Information about Trove user: InstituteOfAustralianCulture

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,744,015
2 noelwoodhouse 3,874,660
3 NeilHamilton 3,414,885
4 DonnaTelfer 3,239,980
5 Rhonda.M 3,052,354
...
73 JaneM1951 573,850
74 IWalrus 567,757
75 Hinde 563,410
76 InstituteOfAustralianCulture 562,488
77 Sharon.Nunn 558,460
78 NevHolden 554,705

562,488 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2019 1,087
July 2019 4,099
June 2019 4,574
May 2019 9,286
April 2019 7,809
March 2019 255
February 2019 2,725
January 2019 1,850
December 2018 774
November 2018 256
October 2018 153
September 2018 643
August 2018 11,505
July 2018 4,593
June 2018 2,030
May 2018 16,724
April 2018 9,156
March 2018 6,471
February 2018 6,544
January 2018 6,949
December 2017 523
November 2017 324
October 2017 357
September 2017 232
August 2017 6,508
July 2017 14,876
June 2017 6,515
May 2017 371
April 2017 928
March 2017 1,387
February 2017 1,803
January 2017 488
December 2016 1,006
November 2016 221
October 2016 1,538
September 2016 1,951
August 2016 874
July 2016 1,170
June 2016 473
May 2016 1,129
April 2016 380
March 2016 693
February 2016 2,268
January 2016 2,704
December 2015 445
November 2015 969
October 2015 5,174
September 2015 3,574
August 2015 2,345
July 2015 2,599
June 2015 1,720
May 2015 3,393
April 2015 14,777
March 2015 12,992
February 2015 4,967
January 2015 2,114
December 2014 2,419
November 2014 4,166
October 2014 4,998
September 2014 2,754
August 2014 16,408
July 2014 3,142
June 2014 6,170
May 2014 7,190
April 2014 5,015
March 2014 4,573
February 2014 4,350
January 2014 2,652
December 2013 2,403
November 2013 2,266
October 2013 5,082
September 2013 14,090
August 2013 20,515
July 2013 15,010
June 2013 22,231
May 2013 14,597
April 2013 18,483
March 2013 23,271
February 2013 18,951
January 2013 15,279
December 2012 22,275
November 2012 11,003
October 2012 7,588
September 2012 17,986
August 2012 18,431
July 2012 5,126
June 2012 3,520
May 2012 3,099
April 2012 371
March 2012 2,261
February 2012 2,199
January 2012 5,620
December 2011 11,175
November 2011 11,446
October 2011 3,102

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,743,813
2 noelwoodhouse 3,874,660
3 NeilHamilton 3,414,756
4 DonnaTelfer 3,239,959
5 Rhonda.M 3,052,341
...
73 JaneM1951 573,758
74 IWalrus 567,757
75 Hinde 562,392
76 InstituteOfAustralianCulture 561,913
77 Sharon.Nunn 558,268
78 NevHolden 554,368

561,913 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2019 1,087
July 2019 4,098
June 2019 4,574
May 2019 9,279
April 2019 7,809
March 2019 255
February 2019 2,725
January 2019 1,850
December 2018 774
November 2018 256
October 2018 153
September 2018 643
August 2018 11,505
July 2018 4,593
June 2018 2,020
May 2018 16,697
April 2018 9,003
March 2018 6,441
February 2018 6,265
January 2018 6,892
December 2017 523
November 2017 324
October 2017 357
September 2017 232
August 2017 6,508
July 2017 14,865
June 2017 6,515
May 2017 371
April 2017 928
March 2017 1,387
February 2017 1,803
January 2017 488
December 2016 1,006
November 2016 221
October 2016 1,538
September 2016 1,951
August 2016 874
July 2016 1,170
June 2016 473
May 2016 1,129
April 2016 380
March 2016 693
February 2016 2,268
January 2016 2,704
December 2015 445
November 2015 969
October 2015 5,174
September 2015 3,574
August 2015 2,345
July 2015 2,599
June 2015 1,720
May 2015 3,393
April 2015 14,777
March 2015 12,992
February 2015 4,967
January 2015 2,114
December 2014 2,419
November 2014 4,166
October 2014 4,998
September 2014 2,754
August 2014 16,408
July 2014 3,142
June 2014 6,170
May 2014 7,190
April 2014 5,015
March 2014 4,573
February 2014 4,350
January 2014 2,652
December 2013 2,403
November 2013 2,266
October 2013 5,082
September 2013 14,090
August 2013 20,515
July 2013 15,010
June 2013 22,231
May 2013 14,597
April 2013 18,483
March 2013 23,271
February 2013 18,951
January 2013 15,279
December 2012 22,275
November 2012 11,003
October 2012 7,588
September 2012 17,986
August 2012 18,431
July 2012 5,126
June 2012 3,520
May 2012 3,099
April 2012 371
March 2012 2,261
February 2012 2,199
January 2012 5,620
December 2011 11,175
November 2011 11,446
October 2011 3,102

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 304,624
2 PhilThomas 122,274
3 mickbrook 106,583
4 murds5 61,555
5 GeoffMMutton 47,379
...
103 jennywren 622
104 Forshaw 611
105 arundel 579
106 InstituteOfAustralianCulture 575
107 SheffieldPark 572
108 ron101297 570

575 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2019 1
May 2019 7
June 2018 10
May 2018 27
April 2018 153
March 2018 30
February 2018 279
January 2018 57
July 2017 11


