Information about Trove user: GlennD61

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,822,344
2 noelwoodhouse 3,920,989
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,322,763
5 Rhonda.M 3,137,786
...
185 DouglasPywell 270,729
186 g.hoult 270,190
187 dlbeare 270,026
188 GlennD61 269,523
189 SydneyPhysicsGuy 268,413
190 tasfamily 267,394

269,523 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

November 2019 65
October 2019 436
September 2019 216
August 2019 232
July 2019 474
June 2019 876
May 2019 1,015
April 2019 931
March 2019 583
February 2019 1,285
December 2018 179
November 2018 112
July 2018 4,951
June 2018 11,756
May 2018 14,050
April 2018 21,885
March 2018 14,531
February 2018 685
January 2018 412
December 2017 5,384
November 2017 6,603
October 2017 10,739
September 2017 11,182
August 2017 15,343
July 2017 8,085
June 2017 4,110
March 2017 48
February 2017 214
January 2017 723
December 2016 1,784
November 2016 2,719
October 2016 4,489
September 2016 5,552
August 2016 3,437
July 2016 540
June 2016 1,297
May 2016 587
April 2016 102
March 2016 26
February 2016 37
December 2015 52
November 2015 6
October 2015 282
September 2015 3,580
August 2015 4,642
July 2015 3,932
June 2015 6,462
May 2015 5,048
April 2015 4,429
March 2015 4,389
February 2015 2,029
January 2015 2,434
December 2014 1,672
October 2014 1,131
September 2014 4,112
August 2014 3,317
July 2014 592
June 2014 48
May 2014 44
April 2014 467
March 2014 449
February 2014 455
January 2014 77
December 2013 196
November 2013 44
October 2013 504
September 2013 2,131
August 2013 3,944
July 2013 4,021
June 2013 1,621
May 2013 1,742
April 2013 786
March 2013 2,179
February 2013 819
January 2013 489
December 2012 411
November 2012 2,021
October 2012 1,178
September 2012 827
August 2012 2,632
July 2012 2,623
June 2012 1,255
May 2012 3,812
April 2012 3,827
March 2012 1,064
February 2012 1,989
January 2012 3,818
December 2011 1,870
November 2011 754
October 2011 601
September 2011 1,012
August 2011 455
July 2011 2,039
June 2011 2,215
May 2011 1,855
April 2011 199
March 2011 1,182
February 2011 1,182
January 2011 1,474
December 2010 947
November 2010 653
October 2010 511
September 2010 337
August 2010 772
July 2010 208

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,822,142
2 noelwoodhouse 3,920,989
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,322,742
5 Rhonda.M 3,137,773
...
183 DouglasPywell 270,729
184 dlbeare 270,026
185 g.hoult 269,665
186 GlennD61 269,523
187 SydneyPhysicsGuy 268,378
188 tasfamily 267,394

269,523 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

November 2019 65
October 2019 436
September 2019 216
August 2019 232
July 2019 474
June 2019 876
May 2019 1,015
April 2019 931
March 2019 583
February 2019 1,285
December 2018 179
November 2018 112
July 2018 4,951
June 2018 11,756
May 2018 14,050
April 2018 21,885
March 2018 14,531
February 2018 685
January 2018 412
December 2017 5,384
November 2017 6,603
October 2017 10,739
September 2017 11,182
August 2017 15,343
July 2017 8,085
June 2017 4,110
March 2017 48
February 2017 214
January 2017 723
December 2016 1,784
November 2016 2,719
October 2016 4,489
September 2016 5,552
August 2016 3,437
July 2016 540
June 2016 1,297
May 2016 587
April 2016 102
March 2016 26
February 2016 37
December 2015 52
November 2015 6
October 2015 282
September 2015 3,580
August 2015 4,642
July 2015 3,932
June 2015 6,462
May 2015 5,048
April 2015 4,429
March 2015 4,389
February 2015 2,029
January 2015 2,434
December 2014 1,672
October 2014 1,131
September 2014 4,112
August 2014 3,317
July 2014 592
June 2014 48
May 2014 44
April 2014 467
March 2014 449
February 2014 455
January 2014 77
December 2013 196
November 2013 44
October 2013 504
September 2013 2,131
August 2013 3,944
July 2013 4,021
June 2013 1,621
May 2013 1,742
April 2013 786
March 2013 2,179
February 2013 819
January 2013 489
December 2012 411
November 2012 2,021
October 2012 1,178
September 2012 827
August 2012 2,632
July 2012 2,623
June 2012 1,255
May 2012 3,812
April 2012 3,827
March 2012 1,064
February 2012 1,989
January 2012 3,818
December 2011 1,870
November 2011 754
October 2011 601
September 2011 1,012
August 2011 455
July 2011 2,039
June 2011 2,215
May 2011 1,855
April 2011 199
March 2011 1,182
February 2011 1,182
January 2011 1,474
December 2010 947
November 2010 653
October 2010 511
September 2010 337
August 2010 772
July 2010 208

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
THE GERMAN NAVY. INCREASING PERSONNEL. LONDON, September 15. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Monday 16 September 1907 [Issue No.15,261] page 7 2019-11-05 11:48 &&Mg@ä@&K
ft jN.ßREASila .#RTON^i^^^
Sreaseo^gīg'I^
THE GERMAN NAVY.
