Information about Trove user: Bellern

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,863,971
2 noelwoodhouse 3,932,425
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,714
4 DonnaTelfer 3,387,463
5 Rhonda.M 3,214,927
...
520 kjharris 93,416
521 ruthm1 93,382
522 BillStrong 93,213
523 Bellern 93,206
524 HelenDrake 93,158
525 bardaster1 92,943

93,206 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 719
September 2019 4,143
August 2019 2,170
July 2019 71
March 2018 287
August 2017 41
June 2017 13
May 2017 2,043
March 2017 485
February 2017 81
January 2017 1,596
December 2016 2,147
November 2016 1,281
October 2016 128
September 2016 2,110
August 2016 616
July 2016 2,415
June 2016 3,734
May 2016 3,595
April 2016 317
March 2016 5
November 2015 44
October 2015 4,022
September 2015 5,732
August 2015 6,095
July 2015 5,044
June 2015 4,210
May 2015 2,846
April 2015 2,850
March 2015 4,749
February 2015 4,287
January 2015 7,085
December 2014 1,368
November 2014 149
August 2014 9
July 2014 2
June 2014 48
April 2014 292
November 2013 312
October 2013 43
September 2013 57
August 2013 29
May 2013 994
April 2013 4,906
March 2013 5,764
February 2013 4,067
January 2013 205

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 5,863,769
2 noelwoodhouse 3,932,425
3 NeilHamilton 3,428,585
4 DonnaTelfer 3,387,442
5 Rhonda.M 3,214,914
...
519 ruthm1 93,382
520 BillStrong 93,213
521 HelenDrake 93,158
522 Bellern 93,067
523 bardaster1 92,940
524 melhamp 92,754

93,067 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2019 719
September 2019 4,143
August 2019 2,170
July 2019 71
March 2018 287
August 2017 41
June 2017 13
May 2017 2,043
March 2017 467
February 2017 81
January 2017 1,596
December 2016 2,147
November 2016 1,193
October 2016 128
September 2016 2,085
August 2016 616
July 2016 2,415
June 2016 3,726
May 2016 3,595
April 2016 317
March 2016 5
November 2015 44
October 2015 4,022
September 2015 5,732
August 2015 6,095
July 2015 5,044
June 2015 4,210
May 2015 2,846
April 2015 2,850
March 2015 4,749
February 2015 4,287
January 2015 7,085
December 2014 1,368
November 2014 149
August 2014 9
July 2014 2
June 2014 48
April 2014 292
November 2013 312
October 2013 43
September 2013 57
August 2013 29
May 2013 994
April 2013 4,906
March 2013 5,764
February 2013 4,067
January 2013 205

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 314,433
2 PhilThomas 137,757
3 mickbrook 113,428
4 GeoffMMutton 84,719
5 murds5 61,555
...
311 IRM22 142
312 josee6 141
313 tdawson 141
314 Bellern 139
315 ChrisHampton 139
316 DesSeary 139

139 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2017 18
November 2016 88
September 2016 25
June 2016 8


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
News of the Churches. (Article), Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907), Wednesday 3 June 1903 [Issue No.1739] page 11 2019-10-07 11:31 I News of the Churches.
The Most Rev. Dr. Alexander, Prim'ate of All I
Ireland, entered upon hie 80th year on Monday,
¡April 3, 1903. ¡
in the early part of J^uly.
A meeting of tlhe la^o^eean consultors was held
cut St. Mary's .Cathedral on Wednesday, at which
Cardinal Morah presided. ' v"''--i
I)r. Alexander Morrison, Principal of the Scots'
College, Melhurne, died very suddenly on Sun
The parishioners of St. Patrick's Church, Par
ramatta have decided to place a hell In the church
tower, as a memorial to the late Monsignor Rig
The damnatory clauses (os they are called) in
sung 'on Sunday, April 12, in Westminster
since his accident a year ago, when lie wa© thrown
from his horse. ".
1 from England a young, active clergyman to act
as curate to Dean Vance, In the parish of St.
Tho Evangelical Council of Sydney has rècelved
an assurance from the Premier of the Gtate, that
the carrying of newspapers in the streets of tho
On St. Barnabas' Day, June ll, a service will be
held in St. Andrew's Cathedral, Sydney, in con
nection with and on behalf of the Melanesian Mis
sion, and also a service on June .'.8, in connection
The Bishop of North Queensland (Dr. Frod
sham) is visiting a number of centres In South
Australia; appealing for fund© 'to- assist In re
to deliver a, lecture on Monday evening in ' the
Cardinal's' Hall, before »lie Catholic; Young
A thirteenth century Bishop's crozier was re
cently found in the rectory garden at Alceeter,
and was purchased; by the British Museum foi
£100., The money is to be devoted toward th*
cost of carrying out certain improvements in tht
The date of the celebration of the Wesley Bi
centenary in Sydney has again been changée
from June 28 to July 2, the committee havini
been able to secure the Sydney Town Hall oi
the latter date. This simply refers to the Syd
Tho seventh anniversary of the pastorate o
the Rev. Walker Taylor as rector of St. Sa
viour's, Redfern, was celebrated last wook b:
a large gathering of the parishioners, Judge Doc
ker presiding, when a number of interesting ad
The report presented to the Irish Genera
Synod (Episcopalian) on Tuesday, April 21, show
¡Body of the Church in Ireland amount t(
£8,348,060, an increase of over £80,000 compare«
¡with the previous year.
Lieutenant-Colonel Gilmour, the Salvatloi
Army's commanding officer in New Zealand, pass
ed through Sydney last week on his homewar<
Journey, having paid a visit to Melbourne on im
portant business connected with the Army'i
operations in his own State. '
Dr. John Hay has definitely promised to con
vey a site of land to the North St. Leonards Pres
by terian Churoh, as soon as the building commit
tee has £600 In hand, Towards this sum £30
hao been raised, and .vigorous efforts are bein
Tho Commissioners of Railways and Trami
having been approached by a deputation of Syd
ney ministers and laymen complaining of th
dlsturbanco of soveral congregations during Di
vine worship on Sundays by the trams, hav
promised to minimise tho evil.
The Rev. A. W. Johnstone, who for tho pat
four years .has had ohargo of the Lismoro Ar
glican parish, and has in consequence of fal!
lng health and the trying olimato, found lt n<
oossary to seek a change, has been appointed 1
Glen Innes, to willoh parish ho will remo-y
in July.,
After a long period- of inaction, the Gongregi
tlcnal cause at Albury has been revived undi
th« direction and efforts of the Rov. A, Rivet
of Beechworth, and such rapid and solid progrèï
has been made that it is expeotod that a oa
will soon ho givon to some suitablo minister i
tho pastor. . '
Tho Glasgow Syn'oa of the United Free Chun
recently adapted a motion, recommending tho G
lierai Assembly to maka careful inquiry Into tl
constitution of tho work of tho Natural Solon
Chairs in Edinburgh, and Glasgow Collogos.ni
to moko «6 appointments until tho mind of i)
Churoh has boon ascertained. ""
Tho organising eecrotary of tho Sydnoy Dioce
san Church Society, tho Rev. «Luke Parr, vlsitod
tho parish of St. Matthew's, "Windsor, on Sunday
evening in the parish church on Sunday, and dur
The eighth annual gathering of tho London En
deavourers was held in the Metropolitan Taber
for. over ten hours, with brief intervals.