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
DEFENCE OF THE AUSTRALIAN COLONIES. (Article), Adelaide Times (SA : 1848 - 1858), Wednesday 24 May 1854 [Issue No.1183] page 4 2019-08-29 21:52 • •.
^'vMtijaidr.Ploier^ZTorch, Tnftnit, Virago,**id'
Trtnbbmke.
—Australian and Neiv Zea•
vestigator, Plover, Torch, Trident, Virago, and
Trincomalee.
—Australian and New Zea-
DEFENCE OF THE AUSTRALIAN COLONIES. (Article), South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), Wednesday 17 May 1854 [Issue No.2390] page 2 2019-08-29 21:51 S -me time since the Australian colonies were told ?
hat they could have tnwps if they would pay for
VesL Indies have not been subjected to these condi
ions. It will be well if England, in the case of a
rar, has not more cause to regret her illiberal treat
ban those colonies themselves would have. An
nemy could only cause them transient annoyance]
o England the loss might be more permanent.
Some time since the Australian colonies were told
that they could have troops if they would pay for
them, but not otherwise! The Cape colony and the
West Indies have not been subjected to these condi-
tions. It will be well if England, in the case of a
war, has not more cause to regret her illiberal treat-
than those colonies themselves would have. An
enemy could only cause them transient annoyance;
to England the loss might be more permanent.
DEFENCE OF THE AUSTRALIAN COLONIES. (Article), South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), Wednesday 17 May 1854 [Issue No.2390] page 2 2019-08-29 21:50 Even in the Cape olony, which has abundance qf
roops and excellent Jand defences, more than siifH
sieut to keep out such an enemy as Russia, without
he aid of a single ship of wir, we find the following
range ofcoa-t im comparison with Australia.
-ar with the naval defences. They aro as follow : —
: lth Regiment of Foot, in New South Wales; the
»8th, in tievr Zealand; the 65th, in New Zealand;
he 89th, on tho way to Australia; tho 99th, in Vaq
3iemen's Land ; and the 40th, in Australia, no place
neqtioned; whilst at the Cape are a rogimeut of
lavalry, the 12th Lancers, tho 2nd Regiment of Foot,
he 6th Regiment, the reserve battalion of the 12th
.legiment, the 45th Regiment, the 2nd battalion of
he 60th Regiment, the 73rd Regiment, and the Capu
Counted Rifles.
With tho inadequate force in Australia, of course ? '
he shipments of gold would be stopped, aud English
winmerce would' be paralysed m consequence.
Inhere is no fear of a hostile force landing in Austral
ia, or tho colonsts themselves would speedily dispose
if the invaders, but. against siiipd of war they are
lowerless. The vast fleet of merchant ships in Hob
on's Bay might be burned by a Russian vessel with
tnpunity, thorc being, at present, no possibility of
eturning a single shot, either afloat .or ashore.
Even in the Cape colony, which has abundance of
troops and excellent land defences, more than suffi-
cient to keep out such an enemy as Russia, without
the aid of a single ship of war, we find the following
fleet—Dee, Grecian, Hydra, Meander, Nerbudda,
range of coast in comparison with Australia.
par with the naval defences. They are as follow:—
11th Regiment of Foot, in New South Wales; the
58th, in New Zealand; the 65th, in New Zealand;
the 89th, on the way to Australia; the 99th, in Van
Diemen's Land; and the 40th, in Australia, no place
mentioned; whilst at the Cape are a regiment of
cavalry, the 12th Lancers, the 2nd Regiment of Foot,
the 6th Regiment, the reserve battalion of the 12th
Regiment, the 45th Regiment, the 2nd battalion of
the 60th Regiment, the 73rd Regiment, and the Cape
Mounted Rifles.
With the inadequate force in Australia, of course
the shipments of gold would be stopped, and English
commerce would be paralysed in consequence.
There is no fear of a hostile force landing in Austral-
ia, or the colonsts themselves would speedily dispose
of the invaders, but. against ships of war they are
powerless. The vast fleet of merchant ships in Hob-
son's Bay might be burned by a Russian vessel with
impunity, there being, at present, no possibility of
returning a single shot, either afloat or ashore.
DEFENCE OF THE AUSTRALIAN COLONIES. (Article), South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), Wednesday 17 May 1854 [Issue No.2390] page 2 2019-08-29 21:46 Di -o, Herald, Portland, Presid nt, lialtlesnahe, In
vestigator, Plpocr, Torch, Trident, Virago, aud Trin
zomale.:
If wo compare other colonies by their real import
formidable fleet stationed iu ihu West Indies, where
tve are not aware of there being much except nig
jors which an enemy could conveniently carry off;
-f Australia. The following is the list of the West
India fleet, Home of which aro lincof-battle ships,
uid others powerful frigates and steamers : — Argus,
Venial.
ivhilst the Australian colonies are undefended, the
following squadron figures on tho coast of Africa,
ivhere we have not a single possession worth C^Hin'
luch;— Alecto, Antelope, Athol, Jiritornart, Orane,
Dolphin, Linnet, Myrmidon, P-:nehpe, Philomel, Pluto,
ships of war on a coast where we havo no trade, and in
Vustralia, the commerce uf which no. v equals that of
ho United States, one ' j icki.ss frigate' and -a
lurveying vessel, and that, too, iip.m tho all but cer
tain eve of a war, and with tho knowledge that tho
:neiny has an efficient force within reach of Aoa
ralia, if wo have not. ?
Dido, Herald, Portland, President, Rattlesnake, In-
vestigator, Plover, Torch, Trident, Virago, and Trin-
comalee.
If we compare other colonies by their real import-
formidable fleet stationed in the West Indies, where
we are not aware of there being much except nig-
gers which an enemy could conveniently carry off;
of Australia. The following is the list of the West
India fleet, some of which are line-of-battle ships,
and others powerful frigates and steamers:—Argus,
Daring, Devastation, Megara, Imaum, Scorpion, and
Vestal.
whilst the Australian colonies are undefended, the
following squadron figures on the coast of Africa,
where we have not a single possession worth calling
such:—Alecto, Antelope, Athol, Britomart, Crane,
Dolphin, Linnet, Myrmidon, Penelope, Philomel, Pluto,
ships of war on a coast where we have no trade, and in
Australia, the commerce of which now equals that of
the United States, one "jackass frigate" and a
surveying vessel, and that, too, upon the all but cer-
tain eve of a war, and with the knowledge that the
enemy has an efficient force within reach of Aus-
ralia, if we have not.
DEFENCE OF THE AUSTRALIAN COLONIES. (Article), Adelaide Times (SA : 1848 - 1858), Wednesday 24 May 1854 [Issue No.1183] page 4 2019-08-29 21:38 W destroy all the naval forces Of all the coun
! tries from Qape Horn to the Isthmus of Pa
> "hlma. The following is the list of the South
*tfeAtteHehn squadron as appears by the navy
^Vif-Donetta, Diamond, Pspiegle. Naiad,
Rifleman, Sharpshooter, Stromholi,
'FipreSs, and Trident; whilst scattered about
any where but where they ate
wanted, are the following—Amphitrite, Dido,
HeraldPortland, President, Rattlesnake, In
or destroy all the naval forces of all the coun-
tries from Cape Horn to the Isthmus of Pa-
nama. The following is the list of the South
American squadron as appears by the navy
list:—Bonetta, Diamond, Espiegle, Naiad,
Nereus, Rifleman, Sharpshooter, Stromboli,
Express, and Trident; whilst scattered about
the Pacific, any where but where they are
wanted, are the following:—Amphitrite, Dido,
Herald, Portland, President, Rattlesnake, In-
DEFENCE OF THE AUSTRALIAN COLONIES. (Article), South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), Wednesday 17 May 1854 [Issue No.2390] page 2 2019-08-29 21:36 valuable colonial possessions, wo have a powerful
what can bo the use of such a squadron it is difficult
to divine, for a single curvetta would be quito sufficient
countries from Cape Horu to the Ihhmus of Panama.
Fhe following is tho list of tho South American
squadron as appears by tho navy list : — Bonetta,
Diamond, Etpiegl ?, Naiad, Nereus, Rifleman, Sharp
ihooter, Slrumboli, Er.prm, and Trident; whilst
they aro wanted, are the foil -wing: — Amphiiritf
valuable colonial possessions, we have a powerful
what can be the use of such a squadron it is difficult
to divine, for a single corvette would be quite sufficient
countries from Cape Horn to the Ishmus of Panama.
