Information about Trove user: AJGreen

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 6,119,558
2 noelwoodhouse 4,034,066
3 DonnaTelfer 3,558,496
4 Rhonda.M 3,538,942
5 NeilHamilton 3,494,329
...
6799 anzinspace 2,543
6800 mgtk 2,543
6801 BerylP 2,542
6802 AJGreen 2,541
6803 JaniceM 2,541
6804 Vivfacts 2,541

2,541 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2020 20
April 2020 946
November 2019 24
August 2019 1
June 2019 10
May 2019 196
April 2019 28
March 2019 8
February 2019 258
October 2018 107
April 2018 5
January 2018 31
December 2016 60
March 2016 57
February 2016 53
June 2015 190
May 2015 196
December 2013 50
October 2013 165
July 2012 93
November 2011 11
October 2011 6
October 2010 5
September 2010 21

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 6,119,356
2 noelwoodhouse 4,034,066
3 DonnaTelfer 3,558,470
4 Rhonda.M 3,538,929
5 NeilHamilton 3,494,200
...
6802 Gut2407 2,538
6803 ajjones 2,537
6804 SamJeez 2,537
6805 AJGreen 2,535
6806 heritagesaved 2,535
6807 bcommon 2,534

2,535 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2020 20
April 2020 946
November 2019 24
August 2019 1
June 2019 10
May 2019 196
April 2019 28
March 2019 8
February 2019 258
October 2018 107
April 2018 5
January 2018 31
December 2016 54
March 2016 57
February 2016 53
June 2015 190
May 2015 196
December 2013 50
October 2013 165
July 2012 93
November 2011 11
October 2011 6
October 2010 5
September 2010 21

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 404,662
2 GeoffMMutton 235,369
3 PhilThomas 145,457
4 mickbrook 115,362
5 DavoChiss 112,872
...
2441 wirrah 7
2442 youngniftynj 7
2443 scollier [NLA] 7
2444 AJGreen 6
2445 alacrity 6
2446 AlbertLucasRiley 6

6 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

December 2016 6


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
NEW SOUTH WALES PARLIAMENT. LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12. (Article), Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), Saturday 13 February 1864 [Issue No.3,[?]4[?]] page 5 2020-05-24 19:23 thia 0,11, on whiob Mr. HAUGH AVK had moved asan
Mr PLUNKETT laid on the table a retorn under tbe
thia 0,11, on whiob Mr. HARGRAVE had moved asan
Advertising (Advertising), Kiama Examiner (NSW : 1858 - 1859), Saturday 11 June 1859 [Issue No.60] page 4 2020-05-24 18:19 Joulhn Haughe Gerrard Irvino
William Wilson William Law
Thos. McPhee Robert Wilson
Joulhn Haughey Gerrard Irvino
Thomas Wilson James King
Thos Wilson Thomas Reid
Thomas Wilson, jun. Thomas Bensley
Edward Wilson John Groats
Daniel White Thos. Wilson
John Wilson John Burton
Advertising (Advertising), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Thursday 22 October 1857 [Issue No.6046] page 1 2020-05-24 18:18 For frelgbt or passage apply to HAUGH and PRELL,
For frelgbt or passage apply to HAEGE and PRELL,
Advertising (Advertising), Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), Monday 25 June 1855 [Issue No.1391] page 1 2020-05-24 18:17 HAUGH, Imparts tho most exquisito relish
SAUCE, Imparts tho most exquisito relish
Family Notices (Family Notices), The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 - 1954), Friday 3 April 1931 [Issue No.41] page 6 2020-05-10 16:52 G5P,?'TApr,JL 19". Elvy areon, beloved wite
nits SSSfaa 3lCBn..' 3-2 Empire street. Hnber-
r«'umoth2r.P Neville ttntl loved
' Shifl Si.. ianc a8, Httinmoud, of
P0r& Bore, Sourke. . Agod 90 ycara.
GREEN - April 2nd, 1931,. Elvy Green, beloved wife
of George Greenn., of 32 Empire street. Haber-
field, mother of Ona and Neville and loved
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Hammond, of
Pera Bore, Bourke. . Aged 29 years.