INCREASING PERSONNEL.
LONDON, September 15.
The personnel of the German navy has in-
creased during the past ten years from
23,403 to 46,950, and next year it will ex-
ceed 50,000.
TRANSATLANTIC RECORD. LUSTANIA'S PASSAGE. FOUR DAYS TWENTY HOURS. LONDON, September 13. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Monday 16 September 1907 [Issue No.15,261] page 7 2019-11-05 11:43 LUOTANIA'S PASSAGE,,
. HOURS.
1 " LONDON, September 13.
"TheVew Ciinard liner Lusitania,' 32,500
The Lusitania's average speed was 2357
miles per hour,' as compared 'with the
vail ed."
The Lusitania's average speed .turns Out
to have' been 23.01 knots per hour.' The
passage front Queenstown to Sandy Hook
occupied'four days and 20 hours." The en-
days. ?"'
The Lusitania, had a tremendous ,recep-'
tion from the people on shore, having "been
through the new Ambrose- Channel,,, by
which there.was a saving of five, miles,",
.The coal consumption was less than, a
/ \._.
LUSITANIA'S PASSAGE.
HOURS.
LONDON, September 13.
The new cunard liner Lusitania, 32,500
The Lusitania's average speed was 23.87
miles per hour, as compared with the
The Lusitania's average speed turns out
to have been 23.01 knots per hour. The
passage from Queenstown to Sandy Hook
occupied four days and 20 hours. The en-
days.
The Lusitania, had a tremendous recep-
tion from the people on shore, having been
through the new Ambrose Channel, by
which there was a saving of five miles.
The coal consumption was less than a

A NEW BLUEBIRD FOR CAMPBELL'S ATTEMPT ON WORLD LAND SPEED RECORD (Article), Victor Harbour Times (SA : 1932 - 1986), Friday 22 July 1960 [Issue No.4] page 121 2019-11-05 11:37 RECORD ^
lk« fxr
The final cost of development of the Bluebird will be 'a long way over £ 1 mil
lion,' said Mr. Campbell.
The finished car will weigh 8.000 pounds, giving it an unprecendented power to
weight ratio of about two pounds for one b.h.p. The engine, a Bristol-Siddcley Proteus
free turbine — basically similar to that which Dowers the Britannia airliner and the
'Brave' fast patrol boats of the Royal Navy — develops more than 4,000 brake horse
The length of the car is 30 feet, with a width of 8 feet, height of 4j feet and
wheel base of 13i feet. Brakes consist of two systems: airbrakes to slow the car
Th» basic requirement in designing the Bluebird C.N.7 was for an ultimate peak
? .' 'nc m.p.h.. but the immediate object is a new world land speed record of
RECORD
the car.
The final cost of development of the Bluebird will be "a long way over £ 1 mil-
lion," said Mr. Campbell.
The finished car will weigh 8,000 pounds, giving it an unprecendented power to
weight ratio of about two pounds for one b.h.p. The engine, a Bristol-Siddeley Proteus
free turbine — basically similar to that which powers the Britannia airliner and the
"Brave" fast patrol boats of the Royal Navy — develops more than 4,000 brake horse
The length of the car is 30 feet, with a width of 8 feet, height of 4½ feet and
wheel base of 13½ feet. Brakes consist of two systems: airbrakes to slow the car
The basic requirement in designing the Bluebird C.N.7 was for an ultimate peak
speed of 500 m.p.h.. but the immediate object is a new world land speed record of
[?]