The following is the list of the South American
squadron as appears by the navy list:—Bonetta,
Diamond, Espiegl, Naiad, Nereus, Rifleman, Sharp-
shooter, Stromboli, Express, and Trident; whilst
they are wanted, are the following:—Amphitrite,
DEFENCE OF THE AUSTRALIAN COLONIES. (Article), South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), Wednesday 17 May 1854 [Issue No.2390] page 2 2019-08-29 21:33 DEFENCE OP THE AUSTRALIAN
COLONIES,
(From the Australian and Neio Zealand Gazette, of
February 4.} ?
1 ho accounts brought from the Australian colonies
last week notice the presence of tho Russian frigate
Dwina in tho waters of the Pacific, and the absence
of any English ship of war fit to coue with her. in
sase ot hostilities commencing. Tho only, vessel of
var thero is tho Calliope, a ship, if we- recollect
ightly, belonging to tho class called 'jackass fri- !
jatus ;' a class of ships of very little uso either for
i jilting or running away. But still wo must have
legenerated in seamanship if even a vessel of this ?
ilass cannot givo a good accouut of any Russian
Late Singapore papers have, however, noticed tho
irrival of several Russian ships of war in that port,
jound for China and the island of Japan. In the
jvent of a war, these would of course be set to look
ifter the modern gold galleons which bear homeward
;!io wealth of our southern possessions. There is
)o question but that England ought to have, and
;hat immediately, a sufficiently powerful squadron in
;he protection of our own commerce, the thousands
jf miles of coast there aro without tho shadow of a
lefonco of any kind, and a Russian frigate might un
nolested lay tho several seaports of tho colony under
MntribiUion. At no period of late years have we
li.id so small a naval foroe in tho Australian colonies
is at proseut. In all Australia arc only the Calliope
lid hlectra ; and in Now Zoalaud, tho Pandora aud
t'untome —all iuufliciunt vessels for any extraordinary
tvailike purposes. A fow years ago there was a
uid tho economists have st-auccehsfully demonstrated
the great expense of the colonies to tire mother
jountry, that anything like eflijiout protection has
ftlrrmst at th«j in :rsy of any enterprising buccaneer
who might become fired wiih . emulating the exploits
of Paul Jones. As for other defences iu Australia,
suo'i as for s, batteries, &c, they arts, whore they
of v q-v, that probably no judicious commander would
i!xpt-su his men to the useless danger of manniug
DEFENCE OF THE AUSTRALIAN
COLONIES.
(From the Australian and New Zealand Gazette, of
February 4.)
The accounts brought from the Australian colonies
last week notice the presence of the Russian frigate
Dwina in the waters of the Pacific, and the absence
of any English ship of war fit to cope with her, in
case of hostilities commencing. The only vessel of
war there is the Calliope, a ship, if we recollect
rightly, belonging to the class called "jackass fri-
gates;" a class of ships of very little use either for
fighting or running away. But still we must have
degenerated in seamanship if even a vessel of this
class cannot give a good account of any Russian
Late Singapore papers have, however, noticed the
arrival of several Russian ships of war in that port,
bound for China and the island of Japan. In the
event of a war, these would of course be set to look
after the modern gold galleons which bear homeward
the wealth of our southern possessions. There is
no question but that England ought to have, and
that immediately, a sufficiently powerful squadron in
the protection of our own commerce, the thousands
of miles of coast there are without the shadow of a
defence of any kind, and a Russian frigate might un-
molested lay the several seaports of the colony under
contribution. At no period of late years have we
had so small a naval force in the Australian colonies
as at present. In all Australia are only the Calliope
and Electra; and in New Zealand, the Pandora and
Fantome—all inefficient vessels for any extraordinary
warlike purposes. A few years ago there was a
and the economists have so successfully demonstrated
the great expense of the colonies to the mother
country, that anything like efficient protection has
almost at the mercy of any enterprising buccaneer
who might become fired with emulating the exploits
of Paul Jones. As for other defences in Australia,
such as forts, batteries, &c., they are, where they
of view, that probably no judicious commander would
expose his men to the useless danger of manning
Give Rugby League a rest Received September 25 (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Friday 29 September 1989 [Issue No.19,714] page 8 2019-08-29 21:22 lump of leather on the ground de
serves the excessive number of col
please keep them to (ewer
publish as many views as pos
desirable. Address the enve
championships or the annual Cay
these two extravaganzas don't in
volve on-field violence or the nar
lump of leather on the ground de-
serves the excessive number of col-
please keep them to fewer
publish as many views as pos-
desirable. Address the enve-
championships or the annual Cay-
these two extravaganzas don't in-
volve on-field violence or the nar-
MAGAZINE; ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT Soothing sounds from FM 103.1 trial A CAPITAL LIFE (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Saturday 29 August 1992 [Issue No.20,957] page 25 2019-08-29 21:20 and Fergie are the principals in a re
high-quality demonstration tapes. Ap
plications are available from the afore
the suggestion last Sunday for a perma
policy proposals, so perhaps we can ex
for greener pastures. Her highly ac
meat pics.
Janice Horne in response to some terri
acting lessons at Stagecoach, in Maw
attending weekly and one adult partici
. No arguments there.
'accompanied the announcement.
• It's a very specialised art but Wojcicch
He now becomes a very special re
and Fergie are the principals in a re-
high-quality demonstration tapes. Ap-
plications are available from the afore-
the suggestion last Sunday for a perma-
policy proposals, so perhaps we can ex-
for greener pastures. Her highly ac-
meat pies.
Janice Horne in response to some terri-
acting lessons at Stagecoach, in Maw-
attending weekly and one adult partici-
No arguments there.
accompanied the announcement.
• It's a very specialised art but Wojciech
He now becomes a very special re-
MAGAZINE; ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT Soothing sounds from FM 103.1 trial A CAPITAL LIFE (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Saturday 29 August 1992 [Issue No.20,957] page 25 2019-08-29 21:19 1^—MAGAZINE; ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT MB————j^—|
By Robert Mack/in
Officially it's a two-week "test trans
hand for the launching ceremony, in
and the lead singer of Spindlcwood,
"Canberra is widely recognised as a cen
special prominence to jazz, folk and ear
'forum to be held at the South Building
Convenor Jennifer Cox, of the muse
ums unit of Bill Wood's Arts Depart
hlas-am opportunity to assert their im
et al over last week's item on the Na
call to your columnist from a high offi
however, there was no denying the es
this week that the Tasmanian Wilder
ness Socicty communication shed,
Franklin River blockade in 1982, is be
available this year for script develop
last year of the half-strength Chardon
nay, the Orlando Bin 62, when Can
Well, news just in from South Aus
It's an excellent idea for arts recep
Come to think of it, 1 haven't seen
MAGAZINE; ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Macklin
Officially it's a two-week "test trans-
hand for the launching ceremony, in-
and the lead singer of Spindlewood,
"Canberra is widely recognised as a cen-
special prominence to jazz, folk and ear-
forum to be held at the South Building
Convenor Jennifer Cox, of the muse-
ums unit of Bill Wood's Arts Depart-
hlas-am opportunity to assert their im-
et al over last week's item on the Na-
call to your columnist from a high offi-
however, there was no denying the es-
this week that the Tasmanian Wilder-
ness Society communication shed,
Franklin River blockade in 1982, is be-
available this year for script develop-
last year of the half-strength Chardon-
nay, the Orlando Bin 62, when Can-
Well, news just in from South Aus-
It's an excellent idea for arts recep-
Come to think of it, I haven't seen

