Information about Trove user: GeoffMMutton

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,701,642
2 noelwoodhouse 3,855,324
3 NeilHamilton 3,400,132
4 DonnaTelfer 3,203,756
5 Rhonda.M 3,005,865
...
28 michaelchristensen 1,039,580
29 BillyC 1,033,077
30 arundel 1,000,000
31 GeoffMMutton 988,174
32 fwalker13 965,372
33 johnfox 954,676

988,174 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2019 30,078
July 2019 47,949
June 2019 38,034
May 2019 38,225
April 2019 35,257
March 2019 32,143
February 2019 37,318
January 2019 39,032
December 2018 37,494
November 2018 42,252
October 2018 39,419
September 2018 40,714
August 2018 41,743
July 2018 41,303
June 2018 39,391
May 2018 39,148
April 2018 38,695
March 2018 44,282
February 2018 42,615
January 2018 45,747
December 2017 30,181
November 2017 14,569
October 2017 10,651
September 2017 10,703
August 2017 12,771
July 2017 10,316
June 2017 10,682
May 2017 10,002
April 2017 10,832
March 2017 10,595
February 2017 9,158
January 2017 6,787
December 2016 1,418
November 2016 6,192
October 2016 15,841
September 2016 12,129
August 2016 6,489
July 2016 1,311
October 2013 800
September 2013 242
July 2013 12
May 2013 110
April 2013 1,132
March 2013 1,661
February 2013 25
January 2013 2,490
October 2012 236

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,701,458
2 noelwoodhouse 3,855,324
3 NeilHamilton 3,400,003
4 DonnaTelfer 3,203,735
5 Rhonda.M 3,005,852
...
31 fwalker13 963,657
32 johnfox 954,235
33 jeri 949,582
34 GeoffMMutton 945,884
35 jhempenstall 920,238
36 MurrayDadds 886,886

945,884 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2019 21,457
July 2019 24,476
June 2019 31,327
May 2019 35,833
April 2019 35,257
March 2019 32,143
February 2019 37,318
January 2019 38,248
December 2018 37,494
November 2018 42,252
October 2018 39,419
September 2018 40,714
August 2018 41,743
July 2018 41,303
June 2018 39,391
May 2018 39,148
April 2018 38,695
March 2018 44,282
February 2018 42,543
January 2018 45,747
December 2017 30,109
November 2017 14,506
October 2017 10,651
September 2017 10,703
August 2017 12,771
July 2017 10,316
June 2017 10,682
May 2017 10,002
April 2017 10,832
March 2017 10,595
February 2017 9,086
January 2017 6,787
December 2016 1,418
November 2016 6,192
October 2016 15,841
September 2016 12,129
August 2016 6,489
July 2016 1,277
October 2013 800
September 2013 242
July 2013 12
May 2013 110
April 2013 1,132
March 2013 1,661
February 2013 25
January 2013 2,490
October 2012 236

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 299,678
2 PhilThomas 121,002
3 mickbrook 106,370
4 murds5 61,555
5 GeoffMMutton 42,290
6 EricTheRed 22,236
7 Stephans 19,868

42,290 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2019 8,621
July 2019 23,473
June 2019 6,707
May 2019 2,392
January 2019 784
February 2018 72
December 2017 72
November 2017 63
February 2017 72
July 2016 34