AT LUGANO. After Crossing the Alps by Car. TOURING IN SWITZERLAND. (Some Notes from the Diary of a World-Tripper) (Article), Coffs Harbour Advocate (NSW : 1907 - 1942; 1946 - 1954), Tuesday 21 April 1931 [Issue No.1669] page 4 2020-04-25 16:21 AT I&Ga&O.
TOURING-IN SWITZERLAND.
(SomeJJotes- from the Diary of a
j World-Tripper)
Oil his jrecent trip, abroad with Sirs.
; Eastern Dorrleo, kept a diary. " Being
to describe whathe saw, his jottings.'
ate very.] interesting apd /instructive.
•WJth'iiMr. iMulheafn's ; permission we
Intend -to publish 'extracts 'from the
that our 'readers will enjoy reading
tliem.
the forest area preparatory to' the
shoreline , of the lake for some dis
tance and'then crossed over the water
,...ON THE SWISS-ITALIAN
ports had been vised wo continued
the run. on to a place called Como,
watering place, ahd tourists are well
ed to be . a considerable fleet of
a considerable amount of ' drinking,
dancing was also largely indulged in
We were astir earlyon the follow
most' tractable. They pulled heavy
varied from gocjjl to very good from
the agricultural' point of view and
ternated with areas growing fine Vege
watering and rolMng. Italy appeared
not say whether tliey compared with
imagine what big wages some of tbe
want for sucb work. Tbere was some
on the Continent we ■ saw the well
were subject to duty. Prices, were re-;
mark ably low,
.We inspected, the- Milan Cathedral,
is not Only the finest cathedral I have
ever .seen, hut is the finest building 2
havhJookedupon. It iB a magnificent
structure and a. masterpiece of art and;
hold it almost spellbound. The Cath-.
edral is not the only fine, building, fpr
The town is impressive with Its wide
streets, open squares, beautiful parksj
on one side of it the women "worked
ing bohrds. They seemed to kneel on
be dofte to take the women off the
end Implements can be obtained from
Raymond's White Way Garage, Coifs
AT LUGANO.
TOURING IN SWITZERLAND.
(Some Notes from the Diary of a
World-Tripper)
On his recent trip abroad with Mrs.
Eastern Dorrlgo, kept a diary. Being
to describe what he saw, his jottings
are very interesting and instructive.
With Mr. Mulhearn's permission we
intend to publish extracts from the
that our readers will enjoy reading
them.
the forest area preparatory to the
shoreline of the lake for some dis
tance and then crossed over the water
ON THE SWISS-ITALIAN
ports had been vised we continued
the run on to a place called Como,
watering place, and tourists are well
ed to be a considerable fleet of
a considerable amount of drinking,
dancing was also largely indulged in.
We were astir early on the follow
most tractable. They pulled heavy
varied from good to very good from
the agricultural point of view and
ternated with areas growing fine vege
watering and rolling. Italy appeared
not say whether they compared with
imagine what big wages some of the
want for such work. There was some
on the Continent we saw the well
were subject to duty. Prices were re
markably low.
We inspected the Milan Cathedral,
is not only the finest cathedral I have
ever seen, but is the finest building I
have looked upon. It is a magnificent
structure and a masterpiece of art and
hold it almost spellbound. The Cath
edral is not the only fine, building, for
The town is impressive with its wide
streets, open squares, beautiful parks
on one side of it the women worked
ing boards. They seemed to kneel on
be done to take the women off the
and Implements can be obtained from
Raymond's White Way Garage, Coffs
MOTORING IN FRANCE. From Grenoble to the North. (Some Notes from the Diary of aWorld-Tripper) (Article), Coffs Harbour Advocate (NSW : 1907 - 1942; 1946 - 1954), Friday 1 May 1931 [Issue No.1672] page 3 2020-04-25 16:05 From C»ren6blQ to the North.
'(Some Notes;, from the Diary of a
'• ' World-Tripper)
■yriiiimam; Cr.Thos. Mulheatn, ot
eastern Dorrigo^kfpt a rdfary,Being
keen, and: observant, with the'iability
to describe what he saw, Mb jottings
are Vpry interesting and Instructive.
With < Mr," f i peranisri&n* we
intenla to publish : extracts fi'«n the
diary in serial form, and arei sure
them. . ■
■ ' '(16) . • .