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. 'nt
    List
    Public

    [Arranged by date.]

    Examples of publications using 'nt instead of n't.
    E.g. "should'nt" instead of "shouldn't".

    For other examples, see the following Trove searches:
    could'nt: http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?q=%22could%27nt%22
    should'nt: http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?q=%22should%27nt%22
    would'nt: http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?q=%22would%27nt%22

    Thread on this topic in the Trove forum:
    Grammar: Was 'nt an accepted early form of n't?
    After some discussion, I hypothesized the following:
    "Maybe there was a rule/usage whereby an apostrophe was used in place of an omitted space between words? That could explain it."
    This was put forward after it was pointed out that the word "did'n't" had been used in the past, where an apostrophe was used in place of an omitted space between words, Therefore, in conjunction with the rule that an apostrophe is placed only in the first position where letters are omitted (or, in this case, a space), and only one apostrophe should be used, then "did'nt" would be correct.
    Obviously there are other rules, regarding the use of apostrophes, where this would be incorrect; however, if that was a rule used by some people in the past, it would answer the question.

    Other examples of words with two apostrophes:


    ag'in' (against) is used in "Over the Sliprails" by Henry Lawson (in the chapter "They wait on the wharf in black").


    fo'c'sle (forecastle) is a common abbreviation used, regarding ships.


    sha'n't (shall not) is used in "The Moods of Ginger Mick" by C. J. Dennis (in the poem "Sari Bair", page 46).



    As an aside, here are some interesting discussions on some related words:
    Apostrophes in contractions: shan't, sha'n't or sha'nt?
    What is “won't” a contraction of?

    45 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-04-04
    User data
  2. acronym "AB" (Allan Border)
    List
    Public

    Early examples of the acronym "AB" (Allan Border).

    33 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-07-02
    User data
  3. acronym "SWAK" (and "SWALK")
    List
    Public

    Examples of the acronym "SWAK" (sealed with a kiss) and "SWALK" (sealed with a loving kiss).

    12 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-04-18
    User data
  4. ANA Day (Australia Day)
    List
    Public

    17 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-28
    User data
  5. Andrew ("Drewey") Dyson
    List
    Public

    Andrew "Drewey" Dyson (ca. 1858 - 1927), a well-known character around Perth (Western Australia).

    6 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-04-21
    User data
  6. Anzac Day as a holy day
    List
    Public

    Descriptions of Anzac Day as a "holy day".

    10 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-07-03
    User data
  7. Australia Advanced or Dialogues for the Year 2032
    List
    Public

    6 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-28
    User data
  8. Australia Day (by that name)
    List
    Public

    Articles which use the phrase "Australia Day" regarding the 26th of January.

