1. List: EYRE, Vi
    EYRE, Vi thumbnail image
    Public

    MRS. EYRE'S FURNACE ROOM
    In her back garden at Coogee, Sydney.
    is made out of a special china clay with
    the addition of bone and particular sub
    stances. ?
    NOW, in the present instance I am
    speaking of pottery and earthenware;
    of pottery that is neither specific 'china,'
    nor porcelain, nor semi-porcelain, and of
    earthenware — that. is, one of the simplest
    forms of pottery ware. Stoneware is yet
    another distinction. But these poor house
    wives will .find their hair turning grey if
    1 put too many technicalities before them!
    Pottery is widely practised by amateurs —
    many of them women — and earthenware is
    made in great quantities in factories in
    Australia. China and porcelain are hardly
    made at all in Australia, and what thero
    is is chiefly semi-porcelain, as used for
    such things as electric insulators and ar
    ticles used for industrial purposes.
    Some of the loveliest Australian pottery
    I hat we can buy in Sydney is made, by
    members of the Society' of Arts and Crafts.
    The returned soldiers' pot lory used to pro
    duce very beauliful work, but that closed
    down during the. last two years. I went
    to see the furnace-room and kiln of one
    of the amateurs of the Society of Arts and
    Crafts, and alihough it is the only one at
    present, owned by any of the eighteen-odd
    pottery members of the society it is typical
    of a little home pottery that could be set
    up in the back garden of any enthusiast.
    Another member used to have a kiln at.
    Bailmrsl, :ind another built up a kiln
    healed by a coal fire at Mosman.
    I STOOD before the furnace-room of Mrs.
    Eyre where it is surrounded by trees
    and the lawn of her back garden at Coogee.
    While the lady showed me her 'throwers'
    wheel, her 'stilts,' 'saggar,' 'slip' (such
    technicalities!), and bade me look through
    the 'spyhole' into the oven to see if the
    'biscuit' was 'firing' (or, rather, to see
    if the 'tests' showed whether the tempera
    ture of the kiln was climbing) I visualised
    not only the enthusiastic Australian lady
    in her beautiful garden, but back through
    the years to long past ages when ancient
    peoples felt the same delight in the art
    and craft of pottery-making. The Israel
    ites baked clay bricks in the sunshine ; the
    Egyptians modelled* little figures of
    Ushabti in 2000 or 3000 B.C.; these they
    buried in Ihe tombs of their dead. Later
    they made coloured dress ornaments and
    beads, and coloured animals as toys for
    the children. Then the ancient Britons
    made pots and cleverly pulled a cord
    round the damp clay to impress a pattern
    upon it. The ancient Greek pottery was
    glorious and wonderful, and finest vases
    made about 400 B.C. attained quality ani
    beauty that have never been surpassed;
    these are numbered in museums all over
    the world. Then there was Chinese po|
    tery in the ancient home of porcelain,
    where, it is said, this fine translucent ware
    was invented in 185 B.C. But in porcelain
    I will deal later, and now return to the
    pottery of our Australian workers.
    THE 'muffle kiln' of an amateur, such
    as that of Mrs. Eyre, is heated by gas
    controlled by twelve gas laps in a row.
    The moist clay of which the pottery is
    composed is first 'thrown,' or turned
    on the potter's wheel, or modelled by hand,
    or pressed into moulds. Then the shape
    has to dry for several clays. Several
    articles — vases, inkpots, salt-cellars, and so
    on — when sufficiently dry are then packed
    into the oven- of the kiln, and propped up
    by stilts to prevent them from touching
    each other or falling. The oven is lighted
    and gradually brought, to the right heat
    with more care than a housewife gives to
    her sponge cake and its cooking. But the
    potter has an advantage over the cooker
    of cakes — she can remove a round plug
    in the open door and look through this
    spyhole to see how the pots are cooking,
    or, really, lo judge the progress of the fire
    that, is registered by small bars, or 'Seger
    cones,' placed high in the stilts level with
    the spyhole. Then she knows whether the
    HAND-MADE POTTERY, The work of members of the Society of Arts and Crafts of 'N.S.W.— Miss H. G. Hirst, Miss K. Blomgren, Mrs. Eyre.. . ? ? . . , ;; . Help
    HAND-MADE POTTERY,
    The work of members of the Society of Arts and Crafts of 'N.S.W.— Miss H. G. Hirst,
    Miss K. Blomgren, Mrs. Eyre.. . ? ? . . , ;; .
    pot and ware in the glowing oven, or sag
    gar, are firing at the correct temperature.
    A cracked pot is the result should the a 11-.
    important firing be loo much or too little..
    The oven has to cool off for hours, some
    times day, before the pots inside can be *
    removed. Afier this first baking the pots
    ;ire called 'biscuit,' and have then to be
    decorated or painted upon and glazed, and
    lo be fired a second time before their
    beautiful colours are completed.
    I WAS surprised at the number of times
    a piece of pottery is handled, and a.,
    the continual lesling and experimenting
    with clays, colours, and- the all-important
    firing, tint is Iruly an 'ordeal by fire.'
    The growth of pottery from the lump or
    clay to a beautiful finished bowl modelled
    with gum-leaves and bright with' colour
    now goes through slages that have taken
    years lo discover, and yet which each
    craftsman (or eraftswoman) must master
    for himself before the arlicle is ready for
    us lo admire in our homes or give as wed
    ding presents.
    The commercial pottery made in our
    great poileries around Sydney goes
    through the same processes, but with
    greater efficiency of method, that enables
    thousands of articles to be turned out
    every week. I visited one of these pot
    teries and examined 1he mysteries of the
    art; but that experience I will describe
    next week. ?
    Correspondents are invited to send
    photographs of any beautiful or extra
    ordinary piece of pollery that they think
    may be -of interest to other people.

