Information about Trove user: Brian.Blaylock

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,902,824
2 noelwoodhouse 3,960,702
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,393,803
5 Rhonda.M 3,297,157
...
999 redrod 43,020
1000 InghamNotes 43,006
1001 luckylu 42,918
1002 Brian.Blaylock 42,902
1003 jennywren 42,832
1004 OzzyAzza 42,758

42,902 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

January 2020 452
December 2019 51
May 2019 47
April 2019 625
March 2019 956
February 2019 1,953
December 2018 1,233
October 2018 4,138
September 2018 1,865
August 2018 233
July 2018 2,569
June 2018 244
May 2018 5,512
April 2018 838
April 2017 2,561
March 2017 10,052
February 2017 6,161
January 2017 1,582
January 2016 185
November 2015 1,645

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,902,622
2 noelwoodhouse 3,960,702
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,393,777
5 Rhonda.M 3,297,144
...
998 InghamNotes 43,006
999 PeterG1947 42,977
1000 luckylu 42,918
1001 Brian.Blaylock 42,902
1002 OzzyAzza 42,758
1003 ianmcn 42,728

42,902 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

January 2020 452
December 2019 51
May 2019 47
April 2019 625
March 2019 956
February 2019 1,953
December 2018 1,233
October 2018 4,138
September 2018 1,865
August 2018 233
July 2018 2,569
June 2018 244
May 2018 5,512
April 2018 838
April 2017 2,561
March 2017 10,052
February 2017 6,161
January 2017 1,582
January 2016 185
November 2015 1,645

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
WITH THE BIRDS. HELD NATURALISTS AT BLACKWOOD. A PROFITABLE AFTERNOON. (Article), The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Monday 27 October 1913 [Issue No.20,892] page 8 2020-01-24 15:16 The' 'well-trained ? ornithological ear, how
ever^ caughf each note separately,- and
identified the- species whence they came,
m tull view. On several occasions the
narrow-billed bronze cuckoo (Oalcococcyx
Basalis) was seen apparently seeking a. nest
number of species, like tfieir ally in' Europe,
have the same habit of -placing the respon
upon some other unwary bird, which un
dertakes ihe duty as though it were its own
offspring. In the tree tops the' striped
diamond bird (Pardalotus etriatus), often
known -as the 'chucky chuck,' on account
of its pretty little calV was observed seek
ing out ifae small insects concealed between
diamond birds, which ore so formed that
mouse-like bnwow in the side of a bank, or
mortar in Home old wall, where there may
make its liome there during the breeding
white eggs. The eggs of nearly ail the birds
that Jay in hollows and burrows, Mr. Mel
ings of any kind, as in Bnch places the eggs
are not iu sight of enemies. Thus Nature
provide deceptive features and to' make
placed. Some of these deceptions are ex
ground bjrds, whose eggs are laid upon 'the
the leafy houeiis of the fljumtrees, the rest
forth its sciS60r-nrinding notes, and ever on
the 'move from twig to Mz in search ot
aies and gnats. It is a near ally to the
shepherd's companion, or wiBie wagtail,
bnt has a white throat, in place of the
which crosses the Sturt Creek, our atten
as the fairy martin (Petrocheiidon arid).