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
NEEDLES "Short sharp shiny." (Article), The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), Thursday 7 August 1884 [Issue No.6,180] page 2 2019-08-20 09:04 1 ShorW*l)aQ)» shiny."
Question-bos lecture.
Ob, those selfishSmen!
Enabling Bill-abandoned.
•What about the future husbands?
The garter conferred on Prince .George.
Allerdale's,Bill reluctantly withdrawn.
Isn'tthat-case at Bordertown settled yet ?
gofo. Egypt.
'Mr, Grainger never posed as a workieg
Newspaper 'postage not .to be abolished
"20.votesfo 18.
The "New South Wales "Legislators debating
Hid you hear the rain pattering on the
Europe has 28 -per cent, of its area yet re
maining-forest.
Allerdale thinks the Premier is not a work
ingman'alriend.
Italy has an area of forest lands-amounting
-to 14,000.000 acres.
attend to'his duties.
opened on Auguatl9.
In Prussia 500,000 dollars are annually ex
rescue Chinese GordoD.
Alleged smallpox case at Traralgon .an
Supposed outbreak of chlckenpox at Blin
-wines is the Argentine Republic.
Will the Ministry faring in Employers'
.Liability Bill within a fortnight?
Mr. Grainger says the Premier once re
savages,"
Government .of Western - Australia passed
a Bill for -quarantining imported dogs for
six-months.
.The American cotton crop last year
4,766,597-were • exported.
According to the eensus of .1880 there were
in -the United St at e a _9,945,617 families and
lj075,655 domestic servants.
.Dr. J. H. Hcckeran charged at .Sydney
-Water Police Court with endeavoring to pro
coyer 50.0,000,000 acrea, or nearly 20 per cent,
Mr. Symon thinks .newspaper .postage is
•only freight and nothing more. Of .course it
is. But,all freights are not justifiable.
The late Judah P. Benjamin is authori
tatively stated to have made 75,030 dollars a
year at:the English bar for some years.
Mr. Brett, .the acting,inapector-general of
pen ale&tabiishments:thinks tfiatthe Pentridge
Stockade is undermanned in .respect of
Allerdale's arms Hopped about like the
wings of an old hemscratobing .before break
fast during iris speech pn the ."Employers'
Liability Bill-y esterday,
Hindmarah Tram Company's manager .re
signed. .Successor accepts office gratis.
Wonder whether the line will p#y 2C.par
cent, dividend-next half-year.
..The Emperor .of Ghinajsecontly. authorised
the-destruction of-4;000,000 dollars worth of
-opium,^andemphatiealJy refuses to aoceptsny
JFromeork efaippings, once thrown away*
thouiandsof yards of Hnoleum are Aow made
at -Del mentor at, Germany, where the in
dustry is becoming quite-important,
NEEDLES
"Short, sharp, shiny."
Question-box lecture.
Oh, those selfish men!
Enabling Bill abandoned.
What about the future husbands?
The garter conferred on Prince George.
Allerdale's Bill reluctantly withdrawn.
Isn't that case at Bordertown settled yet?
go to Egypt.
Mr. Grainger never posed as a working
Newspaper postage not to be abolished—
20 votes to 18.
The New South Wales Legislators debating
Did you hear the rain pattering on the
Europe has 28 per cent. of its area yet re-
maining forest.
Allerdale thinks the Premier is not a work-
ingman's friend.
Italy has an area of forest lands amounting
to 14,000,000 acres.
attend to his duties.
opened on August 19.
In Prussia 500,000 dollars are annually ex-
rescue Chinese Gordon.
Alleged smallpox case at Traralgon an-
Supposed outbreak of chlckenpox at Blin-
wines is the Argentine Republic.
Will the Ministry bring in Employers'
Liability Bill within a fortnight?
Mr. Grainger says the Premier once re-
savages."
Government .of Western Australia passed
a Bill for quarantining imported dogs for
six months.
The American cotton crop last year
4,766,597 were exported.
According to the census of 1880 there were
in the United States 9,945,617 families and
l,075,655 domestic servants.
Dr. J. H. Heckeran charged at Sydney
Water Police Court with endeavoring to pro-
coyer 500,000,000 acres, or nearly 20 per cent.
Mr. Symon thinks newspaper postage is
only freight and nothing more. Of course it
is. But all freights are not justifiable.
The late Judah P. Benjamin is authori-
tatively stated to have made 75,000 dollars a
year at the English bar for some years.
Mr. Brett, .the acting inspector-general of
penal etablishments thinks that the Pentridge
Stockade is undermanned in respect of
Allerdale's arms flopped about like the
wings of an old hen scratching before break-
fast during his speech on the Employers'
Liability Bill yesterday.
Hindmarsh Tram Company's manager re-
signed. Successor accepts office gratis.
Wonder whether the line will pay 20 per
cent. dividend next half-year.
The Emperor of China recently authorised
the destruction of 4,000,000 dollars worth of
opium, and emphatically refuses to accept any
From cork chippings, once thrown away,
thouiandsof yards of linoleum are now made
at Delmenborat, Germany, where the in-
dustry is becoming quite important.
REUTERS TELEGRAM. THE AUSTRALIAN CBIUSETERS IN ENGLAND. KENT V. AUSTRALIANS. THIRD DAY. LONDON, AUGUST 6. (Article), The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), Thursday 7 August 1884 [Issue No.6,180] page 2 2019-08-20 08:55 THE AUSTRALIAN CBIUSETERS
TN ESfiLANH.
KENT V. AUSTRALIAN?,
IHIRD DAY.
Lokdox, August -.6.
. Jileven. and the .County of Kent was
resumed and -.concluded to-day in ,fine
large, and the.greatest interest was taken
in the game until its conclusion, The
Australians only added 26 runs to yester
day's score, the.last -wicket falling at.lQD.
E cnt thus won the -match with ffl -runs to
snare.
THE AUSTRALIAN CRICKETERS
IN ENGLAND.
KENT V. AUSTRALIANS.
THIRD DAY.
LONDON, August 6.
Eleven and the County of Kent was
resumed and concluded to-day in fine
large, and the greatest interest was taken
in the game until its conclusion. The
Australians only added 26 runs to yester-
day's score, the last wicket falling at 109.
Kent thus won the match with 96 runs to
spare.
Family Notices (Family Notices), The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), Thursday 7 August 1884 [Issue No.6,180] page 2 2019-08-20 08:53 the wife of Mr. S. Strapps, of a son.
BROSTER-HARRISON.-On the 6th August, at
second son of Mr George Broster, Penfield, to
laide, by the Rev. E. Gratton, Richard Noall to
his daughter, Mrs. Aea Butterfield, Koolunga of
KELLY.- On the 3rd August, at Manoora, of
the wife of Mr. S. Strapps, of a son.
BROSTER—HARRISON.—On the 6th August, at
second son of Mr. George Broster, Penfield, to
laide, by the Rev. E. Gratton, Richard Noall, to
his daughter, Mrs. Asa Butterfield, Koolunga, of
KELLY.—On the 3rd August, at Manoora, of
apoplexy, Edwin Charles Maidment, aged 64 years;
REGISTRATION OF BRANDS ACT OF 1866. (Government Gazette Notices), New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), Tuesday 20 August 1867 [Issue No.140 (SUPPLEMENT)] page 1943 2019-08-20 08:45 HGBSE&~wntwu<e&—-3 (und Numerals)
, ^Brnnd
%ppUedfor.
FormerBrand.
6 applicants :
Same near shoulder » • §4
2 ditto '
JIover2
JE j
4 ditto j
JF ..
JF near shoulder....
2* ditto
Same near shoulder....
3Gc\
Ti
Same ♦»...... ..**
£
Same near shoulder ..'
2 japplicants
j $ ditto
Same................
' "
3^
PilOPEIETOR.
Josepli Davis, junior ..
Jno. Williams, junior..
Jno. Wm. Eather......
Edward Etheridge ....
Jas.Foot
Jno. Fro£t......
Jno. Faint....
Jno. Fawcett ........
Jas.Fitzpatriclc .. ...
Jonathan Gosper......
Jas. M'Guffog....... J
Jas. M'Guffog
*Tas. Gulliver ........
John Hammond ......
John Hamilton ..,,..
Joseph J.dlush ■am .V'..
-yV- V:■"- ■■■■
p: .i'--':' -
Sackville Beach
Overton, Muswellbrook |
Wood's Reef j
Joaramiu Creek, Marulan \
Clover Hill, Hall's Creek, Den-*
Fish River Creek * ?
# J
i
;
f
, Fern Grove, Rydal
Baumarez Ponds, Armiflale j
__ $
* ^
Meadow Flat, Batliurst
Cookamalla, Braid wood- *
I
.No. of
Applica
2467 «
1S707
€094
j
2384s
HORSES—continued—-J (and Numerals)
Brand
applied for.
Former Brand.
6 applicants
Same near shoulder
2 ditto
JI over 2
JE
4 ditto
JF
JF near shoulder
2 ditto
Same near shoulder
JG
7
Same

Same near shoulder
2 applicants
6 ditto
Same

PROPRIETOR.
Joseph Davis, junior
Jno. Williams, junior.
Jno. Wm. Eather
Edward Etheridge
Jas. Foot
Jno. Frost
Jno. Faint
Jno. Fawcett
Jas. Fitzpatrick
Jonathan Gosper
Jas. McGuffog
Jas. McGuffog
Jas. Gulliver
John Hammond
John Hamilton
Joseph J. Hush

Sackville Reach
Overton, Muswellbrook
Wood's Ree
Joaramin Creek, Marulan
Clover Hill, Hall's Creek, Den-
Fish River Creek

Fern Grove, Rydal
Saumarez Ponds, Armidale
Meadow Flat, Bathurst
No. of
Applica-
2467
18707
5094
2384E
REGISTRATION OF BRANDS ACT OF 1866. (Government Gazette Notices), New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), Tuesday 20 August 1867 [Issue No.140 (SUPPLEMENT)] page 1943 2019-08-19 23:34 , 1 — *
3
i,
» f
, applied for.
*} I
JO
c-iA near shoulder ....
J^}
Same off shoulder .,.
2• applicants
jb
jxb
Same near shoulder ..
JO
15 applicants *
3 ditto \
JO I
Jc) j
J01
Same ...
JO near shoulder......
%
Same near shoulder....
Same near shoulder....
J0 with semicircle over
Same near shoulder ..
Proprietor.
John Collins..
J. A, Arndell
John M'Cahon
Jas. M'Alister
John Adams..
James Allen...
James Baxter ........
I
John Cropper.......
John Carthrite,
J. G. Boyle
Gilmcre, Tumut
*
#
Sherwan's Flats, Tairago, Goul
Kyamba, Tareutta
Lake Bathurst, Tarrago •
TJlinbawn, Sackville Beach
Applica
1S677
3098d
1290£
3176b
0178
,v »*
HOUSES—continued——J (and Numerals)


applied for.
JJ
JC
JA near shoulder
JA
Same off shoulder
2 applicants
JB
JXB
Same near shoulder
JC
15 applicants
3 ditto
JC
JC
JC
Same
JC near shoulder
Same near shoulder
Same near shoulder
JC with semicircle over
Same near shoulder
PROPRIETOR.
John Collins
J. A. Arndell
John McCahon
Jas. McAlister
John Adams
James Allen
James Baxter
John Cropper
John Carthrite
J. G. Doyle
Gilmore, Tumut

