Information about Trove user: IanMurrell

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,780,844
2 noelwoodhouse 3,896,204
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,270,981
5 Rhonda.M 3,093,549
...
764 MalcolmHughes 58,481
765 AnthonyJessup 58,457
766 cantwell 58,419
767 IanMurrell 58,321
768 helwhiz 58,276
769 atlantis 58,202

58,321 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 94
August 2019 234
July 2019 55
June 2019 615
May 2019 1,033
April 2019 435
March 2019 8
February 2019 290
January 2019 347
December 2018 1,003
November 2018 719
October 2018 1,321
September 2018 1,038
August 2018 1,092
July 2018 1,118
June 2018 160
May 2018 1,218
April 2018 1,009
March 2018 1,295
February 2018 2,317
January 2018 1,017
December 2017 1,315
November 2017 471
October 2017 2,101
September 2017 890
August 2017 1,220
July 2017 1,078
June 2017 2,939
May 2017 384
April 2017 211
March 2017 1,248
February 2017 1,917
January 2017 2,315
December 2016 264
November 2016 2,088
October 2016 3,301
September 2016 2,462
August 2016 387
July 2016 262
June 2016 1,283
May 2016 290
March 2016 127
January 2016 326
December 2015 319
November 2015 461
October 2015 1,230
September 2015 373
August 2015 138
July 2015 1,344
June 2015 2,928
May 2015 3,792
April 2015 2,654
March 2015 106
February 2015 44
January 2015 9
December 2014 59
November 2014 278
October 2014 406
September 2014 94
August 2014 343
July 2014 106
June 2014 29
May 2014 71
December 2013 138
November 2013 102

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,780,642
2 noelwoodhouse 3,896,204
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,270,960
5 Rhonda.M 3,093,536
...
768 tagger111 58,171
769 borough2007 58,135
770 Jennifer.Crockett 58,013
771 IanMurrell 57,991
772 fitztrove 57,906
773 alaneade 57,857

57,991 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 94
August 2019 234
July 2019 55
June 2019 606
May 2019 853
April 2019 429
March 2019 8
February 2019 290
January 2019 347
December 2018 1,003
November 2018 719
October 2018 1,302
September 2018 1,038
August 2018 1,092
July 2018 1,118
June 2018 160
May 2018 1,218
April 2018 1,009
March 2018 1,295
February 2018 2,309
January 2018 988
December 2017 1,315
November 2017 416
October 2017 2,101
September 2017 890
August 2017 1,212
July 2017 1,078
June 2017 2,939
May 2017 384
April 2017 211
March 2017 1,248
February 2017 1,917
January 2017 2,315
December 2016 264
November 2016 2,088
October 2016 3,301
September 2016 2,462
August 2016 387
July 2016 262
June 2016 1,283
May 2016 274
March 2016 127
January 2016 326
December 2015 319
November 2015 461
October 2015 1,230
September 2015 373
August 2015 138
July 2015 1,344
June 2015 2,928
May 2015 3,792
April 2015 2,654
March 2015 106
February 2015 44
January 2015 9
December 2014 59
November 2014 278
October 2014 406
September 2014 94
August 2014 343
July 2014 106
June 2014 29
May 2014 71
December 2013 138
November 2013 102

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 310,992
2 PhilThomas 128,488
3 mickbrook 107,593
4 murds5 61,555
5 GeoffMMutton 51,076
...
164 onewaymule87 344
165 gumnut440 341
166 NevHolden 337
167 IanMurrell 330
168 bbroom 322
169 meggie 322

330 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2019 9
May 2019 180
April 2019 6
October 2018 19
February 2018 8
January 2018 29
November 2017 55
August 2017 8
May 2016 16


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
COST OF LIVING AND PROSPERITY (Article), The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Monday 12 January 1920 [Issue No.22,831] page 6 2019-10-11 03:55 COST OF LTVTNG AND PROSPERITY.
'Mr. Howard F. Hudson, of Sydney, who
news of an important federation of Ameri
trade. They arc, he says, establishing cor
porations to control this |-art of their 'busi
ness. One of the largest of these- is the
?of this corporation. iMr. Hudson, who has
?been absent from Sydney for nearly 12
gained from hi3 investigations among
'manufacturers is that prices are not likely
within 100 ner cent, of pre-war rates. ''The
cost of living, H is true, is lu'gh in
America,' he says, 'but there seems to be
too. One instance is furnished iby the
strike of milkcartcrs in Chicago. They
flowers— a few orchids for ihe women, and
course dinner must have cart 'that party
£15. Plenty of money is 'being spent in
and a frock £20. At the Olympia Exhibi
tion, motor cars were ibeing sold at a pre
mium. In fiome instances men were buy
weeks oE -the date of delivery placing them
accommodation. People have to tike what
they can get. We were for six weeks try
on our -behalf that we succeeded.'