World Of Sport (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954), Thursday 4 November 1954 [Issue No.29,971] page 12 2019-11-05 11:31 Campbell, the 33
year-dld son of
Campbell; will shortly
recapture the world, water
in. 1948.
Bluebird/he took it to Italy
k.p.h. -
the US record of 160 m.p-h.,
170 m.p.h. j
a fog of secret research,'!
in a great timber Eliza
believes %1H do in the
vicinity of 200 m.pi. (the
m.pJi. set in 1952).
Campbell, the 33-
year-old son of
Campbell, will shortly
recapture the world water
in 1948.
Bluebird he took it to Italy
k.p.h.
the US record of 160 m.p.h.,
170 m.p.h.
a fog of secret research,
in a great timber Eliza-
believes will do in the
vicinity of 200 m.p.h. (the
m.p.h. set in 1952).
SIR MALCOLM CAMPBELL'S SPEED (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954), Thursday 5 September 1935 page 17 2019-11-05 11:26 The amazing record of 301,337 m.p.h.,
with one-way speed of 304,311 m.p.h., es- <*>
tablished today by Sir Malcolm Camp- <*>
again demonstrate the superiority.
workaiF.nship and niai/erial of Inc
Rolls Royce engine.*, uted.
A contiibutins lactor to Sir Malcolm
Campbell's fucceEi was the is? ""f a
.'standard grade of wakefield "Csttmv
! Motor Oil. This is the eiehth occa.Mon
on which Campbell has broken tlie
| world's land speed record with "Cas-j
trol" lubricated engines. ** I
The amazing record of 301.337 m.p.h.,
with one-way speed of 304.311 m.p.h., es-
tablished today by Sir Malcolm Camp-
again demonstrate the superiority,
workmanship and material of the
Rolls Royce engines used.
A contributing factor to Sir Malcolm
Campbell's success was the use of a
standard grade of Wakefield "Castrol"
Motor Oil. This is the eighth occasion
on which Campbell has broken the
world's land speed record with "Cas-
trol" lubricated engines.
U-Boat in America? NEW YORK, October 27. (Article), The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Monday 30 October 1916 [Issue No.21,833] page 5 2019-10-20 14:02 NEW YORK. October 27.
learned that a German submarine bos ar
rived at Norfolk, Virginia. MI informa
Trfe Navy Department now says that the
news -of the submarine's arrival at Nor
NEW YORK, October 27.
learned that a German submarine has ar-
rived at Norfolk, Virginia. All informa-
The Navy Department now says that the
news of the submarine's arrival at Nor-
"TACKLED A U-BOAT." NEW YORK, May 16. (Article), The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Friday 18 May 1917 [Issue No.22,004] page 7 2019-10-20 13:55 'TACKLED A U-BOAT.'
fork state that ft is believed an American
destroyer has -had an engagement with a
»erman submarine, but with wiat result
u unknown.
i TJhe greatest satisfadion as felt concern
ing -?the arrival of the American flotilla a£ .
he-war- zone. Tie New York World says
hat more warships are going from the
United States to Eurdpe,-and- it is believed
nat 'American -naval craft took pirt in.
the latest raid on Zeebrugffe.
' . WASHINGTON, May 16.
The American Minister of -the Navy. (Mr.
Daniels) 6as made the following official
statement:— ^'United States naval vessels
nave been' operating with 4he allied fleet*
in European waiters eiace May 4. Tde de
stroyers sailed from America towards tihe
-nn8, who will work with the British and '
French navies- His plans are now being
put into effect. It has been tihe purpose of
Uae United States Navy to give -tihe largest
measure of assistance to the Affies consis
tent with tfoe complete protectflon of our
not received rep'orts of any engagements .
between the United States war craft and.
enemy vessels. * ' ' .
"TACKLED A U-BOAT."
York state that it is believed an American
destroyer has had an engagement with a
German submarine, but with what result
is unknown.
The greatest satisfaction as felt concern-
ing the arrival of the American flotilla at
the war zone. The New York World says
that more warships are going from the
United States to Europe, and it is believed
that American naval craft took part in
the latest raid on Zeebrugge.
WASHINGTON, May 16.
The American Minister of the Navy (Mr.