The Bishop of Bathurst, D¿ Camidgé,"-visited
Cowra on Sunday week, and conductod ser
vices In St. John's Anglican Church. At the
confirmation which he held In-the forenoon, a
On Saturday, tho St; Mark's Society of Change
and rang the flrstpeal of bells, A 50400, Grandsire
Minor In 2 hours 45 minutes, the ringers being
H. Campbell (treble), J. Adams (soond), J. A.
White (third), T. Biddle (fourth), P.- Howard
(flith), and C. W. Porter (tenor and conductor).
visited St. Monica's Church; Parramatta north, on
.Sunday afternoon, a special' éholr having been
'Strong opposition was manifested in England
in April against the Army Cuild* Service, which
London, on " May 6.- The "Record," an evangeli
cal Anglican paper, steted repeatedly that the
service would be distinctly "a service for the re
Tho Anglican Bishop of 'Manchester recently
oitj% with the Rey. F.-, S. Collier, the superintend
ent, and -expressed himself surprised and delight
also sont a donation to the funds, and will be a
patron ot' a bazaar, which was to be held during
Churches, and for the reconstn- 3tlon of National
The-ceremony of formally inducting the Rev.
Bast took place at High Mass on. Sunday morning
(li o'clock), when his Eminence Cardinal Moran
Thames-street, ' Balmain East.
The usual Sunday morning breakfast was^given
on May 31, at tho City Night Refuge and-Soup
Kitchen, Kent-street, to 115 men, 9 women, and;2
children.-; Durftfg-last week 383 meals were sup
Shelter was afforded to 022 men, 78 women, and
: Prison Sunday was observed by a number of
Episcopal and other churches in' Sydney and
the suburbs on May 31. Circular t.eltord were
addressed by Archdeacon Gunther, tho Vicar
olergy, and also by the Rev. Rainsford Uavin, the
President of the Methodist Church in New Soutl
The Archbishop of Sydney was expecting t(
spend a few days about the end of April at Lam
beth Palace, as the guest of the Archbishop o:
Canterbury, after which his Grace had arrangé*
to attend the May meetings of the great Anglicai
societies in London, also to preach for the Colo
nial and Continental Church Society, on May 3
The Bishop bf Bathurst, Dr. Camidge, acting
resignation of Archdeacon Campbell. Archdea
con Dunstan has been connected with the. diocese
everywhere. ' .
Some time ago tho threatened total blihdhesi
of Mr. Ira D. Sankey (the celebrated música
composer and the friend and companion; of th<
late Mr.'ÜÖ; L. Moody) "was reported In the "Towi
ancf Country Journal,", but the Ratest news give!
hopevthat tUe right eye may ,be. saved, Mr
Sankey, whbSe générai health was much impair
ed, has improved: somewhat, and is more hope
Meetings of the parishioners of Sit. Joseph'
Roman Cathollo Church, Woollahra, have recent
ly been held at tho Instigation of the Rev. Fathe
Lawler, O.F.M., to consider the necessity of re
novatlng the ohuroh and increasing the seatin
accommodation, and lt was resolved to under
take, the necessary Improvements at once, th
second Sunday in June being fixed as a day to
The Rev. F. B. Meyer, B.A., whose return to th
pastorate pf Christ Churoh, Westminster Bridge
road, London, was recently reported by th
"Town and Country Journal," has told his congre
gatlon that he hopes to preach ^through tho Bibi
during his second pastorate at Christ Churoh. H
thinks that nothing is more necessary than t
give people a systematic and thorough knowledg
The Rev. George Lane, the President of th
Genoral Conference of the Australasian Methó
dist Ohuroh, and Mr. William Robson, M.L.Ó
of Sydney, members of the deputation appointe
by tho reoent Methodist Oonferonoo of Noi
South Wales to visit Fiji, as previously report
od, roíürnod óafply td Sydney on May 20, afto
ft very* stormy passage Thoy róport very fa
Vourably Of th<5 state- of the Methodist Churo
in FIJI, and ataio tîmt tholi interviewé wit
tho aovórnoif woro satisfactory and rôassur
lng, A meeting 6Í the Methodist Board c
Mission^ was convened for Tuesday ftftornoo
to fotíóiv& tho voport of the deputation, whoi
^oubtloÄB^Uil 4ôtall£ jryi b§ sjippllod f0£ put
Genoral Booth's seventy-fourth birthday, on
Friday, April 10, was colobratod by a party at his
little cottage at Hadley-wood, tho guests being a
few of his numerous grandchildren, and the faro
was strictly vegetarian. Among those.. présent
was Mr. Bramwell Booth's youngest son, Wy
cliffe, whose brother Bernard may bo termed the
* Brigadier Bruntnoll, the leader of tho Salva
tion Army in N.S.W., left Sydney on. Thursday of
where ho will be engaged In a tour of inspection
been arranged at each town¿"thls being the Briga
dier's first visitation of those parts since his ar
rival, and in connection also with which thc an
During the absentee of his Grace the Arch
him la nuín'bér of confirmation services, and has
offered to hold a central confirmation on July 16,
the usual way.'' Last week Bishop tSanton held
. The Methodist Sunday School Union com
mittee of the New South "Wales Conference, has
people.of Methodism, upan "The Life and .Timos
of-john Wesley." The competition is not restrict
ed to actual Sunday scholars, but ls open to the
young people of-the congregations. There are
Prebendary Kitto (son pf Dr. Kitto, the cele
brated Biblical scholar), died on Monday, April 13,
and gained his remarkable. Biblical and Oriental
Fenwick, his eldest son-who subsequently be
came prebendary of Wlllesden in St. Paul's Ca
thedral, London, was born in 1837, and was conse
quently about (5G years of age at his death.
At the meeting of the executive committee o
the Methodist Home Mission and Sustentatloi
Fund held a few days ago in Sydney, several pro
posais to build new churches and other churcl
buildings, were submitted and dealt'' with, ant
applications for loans to church trusts aggregat
lng £27,000, indicate tha. progressive characte
of Methodism in New South Wales. Among thi
proposed new erections sanctioned were those o
new churches at Toxteth (the Glebe) and Hurst
Arrfangements for the British and Forelgi
Bible Sooiety centenary celebrations in Austra
lia are being made far in advance, remarks J
contemporary, and several of the arrangement
in Victoria are quoted by way of illustration
But the dates fixed for the meeting in tho sev
eral States, are those made by the deputation an
the Home Committee, and it would be well fo
local committees to communicate at once wit
the secretary of the State auxiliary.of the B<
clety.