COST OF LIVING AND PROSPERITY.
Mr. Howard F. Hudson, of Sydney, who
news of an important federation of Ameri-
trade. They are, he says, establishing cor-
porations to control this part of their busi-
ness. One of the largest of these is the
of this corporation. Mr. Hudson, who has
been absent from Sydney for nearly 12
gained from his investigations among
manufacturers is that prices are not likely
within 100 per cent, of pre-war rates. ''The
cost of living, it is true, is high in
America," he says, "but there seems to be
too. One instance is furnished by the
strike of milkcarters in Chicago. They
flowers— a few orchids for the women, and
course dinner must have cost that party
£15. Plenty of money is being spent in
and a frock £20. At the Olympia Exhibi-
tion, motor cars were being sold at a pre-
mium. In some instances men were buy-
weeks of the date of delivery placing them
accommodation. People have to take what
they can get. We were for six weeks try-
on our behalf that we succeeded."
IMPORT ENTRIES PASSED AT HIS MAJESTY'S CUSTOMS. (Article), Daily Commercial News and Shipping List (Sydney, NSW : 1891 - 1954), Thursday 7 July 1921 [Issue No.10,319] page 2 2019-10-11 03:50 __ Hardware.
H. F. Hudson, 2 cs shovels ? e
_Hardware.
H. F. Hudson, 2 cs shovels E
COMPANY NEWS. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 23 February 1924 [Issue No.26,875] page 19 2019-10-11 03:49 to chance the name of the company to Alumino
to chance the name of the company to Alumino-
Family Notices (Family Notices), The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), Saturday 14 August 1920 [Issue No.12874] page 10 2019-10-11 03:48 HUDSON. — 6th August, at "Le Chalet," Milson Road,
J '> Crcmorne, wife of- Howard F. Hudson— a son.
HUDSON. — 5th August, at "Le Chalet," Milson Road,
Cremorne, wife of Howard F. Hudson— a son.
EMPIRE TRADE. PREFERENCE URGED. British Manufacturers' Meeting. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Thursday 13 December 1923 [Issue No.26,814] page 9 2019-10-11 03:47 At the' ninth annual mooting of the Aus-
the Chamber of Commorce building, tho nnnuol
bodies for British manufactures wore being
Council, giving an "absoluto" and not a "poi
contage" preference to British goods, but
tion to tho Lord Mayor, tho Council not only
rescinded the resolution, hut also eliminated
the "percentage" proforonco previously al-
lowed, with the result that British goods havo
now no recognised definite ndvnntago over
thoso of foreign mnnufacturo. The position
now Is, us officially advised by tho Town Clerk,
that each tender Is to bo considered on its
own merits, nnd tile degroo of preference to
Australian and other British goods is to bo
left to tho discretion of the Council. Tho
association applied to tho Tariff Board tor in-
formation tis to its methods in dealing with
applications received hy it from Australian
chairman of tho board on several occasions
granted or Increased, the applicant would have
to prove his ability to Bupply a .largo por
centago of tho market requirements, mid also
that no decision would bo given until ovldenco
had been obtnined from all parties intorostcd.
As it would appear that in some instances iit
hered to, tho council had asked the Tariff
Board to notify it of all applications affoctlng
British goods, in ordor that when necessary
the association might bo in a position to col-
lect information from membors with a view
to protecting their Interests.