Daniels) has made the following official
statement:— "United States naval vessels
have been operating with the allied fleets
in European waters since May 4. The de-
stroyers sailed from America towards the
Sims, who will work with the British and
French navies. His plans are now being
put into effect. It has been the purpose of
the United States Navy to give the largest
measure of assistance to the Allies consis-
tent with the complete protection of our
not received reports of any engagements
between the United States war craft and
enemy vessels.
U BOAT MENACE. BUILD MORE SHIPS. (Article), The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Saturday 17 March 1917 [Issue No.21,951] page 13 2019-10-20 13:45 fight the-iUibpatsl. and: only 'another .small
Ifroportion: cari: assist ia- building-the ship's,
with 'whichvto replace- those siink by .the'
eneniyj'.but'each.one of-tis las it'in-his
power to cut: down tne /amount .of ?-. avail
able tonna-ge that. is aihsprbed by fhe.impjrt
of: articles 'from- abroad that are, nearly, or
totally unnecessary. ?' From pineapples and
pomegrahates :to- tobacco and potted lob
stei;, ?tliougands of tons of- carrying capacity'
are-AWisted in-thiisway,and there-arc few
families in the old1 cquhtrywliich. could not
do good to ithemselves'as well -as to the coun
try' by substituting more homely and whole
shipping- should' be. used 'for nothing but
an easy lead to die ^Government by deny
ing' itself the luxuries/- ? '''.
fight the U boats, and only another small
proportion can assist in building the ships
with which to replace those sunk by the
enemy; but each one of us has it in his
power to cut down the amount of avail-
able tonnage that is absorbed by the import
of articles from abroad that are nearly or
totally unnecessary. From pineapples and
pomegranates to tobacco and potted lob-
ster, thousands of tons of carrying capacity
are wasted in this way, and there are few
families in the old country which could not
do good to themselves as well as to the coun-
try by substituting more homely and whole-
shipping should be used for nothing but
an easy lead to the Government by deny-
ing itself the luxuries.
U BOAT MENACE. BUILD MORE SHIPS. (Article), The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Saturday 17 March 1917 [Issue No.21,951] page 13 2019-10-19 15:52 few submarines vabdve the number which
the. enemy possessed, 'builjLor building^ at
theoutbreak of war. ' Since, then, con
centration of resources on U-boats has Jed'
to, me -rapia rouicipiicanon ot itne nouuas,
andj 'vyhat'is .even- more serious, -there has
been a striking 'development of ^type3.' ? ,
' r' —Increased Cruising . RSdins.— ?
It is no longer . necesEary. fpr' the sifb
marinc ? to work in ? relatively ? confined
irreas., like -the North Sea and tie entrance
to the 3 1 Channel, where .sweeping' and'
searching operations, can i be carr-ied put
mbre'or. less thoroughly, '2{or Is it neces
sary for. the- boat3 to ? traverse nearly -as
frequently as they used to, do, the greatest
ot all their danger areae, the-Nopth ^Sea
itself. Their individual , cntising capacity
has beeni greatly mmeaeed, J/he latest poate
being credited with a 'staying jower'. of
70 days;':and. in addition, it is knowii that
veaels like the ?Deirtschland Vdnd Bremen
iiave been nut into .iomroissi.on to eprve
as supply ships for -the long-distance flo
completely changed Bi'nce the early- spring
ot 1915. Then the submarine was only in
its infancy as a -war .machine, and since
Germany has been taught .many- lessons by
fiie! losses inflicted on her. The enemy'
call 'their. suljmarine.;camp'aign..a 'cruiser'
Warfare/' and tlie description is at least
correct; in so far as it is waged on the
highways of the. ocean and. from bases
which unfortunately cannot he' dealt Tvith
so' easily: and'prbmntly'/as siich' places, as
Kiao-Chau,, Dar-es-Salaafi,' 'and the' coasts
of the. Camefoom, .- which' have the '.advant-
age^ -froin. our! point . pf' yjew, 'bf'. being
wark'eVi -onl.t1-e' map. The .siibinarine iiva-.
paigii 'tb:day is waged -b'y sub'meriable'^eraft
dperating* from--, submersible andishifting
baaes, !and' although .the; First Sea: Lord is
confident .t^t. it 'must' and-'.wdll'jbe '. dealt
with' we'ean' only. dp «ur part,' tp.wardsjt
b^vvrecbgnising- tKa'fiwe are confronted, withi
the most-serious menace that has- ?: ever
the -.people in . Great Britain ? can ? help ? to
few submarines above the number which
the enemy possessed, built, or building, at
the outbreak of war. Since, then, con-
centration of resources on U-boats has led
to the rapid multiplication of the flotillas,
and, what is even more serious, there has
been a striking development of types.