Upon the 'ceiling of 'the arch we soon dis
covered that the little birds' ware smarting
to build their bottle-fhaped mud nests,
?which arc often placed close together in
very often diaiurbcd by thoughtless school
boys, who throw atones and sticks at these
preity little nests, and knock out the
young. It is to be hoped thai the boys
oi BJackwood will see to it and protect
by only locking at the nests, leaving them
alone, so thati these useful little birds may
with, aa their nests are placed high up
and ont of the reach of harm's way as far
as cats and so on axe. concerned. A halt
?was called on a sloping grassy bank, in the
not in proportion to Hie amount of ?walk-
It is generally when quiet and at ca^e that
the observer can make the best of bis
time. This was exemplified on the pre
about, and seemed quite 'tam«. Tbe blue
\vyen (Malurus cyaneus), the male t/ird
ventured quite close to us, ini the thick
dosra-e bish bv the stream, while close
by the silvereyes (Zosterops coerulefceiu)
liODDed about and uttered their plaintive
libtle notes. Above us, along the high
cliffy banla. the sacred kingfisher (Hal
cyon sanctus) was filling, and flying up
£nd down stream, doubtless finding plenty
of tood in small fkh and tadpoles in the
water. Tbe white*acked magpie (Gym
norhina leuconota.) was piping his well
the white-naped honeyeater (Melithrepfcus
lunulatiis) was prying for inBeoia among
tie topmost branccei, The nest oi *&*
bird is a pretty pendulant cup-ahaped
spot. A near alley of this- bird, tie
dackcapped honeyeater (M. gularis/, Mr.
from the cows, and wrth the-e so orna
well out. and away from the prevailing
always sticks close to the nest, and eo keeps
spaca the pipit or ground lark (Anthus
of the hooded robin (Melanodryas bieolor)
like the_ rough broken top of the stem,
and with ? some wonderful ? deceptive
eatures outside, in the shape of pieces of
ong bark stuck all around with makebe
lieve, tbe nest was merely a piece of rough
stringy bark. The hiding of the stmctnre
nearly touch it, but bad not so.much as
jnve-coiourea eggs ot tne usual size and
[orm laid by the pretty Jittle pied, or
While qnietly resting observing' on the
and gave some interesting and useful ob
necessitythore wnsthatihe feathered police
should be protected.- Their extinction, he
remarked, would mean eventually the ex
tinction of the human race,- for tbe biros
formed, as it were, a tooth in the- great
would mean the same as /knocking out a
tooth from the cogwheel of a. mdfchme— the
h&rty vpte of thanks was accorded Mr.
Mallor for his interesting impromptu
minds of those that had -not previously
studied the birds, and set them thinMng
to .Blackwood was made as the shadows
the train, the city, was reached shortly b«
outing, characteristic of the Field Natu
ralists. Society, whose lneinbers have tastes
for nature so wide and varied,' that study
no matter when and how' the excursions
are taken)
The well-trained ornithological ear, how-
ever caught each note separately, and
identified the species whence they came,
in full view. On several occasions the
narrow-billed bronze cuckoo (Calcococcyx
basalis) was seen apparently seeking a nest
number of species, like their ally in Europe,
have the same habit of placing the respon-
upon some other unwary bird, which un-
dertakes the duty as though it were its own
offspring. In the tree tops the striped
diamond bird (Pardalotus striatus), often
known as the "chucky chuck," on account
of its pretty little call was observed seek-
ing out the small insects concealed between
diamond birds, which are so formed that
mouse-like burrow in the side of a bank, or
mortar in some old wall, where there may
make its home there during the breeding
white eggs. The eggs of nearly all the birds
that lay in hollows and burrows, Mr. Mel-
ings of any kind, as in such places the eggs
are not in sight of enemies. Thus Nature
provide deceptive features and to make
placed. Some of these deceptions are ex-
ground birds, whose eggs are laid upon the
the leafy boughs of the fgumtrees, the rest-
forth its scissor-grinding notes, and ever on
the move from twig to twig in search of
flies and gnats. It is a near ally to the
shepherd's companion, or wllie wagtail,
but has a white throat, in place of the
which crosses the Sturt Creek, our atten-
as the fairy martin (Petrocheiidon ariel).