    See also:
    ANA Day (Australia Day), http://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=71077
    First Landing, http://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=71080

    9 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2016-12-13
    User data
  9. Australian colonies as nations
    List
    Public

    Australian colonies being described as separate nations.

    5 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-08-15
    User data
  10. Banditti Petition
    List
    Public

    11 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2018-05-26
    User data
  11. Boer War, "fontein" place names
    List
    Public

    Names with the suffix "fontein" which featured in the Boer War.

    25 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-30
    User data
  12. Boer War, concentration camps
    List
    Public

    Articles re. the concentration camps in South Africa during the Boer War.

    Searched Trove up to 25 August 1901 inclusive
    http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?sortby=dateAsc&q=%22concentration+camp%22~0&s=380

    32 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-30
    User data
  13. book burning
    List
    Public

    21 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2014-06-06
    User data
  14. breach of promise
    List
    Public

    Examples of legal action (or threat of legal action) re. breach of promise (re. a promise to marry).

    5 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-05-30
    User data
  15. Cataline (instead of Catiline)
    List
    Public

    Examples of the Roman politician Catiline being called Cataline.

    14 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-10-25
    User data
  16. chivalry in wartime
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-30
    User data
  17. Erle Cox stories
    List
    Public

    27 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-18
    User data
  18. Eureka Rebellion trials
    List
    Public

    4 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-04-11
    User data
  19. farthings
    List
    Public

    Usage of farthings in Australia

    10 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2016-05-10
    User data
  20. Fatherland reference to England
    List
    Public

    England described as Australia's Fatherland.

    A search for "our fatherland England" gave 8 results, ranging from 1851 to 1896 (a 9th result, dated 1917, is not re. England, but is a quote from the Kaiser re. Germany).

    A search for "our motherland England" gave 27 results, ranging from 1900 to 1947 [see list "Motherland reference to England": http://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=70573].

    11 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-20
    User data
  21. First Landing [re. the First Fleet landing in Australia]
    List
    Public

    29 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-28
    User data
  22. Fools' Harvest, by Erle Cox
    List
    Public

    The serialised story "Fools' Harvest", by Erle Cox.
    It first appeared in The Argus (Melbourne), then in several other newspapers, and was published in book form in 1939.

    24 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2018-08-01
    User data
  23. Grant Hervey
    List
    Public

    22 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2014-04-18
    User data
  24. Historic Melbourne (The Australian Town and Country Journal, 1901)
    List
    Public

    The series "Historic Melbourne" in The Australian Town and Country Journal (1901).

    16 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2014-03-23
    User data
  25. horse accidents
    List
    Public

    3 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-31
    User data
  26. illustrations of people
    List
    Public

    4 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-04-24
    User data
  27. initialism SST (State School Teacher)
    List
    Public

    Examples of the acronym "S.S.T.", meaning "State School Teacher".

    9 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-30
    User data
  28. Kookaburra by Marion Sinclair
    List
    Public

    Some web pages say that "Kookaburra" was first sung at the World Jamboree at Frankston (Victoria) in 1934.
    However, no verifiable source states that it was publicly sung in 1934, although it was practised in 1934.

    In fact, as the Jamboree was held from 27 December 1934 to 13 January 1935, it may be more accurate to say that "the song was first sung at the 1934-1935 World Jamboree".
    The Argus (4 January 1935) reports that the song was sung by Scouts on Thursday 3 January 1935 at a gathering to pay tribute to the State Chief Scout (Sir Winston Dugan) and the World Chief Scout (Lord Baden-Powell).

    The first verifiable occasion when the song was sung in public occurred on 2 January 1935, "when more than 1,000 Guiders gathered to welcome the World Chief Guide (Lady Baden-Powell)" (see The Argus, 3 January 1935).
    The song had been practised in private by the Girl Guides in late 1934, in preparation for the event of 2 January 1935 - e.g. on 7 December 1934 at the Scot's Church Hall (see The Argus, 6 December 1935), which is in Melbourne.


    Reference re. 1934/1935 Jamboree:
    The first Australian Pan Pacific Scout Jamboree was held in Frankston from 27th December 1934 to 13th January 1935.
    http://www.discovermorningtonpeninsula.com.au/fascinatingfacts/frankston-scout-jamboree-1935.php

    14 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-02-04
    User data
  29. L. E. Homfray
    List
    Public

    Items regarding Lucy Everett Homfray (1873-1951).

    Some minor items that are possibly re. Lucy Everett Homfray have been placed at the end of the list.

    51 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2017-02-27
    User data
  30. Mother's Day
    List
    Public

    Early mentions of Mother's Day in Australia.

    2 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-05-10
    User data
  31. Motherland reference to England
    List
    Public

    England described as Australia's Motherland.

    A search for "our motherland England" gave 27 results, ranging from 1900 to 1947.

    A search for "our fatherland England" gave 8 results, ranging from 1851 to 1896 [see list "Fatherland reference to England": http://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=70581] (a 9th result, dated 1917, is not re. England, but is a quote from the Kaiser re. Germany).

    27 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-20
    User data
  32. nickname "The Bully", for The Bulletin
    List
    Public

    Examples where The Bulletin newspaper (later magazine) was nicknamed "The Bully", "Bully-tin", or similar.

    9 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-29
    User data
  33. Norman L. Beurle poetry
    List
    Public

    Poetry by Norman L. Beurle.

    39 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-05-07
    User data
  34. Norman L. Beurle, articles and letters
    List
    Public

    Articles, essays, and letters by Norman L. Beurle.

    5 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-05-07
    User data
  35. Peter Lalor
    List
    Public

    37 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-04-11
    User data
  36. phrase "a child among them taking notes"
    List
    Public

    Texts with the phrase "a child among them taking notes".

    The phrase "a child among them taking notes" (or "a child amongst them taking notes") refers to a situation where a child, an innocent, or an outsider is in the company of others, remembering what they say and do.

    14 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-01-25
    User data
  37. phrase "all over bar the shouting"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "all over bar the shouting", or similar (e.g. "all over but the shouting").
    Note: Most early usages are. re. horse racing.