Tho chairman (Mr. F. G. Shrlmpton) men-
tioned that news had beon received that day
that" all tho Government departments except
one had now ngrood to a requost by the asso-
ciation that uniformity of practico should bo
followed in nil the departments, particularly
with regard to making the dotalls of tenders
lodged available for the inspoctlon of unsuc-
"Efforts to promoto tho Imperial spirit must
, bo quietly and subtly educational," tho chair-
support of hor children oversea', and while sho
looks with dollghtod and proud oyos on ovory
effort they make to provo themselves self
reliant and self-supporting, she Is surely en-
titled to ask that thoy do not forgot her when
thoy aro wanting something beyond llioir
powers to produce-for ovory penny BPont out-
side tho bounds of our Empire is an actual
loss, and a wonkonlng of its powor."
land, said ho was struck while in England by
the amount of unemployment In tho Industrial
districts. Ho did not know whother It was
reasonable to expect a great country Uko Eng-
land, that had prospered under a frootrado
at such short notice Ile believed, however,
that tho tlraa would ovontunlly como when
something of that nature would hnvo to bo
brought about,
Tho following members wore elected to the
council of the nssoclallon for tho coming yoar:
-MoBBrs. W. W. Andorson, Howard F, Hudson,
J. B. Rumford, V. G. Shrlmpton, C. J. Spnrowo,
At the ninth annual mooting of the Aus-
the Chamber of Commerce building, the annual
bodies for British manufactures were being
Council, giving an "absolute" and not a "per-
centage" preference to British goods, but
tion to the Lord Mayor, the Council not only
rescinded the resolution, but also eliminated
the "percentage" preference previously al-
lowed, with the result that British goods have
now no recognised definite advnatage over
those of foreign manufacture. The position
now is, as officially advised by the Town Clerk,
that each tender is to be considered on its
own merits, and the degree of preference to
Australian and other British goods is to be
left to the discretion of the Council. The
association applied to the Tariff Board for in-
formation as to its methods in dealing with
applications received by it from Australian
chairman of the board on several occasions
granted or increased, the applicant would have
to prove his ability to supply a large per-
centage of the market requirements, and also
that no decision would be given until evidence
had been obtained from all parties interested.
As it would appear that in some instances at
hered to, the council had asked the Tariff
Board to notify it of all applications affectlng
British goods, in order that when necessary
the association might be in a position to col-
lect information from members with a view
to protecting their interests.
Te chairman (Mr. F. G. Shrimpton) men-
tioned that news had been received that day
that all the Government departments except
one had now agreed to a request by the asso-
ciation that uniformity of practice should be
followed in all the departments, particularly
with regard to making the details of tenders
lodged available for the inspectlon of unsuc-
"Efforts to promote the Imperial spirit must
be quietly and subtly educational," the chair-
support of her children oversea, and while she
looks with delighted and proud eyes on every
effort they make to prove themselves self-
reliant and self-supporting, she is surely en-
titled to ask that they do not forgot her when
they are wanting something beyond their
powers to produce-for every penny spent out-
side the bounds of our Empire is an actual
loss, and a weakening of its power."
land, said he was struck while in England by
the amount of unemployment in the Industrial
districts. He did not know whether it was
reasonable to expect a great country like Eng-
land, that had prospered under a freetrade
at such short notice. He believed, however,
that the time would eventually come when
something of that nature would have to be
brought about.
The following members were elected to the
council of the association for the coming year:
-Messrs. W. W. Anderson, Howard F. Hudson,
J. B. Rumford, V. G. Shrimpton, C. J. Sparowe,
Advertising (Advertising), Tweed Daily (Murwillumbah, NSW : 1914 - 1949), Friday 31 January 1947 [Issue No.27] page 6 2019-08-31 05:20 I Fern Hooks — Two sided ' ' , ?
r ^ Each ? -: .... n/3
| Crow Bars — 6' feet
[ Each.. ? ..;...... ...11/6
' Crow Bars — 7 feet r ' - '. '
Post Hole Shovels- — '* k I. ??'?/'
Dairy Brooms . 6/6 and 6/9
!! Line Levels — ^in ? ;r.. . . 5/3,
?! Spirit Levels ? i', . . ..''.. 4/11 J
? Spirit Levels — 1 2r ? '. / ? 4/9
T Spirit Levels — 18' ? '. . . . . 12/6
Spirit Levels — 24' . . , ? ; . . 15/6
Order now' and save di. ?appointment. We also
have a complete range of Saddlery, Tinware, i
Paints and General Ironmongery. Remember the |
t Phone number is 45 1'. The place is Scotty Mac- :
Donald, Wharf Street and ? the Slogan 'Scotty's ; ,
Way is the Right Way.' ;
34 and 37 WHARF and QUEjEN STREETS,
Fern Hooks — Two sided
Each 11/3
Crow Bars — 6' feet
Each ........11/6
Crow Bars — 7 feet
Post Hole Shovels —
Dairy Brooms 6/6 and 6/9
Line Levels — ¾in 5/3,
Spirit Levels 4/11
Spirit Levels — 12" 4/9
Spirit Levels — 18' 12/6
Spirit Levels — 24' 15/6
Order now and save disappointment. We also
have a complete range of Saddlery, Tinware,
Paints and General Ironmongery. Remember the
Phone number is 45 1'. The place is Scotty Mac-
Donald, Wharf Street and the Slogan 'Scotty's
Way is the Right Way.'