Grenoble is a .very fine inlaudTtown,
prettily situated on the Isere Klyer, a •
tributary of . the Rhine, and pbsBess^s j;
many 'fine buildings.. Chambery was
, our next stop after Grenoble and the
intervening country was largeiyggiven
over tb grape growing and bay and
passed by areas of; root crops, Truits,
and cereals, -fhe. hay crops in this
pleasure of witnessing on. our Contin
ental tour. The hay was made i'rom •
clover, tares and vetches, mixed, with '
The pastures' were also in excellent
condition and 'the.district was experi
encing a wonderful-'growing seksou.
We covered the 30 miles to' Grenoble
fpr the night at Chambery.
" It' was quite in keeping with tlie
conditions 6f work in other centres
that here also the women dnl ap
proximately 90 per cent, of the work
in the field. They were stocking- and
the crops, and in some cases -were
at midnight then there .were peals
that they seemed never to stop ring- j
ing. • - . -
I sauntered round the town, in the j
what there was to explore. Many of !
the buildings in the"- place appeared
though in the general sense of the |
Proceeding from Chambery wc mo
Bains to notice the innumerable seijan
chairs;-which had been brought into
commission; and it almost resembled
Japan, or China. The occupant's of the
the rheumatic patients were swalhed
curative baths and were then earned
men, and old wqmen and men, and
The town, wag epic and span and it
pqgsessed fine gardens and public
places. The racecourse wag very at
of a.chain which extends to Geneva,
En route to Geneva we ' passed
! (own itself is not so attractive as Aix
I les Bains. It, too, has its famous cura
tive -baths. The road from Aix les
fin pvpry hand, and bread steady
pleasant. The panoramas horn the
ous, revealing Jake, mountain and
ed on to Geneva and, of course/had
tbe notes Mr. Mulhearn makes some
fore the road further xnocth is con
From Grenoble to the North.
(Some Notes;, from the Diary of a
World-Tripper)
Mulhearn, Cr.Thos. Mulhearn, of
Eastern Dorrigo kept a diary. Being
keen and observant, with the ability
to describe what he saw, his jottings
are very interesting and instructive.
With Mr. Mulhearn's permission we
intend to publish extracts from the
diary in serial form, and are sure
them.
(16)
Grenoble is a very fine inland town,
prettily situated on the Isere River, a
tributary of the Rhine, and posses
many fine buildings. Chambery was
our next stop after Grenoble and the
intervening country was largely given
over to grape growing and hay and
passed by areas of; root crops, fruits,
and cereals. The hay crops in this
pleasure of witnessing on our Contin
ental tour. The hay was made from
clover, tares and vetches, mixed with
The pastures were also in excellent
condition and the district was experi
encing a wonderful growing season.
We covered the 30 miles to Grenoble
for the night at Chambery.
It was quite in keeping with the
conditions of work in other centres
that here also the women did ap
proximately 90 per cent of the work
in the field. They were stocking and
the crops, and in some cases were
at midnight, then there were peals
that they seemed never to stop ring
ing.
I sauntered round the town, in the
what there was to explore. Many of
the buildings in the place appeared
though in the general sense of the
Proceeding from Chambery we mo
Bains to notice the innumerable sedan
chairs which had been brought into
commission, and it almost resembled
Japan, or China. The occupants of the
the rheumatic patients were swathed
curative baths and were then carried
men, and old women and men, and
The town, was spic and span and it
possessed fine gardens and public
places. The racecourse was very at
of a chain which extends to Geneva,
En route to Geneva we passed
town itself is not so attractive as Aix
les Bains. It, too, has its famous cura
tive baths. The road from Aix les
on every hand, and broad steady
pleasant. The panoramas from the
ous, revealing lake, mountain and
ed on to Geneva and, of course, had
the notes Mr. Mulhearn makes some
fore the road further north is con
SWISS BEAUTY. Thrilling Trip over the Alps lay Car. GLORIES UNSURPASSED. (Some Notes from the Diary of a World-Tripper) (Article), Coffs Harbour Advocate (NSW : 1907 - 1942; 1946 - 1954), Thursday 2 April 1931 [Issue No.1665] page 1 2020-04-25 15:43 lay Car.
(Some Notes from tlie Diary of a
On his recent trip abroad witli Mrs.
Mulhearn, Cr. Tlios? Mulheara, • gf
to describe ..wlyit hb • saw,Wis,. jottings
and > =VSry-^iiiSeresting randHnstfuctive.-4
intend to . publish extracts from the
tonic. •
Murrcn and Allmena Hubel, which arc
across the great gap light opposite.