—Increased Cruising Radius.—
It is no longer necessary for the sub-
marine to work in relatively confined
areas, like the North Sea and the entrance
to the Channel, where sweeping and
searching operations can be carried out
more ore less thoroughly. Nor is it neces-
sary for the boats to traverse nearly as
frequently as they used to do the greatest
of all their danger areas, the North Sea
itself. Their individual , cruising capacity
has been greatly increased, the latest boats
being credited with a "staying power" of
70 days; and, in addition, it is known that
vessels like the Deutschland and Bremen
have been put into commission to serve
as supply ships for the long-distance flo-
completely changed since the early spring
of 1915. Then the submarine was only in
its infancy as a war machine, and since
Germany has been taught many lessons by
the losses inflicted on her. The enemy
call their submarine campaign a "cruiser"
warfare," and the description is at least
correct, in so far as it is waged on the
highways of the ocean and from bases
which unfortunately cannot be dealt with
so easily and promptly as such places as
Kiao-Chau, Dar-es-Salaam, and the coasts
of the Cameroons, which have the advant-
age, from our point of view, of being
marked on the map. The submarine cam-
paign to-day is waged by submersible craft
operating from submersible and shifting
bases, and although the First Sea Lord is
confident that it "must and will be dealt
with" we can only do our part towards it
by recongnising that we are confronted with
the most serious menace that has ever
the .people in Great Britain can help to
U BOAT MENACE. BUILD MORE SHIPS. (Article), The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Saturday 17 March 1917 [Issue No.21,951] page 13 2019-10-18 21:19 |fSif?BpKMpE.|^^.|i.:|5;^
~:: -it;':i8'('fe^be?'f eared^Hat&e^al-'serioua-
ness ;bf ' thp ? Geltf ani ciampSign: 'against mer
chiiiit JiShippirig^is 'riot % realized;? bjv- uie
hihJOTiiy(of^iM|-peb^b^inJGr«t^Br^ni
Sir :T6hh^cllip^oe-s;;.recen|'Eolemn^^^
1#aK^h&-menapejis:^
iii'''-afi'^'!;pttio^^£.^Ke'''^a^'^a^d.:pra'titi-;
eallyJ; jihnotieedy Oaiidtthe -daily;;Tecord; of
ships^n1^i»ithe;jb^tbnvJies,.be^me^So
re^ar^.ajjfeaturd^f ';.? the rniorning ^news^'
pap8rs^tliat^np-parti^^r:nb&».'is^^
unless 'v.Mm'BrunusnaI- a'fcrocity.Ca'btends -tiie
incident^ or y the :'vesselrlSappens'.; tosbe ;;.'-,a;
LusiiKiniaior; a .'.^Britannid i^sayr The 'Daily
Leader) .;:;':Yetvfrpm ^^^'thg;emnomio:p6ini;6f
yieiv,^^i8.'o;;f«r.'iiiore'8fer'»M'ma't^r-;.to:lo8e
W-^ships ^^ 'of '3,000 tpns-.'each-'tlja.n. one :pf
30,000:-.\The ^^ Germp;:sabmiarine-:blockadei
it'wili'be remembered, qameinto being.on
February 18, ;:1915, -and ibr ^ some -.months
the^iAdmimlty ^issued a: weeldy: statement,
showingthe number ot yessels of 300' tons
and over engaged ; in 'the ' foreign, trade,
entered - ^^abd ^cleared :i: atjVvTJnatetl ^^-'Kngdom
pdrtB,:-:'and also':- the number of . ^Britisli
vessels siink by: the' enemy;* After ;35 weeks,
th'e',iss^ejf6f'-thi8'mmnur^.'-'.v'^^.'djscon-'
tiniied, nbireasbni.beirig^giyen. Throughout.
