Information about Trove user: Keelyh

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

No text corrections contributed yet

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Aboriginal Soldiers
    List
    Public

    3 items
    created by: public:Keelyh 2017-10-04
    User data
  2. Internment in Australia during WWII
    List
    Public

    To what extend did the restrictions placed upon internees following their release from internment in WWII work to alienate individuals rather than integrate them into society?

    For this research project I have chosen to look into the appeals to internment process, in particular the restrictions placed on individuals after their appeal was successful. The archival collection that I used was Trove newspapers from the period of 1940-45. This question asks what requirements some individuals had to agree to abide by once released from internment and how these strict requirements and the consequences of not abiding by them worked to further segregate these individuals from society.

    Source 5 backs up the information found in the primary sources by adding more in depth explanation of individual cases and how these individuals were actually affected mentally and physically by the segregation. For example the source talks of one German family, the Schuster family who applied for a telephone service but their application was refused and they were only allowed to leave their farm with police permission. Hence, this shows that they were further segregated from society as these requirements restricted contact that they could have with other members in their community.

    Source 4 is extremely useful in helping me to answer this question as it provides some background information into how appeals against internments are assessed, which gives an indication into the purpose of restrictions imposed on individuals when they are released. It states that the tribunals would not recommend the release of someone if they were satisfied that they would be a risk to public safety, the defence of the commonwealth or the sufficient prosecution of the war or cause unrest in the community. Hence, this indicates that although internees would not be released if they posed a threat to society, many were still placed under restrictive conditions anyway, which contradicts the argument that conditions were put into place to protect society, making it seem as though some of the restrictions discussed in this research were just there to alienate these individuals.

    Source 9 is a newspaper article which shows the highly xenophobic attitudes towards foreigners of enemy countries at that time. It is helpful in answering this question as it shows the attitudes of the Healesville Guardian newspaper align with those of the R.S.S.A.I.L.A in that they believe that people from enemy countries should be treated like aliens when they are released from internment as they suggest that if they are seen to be disloyal to the country they should be 'struck off the roll' and those that were sent over from Britain should be sent back after the war. Hence, this advances the argument by showing that some members of society were also willing to exclude ex-internees from Australian society and wanted these conditions put in place to exclude them.

    With regards to these sources, I have come to the conclusion that it is too a large extent that the restrictions placed upon the ex-internees work to segregate rather than too integrate these people into society.This is because many sources describe restrictions such as having to stay at the one address, restrictions to communication with family members who may pose a threat, and restrictions to where someone is allowed to work after their internment. Hence these restrictions limit the opportunities that these people have to interact and make connections with others in society, just like when they were in the camps.

    10 items
    created by: public:Keelyh 2017-09-05
    User data
  3. Introduction of the 'Contraceptive Pill' to Australia
    List
    Public

    What is the difference between the opinions of the Australian Women's Weekly and the Catholic about the introduction of the contraceptive pill to Australia?

    What forms of opposition existed in the 1960s the the oral contraceptive pill and how did this affect women's lives?

    Why and how did the Catholic church fail in convincing people that the contraceptive pill should not be used?

    7 items
    created by: public:Keelyh 2017-09-24
    User data
  4. Japanese-American Internment in WWII
    List
    Public

    How did people of Japanese ancestry respond to the imposition of curfews and/or being interned on the West Coast of the USA during WWII.

    31 items
    created by: public:Keelyh 2019-08-05
    User data
  5. Weimar Years
    List
    Public

    Germany between the wars, the rise of nationalism and Nazism.

    15 items
    created by: public:Keelyh 2017-07-25
    User data
  6. Women's involvement in pacific war
    List
    Public

    6 items
    created by: public:Keelyh 2019-08-15
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.