICES, &C (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Friday 12 June 1891 [Issue No.4697] page 4 2019-12-12 23:40 MrSturt told thorn thoy 4 must make
allowonco under the circumstances,
and modcrato their apputitcs until
thu drayR, with supplies, camo to hand."
I fancy I could fill a volume by nioro < or
loss interesting reminiscences of stirring
in early days, as I was engaged fri pastoral
upwards of forty years, with a rnetUoy of
thoothcriiidustrial enterprises wopiunccra
helped to initinto or establish licrt% I
loft the South Australian borders
in 1850, having sold tlio station
to Messrs. Loarmonth, of KrcUdouiio,
Melbourne, for near relatives then ox-
peeled. In so soiling, I parted with the
boforo the era of gold discovery, when
such properties quadrupled in vnfuc. The
subsequent incrcasom valuo of the runs I
South Australia may bo estimated by the
facta that whereas when taken up, and
stocked —ultimately, with, in 185(1,
nnd horses, al! on hire terms, giving ino
half their incrcaso, iny annual payments
than L50. The Aggregate annual rents
Mr Sturt told them they " must make
allowance under the circumstances,
and moderate their appetites until
the drays, with supplies, came to hand."
I fancy I could fill a volume by more or
less interesting reminiscences of stirring
in early days, as I was engaged in pastoral
upwards of forty years, with a medley of
the other industrial enterprises we pioneers
helped to initiate or establish here. I
left the South Australian borders
in 1850, having sold the station
to Messrs. Learmonth, of Ercildoune,
Melbourne, for near relatives then ex-
pected. In so selling, I parted with the
before the era of gold discovery, when
such properties quadrupled in value. The
subsequent increase in value of the runs I
South Australia may be estimated by the
facts that whereas when taken up, and
stocked —ultimately, with, in 1850,
and horses, all on hire terms, giving me
half their increase, my annual payments
than L50. The aggregate annual rents
REMINISCENCES OF A PIONEER. ABORIGINAL TRAITS AND NOTICES, &C (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Friday 12 June 1891 [Issue No.4697] page 4 2019-12-12 23:35 Button's residence, Merri Crook. Ho
said, 41 What shall wo do with it, unless
carriago horses." I ascertained,- how--
over, that ther« wero empty tea chests la
the store room, and set to work, and re
packed the taboood tea in thoso. I
simply appeased, and thoro was novor a
syllable of complaint mado thoreaftor as
I had a largo establishment of timber
cutters, splitters, and sawmill bands at
1 arranged that they should como into
the parlor ono by ono from the back
kitcnon, and after each had told his story
and had left, ho was to bo prevented
from communication with his co-consnira-
in largo boxes from Valparaiso, aud had
cost tne sixty pounds a ton ! The men
camo in singly, accordingly, and all - but
ono said 44 the flour was not so
bad, "some said it was very good, and they
bad no cause of complaint, but the rest
wcro coming, aud they hod to como too.
Each so pretesting their goodwill got a
glass of rum (the then usual homostead
uratuity), and was escorted towards his
routo homewards. The only really dis
affected ono was paid off at onco, and
nothing moro was heard of the
matter. At Mount Gambior, one
vory wot Rpring, when the roads
wore impassablo, and dravs coming up
with stores, wero dotainca by floods and
rond bogs, a numbor of mon from the
hoforo the feto Mr E. 'P. S. Sturt, then
P.M. nc Mount Gambier, to complain
that their ogrcoinont as to weekly
rations of flour was not adhorod to, but
doublo rations oi meat tendorod instead!
Hutton's residence, Merri Creek. He
said, " What shall we do with it, unless
carriage horses." I ascertained, how-
ever, that there were empty tea chests in
the store room, and set to work, and re-
packed the tabooed tea in these. I
simply appeased, and there was never a
syllable of complaint made thereafter as
I had a large establishment of timber
cutters, splitters, and sawmill hands at
I arranged that they should come into
the parlor one by one from the back
kitchen, and after each had told his story
and had left, he was to be prevented
from communication with his co-conspira-
in large boxes from Valparaiso, and had
cost me sixty pounds a ton ! The men
came in singly, accordingly, and all but
one said " the flour was not so
bad, " some said it was very good, and they
had no cause of complaint, but the rest
were coming, and they had to come too.