Upon the ceiling of the arch we soon dis-
covered that the little birds were starting
to build their bottle-shaped mud nests,
which are often placed close together in
very often disturbed by thoughtless school
boys, who throw stones and sticks at these
pretty little nests, and knock out the
young. It is to be hoped that the boys
of Blackwood will see to it and protect
by only looking at the nests, leaving them
alone, so that these useful little birds may
with, as their nests are placed high up
and out of the reach of harm's way as far
as cats and so on are concerned. A halt
was called on a sloping grassy bank, in the
not in proportion to the amount of walk-
It is generally when quiet and at care that
the observer can make the best of his
time. This was exemplified on the pre-
about, and seemed quite tame. The blue
wren (Malurus cyaneus), the male bird
ventured quite close to us, in the thick
dogrose bush by the stream, while close
by the silvereyes (Zosterops coerulescens)
hopped about and uttered their plaintive
little notes. Above us, along the high
cliffy banks. the sacred kingfisher (Hal-
cyon sanctus) was caling, and flying up
and down stream, doubtless finding plenty
of food in small fish and tadpoles in the
water. The white-backed magpie (Gym-
norhina leuconota) was piping his well-
the white-naped honeyeater (Melithreptus
lunulatus) was prying for insects among
the topmost branches. The nest of this
bird is a pretty pendulant cup-shaped
spot. A near alley of this bird, the
blackcapped honeyeater (M. gularis), Mr.
from the cows, and with these so orna-
well out, and away from the prevailing
always sticks close to the nest, and so keeps
space the pipit or ground lark (Anthus
of the hooded robin (Melanodryas bicolor)
like the rough broken top of the stem,
and with some wonderful deceptive
features outside, in the shape of pieces of
long bark stuck all around with make-be-
lieve, the nest was merely a piece of rough
stringy bark. The hiding of the stucture
nearly touch it, but had not so much as
olive-coloured eggs of the usual size and
form laid by the pretty little pied, or
While qnietly resting observing on the
and gave some interesting and useful ob-
necessity there was that the feathered police
should be protected. Their extinction, he
remarked, would mean eventually the ex-
tinction of the human race, for the birds
formed, as it were, a tooth in the great
would mean the same as knocking out a
tooth from the cogwheel of a machine— the
hearty vote of thanks was accorded Mr.
Mellor for his interesting impromptu
minds of those that had not previously
studied the birds, and set them thinking
to Blackwood was made as the shadows
the train, the city, was reached shortly be-
fore 7 o'clock, after a thoroughly enjoyable
outing, characteristic of the Field Natu-
ralists Society, whose members have tastes
for nature so wide and varied, that study
no matter when and how the excursions
are taken.
EXPORT OF BIRDS Local Society Opposes Ban (Article), The Register News-Pictorial (Adelaide, SA : 1929 - 1931), Thursday 11 April 1929 [Issue No.27,349] page 18 2020-01-24 13:38 section and issue
spection and issue
Out among the People Fishing at £6.000 a Mile (Article), The Register News-Pictorial (Adelaide, SA : 1929 - 1931), Friday 14 June 1929 [Issue No.27,404] page 6 2020-01-24 12:45 'After an examination of the stomachs of
thousands of starlings in' many districts
of various States, it was. conclusively
ihown that the. record was entirely on the
tviong side of the ledger. -_'
''Sheep men told me that in their dis
in. the destruction of ticks. . This is -
juite wrong, as I. never found a single
tick. .In picking into the sheep they
jJTeet the staple of. the -wool. They, ajso
leave matter which attracts' blowflies.'
insects after rain, but I have, found
oil, and many other grasses beneficial to
'In the fruit areas the bird takes a
toll that is beyond all measure. -On -an
iverage throughout the year it 'does not
:onsiune S pet cent.- of 'insect life for
'obd. ?;.. .:.-. ? . 'V .,-;?. ...:..-
. ''The starling is increasing in Australia
n most alarming numbers, and is driving
native birds '-from their natural' habitat. '
[fis ?'? .[dirty,, quarrelsome, aggressive .bird,
[t is very cunning, ' and has. sentinels
Etching on the -tree tops when it is at .
s-ork. The starling might be all -right
.h '-'Europe, ..which, is. its proper environ*
hent; .'.There' -other birds, can keep it ?
ipiet.' . . ? . ;.r .????'? .-. ./'?'. Jr -
"After an examination of the stomachs of
thousands of starlings in many districts
of various States, it was conclusively
shown that the record was entirely on the
wrong side of the ledger.