Sherwan's Flats, Tarrago, Goul-
Kyamba, Tarcutta
Lake Bathurst, Tarrago
Ulinbawn, Sackville Reach
Applica-
18677
3098D
12904
3176B
9178
REGISTRATION OF BRANDS ACT OF 1866. (Government Gazette Notices), New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), Tuesday 20 August 1867 [Issue No.140 (SUPPLEMENT)] page 1943 2019-08-19 23:29 HOESES—ronfca^—1 (and Numerals)
I
i}
Same on shoulder ....
| 3 applicants
j 8
| IG near shoulder......
I 2 applicants
JED
Same................
Same.. ..............
t shoulder
IH near shoulder ....
IH near shoulder......
IJ near shoulder \
2 near thigh /■•••
IL .....
Same near shoulder ..
m
Satne near shoulder ,.
IP\
2 r •*•••••••»#♦ **•
Same near shoulder ..
P....................
Same................
Same near shoulder* *«i
Pbopbietob.
JohnH.Alcorn ......
John Beck. .....
John CollinB..
DanielCunneen ......
John Donough..
John Foster, junr. ....
John Francis ........
John Gowen, senr.....
John Gardiner........
JohnHeffernan ......
JohnHeyden
Francis B. Bennett....
Francis B. Bennett....
Elizth. M'Cain
Irvine Martin .........
Caroline M'Haugh....
JohnMarooney
John Post..
Ellen Palst ..........
IsaacPolaclc ........
Sarah Williams ......
Address,
Macdonald River, St. Alban*s
Back Swamp, Evans* Plains
* Reid's Flat
Peedee Greek and ElBinore,
Kempsey, M'Leay River
Queaiibeyan
Albury.

Bobundaraji
Murrab, Bega
Willis, Jindabyno
Applica
| 2247
6621*
3452a
1653b
]
3382 !
8579 S
HORSES—continued—I (and Numerals)

2
A
Same on shoulder
applicants
8
IC near shoulder
2 applicants
HD
Same
Same
shoulder
IH near shoulder
IH near shoulder
IJ near shoulder
2 near thigh
IL
Same near shoulder
IM
Same near shoulder
IP
2
Same near shoulder
P
Same
Same near shoulder
PROPRIETOR.
John H. Alcorn
John Beck
John Collins
Daniel Cunneen
John Donough
John Foster, junr.
John Francis
John Gowen, senr.
John Gardiner
John Heffernan
John Heyden
Francis B. Bennett
Francis B. Bennett
Elizth. McCain
Irvine Martin
Caroline McMaugh
John Marooney
John Post
Ellen Palst
Isaac Polack
Sarah Williams
Address.
Macdonald River, St. Alban's
Back Swamp, Evans' Plains
'Reid's Flat
Peedee Creek and Elsinore,
Kempsey, McLeay River
Queanbeyan
Albury
Bobundarah
Murrah, Bega
Willis, Jindabyne
Applica-
2247
6621F
3452H
1653E
3382
8579
REGISTRATION OF BRANDS ACT OF 1866. (Government Gazette Notices), New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), Tuesday 20 August 1867 [Issue No.140 (SUPPLEMENT)] page 1943 2019-08-19 23:23 -.gppliM for.
~Former"Brand.
Samenear shoulder....»
H ,..
^ame
Same *
Same off shoulder ....
Same near shoulder ., j
1
HB near shoulcler .... I
HB } ncar s^ou^er • • i
*San e near shoulder, 3|
HC otf shoulder....
HD near shoulder .... |
Same near shoulder... J
^ \
PL!
Same near shoulder ,.!
iIm ..............
*HM near Tibs, 5 neav|
tiheefc.
H5I } near shoulder
HQ
(TO J
HQ }
w i
Same off shoulder ...
| near shoulder
HW near shoulder ....
Pbopbietob.
Jno. Haj'trood
Tlios. Harris
D.Herbert
R. Heness............
Uly. Holland
Jolm Hughes, junior ..
John Ilerks
Mai tin Hobbins .. ...
Fras.H. Hill
Hy. Braitliwaite
ThoS. Coles
Tlio. Lucas
Wtn. M'Crorey
H. M'Donald
Hy. Maynard ........
Hy. Milton .........
Jno.R.' and Awn Howe
Pat. *M*Gratfr ........
Hy ."Prince
G.J.J.Lowe
Henry Sehytrumpf...
Hugh Stewait
Straton.
Uy. Watts............
35ega
.iBow Hill, Upp er Paters on
SVIartliaguy, Coonamble
tOrange
Bombala i
Huth Vale, Bringclly
Balklaba, Braidwood
"Wellington Inn, Change
f
Addicombcne, Atiamfriaiby
'Tettebali, NimttybcHc
'Burry'Burry Creek,'Taralga
'Rvdboiuimry, SinglfetOii j
Mosquito 'Creek, WaiiaWa
i
Gliowar.Demliqui i\
I
- i
Tlnfieid.Nortli Eiclimoia > •'
*&^j)ptica
G298
11038
9G14
1774G
1517G
115s
145s
1459S
32709
Brand
applied for.
Former Brand.
Same near shoulder
H
Same
Same
Same off shoulder
Same near shoulder

HB near shoulder
HB near shoulder
Samee near shoulder, 3
HC off shoulder
HD near shoulder
Same near shoulder
HL
Same near shoulder
HM
HM near ribs, 5 near
cheek.
HM near shoulder
HO
W
Same off shoulder
5 HS near shoulder
HW near shoulder
PROPRIETOR.
Jno. Haywood
Thos. Harris
D. Herbert
Hy. Holland
John Hughes, junior
John Herks
Martin Hobbins
Fras. H. Hill
Hy. Braithwaite
Thos. Coles
Tho. Lucas
Wtn. McCrorey
H. MvDonald
Hy. Maynard
Hy. Milton
Jno. R. and Ann Howe
Pat. McGrath
Hy. Prince
C. J. J. Lowe
Henry Schytrumpf
Hugh Stewairt
Streton.
Hy. Watts
Bega
Marthaguy, Coonamble
Orange
Ruth Vale, Bringclly
Ballalaba, Braidwood
Wellington Inn, Orange
Addicombene, Adaminaby
Tettebah, Nimitybelle
Burry Burry Creek, Taralga
Redbourbury, Singleton
Mosquito Creek, Warialda
Chowar, Deniliquin