Each so protesting their goodwill got a
glass of rum (the then usual homestead
gratuity), and was escorted towards his
route homewards. The only really dis-
affected one was paid off at once, and
nothing more was heard of the
matter. At Mount Gambier, one
very wet spring, when the roads
were impassable, and dravs coming up
with stores, were detained by floods and
road bogs, a number of men from the
before the late Mr E. P. S. Sturt, then
P.M. at Mount Gambier, to complain
that their agreement as to weekly
rations of flour was not adhered to, but
double rations of meat tendered instead.
REMINISCENCES OF A PIONEER. ABORIGINAL TRAITS AND NOTICES, &C (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Friday 12 June 1891 [Issue No.4697] page 4 2019-12-12 23:27 The said rationed mull, however, were
not then onlightoncd its to such secrets of
episode occurs to iny recollection iu
couuoolton with this tea client utilisa
tion''- by puBay. Men wore occa
sionally, 'even in these- remote
times, vory troublcsomo as to quality of
thoir rations. When I was manager for
Captain Charles Hutton, J.P.« a well-
known early Melbourne) city magistrate,
the station hands had refuaod to use the
"JackthoPaintcr," a common men's name
for bad tea. I took the ehesta on hand,
The said rationed men, however, were
not then enlightened as to such secrets of
episode occurs to my recollection in
connection with this tea chest utilisa-
tion by pussy. Men wore occa-
sionally, even in these remote
times, very troublesome as to quality of
their rations. When I was manager for
Captain Charles Hutton, J.P., a well-
known early Melbourne city magistrate,
the station hands had refused to use the
"Jack the Painter," a common men's name
for bad tea. I took the chests on hand,
REMINISCENCES OF A PIONEER. ABORIGINAL TRAITS AND NOTICES, &C (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Friday 12 June 1891 [Issue No.4697] page 4 2019-12-12 23:24 Theru must be, in another cave near the
south-easterly son coast, anothur singular
petrifaction of a non-ludigenons animal
for, when engaged in literary work iu
Edinburgh, iu 1610, requiring potman! of
blue hooka on colonial subjects, in the
Advocate's Library Llioro, I camo across
an account of u trial, or court martial, on
a shiti captain, who, having had part of
his formerly shipwrecked crow massacred
oil tliesouth-unst coast of South Australia
by the blacks there, after liia cscapo and
return towards Nuw South Wales on an-
outer voyago, calling en route at unpo ot
Good Hope, bad nurehnsud a lioness, and
safely landed the buiist for the benefit of
the black mimlurcra of bis formororow at
or near the site of bin form or shipwreck.
The matter, however, laid entirely
several tamo blacks' recitals with
glistening oyos, uml horror-stricken
a long time ago, Limy said. It F plenty
kill'oin blnckfoliaw and lubrn," said thoy,
until it disappeared as suddenly ns its
ndvout on the sceno ; and it wns traced
to a eavo containing water, which it had
bctug no tmrfaco water there, and had got
into it by a shaft-hlio entrance, it could not
climb put of. 1 had brought up in a bag
on my snddlo a lady cat about to lisvo a
family, she wub of a sort of grey and
yellow mixed color, from Portland, dis
dnmenlio cat introduced into the Lower
Oluuelg. and Mount Gnmbier dis
tricts, although the squatters' huts nnd
store-rooms wore then ovorrun with
a reddish long-haired kind of rat. vory
fact it was omnivorous, eating uvury kind
of hido or Iruthor articlos. Pussy wns a
grant ubjoct of interest to the black
families 1 protected on the iiomcstond,
and they told tno of big one, likot thai
hud the nm of my store-room, ami
brought forth hor family amongst the
pui'lielea of lijvon skin, tlio usual rutbu
tea thou, in the moil's ration tea
chest. Her kittona wero bartered
to neighbors for two fat wutiiors oach.