34 and 37 WHARF and QUEEN STREETS,
Advertising (Advertising), Tweed Daily (Murwillumbah, NSW : 1914 - 1949), Friday 31 January 1947 [Issue No.27] page 6 2019-08-31 05:16 [MT'SHERE
:..:: tools —
; Best Quality Chipping Hoes ? 1\'
:- Best Quality English Chipping Hoes —-5'
Each ....... ?'.'. ? ? fi/ig,f
i , Each .. .. .I .... ? ,_ _ 12/5
\', Bananai Forks — English 4 pronged
I Each... ? n^
j Grubbing Madocks . . ? '. . . . 14/6
t ' ? Picks — - Superior quality
♦ Each ? .; . .-.» ? n/6
i Fern Hooks — One sided -? 7 - '
j - Each ... ? .' ? 9/8
Each ? .... .. n/6
i Short Handle Shovels ? :, .V . . . . '10/
! Spades — - Short Handle .. . . '.' .\*V ? 11/6
; Pitch Fork - — 3 prong . . '. . . : ? 10/6
| Pbst Hole Augers ? ' ;.'. - .' . .-. £2/6/0
Dairy Broorns ? .',.;. !; . 6/6 and 6/9
ii Dairy Scrubs ? ':'; . . ' ? 2/4
I Horse Brushes ? '..'.. . . 4/6 to 7/6
I Wire Block Brushes . . ..-../; ? ' . . 2/11
; Clothes Brushes ? . . ..... . . 3/6
;; Split Links — All sizes, lb ? 2/3
j Dog Chains — Heavy . . .... ; ? 2/3
-t Chip-It Chisels — i'm ? .... .. 4/6
IT'S HERE
Tools —
Best Quality Chipping Hoes ½"
Best Quality English Chipping Hoes — 5"
Each ....... 6/6
Each .. 12/5
Banana Forks — English 4 pronged
Each... 11/6
Grubbing Madocks 14/6
Picks — - Superior quality
Each 11/6
Fern Hooks — One sided
Each 9/8
Each 11/6
Short Handle Shovels 10/
Spades — Short Handle 11/6
Pitch Fork — 3 prong 10/6
Post Hole Augers £2/6/0
Dairy Brooms . 6/6 and 6/9
Dairy Scrubs 2/4
Horse Brushes .... . . 4/6 to 7/6
Wire Block Brushes . . .... . . 2/11
Clothes Brushes . ..... . . 3/6
Split Links — All sizes, lb 2/3
Dog Chains — Heavy . . .... ? 2/3
Chip-It Chisels — ¼in. .... .. 4/6
THE NEW VICTORIAN LAND BILL. (Article), Queensland Country Life (Qld. : 1900 - 1954), Friday 1 December 1905 [Issue No.12] page 24 2019-08-31 05:04 like the panel saw, be either straight or hollow in the back (see illus
tration) : there is no practical difference in the working, though I
when building. One carpenter will have,a fad
:bM^bratid' on ;th© market at th$ present time that suits me is again
the Disston. In this brand, however, tlie buyer must be careful to get
This in rip and panel saws is in the hollow-back and
fetamp^ 1112, London spring, extra refined, warranted; in the straight
back 1&, London spring, extra refined, warranted, the handle has also
...about'-28. more than the common ones; the quality about double.
inch (Fig. 65),otherwise like the rip, same brand and quality,and picked
uofc too flush of cash get a 28-inch, with six
teeth to the inch, this i| called a half rip, and
can be used both as a rip" or hand-saw. It is, of
b© as shown (Fig. 66),-length of blade,
14 inches,^%ireh^ teeth to the inch, the back should be steel, as it is
Pier. 66.