    13 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-09-25
    User data
  38. phrase "Are you the cove?"
    List
    Public

    Instances of the phrase "Are you the cove?", or similar.
    http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?q=%22Are+You+the+Cove%22&sortby=dateAsc

    7 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-04-01
    User data
  39. phrase "Australia Felix"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the term "Australia Felix".

    14 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-05-27
    User data
  40. phrase "back of Bourke"
    List
    Public

    7 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-05-11
    User data
  41. phrase "clean up the pole"
    List
    Public

    The phrase "clean up the pole", meaning crazy, mad, looney, loopy.

    4 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2014-06-06
    User data
  42. phrase "cock-tail", as a derogatory term
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "cock-tail", used as a derogatory term.

    2 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2018-08-01
    User data
  43. phrase "currency lads" (and "currency lasses")
    List
    Public

    Examples of the terms "currency lads" and "currency lasses", or similar.

    5 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-08-15
    User data
  44. phrase "dead marine"
    List
    Public

    The term "dead marine", regarding empty bottles.

    6 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2014-06-06
    User data
  45. phrase "dead tight"
    List
    Public

    The term "dead tight", meaning drunk.

    Also appears in the poem "The Ways Are Wide", by E. J. Brady, in The Ways of Many Waters (1899).

    2 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-04
    User data
  46. phrase "give it a burl, Shirl"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "give it a burl, Shirl", or similar.

    See also the list for the phrase "give it a burl":
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=132373

    9 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-06-30
    User data
  47. phrase "give it a burl"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "give it a burl", or similar.

    See also the list for the phrase "give it a burl, Shirl":
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=132374

    12 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-06-30
    User data
  48. phrase "had rats"
    List
    Public

    The term "had rats" (or similar), meaning crazy, insane, mad, etc.

    3 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2014-06-16
    User data
  49. phrase "Heenan's hug"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "Heenan's hug", "the Heenan hug", or similar.

    For information on the American boxer John C. Heenan (1834-1873), see:
    [Note: His middle name was “Camel”, although it was sometimes mistakenly reported as “Carmel”.]
    "John C. Heenan", Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_C._Heenan
    "John Camel “Benicia Boy” Heenan", Find A Grave, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/110954112
    "John Carmel Heenan (the "Benecia Boy")", The Cyber Boxing Zone Encyclopedia, http://cyberboxingzone.com/boxing/heenan.htm
    Frank Keating, "Heenan v Sayers: The fight that changed boxing forever", The Guardian, https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2010/apr/14/john-heenan-tom-sayers-boxing

    7 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-06-14
    User data
  50. phrase "in love with death"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "in love with death", or similar.

    16 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-06-29
    User data
  51. phrase "it is what it is"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "it is what it is".

    15 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-09-30
    User data
  52. phrase "kick against the pricks"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "kick against the pricks", or similar.

    9 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2017-08-17
    User data
  53. phrase "knocked up" (meaning: very tired)
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "knocked up" (meaning "very tired").

    5 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2016-01-19
    User data
  54. phrase "laughing gear" (meaning mouth)
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "laughing gear" (meaning mouth).

    11 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-05-19
    User data
  55. phrase "licked them hollow"
    List
    Public

    The phrase "licked them hollow" (or similar), meaning to beat.

    Included in the story "She wouldn’t speak" by Henry Lawson, in While the Billy Boils (1896):
    "They pitch a blanky lot about them New Englan’ gals but I’ll back the Darlin’ girls to lick ’em holler as far’s looks is concerned"

    14 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-06
    User data
  56. phrase "lion in the path"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "lion in the path" (or "lions in the path").

    Derived from a passage in the Bible:
    "The slothful man saith, There is a lion in the way; a lion is in the streets."
    (Proverbs 26:13, King James version).

    19 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-06-09
    User data
  57. phrase "Mexican stand-off"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "Mexican stand-off".
    The phrase refers to a confrontation with no likely winner.

    It has been alleged that the phrase originated in Australia: "The expression came into use during the last decade of the 19th century; the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary makes an unattributed claim that the term is of Australian origin."
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_standoff

    However, the earliest located example of the phrase in Australian newspapers in Trove only dates back to 1904.

    4 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2017-12-16
    User data
  58. phrase "Ned Kelly beard"
    List
    Public

    The term "Ned Kelly beard", regarding a full beard.

    5 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-08
    User data
  59. phrase "Never-never country"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "Never-never country", or similar.

    8 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2016-08-09
    User data
  60. phrase "Nigger Head"
    List
    Public

    The term "Nigger Head", used in the name of various items; often used as a brand name, a colour, or in a perceived descriptive sense.

    Many instances exist of this name, especially used re. clothing and colours (as well as place names).
    This list includes selected and representative examples.

    Searched up to 1914, inclusive.
    Search used (looking in articles marked "Advertising"): http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?q&exactPhrase=Nigger+Head&anyWords¬Words&requestHandler&dateFrom&dateTo&l-advcategory=Advertising&sortby=dateAsc&s=0

    20 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2014-12-17
    User data
  61. phrase "Old Dart"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the term "Old Dart", regarding England or Britain.
    Although not definitely using "Old Dart" to refer to Ireland, several early examples use "Old Dart" in connection with Ireland, so the term may have been used re. Ireland early on, even though the term later became mainly associated with England. If the earliest examples were re. Ireland, then this lends creedence to the theory that the term "Old Dart" was a vernacular rendering of "old dirt" in an Irish brogue. Therefore, this would seem to negate the theory that the term derived from the River Dart, which enters the sea at Dartmouth in southern England.

    14 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-10-12
    User data
  62. phrase "old sod"
    List
    Public

    The term "old sod", meaning the "old land", being one's native country, or the land where one's family originated from; in an Australian context, the "old sold" commonly refers to Ireland and the Irish.

    As an exception to the usual usage (re. Ireland), there was one example found which used the phrase with regards to China (Freeman's Journal, 19 June 1880).

    11 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-10
    User data
  63. phrase "onwards and upwards"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "onwards and upwards", or similar.