Enfield, North Richmond
Applica-
tion.
6298
11058
9614
17746
15176
115S
145S
14598
12709
REVIEW. THE REV. W. B. CLARKE ON DIAMONDS, GOLD, TIN. &c. (Article), The Armidale Express and New England General Advertiser (NSW : 1856 - 1861; 1863 - 1889; 1891 - 1954), Saturday 9 November 1872 page 7 2019-08-19 22:49 bottom rocks are Paleozoic, chiefly gneiss;
ing an elevation of 3000 feet, and carry
mond-pouinted drills in boring for blasts
occasionally, and rarely, occur at 30 feet,
pyritous matter. Such ore yields by as
the revival of ourauriferous wealth (mostly,
that when found in tbe river bed,
and it was equally common in the South
alternate with innocent ones; wliile with
bottom rocks are Palæozoic, chiefly gneiss;
ing an elevation of 3000 feet, and carry-
mond-pointed drills in boring for blasts
occasionally, and rarely, occur at 30 feet.
pyritous matter. Such ore yields by as-
the revival of our auriferous wealth (mostly,
that when found in the river bed,
and it was equally common in the South-
alternate with innocent ones; while with
REVIEW. THE REV. W. B. CLARKE ON DIAMONDS, GOLD, TIN. &c. (Article), The Armidale Express and New England General Advertiser (NSW : 1856 - 1861; 1863 - 1889; 1891 - 1954), Saturday 9 November 1872 page 7 2019-08-19 22:23 Clarke delivered a highly interesting ad
to the Royal Society of New . South
Wales, of which body he is Vice Presi
referring principally to tin, which we in
landed to republish—but other pressing
'matters came in the way for several issues,
and thus our original intention was not'
'tOlfiUwbww
We have now before us a pamphlet con
pages, and there is an appendix, of 28.
Nevertheless, we think it will be i accept
able to our readers if we give thejm some
idea of its contents, as no doubt inany of
perusing the pamphlet. j
B. Clarke in the twin neldB of geology and
His reputation is not simply Australian
honoured the rev. gentleman is j held in
Science in the present age. |
nrospects of the Society, followed by ob
s8ni|jgns on the expedition to _ New ,
Guinea^Mr. Clarke communicates inter
esting information with respect to the dia- |
mond field of Bahia, and, with his invari- j
able candour, gives full prominence to the i
authorities whose statements he deems j
reliable It appears tliat the matrix of
the diamond in Baliia is certainly a sand
forms the summits of flat-topped ranges, j
the general strike of which varies from j
region must have a wide areaj, though |
only a portion of the country lias yet been
thoroughly explored. It is ! specially
the presence of the fatter—but Tertiary '
produced the sands in which thejdiamonds
Bahia is set down as worth thr^e million
Mr. Clarke adds :— |
■ " Mr. Nicolay shows that the principal
passing, on the one hahd, into! porphyry :
and granite, and, on the other, jinto horn- ;
blende rock and quartzite. They are sur
and schists, and in other parts; by sand
stones, a Tertiary conglomerate^ or sand
S.S.W." !
Western edge of the Lagos or bay, attain
ous, (hanging with the distinctive locali
^been found in twelve different sites in
Wales jted Victoria. Hejthen .observes :
doubtless, be many more;
ttfclstone, resembling
tedia'^lfeer® elso Itacolumite is not known
to exrstA He also very judiciously points
out thatlfc® diamond is not to be regarded
as a merekmticfe of luxury, and, as an in
stance. iJpr* to the great value of dia
mond-pouM drills in boring for blasts
in the timipl through Mont Cenis, a work
which iaon^ljthe marvels of the present
The next subJ^M® African^dia
mond fields, whi& Wve been wonderfully
prolific. Mr. Glsrkejtfludes to the large
size of many pf/he diamonds obtained in
South Africa, ihere being numerous speci
> of one fsct alone—that in 1870,there were
exported from South African1 ports dia
monds found at Du Toit's Pan and Bult
latter place, in 1869.
" It seemB that the diamonds are now;
found either on the surface, or at a deptli
metimes they are broken from ooncus
—sometimes with chipped edges—and
"ver beds are water-worn and un