    17 items
    created by: KEVING. on 2016-11-24 20:51:02.0
    User data
    Tags:
    Add tag(s)
    Comments: No comments yet - Add one!
    Rating: unrated

List items:

Showing: 1 - 17 of 17

  1. ARTS AND GRAFTS. Exhibition at Education Department.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 24 October 1933 p 15 Article
    Abstract: We have lived in our machine age long enough to know that the machine is not always the enemy of be uty and that things that are "hand-made" are not, ... 509 words
    • Text last corrected on 24 November 2016 by KEVING.
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-11-24 20:51:02.0

    Pots

    Hide note
  2. ANNUAL EXHIBITION. Society of Arts and Crafts.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 21 October 1930 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Some loan collections add interest to the annual exhibition of the members of the Society of Arts and Crafts, to be opened tomorrow afternoon at 3 o' ... 487 words
    • Text last corrected on 31 July 2017 by tonkit
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-11-24 21:38:54.0

    Pots

    Hide note
  3. POTTER'S CLAY ART WORKERS EXHIBIT VARIED DISPLAY
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Tuesday 23 October 1928 p 21 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: PERHAPS the most striking article in the exhibition of the Society of Arts and Crafts, which will be opened at the Education Buildings to-morrow, 563 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-05-23 10:01:56.0

    Outstanding- Exhibitor : Outstanding is Mrs. VI. Eyre's pot tery, which is not only delightful in design, 'but dias beautiful color, her blues being most cheering. Mrs, Eyre takes a lizard and puts him on- a vase, and the' effect is ex ceedingly good. Then there are little inkwells symbolising whiter-topped waves in their decoration1.' .'Cicadas, big fat cicadas, are; intriguing'on one bowl, and great , geese march round- a piece of lustre. Mrs. Eyre haB her own kiln, and she has been experimenting, with excellent result, among the glazes. The hand-weaving is certain to catch the feminine fancy. Miss Doro thy Wager hsH brought to her loom a delicious assortment of colors, which she baa. combined with cunning Angers, and her cushions, handbags, and scarves are an most unarming. In this section, too, is the work of

    Hide note
  4. FOR WOMEN. POTTERY.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 15 March 1927 p 5 Article
    Abstract: Modern women are often puzzled about the terms pottery and china. We need not be ignorant about pottery, for anything made of clay and hardened is a ... 553 words
    • Text last corrected on 31 July 2017 by tonkit
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-05-23 10:05:00.0