'They are like Wengeu, which 1 have
already referred to, and are centres •
booked: Some of the hotels keep
the place in any Wher season.
small stores, and a number of wooden I
chateaus. After leaving 'Scheidegg
the Jungfrau railway starts for Berg- J
of the distance the railway climbs to |
through long tufinels, but as we were
to the top, we had to content our- |
of the tra'in on the return run down
the great mountain side. We almost I
of things, and the bracing mountain -
"air Had given us a new vigor also, j
side oil a grade that is stated to be
The Jungfrau Mountain, which we !
had ascended, is one of the best and i
most popular pleasure grounds of j
Switzerland, and it is worth going i
deed be wonderful in the winter time !
where we enjoyed another run around i
tile district, and then started out on
cover about sixteen miles to erach the
top df Grimsel Pass, an altitude of
had to climb from 5000 to GOOO feet
for, we could not determine. 11 was
moving very rapidly, however, 1
ground, while at other points , tliey
places, where there Were turnings in
the Hue, or where there was less
height, there were substantial wgod
places; how the rougb gorges were
Printed and published by James.
iSawyer, proprietor, at the "Advo
3T i ■ ■
material to the-site and to' construct
the supports, in home cases on sheer
cliff face 3000 feet above the raging
kets turned the-,corners was marvel
ous, and only at.one very steep turn
CLIMBING *TO THE SKY.
As far as our own run Was con
cerned we iiad a /thrilling passage up
ten most of thefdisiance. On looking
over the j-oadMhaj^on^-diimiiii^t-i
^pem^.^pUdng >hoirt;jpl miles doivn
^^r<®iiit»uk":ti3l)^fde' to "the Tcpeek ^b'e-:
low, though of colirse it was not that
and feelinglTie strain we were forced
to pull, up every two miles or so and
let it cool down. Wc had to hang out
near the open side with nothing he
tween us and the creek below K we
scenery., of course, was gorgeous, and
wild—in fact, loo wild, and inclined
to be uncanny .sending thrills right
down to tiic backbone. The ladies of
fortable - at times. However, the
gotiated. Towards the top wc had a
^j^g£ab"6u^Jptyf,feet abp^. the bed of
a river,; wliiclr'was .dashing along in
fui f torrent at • 20' to ■ 3 0 m i 1 es an hour,
and get some water 'in two kettles to
some . bush on the edge of the cliff
speed. Ultimately .however, he re-ap
pcared, just as I was making down
to search for him .having had, for
to fill tlie receptacles. We again pro
warning to lis, which we did not in
ing nearby' there was also a signal
soon saw tlie reason for the blasting
as we rail by a huge granite quarry,
where blocks were being cut into '
by Car.
(Some Notes from the Diary of a
On his recent trip abroad with Mrs.
Mulhearn, Cr. Thos. Mulhearn, of
to describe what he saw, his jottings
are very interesting and instructive.
intend to publish extracts from the
tonic.
Murren and Allmena Hubel, which arc
across the great gap right opposite.
They are like Wengen, which I have
already referred to, and are centres
booked. Some of the hotels keep
the place in any other season.
small stores, and a number of wooden
chateaus. After leaving Scheidegg
the Jungfrau railway starts for Berg
of the distance the railway climbs to
through long tunnels, but as we were
to the top, we had to content our
of the train on the return run down
the great mountain side. We almost
of things, and the bracing mountain
air had given us a new vigor also.
side on a grade that is stated to be
The Jungfrau Mountain, which we
had ascended, is one of the best and
most popular pleasure grounds of
Switzerland, and it is worth going
deed be wonderful in the winter time
where we enjoyed another run around
the district, and then started out on
cover about sixteen miles to reach the
top of Grimsel Pass, an altitude of
had to climb from 5000 to 6000 feet
for, we could not determine. It was
moving very rapidly, however, I
hour, and there was a steel bucket
ground, while at other points, they
places, where there were turnings in
the line, or where there was less
height, there were substantial wood
places; how the rough gorges were
Printed and published by James
Sawyer, proprietor, at the "Advo

material to the site and to construct
the supports, in some cases on sheer
cliff face 1000 feet above the raging
kets turned the corners was marvel
ous, and only at one very steep turn
CLIMBING TO THE SKY.