as. it should .be.jthat^suihniarizmg British
ship^'fiuiik ,was i.75,-the 'average eachweek
being'eiaduly five yessels::It,is not realized
83, it{should. be/that; summarising- 'British
losses over the last ^Ureeimbnths, the rate
of1 lossvbas'betin: multiplied ? neaijly . three
times: .tThe;:d!es'irbyed.yessels'- belonging 'to
?allied' and 'neutral ^Powersy thus ?outnum-
bered': the; British ;'iby.. about : 50 . per 'cent. ;
biit .eyery'^iie of 'such; ships', represents. 'a
direct'.: Ios3* to ' us' 'only, slightly -less, than
that pf a British yesseL-', In, the; first place,
each one' sent'to theljpttbin represeiiiiB-go
inuim^ teducition in', the .Carrying capacity 'of
the; Available' shipping, ^yliich has already
been so greatly 'curtailed by the sequestra
tion of more 'than'. 50 per cent. ~ of the
British mercantile maririe -for war pur
iwses, and by the enforced absence from
thc:sea3 of the German and Austrian flags,
ports. . . ? ; ..' '?'.
; i' ? jinking:' of JTeufcrals.— ,-' .
In the eecohd. place; iri'-fipite of the law
lessness wliichl accompanies 'the German
si/bmarine campaigii^ 'it .must be. borne .in
niiiid that . in-,practaca% :,every-.. instance
where'a lieutra^.ehip hasi been,- destroyed
the .'Germiuis .have had the more, ot- ieoi
])lausiblo excuse eitlier,' tliat. Bhe'was.vcaci'y
,rag a Bi'jtish carjgb, of . that slio ;wa3-«irryT
ing [a 'cargb to Englahdi'... . Each- such/ ship,'
therefore,, may V-? iaken as representing a
Britash car^paii-i, & ?couise, tlift maKUfcy
to. carrjr British'.paTgpes in firtute.' v :.The
Bttbrnarine: .menace' 'has 'become 'firmly
robted. 'This b no. time for. ihe, pursuit
of controversies o'n' the matter, but il'ja;
absurd to argue, as it is argued, that the1
reason is to be found in' the laxity of the
late Bojird.-of Admiralty;- The board
U BOAT MENACE.
BUILD MORE SHIPS.
It is to be feared that the real serious-
ness of the German campaign against mer-
chant shipping is not realized by the
majority of the people in Great Britain.
Sir John Jellicoe's recent solemn warning
that the menace is "far greater now than
at any period of the war" passed practi-
cally unnoticed, and the daily record of
ships sent to the bottom has become so
regular a feature of the morning news-
papers that no particular notice is taken
unless some unusual atrocity attends the
incident, or the vessel happens to be a
Lusitania or a Britannic (says The Daily
Leader). Yet from the economic point of
view it is a far more serious matter to lose
10 ships of 3,000 tons each than one of
30,000. The German submarine blockade,
it will be remembered, came into being on
February 18, 1915, and for some months
the Admiralty issued a weekly statement
showing the number of vessels of 300 tons
and over engaged in the foreign trade,
entered and cleared at United Kingdom
ports, and also the number of British
vessels sunk by the enemy. After 35 weeks
the issue of this summary was discon-
tinued, no reason being given. Throughout
as it should be that, summarizing British
ships sunk was 175, the average each week
being exactly five vessels. It is not realized
as it should be that, summarising British
losses over the last three months, the rate
of loss has been multiplied nearly three
times. The destroyed vessels belonging to
allied and neutral Powers thus outnum-
but every one of such ships represents a
direct loss to us only slightly less than
that of a British vessel. In the first place,
each one sent to the bottom represents so
much reduction in the carrying capacity of
the available shipping, which has already
been so greatly curtailed by the sequestra-
tion of more than 50 per cent. of the
British mercantile marine for war pur-
poses, and by the enforced absence from
the seas of the German and Austrian flags,
—Sinking of Neutrals.—
In the second place, in spite of the law-
lessness which accompanies the German
submarine campaign, it must be borne in
mind that in practically every instance
where a neutral ship has been destroyed
the Germans have had the more or less
plausible excuse either that she was carry-
ing a British cargo, or that she was carry-
ing a cargo to England. Each such ship,
therefore, may be taken as representing a
British cargo—and, off course, the inability
to carry British cargoes in future. The
submarine menace has become firmly
rooted. This is no time for the pursuit
of controversies on the matter, but it is
absurd to argue, as it is argued, that the
reason is to be found in the laxity of the
late Board of Admiralty. The board

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. 9th Light Horse Regiment
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:Glennd61 2015-09-11
    User data
  2. RAAF Catalina Squadrons
    List
    Public

    5 items
    created by: public:Glennd61 2015-09-13
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.