    Australians aro contributing their part to this story, and pottery and designs which have never been used In tho world before are being made by tho hands of Australian mon and women, who aro members of the Society of Arts and Crafts of N.S.W. There aro gum-leaves moulded in pottery, and not seen anywhere In Europe, but made by Miss Hirst and Miss Madsen, of Sydney. Mrs. Eyre fashions pottery with Inlaid designs, and we may choose modern or ancient motif, just na we like. Mrs. GHI, from Brisbane, builds up chiefly by hand, and eschews the potter's wheel, but Miss Violet Mace, from Adelaide, prefers the pierced pottery, and cuts and shapes her designs Uko a coarse lace. The pottery of Mr. Merrie Boyd, from Melbourne, Is well known, as also Mr. Harry Linde- mans. All these "pots," and the story of tho Infinite patience, perseverance, and art of the workers, can lie seen at the rooms of the Society of Arts and Crafts of N.S.W., in Fix this textRovve-fctrcet, Sydney.

    Hide note
  5. NEAR AND FAR.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 17 April 1928 p 5 Article
    Abstract: Miss Elaine do Chair presided at a "younger set" committee meeting, held at Paling's on Friday morning to discuss ways of assisting the Irene Vanbrug ... 1517 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-05-24 13:40:30.0

    The annual meeting of the Society of Arts and Crafts was held at the Blue Tea-room, Rowe-street, last night, when the following office-bearers were elected for the ensuing year:-President, Misa F. Sulman; vice-presi- dents, Miss Fairfax, Miss Eadith Walker, Mr. W. H. Ifould; hon. treasurer, Miss M. R. Innes; executive, Miss V. F. P. Allen, Miss M. D. Bamborger, Miss J. Booth, Mrs. L. G. Dalgarno, Mr». V. Eyre, Miss M. Farmer, Miss H. G. Hirst, Mr. W. Inman, Mi&s J. M. Less lie, Miss R. M. Madsen, Miss J, Mackenzie, Miss E. Mort, Mrs. A. M. Parsons.

    Hide note
  6. SOCIETY OF ARTS AND CRAFTS.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 26 February 1929 p 4 Article
    Abstract: A welcome home to Miss Grace Allen, a former president of the Society of Arts and Crafts, who returned last Saturday from a trip to England, was give ... 436 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-05-24 13:41:17.0

    Later In the evening brief talks on ancient and modern crnft work were given by mombcrs who had brought handicraft specimens to the meeting with them. Among those present «ero Miss V. E. P. Allou, Mrs. F. W. Parsons, Mrs. Vi Eyre, Mrs. P. Ashton, Miss J. Booth, Miss M. Innes, Miss Simpson, Míos Barbnra Parr, Miss H. Craig, Mrs. Dalgarno, Miss Young, Mrs. B. Phillips, Miss E. Innes, Miss Gwen Pearce, MISB M. Farmer, Mrs. Noble Wallace, Miss E. M. Young, Miss H. Hirst, and Miss Daisy Dowse.Later In the evening brief talks on ancient and modern crnft work were given by mombcrs who had brought handicraft specimens to the meeting with them. Among those present «ero Miss V. E. P. Allou, Mrs. F. W. Parsons, Mrs. Vi Eyre, Mrs. P. Ashton, Miss J. Booth, Miss M. Innes, Miss Simpson, Míos Barbnra Parr, Miss H. Craig, Mrs. Dalgarno, Miss Young, Mrs. B. Phillips, Miss E. Innes, Miss Gwen Pearce, MISB M. Farmer, Mrs. Noble Wallace, Miss E. M. Young, Miss H. Hirst, and Miss Daisy Dowse.