His Graoë the Archbishop of Sydney, Dr. Sau
marèU-Smith, who'itr at present on a visit to Eng
land, met "with a painful accident about a mont
ago at Chepstow Castle, while en route to Tir
tern Abbey, near Gloucester. The ArchbiBho
slipped on a stony roadway, falling heavily on hi
left leg, bruising it seriously, though fortunate!
without injuring the bones or tendons. He we
confined ito.^he house for about a fortnight, bi
When the -nVBtt left he had nearly recoverei
The seventy-first annual report of the Congrt
gatlonal Union of England and Wales, whic
was submitted to the Union meetings on Ma
ll, was propared by tho late Rev. W. J. Wood
in the weeks immediately preceding his deatl
and afterwards passed by tho general commii
teo Of the Union. The report condemns tl
Educational Act in clear and ünswering terîni
while at the same time it states that they woul
do their best to administer it "in the interés
of a truly national and unsectarlan education
As reported recently in the "Town and Count
Journal," the. jubilee meetings of Queenslai
Congregationalism are to be held in Brisbane i
June 14 and following days, and subsequently
Ipswich. A party of New South Wales Congi
gationalisits, numbering about twenty miniate
and an equal number of laymen, have, therefoi
arranged to visit the northern city to take pr
in the celebrations, among them being the Cha
man and secretary of the N.S.W. Congregatior
Union and other official visitors. Delegates fr<
other States will also join the party at Sydney
The blind chaplain of the United States Sena
Dr. William Henry (Milburn, died early in April,
California, at the age of nearly 80. By indom
able pluck and resolution, he carried on 1
jitudles by means of the glimmering vision of o
eye during his "teens," but later ra life he bècoi
totally blind. He was elected chaplt
of the Congress when 21, and, w
abort Intervals, he has~ continued as chi
lain, either to Congress or the Senate. His <
traordlnary memory enabled him to read the 1<
sons as well as to preach without the aid of sig
The Inaugural meeting of the Glebe brar
of the Y.W.O.A. was held in the local Town H
on the evening of Thursday, May 28, when tin
was a largo attendance of young women. Lr
Ronwick presided, and Miss Rennie, the h
secretary, gave an intoroBting sketch, ontlt
"A bird's-eye viow of tho World's Y.W.C..
Miss Mayers, tho gonoral socrotary, also ep<
on "Some Features of tho Sydnoy y/.w.C
Work." A musical programme was ronde
during the evening, and Miss Bayley,
branch soorotary, gave a hearty Invitation to
young women present who wero not momb
-An official report of tho dlooeso of Carpontt
shows that ls is of vast extent, comprising
the northern part of the State of Queensland
the wholo of tho Northern Territory of So
Auetràlla, and ls of vast slzo, being in óxtr<
lorgth, about 1200 milos from th© north ci
to Charlotte Waiora on the South Australian 1
dei', and 1000 milos In width from tho east o<
to the borders of Western Australia. It c
prisca an area of at least half a million sq\
miles, lnhabltod by only 17,000 whites, 8000
ourod allons of various; nationalities, and 3E
aboriginals. Tho staff of Anglican olorgy, li
over, ia as small as tho diocese la oxton*
numbering recently only six. ;>
The Scottish "Churoh Hymnary" ls not
ûppoars» acoopted by, tho Pan-Prósbyto:
- ?? ?- ? . ???? ? ????? ? ? '?- . ???? ???r.-^-mrm
Church (saya tho , "Christian World," London),
Tho English Presbyterians inclino to hold to
their excellent "Church Praise." Tho Church
of Scotland is preparing a third edition of Ita
own hymn and tune book. Tho Canadian Pres
byterians havo re-lssuod their book; while the
Irish Presbyterians hold chiefly to the metri
points out that it contains HG hymns not iii tho
"Church Hymnary," which, he considers, is de
ficient in hymns of praise-bright, cheery, in
spiring, uplifting lyrics, not doleful ditties en*
compassing ono like a wet blanket."
News of the Churches.
The Most Rev. Dr. Alexander, Primate of All
Ireland, entered upon his 80th year on Monday,
April 3, 1903.
in the early part of July.
A meeting of the diocesan consultors was held
at St. Mary's Cathedral on Wednesday, at which
Cardinal Moran presided.
Dr. Alexander Morrison, Principal of the Scots'
College, Melburne, died very suddenly on Sun-
The parishioners of St. Patrick's Church, Par-
ramatta have decided to place a bell in the church
tower, as a memorial to the late Monsignor Rig-
The damnatory clauses (as they are called) in
sung on Sunday, April 12, in Westminster
since his accident a year ago, when he was thrown
from his horse.
from England a young, active clergyman to act
as curate to Dean Vance, in the parish of St.
The Evangelical Council of Sydney has received
an assurance from the Premier of the State, that
the carrying of newspapers in the streets of the
On St. Barnabas' Day, June 11, a service will be
held in St. Andrew's Cathedral, Sydney, in con-
nection with and on behalf of the Melanesian Mis-
sion, and also a service on June 8, in connection
The Bishop of North Queensland (Dr. Frod-
sham) is visiting a number of centres in South
Australia, appealing for funds to assist in re-
to deliver a lecture on Monday evening in the
Cardinal's Hall, before the Catholic Young
A thirteenth century Bishop's crozier was re-
cently found in the rectory garden at Alcester,
and was purchased by the British Museum for
£100. The money is to be devoted toward the
cost of carrying out certain improvements in the
The date of the celebration of the Wesley Bi-
centenary in Sydney has again been changed
from June 28 to July 2, the committee having
been able to secure the Sydney Town Hall on
the latter date. This simply refers to the Syd-
The seventh anniversary of the pastorate of
the Rev. Walker Taylor as rector of St. Sa-
viour's, Redfern, was celebrated last week by
a large gathering of the parishioners, Judge Doc-
ker presiding, when a number of interesting ad-
The report presented to the Irish General
Synod (Episcopalian) on Tuesday, April 21, show-
Body of the Church in Ireland amount to
£8,348,060, an increase of over £80,000 compared
with the previous year.
Lieutenant-Colonel Gilmour, the Salvation
Army's commanding officer in New Zealand, pass-
ed through Sydney last week on his homeward
journey, having paid a visit to Melbourne on im-
portant business connected with the Army's
operations in his own State.