erage yield per cubic yard i?
assign; but in one place 3S
ace sand yielded fifteen dia
average weight each 8 carats, i
A .eath this, a hole 1280 cubic feet
lii cAtent produced nine diamonds, weigh
ing in all 6| carats."
Mr. Clarke quotes Mr. Dunn's clear i
description of the geological character of ;
lower aicynodon beds, with huge fossil
saarians ; 210 miles upper dicynodon beds,
wi&yjLof igneous dykes and beds. TheHe
ilaTab^ full ofi fossil saurian and vege-1
tshe reundhfc 'On these (says Mr.
Dam) are situated our present diamond
1 fieda of South Africa.'
. ** It is nevertheless remarkable that, as
TSSjlahia, a gneiasic rock appears to be the
of the diamond region, buf it is by
no m""18 clear that it is of the same
etas as the Brazilian rock.
kijid,-#ueh a*i sandstone, not Tertiary, as
" Afgravel is very common, and
fo>- p a striking feature in the upper
-W of the Vital. This has been held j
ue to be indicative of diamonds. j
But agates are common enough in :
v places where no suspicipns of dia
* acknowledged." |
e mentions some interesting i
jp which it appears not im- ;
natives of various coun
diamonds for the pur
>through atones, that
made serviceable as
i and other uses,
eats of gold fields,
he. outset explains
been principally
and it much mora
Thus he was the
first person in these colonies to call at
tention to the value of quartz in connec
Herald' of July 8, 1851. And, in follow
ing thiB .opinion up, he endeavoured to
work out a wide field of enquiry on inde
Murchis in hoped that our population
not found in depth, " an opinion (ob
in a neighbouring colony, led; to much
hindrance in the progress of gold produc
will have to give way." Mr. Clarke evi
reefing were given up f
of the expediency of tunnelling under ba
and we thoroughly agree with - him—at
Rocky River (the latter a wasteful expen
diture of time, labour, and monisy, which,
.moreover, is not yet obsolete). '
tion that available gold is ONtv to be
the lower Silurian rocks must be aband
lower Palaeozoic age has ever been, disco
is all from granite, or deposits of iron
but also from solid grauite. The rich
: gold field of Gympie appears -to be not
■ much older than the Carboniferous forma
' tion. In New Zealand, the wonderfully
rocks not older than the Trias whilst in
California a large portion of the aurifer
ous rocks are as recent as Trias and Juras
in Transmutation. Such was'the effect
that produced much of the gold at TTill
End and Tanib&roora, as well as elsewhere
at Hawkins's Hill in which thejlodes occur
are so much like those that nave made
follow highly interesting details in sup
Hill End region are not older than Silu
of this large tract will be found produc
Wheeler, Qd., the mother rock is ser
the whole of Frederick's Valley is aurifer
ous, yet the operations have not been ex
tended to the hills on the E. of the val
Mr. Clarke's opinion in this case is fur
Tambaroora, and another at Wvaeden
gold in granite, and recently he has ascer
granite for Beveral miles in that region.
there has been a not mineral spring, in
pointed out to the Government as de
in many cases the gold is held in the sul
quartz miners when he states ;—" Per
sons are often confused when they see au
riferous stone suddenly, as.it were, losing
sulphides of iron. But it is a fact, estab- I
sign of its actual disappearance. Never
countries shows plainly that an excess of !
of gold as the absence of it; and, 'when
either is too much in excess, the aurifer
(Authority given.) When, 21,years ago,
Mr. Stutclibury appended a note to one
Mr. Clarke's opinions on gold in rela
Min&s Geraes, Brazil, Mr. C, pro
is the case at Morro Velho. The sul
which is most abundant, and yields a lit
phides (holding gold) una reported to me
at Ravenswood, > in Queensland, Mr.
at Hawkins's HilL
" Mr.' Arthur Phillips also points out
the same foot inBraziL Mr. Hockin,
stated to Mr. Phillips that the composi-]
tionof the pure ore may be taken at about
43 per cent, of silica, and 57 per cent, of
pyritous matter. SuGh ore yields by as
say from'4 to 6 ozs. of gold per ton; and
is large. Cubical pyrites is of more fre
quent occurrence, but is far less rich in I
gold. Solid specimens of this Bubstance,
than 4 dwts. per ton. Bunches of clay,
slate are often found in the principal :
veins, and this rock, by assay, affords :
from 5 to 7| dwts. per ton. ' Quartz
says) has never been found to be auri
the ore In the mine.'
tain igneous rocks are present, such as di
or felstones in company with pyritous
minerals, the conclusion is almost irre
We have now arrived at a very import
ant part of Mr. Clarke's address—that re
lating to tin. It appears that daring his
explorations in 1851-2-3 tin ore waB dis
mentioned in his reports to the Govern
a view of inducing operations for its de
search for and working of the ore. More
(C) which ^will justify the assertion that,
notwithstanding, the claims of any other
person, the &rst mention and first dis
covery of tm, "a&-& product of New South
my Researches in the Southern Gold
Fields (p. 128) in 1860. Moreover, I ex
1853, the dr.te of my explorations in the
Macintyre tin districts, but not till 3866
Exhibition at Paris in 1867, among seve
ral specimens of tin ore Bhown was some
The great value of tin ore to Queens
Queensland which touches the N. boun
pounds' worth of stream tin alone, irre
have settled it that the stanniferous gran
ites are Palmozoic, pre-Permian, and post
be quaternary or recent in its present po
reduced from the peroxide, either by ac
mistake: (See my report of 14th Feb.,
common in our granite country than haB
Tenasserim, Merghni, and Malacca have
not decreased in value since the com
is reckoned at nearly 4| millions per
_" The Island of Banca has mines, first
millions sterling. The tin there is asso
us the tin is always in the state of per
Coming then to copper, Mr. Clarke re
worked for tin. Mr. Came, an author
New South Wales occurs in buncheB or
' blows,' it would be well if aome experi
persons looking for the former in & granite
j. found that, in one of the richest copper
I " A contrary fact relating to granite
aeen myself. The rich gold reefs of Cas
| tlemaine and Bendigo stop at the junction
I of the slates and the granite.
II inconsiderable value, though deceiving to
Such is the case at Kilkivan, in Queens
the condition of hardness or of decompo
sition of our granites and traps; inas
and gold in decomposed trap, under cir
cumstances of great interest and import
the revival of ourauriferous wealth ^mostly,
be it noticed, by mining in the rack), is
flat uninteresting desert between the Lach
lan, Bogan, and Darling." Nor does lie
Mr. Clarke adds :—" Some excitement'
lias been occasioned by discoveries of a
conglomerate ore of gold, silver, arid cop
per, near Gympie. It is ascertained 'to be
fonnd copper alloyed with antimony 5 and
I have a specimen, from near Bathurst, in j
and gold, silver and lead, silver and cop
our distinguished geologist has an oppor
tunity of proving that he has given mate
patches marked metamorphic may, how
ever, be transmuted Silurian. But I con
fess to have seen no fossils from Queens
in Queensland,. in 1870, of the precious
were collected from a lull in Secondary
it was originated in silicious waters, pro
trict there now occur numerous j water i
quartz by the presence of water of com
" We have now evidence that Eastern |
and other minerals of less local import
who are destined to see a British popula
descendants, to use it aright, as respon
land,' this ' large lamr—' a land that the
Lord our God careth for.'"
extracts from Mr. Clarke's anniver
sary address in May, 1870; these refer
and opinions as to their origin. It ap
opinions expressed by Mr. Norman Tay
lor and Professor Thomson on the dia
that the diamond district iB limited to the
whilst in the drift; alluded to they
the failing of the miners having been
merely an alluvial apace at one of those
ancient date in the vicinity axe considered
to be Upper Silurian, traversed.by green
the deposit in which the Cudgegong dia
zircon, topaz, sapphiie, corundum, spinel,
pleonaste, &c,, from which Mr. Norman
but with those gems which are lmlil to
they do in rocks which are so denomi
diamond is thus associated, on the Cudge
gong and on the Macquarie, as at Suitor's
hundreds of spofe throughout the length
and breadth of Australia where the «««
genu are found in as great abundance,
existence of a diamond. I have fonnd
exaggerate when I call it a hundred thou
the Cudgegong, while he adds that lie has