    Hide note
  7. WOMAN'S HIMS and WAYS. TWENTY YEARS AGO Arts and Crafts Society EXHIBITION OF WORK
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Tuesday 30 October 1923 p 13 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: BEGINNINGS of successful movements are always interesting and the recognised position of the Arts and Crafts Society to-day is 526 words
    • Text last corrected on 29 July 2017 by tonkit
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-05-24 17:10:24.0

    Pots

    Hide note
  8. ARTS AND CRAFTS. EXHIBITION OF AUSTRALIAN WORK.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 14 October 1921 p 6 Article
    Abstract: The Now South "Wales Society of Arts and Crafts aro holding their annual exhibition In tho Art Gallery of the Education Department. Lady David ia to ... 832 words
    • Text last corrected on 5 August 2017 by tonkit
    Digitised article icon
  9. NEW CRAFTWORK is colorful Frogs Are Fashionable, But Where, Oh Where, Is the Familiar Kookaburra?
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Sunday 25 October 1931 p 27 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: High standards of craftsmanship distinguished the work of members of the Arts and Crafts Society, at present on view at the gallery in the Education ... 709 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-07-14 07:29:51.0

    AMAZING ARTICLE AND PIX

    Hide note
  10. Arts and Crafts Society
    Sydney Mail (NSW : 1912 - 1938) Wednesday 7 November 1923 p 23 Article
    Abstract: The general arrangement of the exhibits of the Society of Arts and Crafts is one of the features of the exhibition. Apart from the excellence of the ... 527 words
    • Text last corrected on 29 July 2017 by tonkit
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-12-01 10:07:50.0

    ALTHOUGH there may be fewer exhibits this year, owing, it is understood, to the illness of some of the members, the usual high standard has been maintained, and most of the work shows an originality which is really delightful. The fact, too, that the trustees of the National Art Gallery made several purchases is gratifying to all connected with the organisation, the fortunate workers being Mrs. V. Eyre (two pottery vases), Miss M. Alston (a. hand-bound book), Mrs. B. Maxwell (a wonderfully embroidered d'oyley), and Miss Jessie Booth (a hand-woven scarf Fix this textand bag. It is gratifying als

    Hide note
  11. The Ideal Workbox
    Sydney Mail (NSW : 1912 - 1938) Wednesday 20 December 1922 p 22 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Here are some particulars relative to the making of the ideal workbox. A box suited to a foundation may be had from the grocer, especially if you are ... 1660 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-12-01 10:38:38.0

    WONDERFUL PHOTO OF VI : MRS. U. EYRE, A clever worker in pottery and an ex hibitor at the Arts and Crafts exhibi tions. Mrs. Eyre works by a new method which is most effective, and which has not hitherto been used in Australia. One colourd clay is inlaid on another in the form of a design, the pattern thus being raised from the surface. The difficulty lies in obtaining clays of the same 'contraction.' (Photo: Judith Fletcher.)

    Hide note
  12. FINE WORK Arts and Crafts Display OPENED TO-DAY
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Wednesday 25 October 1933 p 22 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Originality and pleasing workmanship are again displayed in the annual exhibition of the Society of Arts and Crafts of New South 656 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-06-01 16:52:00.0

    Mrs. Vi Eyre has an attractive dlsplny of inlay pottery, a large blue vase showing a design of white albatrosses dominating the table.

    Hide note
  13. NEAR AND FAR.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 28 August 1928 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Miss B. Buchanan, a visitor from the Brisbane Red Cross, called at the Red Cross Handicrafts Shop, 11 Angel-place, yesterday morning, and spent an in ... 1127 words
    • Text last corrected on 31 July 2017 by tonkit
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-07-29 16:46:03.0

    An exhibition of china painting and pottery by members of the Society of Arts and Crafts is now being held at the society's depot, Rowe- street. The display Includes painted ornaments, vases, jugs, bowls, and cups and saucers. There is also a section composed of painted porcelain brooches and pins. The artists exhibiting include Mrs. Sterling Levis, Mr. Merric Boyd, the Misses Blomgren, Madsen, May Crouch, Hirst, Mace Lesslie, Mesdames Eyre. Nosworthy, Mr. Lindeman, Mr. Horniman, Mrs. G. Barker, the Misses Newman, Atkinson, Matthews, D. Dowse, T. Johnson, M. Innes, R. and P. Vidler, and Mrs. Warburton.