"Sheep men told me that in their dis-
in the destruction of ticks. This is -
quite wrong, as I never found a single
tick. In picking into the sheep they
affect the staple of the wool. They also
leave matter which attracts blowflies."
insects after rain, but I have found
foil, and many other grasses beneficial to
"In the fruit areas the bird takes a
toll that is beyond all measure. On an
average throughout the year it does not
consume 5 per cent of insect life for
food.
"The starling is increasing in Australia
in most alarming numbers, and is driving
native birds from their natural habitat.
It is a dirty, quarrelsome, aggressive bird.
It is very cunning, and has sentinels
watching on the tree tops when it is at
work. The starling might be all right
in Europe, which, is its proper environ-
ment. There other birds, can keep it
quiet."
A Bird Lover on the Murray Just how absorbingly interesting the bird life of the River Murray can be to one who has eyes to see is revealed in this entertainingly written article from the pen of a noted ornithologist who has enjoyed a happy restful holiday at Renmark. The writer is Mr. S. E. Terrill, president of the South Australian branch of the Ornithological Society and member of the, board of the Avicultural Society of South Australia, and his observations should be of value not only to bird lovers but to readers in general. (Article), Murray Pioneer and Australian River Record (Renmark, SA : 1913 - 1942), Thursday 3 September 1936 [Issue No.36] page 2 2020-01-24 11:44 Oh well! if you aee interested in
toils medium in the world for the
Oh well! if you are interested in
lous medium in the world for the
A Bird Lover on the Murray Just how absorbingly interesting the bird life of the River Murray can be to one who has eyes to see is revealed in this entertainingly written article from the pen of a noted ornithologist who has enjoyed a happy restful holiday at Renmark. The writer is Mr. S. E. Terrill, president of the South Australian branch of the Ornithological Society and member of the, board of the Avicultural Society of South Australia, and his observations should be of value not only to bird lovers but to readers in general. (Article), Murray Pioneer and Australian River Record (Renmark, SA : 1913 - 1942), Thursday 3 September 1936 [Issue No.36] page 2 2020-01-24 11:38 if the citizens of the Comnonwealth
iinked system of inheritance and
if the citizens of the Commonwealth
binos.
linked system of inheritance and
A Bird Lover on the Murray Just how absorbingly interesting the bird life of the River Murray can be to one who has eyes to see is revealed in this entertainingly written article from the pen of a noted ornithologist who has enjoyed a happy restful holiday at Renmark. The writer is Mr. S. E. Terrill, president of the South Australian branch of the Ornithological Society and member of the, board of the Avicultural Society of South Australia, and his observations should be of value not only to bird lovers but to readers in general. (Article), Murray Pioneer and Australian River Record (Renmark, SA : 1913 - 1942), Thursday 3 September 1936 [Issue No.36] page 2 2020-01-24 11:32 and most species apepar to be al-
Mirier) eating the black cater-
hear the local news, and I read' n
and most species appear to be al-
Miner) eating the black cater-
hear the local news, and I read in
A Bird Lover on the Murray Just how absorbingly interesting the bird life of the River Murray can be to one who has eyes to see is revealed in this entertainingly written article from the pen of a noted ornithologist who has enjoyed a happy restful holiday at Renmark. The writer is Mr. S. E. Terrill, president of the South Australian branch of the Ornithological Society and member of the, board of the Avicultural Society of South Australia, and his observations should be of value not only to bird lovers but to readers in general. (Article), Murray Pioneer and Australian River Record (Renmark, SA : 1913 - 1942), Thursday 3 September 1936 [Issue No.36] page 2 2020-01-24 11:13 A Bird Lover on the Murray.