Dr. John Hay has definitely promised to con-
vey a site of land to the North St. Leonards Pres-
byterian Church, as soon as the building commit-
tee has £600 in hand. Towards this sum £300
has been raised, and vigorous efforts are being
The Commissioners of Railways and Trams,
having been approached by a deputation of Syd-
ney ministers and laymen complaining of the
disturbance of several congregations during Di-
vine worship on Sundays by the trams, have
promised to minimise the evil.
The Rev. A. W. Johnstone, who for the past
four years has had charge of the Lismore An-
glican parish, and has in consequence of fail-
ing health and the trying climate, found it ne-
cessary to seek a change, has been appointed to
Glen Innes, to which parish he will remove
in July.
After a long period of inaction, the Congrega-
tional cause at Albury has been revived under
the direction and efforts of the Rev. A. Rivett,
of Beechworth, and such rapid and solid progress
has been made that it is expected that a call
will soon be given to some suitable minister as
the pastor.
The Glasgow Synod of the United Free Church
recently adapted a motion, recommending the Ge-
neral Assembly to make careful inquiry into the
constitution of the work of the Natural Science
Chairs in Edinburgh, and Glasgow Colleges, and
to make no appointments until the mind of the
Church has been ascertained.
The organising secretary of the Sydney Dioce-
san Church Society, the Rev. Luke Parr, visited
the parish of St. Matthew's, Windsor, on Sunday
evening in the parish church on Sunday, and dur-
The eighth annual gathering of the London En-
deavourers was held in the Metropolitan Taber-
for over ten hours, with brief intervals.
The Bishop of Bathurst, Dr. Camidge, visited
Cowra on Sunday week, and conducted ser-
vices in St. John's Anglican Church. At the
confirmation which he held in the forenoon, a
On Saturday, the St. Mark's Society of Change
and rang the first peal of bells, A 50400, Grandsire
Minor in 2 hours 45 minutes, the ringers being—
H. Campbell (treble), J. Adams (second), J. A.
White (third), T. Biddle (fourth), P. Howard
(fifth), and C. W. Porter (tenor and conductor).
visited St. Monica's Church, Parramatta north, on
Sunday afternoon, a special choir having been
Strong opposition was manifested in England
in April against the Army Guild Service, which
London, on May 6. The "Record," an evangeli-
cal Anglican paper, stated repeatedly that the
service would be distinctly "a service for the re-
The Anglican Bishop of Manchester recently
city, with the Rev. F. S. Collier, the superintend-
ent, and expressed himself surprised and delight-
also sent a donation to the funds, and will be a
patron of a bazaar, which was to be held during
Churches, and for the reconstruction of National
The ceremony of formally inducting the Rev.
East took place at High Mass on Sunday morning
(11 o'clock), when his Eminence Cardinal Moran
Thames-street, Balmain East.
The usual Sunday morning breakfast was given
on May 31, at the City Night Refuge and Soup
Kitchen, Kent-street, to 115 men, 9 women, and 2
children. During last week 383 meals were sup-
Shelter was afforded to 922 men, 78 women, and
Prison Sunday was observed by a number of
Episcopal and other churches in Sydney and
the suburbs on May 31. Circular telters were
addressed by Archdeacon Gunther, the Vicar-
clergy, and also by the Rev. Rainsford Bavin, the
President of the Methodist Church in New South
The Archbishop of Sydney was expecting to
spend a few days about the end of April at Lam-
beth Palace, as the guest of the Archbishop of
Canterbury, after which his Grace had arranged
to attend the May meetings of the great Anglican
societies in London, also to preach for the Colo-
nial and Continental Church Society, on May 3,
The Bishop of Bathurst, Dr. Camidge, acting
resignation of Archdeacon Campbell. Archdea-
con Dunstan has been connected with the diocese
everywhere.
Some time ago the threatened total blindness
of Mr. Ira D. Sankey (the celebrated musical
composer and the friend and companion of the
late Mr. D. L. Moody) was reported in the "Town
and Country Journal," but the latest news gives
hope that the right eye may be saved. Mr.
Sankey, whose general health was much impair-
ed, has improved somewhat, and is more hope-
Meetings of the parishioners of St. Joseph's
Roman Catholic Church, Woollahra, have recent-
ly been held at the instigation of the Rev. Father
Lawler, O.F.M., to consider the necessity of re-
novating the church and increasing the seating
accommodation, and it was resolved to under-
take the necessary improvements at once, the
second Sunday in June being fixed as a day for
The Rev. F. B. Meyer, B.A., whose return to the
pastorate of Christ Church, Westminster Bridge-
road, London, was recently reported by the
"Town and Country Journal," has told his congre-
gation that he hopes to preach through the Bible
during his second pastorate at Christ Church. He
thinks that nothing is more necessary than to
give people a systematic and thorough knowledge
The Rev. George Lane, the President of the
General Conference of the Australasian Metho-
dist Church, and Mr. William Robson, M.L.C.,
of Sydney, members of the deputation appointed
by the recent Methodist Conference of New
South Wales to visit Fiji, as previously report-
ed, returned safely to Sydney on May 29, after
a very stormy passage. They report very fa-
vourably of the state of the Methodist Church
in Fiji, and state that their interviews with
the Governor were satisfactory and reassur-
ing. A meeting of the Methodist Board of
Missions was convened for Tuesday afternoon
to receive the report of the deputation, when,
doubtless, full details will be supplied for pub-
lication.
General Booth's seventy-fourth birthday, on
Friday, April 10, was celebrated by a party at his
little cottage at Hadley-wood, the guests being a
few of his numerous grandchildren, and the fare
was strictly vegetarian. Among those present
was Mr. Bramwell Booth's youngest son, Wy-
cliffe, whose brother Bernard may be termed the
Brigadier Bruntnell, the leader of the Salva-
tion Army in N.S.W., left Sydney on Thursday of
where he will be engaged in a tour of inspection
been arranged at each town, this being the Briga-
dier's first visitation of those parts since his ar-
rival, and in connection also with which the an-
During the absence of his Grace the Arch-
him a number of confirmation services, and has
offered to hold a central confirmation on July 15,
the usual way. Last week Bishop tSanton held
The Methodist Sunday School Union com-
mittee of the New South Wales Conference, has
people of Methodism, upon "The Life and Times
of John Wesley." The competition is not restrict-
ed to actual Sunday scholars, but is open to the
young people of the congregations. There are
Prebendary Kitto (son of Dr. Kitto, the cele-
brated Biblical scholar), died on Monday, April 13.
and gained his remarkable Biblical and Oriental
Fenwick, his eldest son—who subsequently be-
came prebendary of Willesden in St. Paul's Ca-
thedral, London, was born in 1837, and was conse-
quently about 66 years of age at his death.