E£y^hM&^ This has one handle (Fig. 67), as jshown, detachable,
aaid threesmall and middle are the ones to take, the largest
&31saws should be used carefully so as not iio buckle or twist
wood square, andtbus
spoils work. It can be beaten outtrue again, but only by a skilful
workman. Secondly, the blade must be kept just the right sliape%at
the teeth so as to cut the wood, properly* By the sha'pe, shown, it (Ca$
be seen that either hand or rip saws cat best at th£ fullest point, jals^
if sawing on another board or the bench you run no risk /of.cuttiqg
the same. * ' , \
Always keep your saws well greased or oiled$ keep them from rustl
ing and they run easier. Keatsfoot is the. only oil to iise on thena^
Always keep good files, and with them keep the saws sharp* Shar|>
tools make light worki v ■ - \
hand with tools better buy an iron Disston's saw vice, .cost about 3s.
I like the wooden one myself, because it is not liable to hurt th#
files. The saw in, set with a Morrill; then take a flat file and top the
the blade as shown before. Now stai^t from the point and file th$
forward thrust, lifting out clear when coming back for each stroke*,
properly, the saw teeth wUl be as shown in the illustration of th4
panel saw; all saws cut with the point,f■:below
it. The rip is sharpened similarly to th^ panel saw, excepting that
the Set given should be very slight, and the file angle so that the tooth
is nearly square, jwsra-.xig-saw^j^^^
The tenon is sharpened similarly to the panel saw,- biit the ^d^
should be straight. ' ; ..
straight edge, and is not set at all. r
J These consist of the tryer, jack, rabbet, smoother, tongue an<l
with iron planes competing against the wooden. In theory, these ar£
much better than the wooden, in .practice much worse. Why?
being planed as tightly as Bland mud to a blanket! . If you knock
enough, but you need lots of time .and oil. The 'wood plane takes
, and not heating like the iron. Another great disadvantage of the
: iron tools is that, being cast, they Tt>reak very easily, and cannot, be
mended. Their only advantage is that tbey, keep true a long time.
In a few case's,lit* pays to use them; these Will -be mentioned as we go
like the panel saw, be either straight or hollow in the back (see illus-
tration) ; there is no practical difference in the working, though I
when building. One carpenter will have a fad
only brand on the market at the present time that suits me is again
the Disston. In this brand, however, the buyer must be careful to get
his best quality. This in rip and panel saws is in the hollow-back and
stamp of 112, London spring, extra refined, warranted; in the straight
back 12, London spring, extra refined, warranted, the handle has also
about 2s. more than the common ones; the quality about double.
inch (Fig. 65), otherwise like the rip, same brand and quality, and picked
not too flush of cash get a 28-inch, with six
teeth to the inch, this is called a half rip, and
can be used both as a rip or hand-saw. It is, of
Tenon Saw.- This should be as shown (Fig. 66), length of blade,
14 inches, twelve teeth to the inch, the back should be steel, as it is
Fig. 66.
Key-hole Saw.- This has one handle (Fig. 67), as shown, detachable,
and three small and middle are the ones to take, the largest
First, all saws should be used carefully so as not to buckle or twist
the handle. A buckled saw will never saw the wood square, and thus
spoils work. It can be beaten out true again, but only by a skilful
workman. Secondly, the blade must be kept just the right shape at
the teeth so as to cut the wood, properly. By the shape, shown, it can
be seen that either hand or rip saws cut best at the fullest point, also
if sawing on another board or the bench you run no risk of cuttihg
the same.
Always keep your saws well greased or oiled ; keep them from rust-
ing and they run easier. Neatsfoot is the only oil to use on them.
Always keep good files, and with them keep the saws sharp. Sharp
tools make light work.
hand with tools better buy an iron Disston's saw vice, cost about 3s.
I like the wooden one myself, because it is not liable to hurt the
files. The saw in, set with a Morrill ; then take a flat file and top the
the blade as shown before. Now start from the point and file the
forward thrust, lifting out clear when coming back for each stroke.
properly, the saw teeth will be as shown in the illustration of the
panel saw; all saws cut with the point about ⅛ of the edge below
it. The rip is sharpened similarly to the panel saw, excepting that
the set given should be very slight, and the file angle so that the tooth
is nearly square, as a rip saw cuts like a pit-saw, with a downward
The tenon is sharpened similarly to the panel saw, but the edge
should be straight.
straight edge, and is not set at all.
These consist of the tryer, jack, rabbet, smoother, tongue and
with iron planes competing against the wooden. In theory, these are
much better than the wooden, in practice much worse. Why?
being planed as tightly as Bland mud to a blanket! If you knock
enough, but you need lots of time and oil. The wood plane takes
and not heating like the iron. Another great disadvantage of the
iron tools is that, being cast, they break very easily, and cannot, be
mended. Their only advantage is that they, keep true a long time.