A Bird Lover on the Murray Just how absorbingly interesting the bird life of the River Murray can be to one who has eyes to see is revealed in this entertainingly written article from the pen of a noted ornithologist who has enjoyed a happy restful holiday at Renmark. The writer is Mr. S. E. Terrill, president of the South Australian branch of the Ornithological Society and member of the, board of the Avicultural Society of South Australia, and his observations should be of value not only to bird lovers but to readers in general. (Article), Murray Pioneer and Australian River Record (Renmark, SA : 1913 - 1942), Thursday 3 September 1936 [Issue No.36] page 2 2020-01-24 11:05 Oh well! if you rxe interested in
ing whistle, "pee-weet, pee-weet," of a'
Oh well! if you aee interested in
ing whistle, "pee-weet, pee-weet," of a
few welcome swallows skimmed
the sparrow and red-tipped Parda-
might, with advantage all round, re-
unexpected cordialtiy and showed me
heir domestic hearth.
GAME LAWS AND THE SOUTHEAST. (Article), Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), Friday 17 January 1919 [Issue No.5718] page 2 2020-01-24 10:54 is, if the existing laws (poor as they
BIRD LOVERS. (Article), The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Saturday 27 July 1918 [Issue No.22,376] page 3 2020-01-24 10:48 applauding Capt. White's remarks, regard
ins the protection of quail. He said he
coirld not understand a man of 'all-British'
principlea shooting these tame-wild biifls
for sport. This 'worker' mentioned that
quail had -frequented the crops last har
to do. If the 'harvester came upon them
field could often .have caught them
if they had ' desired, withotu any
trouble (writes *'E. M. C') in Sntur
uaytfi .Journal). Mr. Bellohamberss notes
on the tawny frogmouthcalls to mind p-ir
old mopoke It was alwajs called a mo
poke because we weie ignorant of the cor
rect name. \Y« brought our bird; -from
the north to our river home. ' He was a
weird-Jooking bundle of fpatliers, with his
frog-like mouth '— hence the name, I pre
sume. This bird Jived in company with a
seagull about the^lawns for a Jong time,
and finally both birds disappeared at diffe
rent times. We concluded tliey had gone
exploring '.'pastures new' along tlie river.
numbers of cockatoo parrots, *mall grey
birds with yellow crests.^ These little
partially closed verandah. It often hap
pened that the 'man of the house' would
f-it ou a form in this verandah reading liis .,
paper, his feet stretched put in a .=emi
reclining position, and while in this atfa-
hia leg, over his ehoulder, and reach tb?
top of his head, and there perch quite com*
fortably. ? r ;*'*
applauding Capt. White's remarks, regard-
ing the protection of quail. He said he
could not understand a man of "all-British"
principles shooting these tame-wild birds
for sport. This "worker" mentioned that
quail had frequented the crops last har-
to do. If the harvester came upon them
field could often have caught them
if they had desired, without any
trouble (writes *'E. M. C') in Satur-
day's Journal). Mr. Bellchambers's notes
on the tawny frogmouth calls to mind our
old mopoke. It was always called a mo-
poke because we were ignorant of the cor-
rect name. We brought our bird from
the north to our river home. He was a
weird-looking bundle of feathers, with his
frog-like mouth—hence the name, I pre-
sume. This bird lived in company with a
seagull about the lawns for a long time,
and finally both birds disappeared at diffe-
rent times. We concluded they had gone
exploring "pastures new" along the river.
numbers of cockatoo parrots, small grey
birds with yellow crests. These little
partially closed verandah. It often hap-
pened that the "man of the house" would
sit on a form in this verandah reading his
paper, his feet stretched out in a semi-
reclining position, and while in this atti-
his leg, over his shoulder, and reach the
top of his head, and there perch quite com-
fortably.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.