It seems that some alleged diamonds 1
and precious stones forwarded from the j
Darling, a few miles from Fort Bourfce, !
in 1870, were found on examination to ;
and other drift. *
impression that there is far more excite
ment respecting diamonds than the sub
ject has yet been proved to be worthy j
of. " The diamonds hitherto found (he !
remarks) have been but of little commer- j
cial value ; and as to the other gems, I'
sale at all. Capital and time and con
forwarded for examination' pieces of
sons supposed to hold respectable posi
tions in hfe could have condescended to
those who have voluntarily given their I
difficult to imagine. It seems to me to j
be an unworthy reward for wasted pa- ■
tience, and not nnfrequently unreturned
postage stamps and other expenses." '
There follows a learned disquisition on !
the origin of diamonds, in which the j
different views of many celebrated writers '
Clarke seemB to be against the theory of
different refractive powers; - and he uses
consequently, the density .in parts and
under which diamonds are found in Bra
mond seekers in this colony may be men
tioned that numbqrs of the Brazilian crys
more than two pr three bf the latter
man found one of 17-^ carats, called an
octavo, he was crowned with flowers, con
has ascertained that up to the 12th Janu
largest being 1§ carat. One, however,
had been found weighing 5$ carats.
also procured from the Woolshed dig
" It is Baid, also, that some small dia
monds have been found at the Echunga j
that bears upon our new colonial in
dustry, that the matters thus brought to- |
gether may be an assistance to persons j
anxious to investigate the curious cir
cumstances connected with the moBt
Paper B contains extracts from Capt. j
reports and evidence by the Rev. W. B. (
Clarke in reference to the; discovery of tin
in the ' S. M. Herald'! of 16th Aug.,
tin being found along parts of the Mur
abundance of schorl; since, in granitic i
of tin in granite from the locality men- j
tioned. Moreover, the abundance of j
copper in this colony naturally suggested j
1851j stating thht he had found a small
Muniong, the tourmaline in which led i
The third is from a similar report, :
have met with sulphnret of antimony;
molybdenite, in radiating masses, occurs |
more plentiful quantity near New Val
ley ; wolfram and oxide of tin, with !
in the alluvia of other tracts, as 1 have :
found it amidst the spinelle rubies, Ori
ental emeralds, sapphires, and other |
I have seen oxide of tin in New Eng
Select Committee of the Legislature, on j
19th Aug., 1853 :—" In sixteen of these j
iron, and tin, and various gems." j
The fifth is from a report to the Colo
that ft is frequently abundant where gold
streams from the Feel to the Condamine, '
mid it was equally common in the South
localities, alwajB with gold derived from
New England and its flanks. I was first |
led to anticipate tin from observing the :
this fact with another, viz., that tin ex
Archipelago, we have every reason to con
to Torres Strait,"
and that he had found it on the Murrum
Our review has now assumed a for
ub in mind of the conjuror's inexhaustible
one partakes of the charming variety pre
sented to him, the more his thirst in
bountiful fountain of knowledge. !
portions of the Rev. Mr. Clarke's moat ex
experience, .the practical shrewdness, and
i disinterestedly tendered by a gentleman i
to the superior duties of his sacred call
ing, has very often " waited the midnight
oil" in giving them information on geo
logy and mineralogy which they could re
Clarke delivered a highly interesting ad-
to the Royal Society of New South
Wales, of which body he is Vice Presi-
dent. It was given in the 'Herald,' and
referring principally to tin, which we in-
tended to republish—but other pressing
matters came in the way for several issues,
and thus our original intention was not
fulfilled.
We have now before us a pamphlet con-
pages, and there is an appendix of 28.
Nevertheless, we think it will be accept-
able to our readers if we give them some
idea of its contents, as no doubt many of
perusing the pamphlet.
B. Clarke in the twin fields of geology and
His reputation is not simply Australian—
honoured the rev. gentleman is held in
Science in the present age.
prospects of the Society, followed by ob-
servations on the expedition to New
Guinea, Mr. Clarke communicates inter-
esting information with respect to the dia-
mond field of Bahia, and, with his invari-
able candour, gives full prominence to the
authorities whose statements he deems
reliable. It appears that the matrix of
the diamond in Bahia is certainly a sand-
stone of Tertiary age; that it once over-
forms the summits of flat-topped ranges,
the general strike of which varies from
region must have a wide area, though
only a portion of the country has yet been
thoroughly explored. It is specially
the presence of the latter—but Tertiary
produced the sands in which the diamonds
Bahia is set down as worth three million
passing, on the one hand, into porphyry
and granite, and, on the other, into horn-
blende rock and quartzite. They are sur-
and schists, and in other parts, by sand-
stones, a Tertiary conglomerate, or sand-
S.S.W."
Western edge of the Lagos or bay, attain-
"The colours of the diamonds are vari-
ous, changing with the distinctive locali-
been found in twelve different sites in
Wales and Victoria. He then observes:
—"There may, doubtless, be many more;
but of a Tertiary sandstone, resembling
that of Bahia, I have seen nothing in Aus-
tralia, where also Itacolumite is not known
to exist." He also very judiciously points
out that the diamond is not to be regarded
as a mere article of luxury, and, as an in-
stance, refers to the great value of dia-
mond-pouinted drills in boring for blasts
in the tunnel through Mont Cenis, a work
which is one of the marvels of the present
age.
The next subject is the African dia-
mond fields, which have been wonderfully
prolific. Mr. Clarke alludes to the large
size of many of the diamonds obtained in
South Africa, there being numerous speci-
of one fact alone—that in 1870 there were
exported from South African ports dia-
Singularly enough, too, "the first dia-
monds found at Du Toit's Pan and Bult-
latter place, in 1869."
"It seems that the diamonds are now
found either on the surface, or at a depth
Sometimes they are broken from concus-
sion—sometimes with chipped edges—and
????? river beds are water-worn and un-
????.
The average yield per cubic yard is
?difficult to assign; but in one place 36
???? of surface sand yielded fifteen dia-
monds, of average weight each 8 carats,
and beneath this, a hole 1280 cubic feet
in extent produced nine diamonds, weigh-
ing in all 6½ carats."
Mr. Clarke quotes Mr. Dunn's clear
description of the geological character of
lower dicynodon beds, with huge fossil
saurians; 210 miles upper dicynodon beds,
full of igneous dykes and beds. These
also are full of fossil saurian and vege-
table remains. 'On these (says Mr.
Dunn) are situated our present diamond
fields of South Africa.'
"It is nevertheless remarkable that, as
in Bahia, a gneissic rock appears to be the
base of the diamond region, but it is by
no means clear that it is of the same
class as the Brazilian rock.
kind, such as sandstone, not Tertiary, as
"Agate gravel is very common, and
forms a striking feature in the upper
????es of the Vaal. This has been held
by some to be indicative of diamonds.
?many places where no suspicions of dia-
monds are acknowledged."
Mr. Clarke mentions some interesting
???????m which it appears not im-
???????????? natives of various coun-
???????????? diamonds for the pur-
poses of ????? through stones, that
???????????? made serviceable as
???????????? s and other uses.
???????????? ?eats of gold fields,
???????????? he outset explains
???????????? been principally
???????????? and it much more
????????????. Thus he was the
first person in these colonies to call at-
tention to the value of quartz in connec-
Herald' of July 8, 1851. And, in follow-
ing this opinion up, he endeavoured to
work out a wide field of enquiry on inde-
Murchison hoped that our population
not found in depth, " an opinion (ob-
in a neighbouring colony, led to much
hindrance in the progress of gold produc-
will have to give way." Mr. Clarke evi-
workings, and remarks—"That gold pro-
reefing were given up?
of the expediency of tunnelling under ba-
and we thoroughly agree with him—at
Rocky River (the latter a wasteful expen-