As far as our own run was con
cerned we had a thrilling passage up.
ten most of the distance. On looking
over the roadside at one turn it
seemed nothing short of miles down
^a precipitous cliffside to the creek be
low, though of course it was not that
and feeling the strain we were forced
to pull up every two miles or so and
let it cool down. We had to hang out
near the open side with nothing be
tween us and the creek below if we
scenery, of course, was gorgeous, and
wild—in fact, too wild, and inclined
to be uncanny sending thrills right
down to the backbone. The ladies of
fortable at times. However, the
gotiated. Towards the top we had a
ning about fifty feet above the bed of
a river,; which was dashing along in
full torrent at 20 to 30 miles an hour,
and get some water in two kettles to
some bush on the edge of the cliff
speed. Ultimately, however, he re-ap
peared, just as I was making down
to search for him, having had, for
to fill the receptacles. We again pro
warning to us, which we did not in
ing nearby there was also a signal
soon saw the reason for the blasting
as we ran by a huge granite quarry,
where blocks were being cut into
SCARS OF WAR. On the Battlefields of France SPLENDID BRITISH CEMETERIES. (Some Notes from the Diary of a World-Tripper) (Article), Coffs Harbour Advocate (NSW : 1907 - 1942; 1946 - 1954), Friday 10 July 1931 [Issue No.1692] page 4 2020-04-25 15:17 On "the Battlefields of France
World-Tripper) . ■, ,
On .Ills recent trip abroad 'with "Mrs.
kcen and observant; with the ability
to -describe what he saw, libs.-jotting?
are very interesting and' instructive.
With Mr. MuViearn's permission we
diary in serial form,,'and are sure
Leaving Paris on a. Monday morn
ing ill midsummer, wo,.motored ■ to
wards the scenes of action in tlje re-'
cent, great war. Although we experi
we stopped at a. bfg manufacturing
depot, for aeroplah.es, and made an
inspection of the place. . Continuing,
wo proceeded through further areas
of farm lands where crops of oats; po
tion, ' and it was particularly notice
many difficulties^ in harvesting.
Our next stop on the run was at.
Compeigne, a centre which wilt go
there that the armistice in the great,
by a settlement known as Senlis.'and
French Government, has, erected a
to Soissons. where we ran into the
dences of the devastation- of war, de
arrived there the workmen.were still
place; but the outlying lanes ami
is in such a condition lliat the casual
19)8 it was nothing more than a dis
mortar. The only evidences of th^ |
conflict .in the town itself now are the
ruins of the great cathedral. Ft has
trendies in which the grim and awful
and the debris of war in" many places.
area., and with tlie wrecked wire en
was not one to attract. • We could
where "else, a shattered machine gun
Close to the belt of the trendies
an average. 6000 soldiers were lying
buried lu each. These were to be
met with every mile or two, aud will
of tlie awful nature of tlie conflict
and of tlie great price that was paid
bert, Pcronno, Bray, Baupaume, Poz
iers, Thiepval, and Beaumont Hamcl,
in tbese rested tile remains of almost
erected on the scene of tlie awful
tpwards Peropne. During our tour
we kept' a' watclifulOye'on tile Austral
ian sections aottbe. cemeteries loViSic
graves? of any fallen frlerids-j&'om/the
Dorfigo. and had Also been- especially
asked by Mrs..'Paul, of Eastern Dor
Vigo, to try and locate the last Crest
omitted to inquire of ilie War- braves
Charlie's £rave before leaving .for the
^continent, "but we made a point ? of
making careful inquiries' frpm the.
caretakers of the . various cemeteries
in the .Poziefs. sector, and were . in;
deed: fortunate. 4b locate , tlm.grave.
Wc Asked1 ibe- -icaVeinkeiv" for.kcmit
flowers'from the grave to-despatch tb:
the "soldier's 'mother, "which • request
. was graciously, acceded to. ft.'if! we
grave. The Paul family will bo cheer
ed to know that .their gallant boy lias
a fine resting place .in one o£. the
finest, cemeteries on the field, antl
wlilcb- is excellently cartd for. The
cemetery was a picture of restfuincss
Willi beautiful flower pots, pavcrl,
walkS, and rows and rows of. graves'
with neat head stones. Every' sol
which must liave cost thousands of
pounds to construct, and the cnrance
of flic cemeteries are deserving of
praise for the way in.which tlicy have
planned everything, and-, tlic great
maintenance of I lie sacred areas. In
course, kept Tree from weeds and in
good order, but; not nearly so attrac
tive as the British. 'ihe German
cemeteries arc "jusv. enclosures," with
the'graves marked with plain black
pleased witli the way the British
On the Battlefields of France
World-Tripper) .