At the meeting of the executive committee of
the Methodist Home Mission and Sustentation
Fund held a few days ago in Sydney, several pro-
posals to build new churches and other church
buildings, were submitted and dealt with, and
applications for loans to church trusts aggregat-
ing £27,000, indicate that progressive character
of Methodism in New South Wales. Among the
proposed new erections sanctioned were those of
new churches at Toxteth (the Glebe) and Hurst-
Arrangements for the British and Foreign
Bible Society centenary celebrations in Austra-
lia are being made far in advance, remarks a
contemporary, and several of the arrangements
in Victoria are quoted by way of illustration.
But the dates fixed for the meeting in the sev-
eral States, are those made by the deputation and
the Home Committee, and it would be well for
local committees to communicate at once with
the secretary of the State auxiliary of the so-
ciety.
His Grace the Archbishop of Sydney, Dr. Sau-
marez Smith, who is at present on a visit to Eng-
land, met with a painful accident about a month
ago at Chepstow Castle, while en route to Tin-
tern Abbey, near Gloucester. The Archbishop
slipped on a stony roadway, falling heavily on his
left leg, bruising it seriously, though fortunately
without injuring the bones or tendons. He was
confined to the house for about a fortnight, but
when the mail left he had nearly recovered,
The seventy-first annual report of the Congre-
gational Union of England and Wales, which
was submitted to the Union meetings on May
11, was prepared by the late Rev. W. J. Woods,
in the weeks immediately preceding his death,
and afterwards passed by the general commit-
tee of the Union. The report condemns the
Educational Act in clear and unswering terms ;
while at the same time it states that they would
do their best to administer it "in the interests
of a truly national and unsectarian education."
As reported recently in the "Town and Country
Journal," the jubilee meetings of Queensland
Congregationalism are to be held in Brisbane on
June 14 and following days, and subsequently at
Ipswich. A party of New South Wales Congre-
gationalists, numbering about twenty ministers
and an equal number of laymen, have, therefore,
arranged to visit the northern city to take part
in the celebrations, among them being the Chair-
man and secretary of the N.S.W. Congregational
Union and other official visitors. Delegates from
other States will also join the party at Sydney.
The blind chaplain of the United States Senate,
Dr. William Henry Milburn, died early in April, in
California, at the age of nearly 80. By indomit-
able pluck and resolution, he carried on his
studies by means of the glimmering vision of one
eye during his "teens," but later in life he become
totally blind. He was elected chaplain
of the Congress when 21, and, with
short intervals, he has continued as chap-
lain, either to Congress or the Senate. His ex-
traordinary memory enabled him to read the les-
sons as well as to preach without the aid of sight.
The inaugural meeting of the Glebe branch
of the Y.W.C.A. was held in the local Town Hall
on the evening of Thursday, May 28, when there
was a large attendance of young women. Lady
Renwick presided, and Miss Rennie, the hon.
secretary, gave an interesting sketch, entitled
"A bird's-eye view of the World's Y.W.C.A."
Miss Mayers, the general secretary, also spoke
on "Some Features of the Sydney Y.W.C.A.
Work." A musical programme was rendered
during the evening, and Miss Bayley, the
branch secretary, gave a hearty invitation to the
young women present who were not members
An official report of the diocese of Carpentaria
shows that is is of vast extent, comprising all
the northern part of the State of Queensland and
the whole of the Northern Territory of South
Australia, and is of vast size, being in extreme
length, about 1200 miles from the north coast
to Charlotte Waters on the South Australian bor-
der, and 1000 miles in width from the east coast
to the borders of Western Australia. It com-
prises an area of at least half a million square
miles, inhabited by only 17,000 whites, 8000 col-
oured aliens of various nationalities, and 35,000
aboriginals. The staff of Anglican clergy, how-
ever, is as small as the diocese is extensive,
numbering recently only six.
The Scottish "Church Hymnary" is not, it
appears, accepted by the Pan-Presbyterian
Church (says the "Christian World," London).
The English Presbyterians incline to hold to
their excellent "Church Praise." The Church
of Scotland is preparing a third edition of its
own hymn and tune book. The Canadian Pres-
byterians have re-issued their book ; while the
Irish Presbyterians hold chiefly to the metri-
points out that it contains 116 hymns not in the
"Church Hymnary," which, he considers, is de-
ficient in hymns of praise—bright, cheery, in-
spiring, uplifting lyrics, not doleful ditties en-
compassing one like a wet blanket."
CAMP CHRONICLES SALVATION ARMY TENT. (Article), The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 - 1918), Thursday 24 August 1916 [Issue No.14,222] page 6 2019-10-06 15:36 salvation army tent.
to The camp on Wednesday evening,
and a most enjoyable time was pro
tant Pannell . acted as chair
man, and- the; items rendered were
the army's work- at the camp,
in a very . hearty manner.
the "last item" There were cries,
lie Wray, Mr. Melrose, Master E,
Miss E. Code. Miss E. Code also pre
At the conclusion of the pro
gramme, Captain ROss (the camp
to The visitors for the enjoyment
afforded the men, and hoped, to soon
see them come again. Mr. Mel
visitors, after which the Na
tional Anthem was- sung most hear
tily also "God Bless Our Splendid
SALVATION ARMY TENT.
to the camp on Wednesday evening,
and a most enjoyable time was pro-
tant Pannell acted as chair-
man, and the items rendered were
the army's work at the camp,
in a very hearty manner.
the "last item" there were cries,
were :—Master W. Baxter, Miss Nel-
lie Wray, Mr. Melrose, Master E.
Miss E. Code. Miss E. Code also pre-
At the conclusion of the pro-
gramme, Captain Ross (the camp
to the visitors for the enjoyment
afforded the men, and hoped to soon
see them come again. Mr. Mel-
visitors, after which the Na-
tional Anthem was sung most hear-
tily, also "God Bless Our Splendid
SALVATION ARMY CONGRESS. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 2 April 1904 [Issue No.20,614] page 8 2019-10-06 15:30 Yesterday's meetings of the Salvatlon Army
Yesterday's meetings of the Salvation Army
SALVATION ARMY CONGRESS. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 2 April 1904 [Issue No.20,614] page 8 2019-10-06 15:26 SALVATION ARMY CONQRESS.
Yesterday's meetings of the Sals'atlon Army
Congross were of a devotional character, and
threo services wore hold in a large marquee
erected In Hyde Park, near Park-stroot, Com-
missioner and Mrs. M'Kle led tho moetlngs,
anti, as ofllcors from all parts of tho State of
Now South Wales were present, there was
a magnificent 'Vally." The Commissioner and
his wife had como from Molbourno spoclally
to attend the Congress, thoy worn assisted by
Colonol Hoskins, olflcer in chargo in Nesv
India, and svlioso present appearances aro
somewhat in the naturo of farewell ones. In
addition to thli a largo numuor of tho offi-
cers woro about to oluingo theil' stations.
