Information about Trove user: Joshua.Gibb

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

No text corrections contributed yet

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. August Offensive
    List
    Public

    2 items
    created by: public:Joshua.Gibb 2019-08-27
    User data
  2. French Revolution
    List
    Public

    9 items
    created by: public:Joshua.Gibb 2019-07-30
    User data
  3. Ned Kelly Trial
    List
    Public

    What evidence is there to suggest that Ned Kelly receive an unfair Trial?

    Ned Kelly, Australia’s most famous outlaw, committed a string crime, which led to his eventual capture, arrest, sentencing and execution. Whilst his crimes cannot be denied, it is possible that that Kelly received a biased trial, and as such received that the sentence that he did. In particular, the judge presiding over Kelly’s case, Sir Redmond Barry may have had a sense of prejudice against Kelly. These sources are invaluable to understanding the matter of whether there was a presence of unfairness in Ned Kelly’s trial. The Newspaper articles published surrounding the Ned Kelly Trial, are quite useful, in that they provide specific events during the course of the trial, such as how the newspaper article Mount Alexander Mail (Vic.: 1854 - 1917) Tuesday 10 August 1880 p 3 (1), covers Kelly’s account of ill-fated confrontation with the police. Furthermore, it also covers witness testimonies concerned with Kelly’s actions. The secondary source Ned Kelly: A Short Life (5) allows for a better understanding of the persons involved in Ned Kelly’s trial, specifically David Gaunson and Sir Redmond Barry, which contributed to understanding why Ned Kelly’s trial was biased and unfair. This book clearly outlines that Sir Redmond Barry looked down on Ned Kelly as a ‘lower’ class Anglo-Irish Australian. It is also worth noting that Kelly’s solicitor, David Gaunson, had very little understanding of trial. In concern, with understanding the level biasness in this trial, attained by Sir Redmond Barry, against Ned Kelly, it is revealed in Redmond Barry and the Anglo-Irish in Australia (8) the extent of Anglo-Irish prejudice against certain other Anglo-Irish. This is also attached to prejudice that Sir Redmond Barry held Anglo-Irish he considered lower than himself, and his reasons behind this believed superiority. A better understanding of the relations between the Anglo-Irish Australian classes, and the views of Sir Redmond Barry are provided in the sources Through Green Tinted Glasses: Barry, Kelly and Irish Sentiment (6) and A Black-Letter Lawyer (7). It can be seen from the newspaper article Ned Kelly’s Trial (2), how Sir Redmond Barry was attempting to belittle Kelly on his behaviour and crimes during their interaction, quite possibly due to a sense of superiority over his Kelly. The source Ned Kelly: A Short Life (5) further emphasizes how Sir Redmond Barry was very much attempting to appeal to the jury the severity of Kelly’s crimes, revealing a certain level of biasness. Overall, all of the following sources provide an insight into the Ned Kelly trial and reveal the level of unfairness that Ned Kelly faced.

    8 items
    created by: public:Joshua.Gibb 2019-08-27
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.