    8 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2018-07-15
    User data
  64. phrase "pissed to the eyeballs"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "pissed to the eyeballs", or similar.
    Arranged in chronological order.

    11 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2018-04-17
    User data
  65. phrase "pure merino"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "pure merino", regarding Australia people (i.e. not re. sheep; although the phrase is derived from Australian merino sheep).


    A very useful article on this phrase was published in the Queensland Figaro [(Brisbane, Qld. : 1901 - 1936) Thursday 20 February 1913 p 3] - see below.

    20 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-10-02
    User data
  66. phrase "resistance is futile"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "resistance is futile", or similar.

    36 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2018-08-17
    User data
  67. phrase "Send her down Hughie"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "Send her down, Hughie" (regarding rain), or similar.

    1 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-05-20
    User data
  68. phrase "snavel the bun"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "snavel the bun".
    Meaning to win the prize, or be the best.

    5 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-12-20
    User data
  69. phrase "Snow King" (meaning Winter)
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "Snow King" (meaning Winter).

    11 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-05-06
    User data
  70. phrase "stone broke"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "stone broke", or similar.

    5 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-07-30
    User data
  71. phrase "strike me lucky"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "strike me lucky".

    10 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2016-10-28
    User data
  72. phrase "strike me pink"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "strike me pink".

    12 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-09-30
    User data
  73. phrase "stumped for cash"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "stumped for cash", "stumped for money", or similar.

    7 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2016-01-28
    User data
  74. phrase "such is life"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "such is life", or similar.

    7 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2018-07-19
    User data
  75. phrase "terra nullius"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "terra nullius".

    26 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2016-09-20
    User data
  76. phrase "the great Australian adjective"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "the great Australian adjective" (referring to the word "bloody").

    The phrase was made even more famous, or infamous, by the poem "The Great Australian Adjective" (1897) by W. T. Goodge:
    http://www.australianculture.org/the-great-australian-adjective-w-t-goodge/

    4 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-04-26
    User data
  77. phrase "think of the children"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the phrase "think of the children", or similar.

    17 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-10-13
    User data
  78. phrase "White Australia"
    List
    Public

    Sir George Reid claimed to have invented the term "White Australia", but was he actually the first to use it?

    Searched up to (inclusive) 16 May 1892
    http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?q=%22white+Australia%22&sortby=dateAsc&s=220



    The first located use of the phrase "white Australia" is from 27 April 1886.
    17 March 1896 is the first example located of George Reid using the phrase "white Australia".

    The claim of George Reid for being the first to use the phrase "white Australia" is found in:
    * Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate, 5 February 1901 (in the list below).
    * "My Reminiscences" (1917), by Sir George Houstoun Reid, p. 203 (in the list below).

    30 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-04-16
    User data
  79. poem "The Bastard from the Bush"
    List
    Public

    Articles re. the poem "The Bastard from the Bush".

    11 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2018-06-30
    User data
  80. poet: J.B., Peak Hill
    List
    Public

    15 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-04-18
    User data
  81. poet: Michael Massey Robinson
    List
    Public

    31 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2014-04-03
    User data
  82. poet: W. H.
    List
    Public

    4 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-05-06
    User data
  83. proposed change of name, from NSW to Australia
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2017-02-12
    User data
  84. Quintus Servinton
    List
    Public

    Mentions of "Quintus Servinton", the first novel published in Australia (author: Henry Savey).

    11 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2016-02-09
    User data
  85. Rhyme: Tinker, tailor, soldier, sailor
    List
    Public

    "Tinker, tailor, soldier, sailor" was a choosing rhyme, or a fortune-telling rhyme, used to indicate what profession someone would become, or to tell someone the profession of the person they were going to marry (it is somewhat similar to the mantra used when picking the petals off flowers, "She loves me, she loves me not, etc.").

    Early versions included the following professions:
    "tinker, tailor, soldier, sailor, apothecary, ploughboy, thief"

    See especially the following dates in this list:
    5 February 1892 = foretelling the profession of a child.
    16 July 1887 = foretelling the future husband of a female.
    16 December 1893 = A very good article re. fortune-telling games.

    91 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2018-08-11
    User data
  86. Round the Camp Fire
    List
    Public

    The "Round the Camp Fire" column.

    5 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2014-06-25
    User data
  87. Santa Claus
    List
    Public

    Early mentions of "Santa Claus".

    9 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-13
    User data
  88. Santa Claus, Father Christmas (pictures)
    List
    Public

    Early illustrations of Santa Claus, Father Christmas, etc.

    9 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2016-02-05
    User data
  89. serial story "Out of the Silence" by Erle Cox
    List
    Public

    14 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2018-06-01
    User data
  90. Smellbourne (Melbourne)
    List
    Public

    Examples of instances when people have referred to Melbourne as "Smellbourne".

    15 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2018-04-06
    User data
  91. The Call from the Dardanelles poem
    List
    Public

    The poem "The Call from the Dardanelles", which begins:
    I stood on the deck of a Troopship
    At the Gate of the Dardanelles

    Authorship has been attributed to several people. However, some attributions may actually relate to a person who forwarded the poem.

    18 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-20
    User data
  92. Waratah Day
    List
    Public

    2 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2018-01-14
    User data
  93. Woop Woop
    List
    Public

    Examples of the fictional place name "Woop Woop".

    24 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-10-10
    User data
  94. word "Anzac"
    List
    Public

    Early instances of the word "Anzac".

    Note: This list is not intended to include duplicates of articles.

    Instances noted up to 16 July 1915, inclusive
    http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?q=Anzac&sortby=dateAsc&s=80

    20 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-04-23
    User data
  95. word "arterwards"
    List
    Public

    Examples of "arterwards", used as a vernacular spelling of "afterwards".

    4 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-11-22
    User data
  96. word "Aussie" (also "Aussy")
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word "Aussie".

    1) The earliest usage located of "Aussie" was that of a woman, Aussie Brown. This may have been a nickname. It is possible that it could have been a misspelling of the name "Gussie", but the appearance of her name in several instances indicates that it was the correct spelling.