At tho iliBt mooting, which bogan at 11 a.m.,
the thomo of tho discourses SYB'Í "Holiness,"
and at the nftornoou and evening nieotlngs,
at 3 and S o'olocli, the burdon of the raossiigoa
was "Salvation." There wore largo orosvds
in tho tont at each meeting, possibly somo
much earnostnoas was ovlncod hy tho speakors,
staffs svoro charged with each dolnil of the
work during yohtorday. To-day thoro svlll bo
an ofilcorB' connell, and to-morrosv and on
Monday dnvotioniil mootings will be hold in
the marquée.
, TUR CENTENARY HALL.
A consecutivo serins of sorvloes svas hold
yostorday «I U>e Centenary Hall, (p connec-
tion willi tho Central Methodist Mission, from
9 a.m. till 6 p.m. Tha »orvlccs were divided
iutoBpctlonsof an hour each, tho chairmanship
bolng divided amongst the Re», W. G. Taylor,
Ross. Tho customary Good Friday sermon
was preached at the midday meeting by tho
Rov. Mr. Foreman, arad for tho two hours
from 3 to 5 p.m. au "old-fashioned Metho-
extreme Inclemency of the weather.
At night a Bacred concert was held in the
Contonarji Hall before a crowded audience,
when J. H. Maunders' Lenton cautata, "Peni-
tence, Pardon, mid Pcaco," orchestrated by
W. I. B. Moto, was successfully given. Se-
by tho Contrai Methodist MIBBIOII oholr and
orchestra. Tho sololBts wore Miss Fanny
Roborts (soprano) mid Mr. Janies M'lutyro,
(baritone). Mr. Arnold R. Moto, B,A.', pro
Sided nt tho organ, and Mr. W. I, B. Mote
SALVATION ARMY CONGRESS.
Yesterday's meetings of the Salvatlon Army
Congress were of a devotional character, and
three services were held in a large marquee
erected in Hyde Park, near Park-street. Com-
missioner and Mrs. McKie led the meetings,
and, as officers from all parts of the State of
New South Wales were present, there was
a magnificent "rally." The Commissioner and
his wife had come from Melbourne specially
to attend the Congress, they were assisted by
Colonel Hoskins, officer in charge in New
India, and whose present appearances are
somewhat in the nature of farewell ones. In
addition to this a large number of the offi-
cers were about to change their stations.
At the first meeting, which began at 11 a.m.,
the theme of the discourses was "Holiness,"
and at the afternoon and evening meetings,
at 3 and 8 o'clock, the burden of the messages
was "Salvation." There were large crowds
in the tent at each meeting, possibly some
much earnestness was evinced by the speakers,
staffs were charged with each detail of the
work during yesterday. To-day there will be
an officers' council, and to-morrow and on
Monday devotional meetings will be held in
the marquee.
THE CENTENARY HALL.
A consecutive series of services was held
yesterday at the Centenary Hall, in connec-
tion with the Central Methodist Mission, from
9 a.m. till 6 p.m. The services were divided
into sections of an hour each, the chairmanship
being divided amongst the Rev. W. G. Taylor,
Ross. The customary Good Friday sermon
was preached at the midday meeting by the
Rev. Mr. Foreman, and for the two hours
from 3 to 5 p.m. an "old-fashioned Metho-
extreme inclemency of the weather.
At night a sacred concert was held in the
Centenary Hall before a crowded audience,
when J. H. Maunders' Lenten cantata, "Peni-
tence, Pardon, and Peace," orchestrated by
W. I. B. Mote, was successfully given. Se-
by the Central Methodist Mission choir and
orchestra. The soloists were Miss Fanny
Roberts (soprano) and Mr. James McIntyre,
(baritone). Mr. Arnold R. Mote, B.A., pre-
sided at the organ, and Mr. W. I. B. Mote
SALVATION ARMY OFFICERS. (Article), The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), Saturday 21 December 1935 [Issue No.15,443] page 15 2019-10-06 08:48 of appointments of Salvation Army offic
ers, Lieutenant-Colonel E. C. Slattery
following: — Captain and Mrs. R. Sandy
Captains Elva and Rose Hocking (Bus
and Mrs. J. Hocking (Fremantle), Adjut
W. Whitney and Lieutenant J. Arm
Of these Captain and Mrs. Sandy, Ad
jutant Carr, Lieutenant Templeton, Ad
of appointments of Salvation Army offic-
ers, Lieutenant-Colonel E. C. Slattery
following :—Captain and Mrs. R. Sandy
Captains Elva and Rose Hocking (Bus-
and Mrs. J. Hocking (Fremantle), Adjut-
W. Whitney and Lieutenant J. Arm-
Of these Captain and Mrs. Sandy, Ad-
jutant Carr, Lieutenant Templeton, Ad-
BRIGADIER BRUNTNELL. RESIGNS SALVATION ARMY SYDNEY, November 27. (Article), Darling Downs Gazette (Qld. : 1881 - 1922), Saturday 28 November 1903 [Issue No.10,991] page 5 2019-10-05 18:29 ? Designs salvation ahmx. .
???-? ' ?- SYDNEY, November 27,
Brigadier Brmitnell, of the Salvation
Army, has resigned, his position because
of it difference' of opinion on tihe drink
question. Brigadier Bruntnctl said lie
had already received several offers. Tho
take up tlio duties. of organising Kccre
inmr rind ? +li« Now South Wales Alliance
was anxious to retain his Bcrvices. If tho
Brigadier Bru-ntnell will reninjn in New
South Wales und take up active pro
Alliance, at once, for 'in view of the
women's vote,' he said, 'there was a
grunt deal to be done.' Should the Now
Zealand Alliance press for his nervices
Brigadier Brimtncll will leave to-ninrrow
RESIGNS SALVATION ARMY.
SYDNEY, November 27.
Brigadier Bruntnell, of the Salvation
Army, has resigned his position because
of a difference of opinion on the drink
question. Brigadier Bruntnell said he
had already received several offers. The
take up the duties of organising secre-
tary, and the New South Wales Alliance
was anxious to retain his services. If the
Brigadier Bruntnell will remain in New
South Wales and take up active pro-
Alliance at once, for "in view of the
women's vote," he said, "there was a
great deal to be done." Should the New
Zealand Alliance press for his services
Brigadier Bruntnell will leave to-morrow
Brigadier Bruntnell. RESIGNING FROM SALVATION ARMY. (Article), Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908), Saturday 28 November 1903 [Issue No.6681] page 12 2019-10-05 18:23 R7SIGNING FROM SALVATION ARMY.
as follows :-Brigadier Bruntnell, *f the Salva
Brigadier Bruntnell said he had already re
orqanising secretary, and the New South
Wales Allisance was anxious to retain his eer
Brigadier Bruntnull will remain in Noew South
Wales and take up active propaganda worlk
the New Zealand Alliance press for his ser
vices Brigadier Bruntoell will leave tonmorrow
RESIGNING FROM SALVATION ARMY.