On his recent trip abroad with Mrs.
keen and observant, with the ability
to describe what he saw, his jottings
are very interesting and instructive.
With Mr. Mulhearn's permission we
diary in serial form, and are sure
Leaving Paris on a Monday morn
ing in midsummer, we motored to
wards the scenes of action in the re
cent great war. Although we experi
we stopped at a big manufacturing
depot, for aeroplanes, and made an
inspection of the place. Continuing,
we proceeded through further areas
of farm lands where crops of oats, po
tion, and it was particularly notice
many difficulties in harvesting.
Our next stop on the run was at
Compeigne, a centre which will go
there that the armistice in the great
by a settlement known as Senlis, and
French Government has erected a
to Soissons, where we ran into the
dences of the devastation of war, de
arrived there the workmen were still
place; but the outlying lanes and
is in such a condition that the casual
1918 it was nothing more than a dis
mortar. The only evidences of the
conflict in the town itself now are the
ruins of the great cathedral. It has
trenches in which the grim and awful
and the debris of war in many places.
area., and with the wrecked wire en
was not one to attract. We could
where else, a shattered machine gun
Close to the belt of the trenches
an average, 6000 soldiers were lying
buried in each. These were to be
met with every mile or two, and will
of the awful nature of the conflict
and of the great price that was paid
bert, Peronne, Bray, Baupaume, Poz
iers, Thiepval, and Beaumont Hamel,
in these rested the remains of almost
erected on the scene of the awful
towards Peronne. During our tour
we kept a watchful eye on the Austral
ian sections of the cemeteries for the
graves of any fallen frlends from the
Dorrigo, and had also been especially
asked by Mrs. Paul, of Eastern Dor
rigo, to try and locate the last rest
omitted to inquire of the War Graves
Charlie's grave before leaving for the
continent, but we made a point of
making careful inquiries from the
caretakers of the various cemeteries
in the Poziers. sector, and were in
deed fortunate to locate the grave.
We asked for the caretaker for some
flowers from the grave to despatch to
the soldier's mother, which request
was graciously acceded to, and we
grave. The Paul family will be cheer
ed to know that their gallant boy has
a fine resting place in one of the
finest, cemeteries on the field, and
which is excellently cared for. The
cemetery was a picture of restfulness
Willi beautiful flower pots, paved
walks, and rows and rows of graves
with neat head stones. Every sol
which must have cost thousands of
pounds to construct, and the entrance
of the cemeteries are deserving of
praise for the way in which they have
planned everything, and the great
maintenance of the sacred areas. In
course, kept free from weeds and in
good order, but not nearly so attrac
tive as the British. The German
cemeteries are just enclosures, with
the graves marked with plain black
pleased with the way the British
LIFE IN HOLLAND. The Land of Canals. A MARVELOUS SYSTEM. (Some Notes from the Diary of a World-Tripper) (Article), Coffs Harbour Advocate (NSW : 1907 - 1942; 1946 - 1954), Tuesday 3 March 1931 [Issue No.1556] page 1 2020-04-25 14:48 LIFE Iff HOLLAND.
A MARVEL0U8 SYSTEM.
WorM-Tripper)
Mulhearn, Cr. JHios. Mulhearn, ot
Eastern Dorr! go, kept a diary. Being
keen and., observant, with the ability
that our readers/ wiU Aenjoy reading
them. " "
--owns a. bicycle. Men ol eighty sum
mers' down to boys o£ very tender
Nuns, PrieBts and all others moved
means of! locomotion.
In contrast with many other coun- j
Holland reside la houses on their
own farms.' Most of the places are
well built in brick, are of pleasing de- j
sign, and, like the dwellings in the j
vegetable plots fo provide the in
along the roads,, and in some In
another, giving the impression Of one
big town. Some 'of the bigger centres
Middleburg and' Goes. These are
centres of canal 'systems, and canals
spring tld.e. The locks, floodgates and
thing which give .the traveller from
Prom the canals - in many instances
Intensive Irrigation in carried into
' BERGEN OP ZOOM.