diture of time, labour, and money, which,
moreover, is not yet obsolete).
Mr. Clarke, further, says:—"The no-
tion that available gold is ONLY to be
the lower Silurian rocks must be aband-
lower Palaeozoic age has ever been disco-
is all from granite, or deposits of iron-
but also from solid granite. The rich
gold field of Gympie appears to be not
much older than the Carboniferous forma-
tion. In New Zealand, the wonderfully
rocks not older than the Trias; whilst in
California a large portion of the aurifer-
ous rocks are as recent as Trias and Juras-
in Transmutation. Such was the effect
that produced much of the gold at Hill
End and Tambaroora, as well as elsewhere
at Hawkins's Hill in which the lodes occur
are so much like those that have made
follow highly interesting details in sup-
Hill End region are not older than Silu-
of this large tract will be found produc-
Wheeler, Qd., the mother rock is ser-
the whole of Frederick's Valley is aurifer-
ous, yet the operations have not been ex-
tended to the hills on the E. of the val-
Mr. Clarke's opinion in this case is fur-
Tambaroora, and another at Wyagden
gold in granite, and recently he has ascer-
granite for several miles in that region.
there has been a hot mineral spring, in
pointed out to the Government as de-
in many cases the gold is held in the sul-
quartz miners when he states:—"Per-
sons are often confused when they see au-
riferous stone suddenly, as it were, losing
sulphides of iron. But it is a fact, estab-
sign of its actual disappearance. Never-
countries shows plainly that an excess of
of gold as the absence of it; and, when
either is too much in excess, the aurifer-
(Authority given.) When, 21 years ago,
Mr. Stutchbury appended a note to one
Mr. Clarke's opinions on gold in rela-
Minas Geraes, Brazil, Mr. C. pro-
"Where the vein rock is rich in sul-
is the case at Morro Velho. The sul-
which is most abundant, and yields a lit-
"A similar change from gold to the sul-
phides (holding gold) was reported to me
at Ravenswood, in Queensland, Mr.
at Hawkins's Hill.
the same fact in Brazil. Mr. Hockin,
stated to Mr. Phillips that the composi-
tion of the pure ore may be taken at about
43 per cent. of silica, and 57 per cent. of
pyritous matter. Such ore yields by as
say from 4 to 6 ozs. of gold per ton; and
is large. Cubical pyrites is of more fre-
quent occurrence, but is far less rich in
gold. Solid specimens of this substance,
than 4 dwts. per ton. Bunches of clay
slate are often found in the principal
veins, and this rock, by assay, affords
from 5 to 7½ dwts. per ton. 'Quartz
says) has never been found to be auri-
the ore in the mine.'
"I would repeat here that where cer-
tain igneous rocks are present, such as di-
or felstones IN COMPANY WITH PYRITOUS
MINERALS, the conclusion is almost irre-
We have now arrived at a very import-
ant part of Mr. Clarke's address—that re-
lating to tin. It appears that during his
explorations in 1851-2-3 tin ore was dis-
mentioned in his reports to the Govern-
ment; and further, that he since re-
a view of inducing operations for its de-
search for and working of the ore. More-
Wales. Mr. Clarke adds:—"I have in-
(C) which will justify the assertion that,
notwithstanding the claims of any other
person, the FIRST MENTION and FIRST DIS-
COVERY of tin, as a product of New South
my Researches in the Southern Gold-
Fields (p. 128) in 1860. Moreover, I ex-
1853, the date of my explorations in the
Macintyre tin districts, but not till 1866
Exhibition at Paris in 1867, among seve-
ral specimens of tin ore shown was some
The great value of tin ore to Queens-
Queensland which touches the N. boun-
pounds' worth of stream tin alone, irre-
have settled it that the stanniferous gran-
ites are Palæozoic, pre-Permian, and post-
be quaternary or recent in its present po-
reduced from the peroxide, either by ac-
mistake. (See my report of 14th Feb.,
common in our granite country than has
Tenasserim, Merghui, and Malacca have
not decreased in value since the com-
is reckoned at nearly 4½ millions per
millions sterling. The tin there is asso-
us the tin is always in the state of per-
Coming then to copper, Mr. Clarke re-
worked for tin. Mr. Carne, an author
New South Wales occurs in bunches or
'blows,' it would be well if some experi-
"Copper and tin appear to be as abund-
persons looking for the former in a granite
found that, in one of the richest copper
seen myself. The rich gold reefs of Cas-
tlemaine and Bendigo stop at the junction
of the slates and the granite.
inconsiderable value, though deceiving to
Such is the case at Kilkivan, in Queens-
the condition of hardness or of decompo-
sition of our granites and traps; inas-
and gold in decomposed trap, under cir-
cumstances of great interest and import-
the revival of ourauriferous wealth (mostly,
be it noticed, by mining in the rock), is
flat uninteresting desert between the Lach-
lan, Bogan, and Darling." Nor does he
has been occasioned by discoveries of a
conglomerate ore of gold, silver, and cop
per, near Gympie. It is ascertained to be
found copper alloyed with antimony; and
I have a specimen, from near Bathurst, in
and gold, silver and lead, silver and cop-
our distinguished geologist has an oppor-
tunity of proving that he has given mate-
patches marked metamorphic may, how-
ever, be transmuted Silurian. But I con-
fess to have seen no fossils from Queens-
in Queensland, in 1870, of the precious
were collected from a hill in Secondary
it was originated in silicious waters, pro-
bably warm; and not far from that dis-
trict there now occur numerous water
quartz by the presence of water of com-
and other minerals of less local import-
who are destined to see a British popula-
"May it be the aim and study of our-
descendants, to use it aright, as respon-
land,' this ' large land—'a land that the
Lord our God careth for.' "
extracts from Mr. Clarke's anniver-
sary address in May, 1870; these refer-
and opinions as to their origin. It ap-
into his hands "New South Wales a Dia-
opinions expressed by Mr. Norman Tay-
lor and Professor Thomson on the dia-
that the diamond district is limited to the
whilst in the drift alluded to they
the tailing of the miners having been
merely an alluvial space at one of those
ancient date in the vicinity are considered
to be Upper Silurian, traversed by green-
the deposit in which the Cudgegong dia-
zircon, topaz, sapphire, corundum, spinel,
pleonaste, &c., from which Mr. Norman
but with those gems which are held to
they do in rocks which are so denomi-
diamond is thus associated, on the Cudge-
gong and on the Macquarie, as at Suttor's
hundreds of spots throughout the length
and breadth of Australia where the same
gems are found in as great abundance,
existence of a diamond. I have found
exaggerate when I call it a hundred thou-
the Cudgegong, while he adds that he has
It seems that some alleged diamonds
and precious stones forwarded from the
Darling, a few miles from Fort Bourke,
in 1870, were found on examination to
and other drift.
impression that there is far more excite-
ment respecting diamonds than the sub-
ject has yet been proved to be worthy
remarks) have been but of little commer-
sale at all. Capital and time and con-
forwarded for examination pieces of
forcibly adds:—"With what object per-
sons supposed to hold respectable posi-
tions in life could have condescended to
those who have voluntarily given their
difficult to imagine. It seems to me to
be an unworthy reward for wasted pa-
tience, and not unfrequently unreturned
postage stamps and other expenses."
There follows a learned disquisition on
the origin of diamonds, in which the
different views of many celebrated writers
Clarke seems to be against the theory of
different refractive powers; and he uses
consequently, the density in parts and
under which diamonds are found in Bra-
says:—"As an encouragement to dia-
mond seekers in this colony may be men-
tioned that numbers of the Brazilian crys-
more than two or three of the latter
of 30 carats; so that when a negro work-
man found one of 17½ carats, called an
octavo, he was crowned with flowers, con-
has ascertained that up to the 12th Janu-
largest being 1 3/8 carat. One, however,
had been found weighing 5 5/8 carats.
near to, the usual 'wash dirt' of the dig-
also procured from the Woolshed dig-
"It is said, also, that some small dia-
monds have been found at the Echunga
that bears upon our new colonial in-
dustry, that the matters thus brought to-