as follows :—Brigadier Bruntnell, of the Salva-
Brigadier Bruntnell said he had already re-
organising secretary, and the New South
Wales Alliance was anxious to retain his ser-
Brigadier Bruntnell will remain in New South
Wales and take up active propaganda work
the New Zealand Alliance press for his ser-
vices Brigadier Bruntnell will leave to-morrow
SALVATION ARMY. Officers' Movements. (Article), The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), Thursday 2 April 1936 [Issue No.15,530] page 21 2019-10-05 08:37 Adjutant and Mrs. Palmer, .formerly of
Melbourne. Lieut. Isobel Rosser. formerly
to take Up work in Adelaide. In addition,
Garrison, of which Lieut.-Col. E. C. Slat
the Army in this State) has been ap
pointed principal. The trainees are Can
Petch (Kalgoorlie), G. Slee (Higbgate),
D. Magill (Midland Junction), M. Lan
ham (Mt. Hawthorn), D. Hammer (High
Major and Mrs. Slee have been trans
ferred from Northam to Bunbury, Cap
Bettison from Pingelly to Narrogin, Adju
to Busselton, and Capt. Rose Hocking, to
Ross Folland have been appointed to Kel
I lerberrin.
Adjutant and Mrs. Palmer, formerly of
Melbourne. Lieut. Isobel Rosser, formerly
to take up work in Adelaide. In addition,
Garrison, of which Lieut.-Col. E. C. Slat-
the Army in this State) has been ap-
pointed principal. The trainees are Can-
Petch (Kalgoorlie), G. Slee (Highgate),
D. Magill (Midland Junction), M. Lan-
ham (Mt. Hawthorn), D. Hammer (High-
Major and Mrs. Slee have been trans-
ferred from Northam to Bunbury, Cap-
Bettison from Pingelly to Narrogin, Adju-
to Busselton, and Capt. Rose Hocking to
Ross Folland have been appointed to Kel-
lerberrin.
THE SALVATION ARMY. (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Wednesday 23 July 1884 [Issue No.2628] page 3 2019-10-05 06:40 Captain Birkonshaw'd prayer waa very im
prmivc. His grammar might be shy, bat
thore was fire aud power in every word. He
cfitllori the meoticg down, and put them in the
proper frame.'
Captain Tom Gibbe, "Yorkshire Relish,'
epoko a great deal too long. Sharp-
shooting, as they call it, should havo
been tho order of tho night, Novorthofos
ho was. extremely effective in some portions
whilo tho ejaculations of bis wifo ohiraed in
with a vory odd souud. But thore was some
what of the air of .a rehearsed arrangomont
hbi.ut it.
Mrs Gibbs spoko well too, Sho is the
thorough cut of tho Hallelujah Lass. Nobcidy
could bolp laughing at hor droll narration of
hew sho used to search Tom's pockets whon ho
was drunk. Then sho gave a praotical illustra
lion of hor stylo of rolling him over on the
floor, at whioh people almost roared. As
soon, howovor, as thoy began to laugh,
socio frightened-looking men in red shirts
enmo running among thorn, with "Sh, sh," and
beroochiog thorn io romombor the solomnity of
the neonlo ud to lausb. and then rebuking them
for it. ,
Major Barker came on tho platform,h(vuding
up a blonde and handsomo young lady, ap
parently attired iu white murim and a cc u-tat
tbo young Indian Ranso, Mies Roberta, who
speaks nud Bings so witobiogly in tho Hindu-
lani fongungo, There is & smock of tho
theatrical, though, about this business,
Ferlmpe tho grand effect of tho evening was
when tho couvorted policeman got up, and
told bow ho had watched Major Barker, Mrs
Barker, and only two or three comrados open
ing fire outside on Cdlingwocd Flat, only IS
. months sign, on a cold cheorfosa Sunday after
noon. And hero wo will pat in a word for
ourselves, for it was -Tub Hbiiald which first
obscurity, We bavo all along watched it with
keen iutorebt, and are rejoiced to eeo the splen
did position attained through 'tho energy or
Major Barker, who may livo to bo General-in
Chief, for he is a romakablo man.
"Altor tho Happy)Policeman" came a grcate
wonder, Lieutcnaut George Kidd, who was ac
tually tho leader ot tho L3irikiu Baud, and
Barker when hn started on Oolliogwood Flat,
Now bo says, " IIo is dotermiued-er to find for
tho Lord-cr, overy day-or, he, gets up highor.''
Kidd ia really a good spjakarand "uo kid'
about it, but bo must reclaim his disposition to
"or." This is a fault to which Salvation
Army officers aro oven mors prone than
Me mbers of Parliament,
Wo could not help admiring tho dexterity
wih which tho "chuckera out" porformef
tbolr office, Tboy boat policeman hollow. No
tbreo or four rod shirked officers set upon him
and carriod him forth with au ease ovi
donlly begot of long praotice. Not mor
tban 10 per cent of the audienoo lost
nigbt belonged to tho working classes. It was
en assemblage of curious persons who had come
to the theatre, A striking effeot was caused
by Captain Oxby'a order for tho soldiers and
lassos to "fix bayonets I" whereupon all held up
thsir right hands, in a forest. Tha appoali,
however, for people to come out aud get savod
atruok coo as rather hollow, when a shilling
"Wo are bo anxious for your soul — 11 you
have a shilling in your pooket." The collection
, was taken up by a largo number of reclaimed
, criminals of tlm Prison Gate Brigade, Nono
ot them kept tho money Altogother tho
affair was tho graateat popular oucotss yet
achieved by tho Ar»y«
\
Captain Birkenshaw's prayer was very im
pressive. His grammar might be shy, but
there was fire and power in every word. He
settled the meeting down, and put them in the
proper frame.
Captain Tom Gibbs, "Yorkshire Relish,'
spoke a great deal too long. Sharp-
shooting, as they call it, should have
been the order of the night, Nevertheles(s)
he was extremely effective in some portions
while the ejaculations of his wife chimed in
with a very odd sound. But there was some-
what of the air of a rehearsed arrangement
about it.
Mrs Gibbs spoke well too. She is the
thorough cut of the Hallelujah Lass. Nobody
could help laughing at her droll narration of
how she used to search Tom's pockets when he
was drunk. Then she gave a practical illustra-
tion of her style of rolling him over on the
floor, at which people almost roared. As
soon, however, as they began to laugh,
some frightened-looking men in red shirts
came running among them, with "Sh, sh," and
beseeching thern to remember the solemnity of
the people up to laugh, and then rebuking them
for it.
Major Barker came on the platform, handing
up a blonde and handsome young lady, ap-
parently attired in white muslin and a scarlet
the young Indian Ranee, Miss Roberts, who
speaks and sings so witchingly in the Hindu-
stani language. There is a smack of the
theatrical, though, about this business.