Prom Goes we travelled on to Ber
gen op Zoom, over the River Scheldt. 1
is one of the historic landmarks of |
the place. The town is truly one of j
jtlaccia of this type can be imagined,
afcd vttflle everything is kept spot- '
lessly dean, - the buildings can never
be made to strike ■ the traveller as
streets arc so narrow that when the
In order to make an inspec.iui .>f
the town before many vere astir, 1
along the streets before six. On everv
day. The whole place was beng
washed down—houses insole and out
side, pavements, streets and nil else.
pended on their work. There w is no
port them and keep them on tile bal
road, just as they do in our own '
—that is, by lasting as each can ar- :
we were moving along comfortably in |
the car again, traversing fields and '
landscapes quite simitar to those I .
vesting methods appeared more and :
more to me to be out of date, as '
everything was done by hand, and nc
machinery was present in the fields
Under high wages conditions th<
cessary to adopt other methods oi
Before we arrived at Dordrecli we
steam ferry from the town of Moer-1
town, has large shipbuilding works tq
dustry, and there jjT a consider
able ineeiP.B and outgoing sea trans
600,000. Hero wc picked up a young
In progress. There were thousands of
4Vere packed with barges, tugs, and
all manner of river anfi gga boats.
Rotterdam, finp ef the principal sea
with beautiful gardens and parfca.
Some of the homes are pajaitai. and ,
appear to be tfie ipde* iQ the prosper
fact, everyone appeared to luive
something to do, lt«d the people ap
is an old windmill—a relic of the old-1
en days—but its great wings still |
occupied the mill for centprlea, In
Rotterdam, as veil as In many of the
Vpry largo towns of Holland, the po
and their national dreBS was less in
(In the next extracts from (he I
diary, references will be made of the |
LIFE IN HOLLAND.
A MARVEL0US SYSTEM.
World-Tripper)
Mulhearn, Cr. Thos. Mulhearn, of
Eastern Dorrigo, kept a diary. Being
keen and observant, with the ability
that our readers will enjoy reading
them.
--owns a. bicycle. Men of eighty sum
mers down to boys of very tender
Nuns, Priests and all others moved
means of locomotion.
In contrast with many other coun
Holland reside in houses on their
own farms. Most of the places are
well built in brick, are of pleasing de
sign, and, like the dwellings in the
vegetable plots to provide the in
along the roads, and in some In
another, giving the impression of one
big town. Some of the bigger centres
Middleburg and Goes. These are
centres of canal systems, and canals
spring tlde. The locks, floodgates and
thing which give the traveller from
From the canals in many instances
intensive Irrigation in carried into
BERGEN OP ZOOM.
From Goes we travelled on to Ber
gen op Zoom, over the River Scheldt.
is one of the historic landmarks of
the place. The town is truly one of
places of this type can be imagined,
and while everything is kept spot
lessly dean, the buildings can never
be made to strike the traveller as
streets are so narrow that when the
In order to make an inspection of
the town before many were astir, I
along the streets before six. On every
day. The whole place was being
washed down—houses inside and out
side, pavements, streets and all else.
pended on their work. There was no
port them and keep them on the bal
road, just as they do in our own
—that is, by lasting as each can ar
we were moving along comfortably in
the car again, traversing fields and
landscapes quite simitar to those I
vesting methods appeared more and
more to me to be out of date, as
everything was done by hand, and no
machinery was present in the fields.
Under high wages conditions the
cessary to adopt other methods of
Before we arrived at Dordrech we
steam ferry from the town of Moer
town, has large shipbuilding works to
dustry, and there is also a consider
able ingoing and outgoing sea trans
600,000. Hero we picked up a young
in progress. There were thousands of
were packed with barges, tugs, and
all manner of river and sea boats.
Rotterdam, one of the principal sea
with beautiful gardens and parks.
Some of the homes are palatial and
appear to be the index of the prosper
fact, everyone appeared to have
something to do, and the people ap
is an old windmill—a relic of the old
en days—but its great wings still
occupied the mill for centuries. In
Rotterdam, as well as in many of the
very large towns of Holland, the po
and their national dress was less in
(In the next extracts from the
diary, references will be made of the

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.