gether may be an assistance to persons
anxious to investigate the curious cir-
cumstances connected with the most
Paper B contains extracts from Capt.
reports and evidence by the Rev. W. B.
Clarke in reference to the discovery of tin
tin being found along parts of the Mur-
abundance of schorl; since, in granitic
of tin in granite from the locality men-
tioned. Moreover, the abundance of
copper in this colony naturally suggested
1851, stating that he had found a small
Muniong, the tourmaline in which led
The third is from a similar report,
have met with sulphuret of antimony;
molybdenite, in radiating masses, occurs
more plentiful quantity near New Val-
in the alluvia of other tracts, as 1 have
found it amidst the spinelle rubies, Ori-
ental emeralds, sapphires, and other
I have seen oxide of tin in New Eng-
Select Committee of the Legislature, on
iron, and tin, and various gems."
The fifth is from a report to the Colo-
that it is frequently abundant where gold
streams from the Peel to the Condamine,
and it was equally common in the South
The sixth is from a letter to the 'He-
localities, always with gold derived from
New England and its flanks. I was first
led to anticipate tin from observing the
this fact with another, viz., that tin ex-
Archipelago, we have every reason to con-
to Torres Strait,."
and that he had found it on the Murrum-
Our review has now assumed a for-
us in mind of the conjuror's inexhaustible
one partakes of the charming variety pre-
sented to him, the more his thirst in-
bountiful fountain of knowledge.
portions of the Rev. Mr. Clarke's most ex-
experience, the practical shrewdness, and
disinterestedly tendered by a gentleman
to the superior duties of his sacred call-
ing, has very often "wasted the midnight
oil" in giving them information on geo-
logy and mineralogy which they could re-
ARTIFICIAL TRINKETS. (From the English Magazine.) (Article), Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), Saturday 18 May 1872 [Issue No.891] page 4 2019-08-19 21:12 ARTIFICIAL TEmSETS. I
This is a .very extensive 'and impor
tant trade. It is of remarkable inte
rest to a superior class of English' arti
j which used to furnish the promenades,
the shops, and tfrff pavilions of the
Palais Eoyal, in Paris, are idle and
is coining over to England. So much
has been .made known by commercial,'
circulars, intended, in a somewhat am
biguous way, to announce that Bir
and much sought-for trinkets. -The
.comprehension is curiously incomplete.
,Take your Parisian master ;v he is a
critic of precious stones; "he knows how
how to imitate them; be is an artist in
every kind of splendid illusion. Wow,
vanity ponsidered, may be reckoned
light, and colour. There are worship
gleams of twinkling brilliance. A phi
found, which shall convert cheap sub
-what is the false French diamond,
years been exhibited at Paris,, which
was, until lately, the very' centre of
this sparkling commerce ? It-is a bit
both perfectly white, except for'the
prismatic aurora incessantly playin.g
topaz, an ametliyst, a crystal, and out
beautiful imposture* which none, ex
cept a professional lapidary would pro
excessively difficult.' " The .cutting is. a
selected with apt less scrupulousness
than are medicines for delicate chil
oxide of arsenic. Here we have a com
-the second in their estimation of all
precious stones-they have to deal with
its wonderful and varying colours-as
Cambay, of Ceylon, of Bohemia. . The
lovely dark light, burning in and burst
is famed, in all its hues-white the
rarest, pale blue, ruby-tinted, vermi
Well, go.to the Jews,'of Amsterdam,
and they will, charge you a .hundred ?
make one "for yourself. We lay no
great' stress on the celebrated Parisian
are of an .asparagus green, rather shell
enough flashing under a galaxy, of
a small degree, .the English mechanics
have encountered a far deeper ? em
barrassment in treating: the ruby
arcades are out of the question. Pro
Brazilian are . generally sapphires,
of rose and cherry; but some are wine
tinted, or of a violet hue,or tinged with
yellow. Ifc is astonishing how far a
and calcined flints will go in competi
"the purple of.Cassius;" it is, how
Cassian purple will produce a beauti
a better is obtained by" a mingling of
acid, red lead, calcined patasb, calcined
borax, and the purple. . Thousands of
have the world believe in- heirloom
- Do you admire Mademoiselle's coral
painter's vermilion-about as much of
the latter as dazzles on her check. Or
her pearls? Ealse pearls were ab
France-false in so many of its fashions.
the scales of the blay-a small flat fish
the latter being of a very silvery ap
continually changing, dried in a horse
added a little gelatine; and this mix
ture is. spread with the utmost care
over, delicate globes of glass. When
cool these are pierced, 'and filled with
?opals, powdered, are used for the more
costly kinds../-The -Turks carry; on a
great traffic in " pearls of -roses,
coloured from roseieaves crushed in a
mortar. The blacky red, and blue
to their charm; by perfuming them
during the process ' with attar and
musk. Among the ingredients also em
Bomans have a simpler method.
They use little alabaster- marbles, the
scales from : oyster and other shell
" Venetian pearls" are glass, arid their
ARTIFICIAL TRINKETS.
This is a very extensive and impor-
tant trade. It is of remarkable inte-
rest to a superior class of English arti-
which used to furnish the promenades,
the shops, and the pavilions of the
Palais Royal, in Paris, are idle and
is coming over to England. So much
has been made known by commercial
circulars, intended, in a somewhat am-
biguous way, to announce that Bir-
and much sought-for trinkets. The
comprehension is curiously incomplete.
critic of precious stones; he knows how
how to imitate them; he is an artist in
every kind of splendid illusion. Now,
vanity pconsidered, may be reckoned
light, and colour. There are worship-
gleams of twinkling brilliance. A phi-
found, which shall convert cheap sub-
—what is the false French diamond,
years been exhibited at Paris, which
was, until lately, the very centre of
this sparkling commerce? It is a bit
both perfectly white, except for the
prismatic aurora incessantly playing
topaz, an amethyst, a crystal, and out
beautiful imposture, which none, ex-
cept a professional lapidary would pro-
excessively difficult. The cutting is a
selected with not less scrupulousness
than are medicines for delicate chil-
oxide of arsenic. Here we have a com-
—the second in their estimation of all
precious stones—they have to deal with
its wonderful and varying colours—as
Cambay, of Ceylon, of Bohemia. The
lovely dark light, burning in and burst-
is famed, in all its hues—white the
rarest, pale blue, ruby-tinted, vermi-
Well, go to the Jews of Amsterdam,
and they will charge you a hundred
make one for yourself. We lay no
great stress on the celebrated Parisian
are of an asparagus green, rather shell
enough flashing under a galaxy of
a small degree, the English mechanics
have encountered a far deeper em-
barrassment in treating the ruby—
arcades are out of the question. Pro-
Brazilian are generally sapphires,
of rose and cherry; but some are wine-
tinted, or of a violet hue, or tinged with
yellow. Itc is astonishing how far a
and calcined flints will go in competi-
"the purple of.Cassius;" it is, how-
Cassian purple will produce a beauti-
a better is obtained by a mingling of
acid, red lead, calcined potash, calcined
borax, and the purple. Thousands of
have the world believe in heirloom
Do you admire Mademoiselle's coral
painter's vermilion—about as much of
the latter as dazzles on her cheek. Or
her pearls? False pearls were ab-
France—false in so many of its fashions.
the scales of the blay—a small flat fish
the latter being of a very silvery ap-
continually changing, dried in a horse-
added a little gelatine; and this mix-
ture is spread with the utmost care
over delicate globes of glass. When
cool these are pierced, and filled with
opals, powdered, are used for the more
costly kinds. The Turks carry on a
great traffic in "pearls of roses,"
coloured from rose leaves crushed in a
mortar. The black, red, and blue
to their charm by perfuming them
during the process with attar and
musk. Among the ingredients also em-
Romans have a simpler method.
They use little alabaster marbles, the
scales from oyster and other shell
"Venetian pearls" are glass, and their

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.