There must be, in another cave near the
south-easterly sea coast, another singular
petrifaction of a non-indigenous animal
for, when engaged in literary work in
Edinburgh, in 1840, requiring perusal of
blue books on colonial subjects, in the
Advocate's Library there, I came across
an account of a trial, or court martial, on
a ship captain, who, having had part of
his formerly shipwrecked crew massacred
on the south-east coast of South Australia
by the blacks there, after his escape and
return towards New South Wales on an-
other voyage, calling en route at Cape of
Good Hope, had purchased a lioness, and
safely landed the beast for the benefit of
the black murderers of his former crew at
or near the site of his former shipwreck.
The matter, however, had entirely
several tame blacks' recitals with
glistening eyes, and horror-stricken
a long time ago, they said. It " plenty
kill'em blackfellow and lubra," said they,
until it disappeared as suddenly as its
advent on the scene ; and it was traced
to a cave containing water, which it had
being no surface water there, and had got
into it by a shaft-like entrance, it could not
climb put of. I had brought up in a bag
on my saddle a lady cat about to have a
family, she was of a sort of grey and
yellow mixed color, from Portland, dis-
domestic cat introduced into the Lower
Glenelg and Mount Gambier dis-
tricts, although the squatters' huts and
store-rooms were then overrun with
a reddish long-haired kind of rat, very
fact it was omniverous, eating every kind
of hide or leather articles. Pussy was a
great object of interest to the black
families I protected on the homestead,
and they told me of " big one, like that
had the run of my store-room, and
brought forth her family amongst the
particles of hyson skin, the usual ration
tea then, in the men's ration tea
chest. Her kittens were bartered
to neighbors for two fat weathers each.
REMINISCENCES OF A PIONEER. ABORIGINAL TRAITS AND NOTICES, &C (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Friday 12 June 1891 [Issue No.4697] page 4 2019-12-12 23:13 of the aborigines must hnvo beon nwful,
for except a fow isolatod groups of fami
lies, chiefly employed or toloratcd on a
fow stations, thu bulk of them became tion
est. 2 well remember a ro|>orted con
flict near Potioht, when n black shot in
the abdomen, and with entrails protrud
ing. escaped into one of the far-famed
mosquitouAVCS.withliialmud on the wound.
Years after this the potrified form of this
man, his hand boing in position
of tlio ramifications of tlus vast cave,
either potrified his wholo frame, or en
cased it in a shell. The youth Australian
Government, ut opening up the caves to
tourists, had an iron cage mid chain made,
cnclnmngandfmldingtlii# relic of humanity
in its position as found ; hub it wns
ufter a time stolen nnd removed from the
colony. .Same government then offered a
rownrd of L10() for its recovery, but it
hud been tooquickly conveyed away, nnd.
it ivns said, wns sold nftorwnrdfi to the
British Musouui in London prior to the
fact of its theft being known thorc.
of the aborigines must have been awful,
for except a few isolated groups of fami-
lies, chiefly employed or tolerated on a
few stations, the bulk of them became non
est. I well remember a reported con-
flict near Penola, when a black shot in
the abdomen, and with entrails protrud-
ing, escaped into one of the far-famed
mosquito caves with his hand on the wound.
Years after this the petrified form of this
man, his hand being in position
of the ramifications of this vast cave,
either petrified his whole frame, or en-
cased it in a shell. The South Australian
Government, in opening up the caves to
tourists, had an iron cage and chain made,
enclosing and holding this relic of humanity
in its position as found ; but it was
after a time stolen and removed from the
colony. Same government then offered a
reward of L100 for its recovery, but it
had been too quickly conveyed away, and
it was said, was sold afterwards to the
British Museum in London prior to the
fact of its theft being known there.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.