Perhaps the grand effect of the evening was
when the converted policeman got up, and
told how he had watched Major Barker, Mrs
Barker, and only two or three comrades open-
ing fire outside on Collingwood Flat, only 18
months ago, on a cold cheerless Sunday after-
noon. And here we will put in a word for
ourselves, for it was THE HERALD which first
obscurity. We have all along watched it with
keen interest, and are rejoiced to see the splen-
did position attained through the energy of
Major Barker, who may live to be General-in-
Chief, for he is a remakable man.
"After the Happy Policeman" came a greate
wonder, Lieutenant George Kidd, who was ac-
tually the leader of the Larrikin Band, and
Barker when he started on Collingwood Flat.
Now he says, "He is determined-er to find for
the Lord-er, every day-er, he, gets up higher.''
Kidd is really a good speaker and "no kid'
about it, but he must reclaim his disposition to
"er." This is a fault to which Salvation
Army officers are even more prone than
Members of Parliament.
We could not help admiring the dexterity
with which the "chuckers out" performed
their office, They beat policeman hollow. No
three or four red shirted officers set upon him
and carried him forth with an ease evi
dently begot of long practice. Not mor(e)
than 10 per cent of the audience last
night belonged to the working classes. It was
an assemblage of curious persons who had come
to the theatre. A striking effect was caused
by Captain Oxby's order for the soldiers and
lasses to "fix bayonets !" whereupon all held up
their right hands, in a forest. The appeals,
however, for people to come out and get saved
struck one as rather hollow, when a shilling
"We are so anxious for your soul — if you
have a shilling in your pocket." The collection
was taken up by a large number of reclaimed
criminals of the Prison Gate Brigade, None
of them kept the money. Altogether the
affair was the greatest popular success yet
achieved by the Army.
THE SALVATION ARMY. (Article), The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Wednesday 23 July 1884 [Issue No.2628] page 3 2019-10-04 16:26 the salvat;om army.
Somo time ago a troupo of French per for
mere introduced a danoo callod the Oan-Cu to
the Mofbourno public, and there was a terrifta
rush to sco tlio uickrdncss of tho 1'uriBfon
Jiiidin Mabillc, However, snmuhov/ the
wickedness did not come off. Fuuplo wero
disiqq.oiuted, until aa oxpotioncad Bardoiau
snid "That's not a bit liko tbo Cflu-C&n." In
ihort, tho Can-C.»n was wiuhcd, shaved, and
put into cloun linoc. beforo bc-iug voutarcd in
Melbourne, So it wan with somo sorry and
tichly stuff wo wnut ta «ro lately on tho Rich-
teocid Cricket Ground, under tho namo of
Ki'frii.sh Aiwrctation Football. " What 1'! wo
reclaimed, "is thin child's play? tho game
uhichSOtO people lutely nifhed from Man
chester to Glasgow for t.o seo, in sixteon
rpecinl (-ruins ?" " Not a bit liko it" was tho
reply of u British barraeker, on thu Pavilion,
If you want tofcu tho Salvation Army at
work, go into the reeking stows of Little
Th.urko street, any night. There you
wil! witness the most fiKcreaful corps in Vic
toria, conducted entirely by volunteers, mon
and women who nceivo no pay, headed by a
railway hand as captaio, and a draper's assis
tant rb lieutenant,
Tho performance at tho Town Hall laifc
night was brilliant and nmuiierutivo, bat it
wan tbr. Solvation Army w.- shid, shavod (thoy
ore always saved), aud put into clean linon,
for the beucfit of au audi&nco admitted at " a
bob a nob," as a feoldior would put it. At the
Grcciau Theatre, tho E&glo, in London
Gunorhl Ifonth n-irnnpnrrrul nviiro (.v!rnniini\n,n
Taking up a lalo number of Iho 7K«r Cry, we
find that "the Onc-oyed l'roi.hetess cauie
bcinuliug nn tlio platform," aud "a soldier ac-
cou'par.itd himself wi.h a eolo on -tho bonosi'
In Mvlbcuroo tho Army seems to be nothing if
rtt if fptciablo, Thoy havo ovtn gottonioo
gilt-sdged hymn books at two shillings apisco
— quito churchy,
A very picturesque soeno was afforded ou
tho platform nt tho Town Hall laBt ovonibgj
whon thoscldiera nud lasses wavod their'haud
kcrchiofo to tho chorus of " Ring thoBolfo o.
Heaven, " whilo a moohter orchestra of brass
bauds joined in full blat It was liken shownr
of pop corn, cr snow flakes, Tho waving o
I.L.UU IIMU (WHS 1.. -a
a tinUbiug touch to the moguificcnfc ensemble,
THE SALVATION ARMY.
Some time ago a troupe of French perfor
mers introduced a dance called the Can-Can to
the Melbourne public, and there was a terrific
rush to see the wickedness of the Parisian
Jardin Mabille. However, somehow the
wickedness did not come off. People were
disappointed, until an experienced Parasian
said "That's not a bit like the Can-Can." In
short, the Can-Can was washed, shaved, and
put into clean linen before being ventured in
Melbourne. So it was with some sorry and
sickly stuff we went to sedately on the Rich-
mond Cricket Ground, under the name of
English Assocation Football. "What !" was
exclaimed, "is this child's play? the game
which 5000 people lately rushed from Man-
chester to Glasgow for to see, in sixteen
special trains ?" "Not a bit like it" was the
reply of a British barracker, on the Pavilion.
If you want to see the Salvation Army at
work, go into the reeking stews of Little
Bourke street, any night. There you
will witness the most successful corps in Vic-
toria, conducted entirely by volunteers, men
and women who receive no pay, headed by a
railway hand as captain, and a draper's assis-
tant as lieutenant.
The performance at the Town Hall last
night was brilliant and remunerative but it
was the Salvation Army washed, shaved (they
are always saved), and put into clean linen,
for the benefit of an audience admitted at "a
bob a nob," as a soldier would put it. At the
Grecian Theatre, the Eagle, in London
General Booth encouraged every extravagance.
Taking up a late number of the War Cry, we
find that "the One-eyed Prophetess came
bounding on the platform," and "a soldier ac-
companied himself with a solo on the bones."
In Melbourne the Army seems to be nothing if
not respectable. They have even got to nice
gilt-edged hymn books at two shillings apiece
—quite churchy.
A very picturesque scene was afforded on
the platform at the Town Hall last evening,
when the "soldiers and lasses" waved their hand
kerchiefs to the chorus of "Ring the Bells o(f)
Heaven," while a monster orchestra of brass
bands joined in full blast. It was like a shower
of pop corn, or snow flakes. The waving o
--- the flags to the music --- --- ---
a finishing touch to the magnificent ensemble.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Family history
    List
    Public

    3 items
    created by: public:Bellern 2013-01-31
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.