    There was also a wrestler by the name of Aussie Brown, who is mentioned in various newspapers from 1920, e.g. Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW), 21 April 1920, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article139426794

    2) There are quite a few references to the "Aussie" boat between 1912 and 1915. Apparently this was the nickname for the boat called "Australian" (see the 29 January 1913 article) - although the owner actually transferred the name between three vessels (see the 25 October 1913 article). That boat's nickname was also spelt, in some rare instances, as "Aussy".

    3) The earliest located version of "Australian" as an abbreviated word (used as a general term), is "Aussy" - which was in an article dated 28 April 1915.
    This spelling was used in quite a few early instances; however, later on, the spelling of "Aussie" became the standard.

    4) The earliest located usage of "Aussie" referring to "Australian" (as a general term), was in an article dated 13 July 1915:
    "Writing on board a transport (May 3) a few hours before landing at Gallipoli from Egypt, he said: "Rare yarns are being told about the 'Aussies' at the front."

    Note: The French word "aussi" translates as "as well" or "too".

    Instances noted up to 15 September 1917, inclusive
    https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?q=%22Aussie%22¬Words&requestHandler&anyWords&exactPhrase&dateTo&dateFrom=1915-02-01&sortby=dateAsc&s=860

    48 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-07-04
    User data
  97. word "barrack"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word "barrack", or similar (meaning: to support or give encouragement).

    3 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-09-12
    User data
  98. word "Bogan"
    List
    Public

    The word "Bogan".

    Also appears in: Henry Lawson, While the Billy Boils, Sydney: Angus and Robertson, 1896, in two short stories:
    1) [in: "The man who forgot"] "but had they all sworn in chorus, with One-Eyed Bogan as lead"
    2) [in: "He'd come back"] "Bogan Bill nodded approvingly".

    Searched Trove newspapers for the word "Bogan" up to 21 September 1835.

    4 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2014-06-14
    User data
  99. word "cady" (meaning "hat")
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word "cady", meaning "hat".

    8 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2016-01-30
    User data
  100. word "crick" (creek)
    List
    Public

    Examples of "crick", meaning creek.

    3 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2016-04-28
    User data
  101. word "digger" (re. miner)
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word "digger" (regarding miners).

    1 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2017-08-14
    User data
  102. word "dimned" (dimmed)
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word "dimned" (dimmed).

    10 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2016-01-19
    User data
  103. word "dinkum"
    List
    Public

    40 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2017-06-23
    User data
  104. word "dunnekin" (and "dunny")
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word "dunnekin", meaning toilet (as well as "dunny", and variations thereof).
    Note: "dunny" can also mean "deaf" (see entries from 1790, 1935).

    21 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2016-10-09
    User data
  105. word "enemy" (re. time)
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word "enemy" being used to mean "time".
    Also included are examples of the phrase "time is the enemy" (including as part of a longer phrase or quotation).

    17 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-10-04
    User data
  106. word "Flossie"
    List
    Public

    9 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-30
    User data
  107. word "fly" (slang)
    List
    Public

    2 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-30
    User data
  108. word "furphy" (meaning rumour)
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word "furphy" (meaning rumour).

    4 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-05-20
    User data
  109. word "Gorsquantity"
    List
    Public

    Examples of usage of the word "Gorsquantity".

    5 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-08-19
    User data
  110. word "grogshop"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word "grogshop" as one word, rather than the more usual "grog shop" or "grog-shop".

    11 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-10-23
    User data
  111. word "hello"
    List
    Public

    4 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2018-04-13
    User data
  112. word "humongous" / "humungous"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word word "humongous", also spelt "humungous".

    The word may derives from a combination of "huge"‎ and "monstrous", or from "huge"‎ and "enormous".
    Possibly of US origin.

    36 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-07-05
    User data
  113. word "nigger" (as a colour)
    List
    Public

    "Men's All Wool Cashmere Half Hose, sizes 9½ to 11, in shades of grey, navy, cream, putty, and nigger"

    1 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2018-02-25
    User data
  114. word "od"
    List
    Public

    Examples of "od", as a euphemism for "God".
    At present, the majority of the examples are of the phrase "Od's blood", with some of "Od's wounds" (many of the examples do not use an apostrophe in the phrase).

    15 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2016-06-12
    User data
  115. word "onst"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word "onst" (meaning "once").

    11 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-08-23
    User data
  116. word "satify"
    List
    Public

    9 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-04-04
    User data
  117. word "slipjack"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word slipjack, slip-jack, or similar, meaning pancake.

    4 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2016-04-17
    User data
  118. word "squoze"
    List
    Public

    Instances of the word "squoze" (slang), i.e. squeezed, being the past tense of squeeze. Includes variations of "squoze".

    18 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-07-25
    User data
  119. word "tresspassed"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word "tresspassed" (archaic spelling of trespassed").

    17 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2019-06-08
    User data
  120. word "whereever" (not "wherever")
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word "whereever" (with four Es), instead of the usual spelling as "wherever" (with three Es).

    6 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-05-01
    User data
  121. word "wowser"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word "wowser".

    Many instances of "wowser" appear from August 1903 onwards.

    19 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2014-12-01
    User data
  122. word "wull" (meaning "will")
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word "wull" (meaning "will").

    16 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2018-08-15
    User data
  123. word "Xmas"
    List
    Public

    Early examples of usage of the word "Xmas", as distinct from the word "Christmas".

    21 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2018-05-21
    User data
  124. word "yahoo"
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word "yahoo".

    19 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-03-27
    User data
  125. word "yous" (or "youse")
    List
    Public

    Examples of the word "yous" (or "youse"), as per the vernacular.
    Used in modern times as the plural of "you" (similar to the American "y'all").
    However, many early examples of "yous" refer to the singular of "you".

    15 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2015-04-01
    User data
  126. word: "multiculturalism"
    List
    Public

    Early usages of the word "multiculturalism", and similar words such as "multi-cultural".

    19 items
    created by: public:InstituteOfAustralianCulture 2017-07-13
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.