In a few case's, it pays to use them; these will be mentioned as we go
along.
THE NEW VICTORIAN LAND BILL. (Article), Queensland Country Life (Qld. : 1900 - 1954), Friday 1 December 1905 [Issue No.12] page 24 2019-08-31 04:47 'Taking the trying plane, it should be as shown {Fig. 68) > the best
red orwhite beech, and of the right grain, asshown in the remarks on
wood. Moseley's and Maliock!s are the two best brands of planes in
my estimation. Mathieson's second. The prices ate "in proportion to
the quality. Load her with lead, as shown, below the handle and. ill
•front, to make her run heavy, as*
when wishing to take
irons out; also roundthe fronts
toat or handle^ ifts if
left sharp it cats the forefinger. In the even t ot t ne moutn
be let into the face as sliown^Jb'ig. 71); tne moum
ja*3^ »s shown
WSflri^©9Y :fee tricked
It&e:33&l-V It
is not necessary to loaa
lack' (Fie*. 70), and is
most useful for saving the otfcier
jack. In the latter {(xermaii)
Fig- 68.
Pig. 71.
, . ** «■ > *4
I rail steel iron in it with a good English
Tlw BabbeL—As shown (Fig. 72), should
b<e> picked like the tryer; the best size is
from 1 to 1$ mcnes. it
can be used as a fibster
by nailing a,strip,of wood
on tlie side for a fence or
guide. The iron is set mi askewj asome
prefer them set ^straight, but they are
..tools. : '',v;
square,gauges, rule, chisels, tnallei, brace, bits, level, spokeshave,
he must hoivever, make it his business to get these of the best quality.
This constant insistence on my part about the besfcbeingthecheapest
bfehind in their work, and never get enough cash to buy a good set
knows better) . Remember time is money, to the settler aswell as jbo
the business man ; not a minute need be wasted, wet or di^';if..a'. jiiian"
has a good set of tools, and a shed to work in. 1
I cannot make these descriptions nearly as full as I would like,
will take ^ach set of tools, wrinkles about stock buildings, etc., and
:. Handsaws.
- The Rip*—As shown (Fig 63), length of. blade, 28 inches, four teeth
to the inch (Fig. 64) i {The number t)f teeth to the inch in * a saw
wood it.^Wilt waste)* To test its quality, hold it up with one
hand and ring it With the other, the same as picking a cross-cut. Then
make ^ure it is strong enough. If weak, you will feel it "whip" or sag
quality,theuser jean not This saw may,
Taking the trying plane, it should be as shown (Fig. 68), the best
red or white beech, and of the right grain, as shown in the remarks on
wood. Moseley's and Mallock's are the two best brands of planes in
my estimation. Mathieson's second. The prices are in proportion to
the quality. Load her with lead, as shown, below the handle and in
front, to make her run heavy, as
hammer on when wishing to take
irons out; also round the fronts
edge of the toat or handle, as if
left sharp it cuts the forefinger. In the event of the mouth
be let into the face as shown (Fig 71) ; the mouth
ordinary jack, as shown
(Fig.69) ; should be picked
like the tryer. It
is not necessary to load
jack' (Fig. 70), and is
most useful for saving the other
jack. In the latter (German)
Fig. 68.
Fig. 71.

run steel iron in it with a good English
The RabbeL—As shown (Fig. 72), should
be picked like the tryer; the best size is
from 1 to 1½ inches. It
can be used as a filister
by nailing a strip,of wood
on the side for a fence or
guide. The iron is set on askew ; some
prefer them set straight, but they are
TOOLS.
square, gauges, rule, chisels, mallet, brace, bits, level, spokeshave,
he must however, make it his business to get these of the best quality.
This constant insistence on my part about the best being the cheapest
behind in their work, and never get enough cash to buy a good set
knows better) . Remember time is money, to the settler as well as to
the business man ; not a minute need be wasted, wet or dry, if a man
has a good set of tools, and a shed to work in.
I cannot make these descriptions nearly as full as I would like.
will take each set of tools, wrinkles about stock buildings, etc., and
Handsaws.