    Hide note
  14. SOCIETY OF ARTS AND CRAFTS.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 21 April 1931 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Hand-weaving and pottery are being displayed at the special exhibition of the Society of Arts and Crafts depot. Rowe-street, this week. The weaving i ... 185 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-10-18 21:43:29.0

    The pottery section includes all kinds of decorative pieces, lamp stands, ash trays, fruit and nut bowls, and vases. They are the work of Mrs. H. L. Lindeman, Mrs. Seccombe. Mrs. D. Nosworthy, Miss P. James, Mrs. F. G. Brett, Miss Mary Crouch, Miss Violet Mace, Miss K. Blomgren, Miss J. M. Lesslie, Mrs. Vi Eyre, Mrs. H. J. Hirst. Miss M. Carlin, and Mrs. V. Brett

    Hide note
  15. Home Furnishing
    Sydney Mail (NSW : 1912 - 1938) Wednesday 3 October 1928 p 30 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: In these columns we deal with furnishings, interior decoration, or antiques that have been seen or can be adopted in Australia, and may provide inspi ... 1257 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-10-19 09:30:29.0

    MRS. EYRE'S FURNACE ROOM In her back garden at Coogee, Sydney. is made out of a special china clay with the addition of bone and particular sub stances. ? NOW, in the present instance I am speaking of pottery and earthenware; of pottery that is neither specific 'china,' nor porcelain, nor semi-porcelain, and of earthenware — that. is, one of the simplest forms of pottery ware. Stoneware is yet another distinction. But these poor house wives will .find their hair turning grey if 1 put too many technicalities before them! Pottery is widely practised by amateurs — many of them women — and earthenware is made in great quantities in factories in Australia. China and porcelain are hardly made at all in Australia, and what thero is is chiefly semi-porcelain, as used for such things as electric insulators and ar ticles used for industrial purposes. Some of the loveliest Australian pottery I hat we can buy in Sydney is made, by members of the Society' of Arts and Crafts. The returned soldiers' pot lory used to pro duce very beauliful work, but that closed down during the. last two years. I went to see the furnace-room and kiln of one of the amateurs of the Society of Arts and Crafts, and alihough it is the only one at present, owned by any of the eighteen-odd pottery members of the society it is typical of a little home pottery that could be set up in the back garden of any enthusiast. Another member used to have a kiln at. Bailmrsl, :ind another built up a kiln healed by a coal fire at Mosman. I STOOD before the furnace-room of Mrs. Eyre where it is surrounded by trees and the lawn of her back garden at Coogee. While the lady showed me her 'throwers' wheel, her 'stilts,' 'saggar,' 'slip' (such technicalities!), and bade me look through the 'spyhole' into the oven to see if the 'biscuit' was 'firing' (or, rather, to see if the 'tests' showed whether the tempera ture of the kiln was climbing) I visualised not only the enthusiastic Australian lady in her beautiful garden, but

    Hide note
  16. 'THINGS OF BEAUTY' To Be Seen at Exhibition Of Arts and Crafts
    The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930) Tuesday 18 October 1927 p 21 Article
    Abstract: Many beautiful objects, rich in color, novel in design, and exquisite in workmanship, are to be seen at the Society of Arts and Crafts' annual exhibi ... 332 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-09 10:09:30.0

    In hand-made pottery and cliina. Mrs., Vi Eyre has a striking display One of her gems is a vase in twilight coloring decollated with flamingoes in silhouette..

    Hide note
  17. ARTS AND CRAFTS. ANNUAL EXHEBITION.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 6 October 1922 p 7 Article
    Abstract: The annual exhibition of the Society or Arts and Crafts of New South Wales will be opened by the Governor. Sir Walter Davidson, In the art gallery of ... 894 words
    • Text last corrected on 5 August 2017 by tonkit
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-09 16:43:42.0

    The exhibition is fairly strong in china painting, in which the work of Ada I. Newman stands out prominently with '36 specimens of her handicraft. In design this covers a wide field. Attention especially may be drawn to a beautiful blue vase (hydrangea), and another piece in the same class (angophora), both of which reveal the talent of the exhibitor at its best. Others who are entered here are E. M. Warburton, Ethel Atkinson, Ada Carlin, Muriel Cornish, May Crouch, V. Eyre, C. L. Eastwood, Myrtle Innes, E. M. Leggett, Zillah Lynch, C. Vidler, L. Whitney, P. Vidler, and Rosalie Vidler.

    Hide note