The Rip.—As shown (Fig 63), length of blade, 28 inches, four teeth
to the inch (Fig. 64). (The number of teeth to the inch in a saw
amount of wood it will waste). To test its quality, hold it up with one
hand and ring it with the other, the same as picking a cross-cut. Then
make sure it is strong enough. If weak, you will feel it "whip" or sag
after quality, as the user cannot saw straight with it. This saw may,
THE NEW VICTORIAN LAND BILL. (Article), Queensland Country Life (Qld. : 1900 - 1954), Friday 1 December 1905 [Issue No.12] page 24 2019-08-31 04:31 for one good free-biting* Turkey, you can buy thirty as hard as steel,
and Wni useISs; bi^itig: Tii^eyfe is too risky, you may get a good
oii^ ^tj'atiglit offor ypu may never; it is all a chance, with, as the
weight. > They wear out a. lot faster than a good Turkey.
isathird of the others.' Some last longer than others, the stone
••having been got out deeper down in the
being a colonial stone is, of course,*against them. To judge a stone's
Cedar is the only wood for this. For holding it firm on
thfe iiench for riibbing-up tools, drive in two small nails at the corners
of one end, and file them off sharp, leaving about i inch out. These
only make^hp^one strpke from end to end. Keep plenty of oil on it
and dust off it. The middle of thestone should be a shade hollow to
hold the oil on nicely^ but not too much or it will spoil the bevel.
this will make it bite. Rub all edges at right anglesto the length
Aase-stone.—This is a smaH pepper and salt stone of sandstone or
soft shale, used for rubbing-up axes. They cost about 3d, each, work
.with -water, or vulgarly " spit/' and are keptinapouchon the ,
FiV. EL
SmoothBr.—^
Ib pilled liki tkeoihers * it is
not loaded 5 2| inciiy s tfjfcli^ best
Are very Handy for making doors,
o^riipmiagpit-saWii3iningboard^?
They are of iron, as less likely ft)
Out of trutlu
BfeVel.
This as shown* (Fig. 74)
the metal cries
workiet';.. the
spoOs building- ^ |
75) , may be either'
to get out of truth li&e the wooden ones. Two are required,
a 10-inch for common wort, and a little 3-inch one for
squaring edges with. Those wifcha mitre on them are to be
Irfl.iicrPB
As shownj Marple's
plated. Kr abutting
ggtuge. Tlie^fcwbod
truth quickly^
whilst tlio J>ra^sr
faced ones sire too
heavy to iise. t
Should be of box, 2 feet long, with brass-bound edges. Ka
make; the 3 feet rules are. quicker, but too awkward to carry. *
for one good free-biting Turkey, you can buy thirty as hard as steel,
and thus useless; buying Turkeys is too risky, you may get a good
one straight off or you may never; it is all a chance, with, as the
weight. They wear out a lot faster than a good Turkey.
is a third of the others. Some last longer than others, the stone
being a better quality, having been got out deeper down in the
being a colonial stone is, of course,against them. To judge a stone's
as shown. Cedar is the only wood for this. For holding it firm on
the bench for rubbing-up tools, drive in two small nails at the corners
of one end, and file them off sharp, leaving about ⅛ inch out. These
only make the one stroke from end to end. Keep plenty of oil on it
and dust off it. The middle of the stone should be a shade hollow to
hold the oil on nicely, but not too much or it will spoil the bevel.
this will make it bite. Rub all edges at right angles to the length
Axe-stone.—This is a small pepper and salt stone of sandstone or
soft shale, used for rubbing-up axes. They cost about 3d. each, work
with water, or vulgarly "spit" and are kept in a pouch on the belt.
Fig. 73.
Smoother.— As shown (Fig. 73.)
Is picked like the others ; it is
not loaded ; 2½ inches is the best
Are very handy for making doors,
or running pit-saw lining boards.
They are of iron, as less likely to
get out of truth.
Bevel.
This as shown (Fig. 74)
is the best, the metal ones
work loose and let the
spoils building.
75) , may be either
to get out of truth like the wooden ones. Two are required,
a 10-inch for common work, and a little 3-inch one for
squaring edges with. Those with a mitre on them are to be
Gauges.
As shown, Marple's
mortice (Fig. 76)
plated. For a cutting
gauge. The all-wood
truth quickly,
whilst the brass-
faced ones are too
heavy to use.
Rule.
Should be of box, 2 feet long, with brass-bound edges. Rabones
make; the 3 feet rules are quicker, but too awkward to carry.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.