1. List: Vennard (Bennard), Alexander Vindex; Reid, Frank, 87 (WW1 Soldier) List of articles in Trove
    Vennard (Bennard), Alexander Vindex; Reid, Frank, 87 (WW1 Soldier) List of articles in Trove thumbnail image
    Public

    WW1 letters, articles, stories ect., written by Alex (Aka.. Frank Reid)
    His involvement with servicemen and woman continued throughout his life.

    67 items
    created by: birdwing on 2016-10-18 15:33:11.0
    User data
    Tags:
    Add tag(s)
    Comments: No comments yet - Add one!
    Rating: unrated

List items:

Showing: 1 - 67 of 67

  1. Web page: Discovering Anzacs
    http://discoveringanzacs.naa.gov.au/browse/person/375228
    Web page
    Note

    2016-10-18 17:00:18.0

    Frank Reid, Alex. V. Bennard

    Hide note
  2. OUTDOOR AUSTRALIA. On Hook Island.
    Sydney Mail (NSW : 1912 - 1938) Wednesday 11 March 1914 p 10 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: IN spite of the wind, by creeping behind islands and dashing across partly-exposed places, I had by 3 o'clock worked out on the trip up to the last c ... 3560 words
    • Text last corrected on 25 October 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-25 20:38:28.0

    ON HOOK ISLAND, BY 'REEFCOMBER.'

    Hide note
  3. The Eight-Ten Train.
    Sydney Mail (NSW : 1912 - 1938) Wednesday 8 April 1914 p 61 Article
    Abstract: BREAKFAST'S such a funny meal; Father's in a hurry; Mother thries to keep me still; Mary's in a flurry. 190 words
    Digitised article icon
  4. COONAMBLE'S WAR CONTINGENT
    The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate (NSW : 1894 - 1954) Friday 6 November 1914 p 6 Detailed Lists, Results, Guides
    268 words
    • Text last corrected on 18 October 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-28 13:30:36.0

    COONAMBLE'S WAR CONTINGENT So far as can be ascertained, the following is a list of the Coonamble and Gulargambone men who have gone or are going to the Front:—A. Vindex Bennard,

    Hide note
  5. In the Firing Line. A Story of the Australian Expeditionary Forces in the Dardanelles.
    The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955) Saturday 12 June 1915 p 6 Article
    Abstract: THE Australian troops knew—or at least understood—that they were landing at Oaba Tepe; what they did not know, but were on their way towards understa ... 3390 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-04-16 14:51:24.0

    By Private Frank Reid, 18th Battalion

    Hide note
  6. Papers for Soldiers. A SOLDIER's REQUEST.
    The Sydney Stock and Station Journal (NSW : 1896 - 1924) Friday 3 December 1915 p 3 Article
    Abstract: The last mail from Gallipoli brought Us the following letter, which speaks for itself. We leave it with our readers:— 343 words
    • Text last corrected on 26 September 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-04-16 14:52:30.0

    Papers for Soldiers.

    A SOLDIER'S REQUEST.

    The last mail from Gallipoli brought us the following letter, which speaks for itself. We leave it with our readers : — ''Headquarters Staff, '5th Australian Infantry Brigade, ''October 18th, 1915.

    ''Editor 'Stock and Station Journal.' ''Dear Sir, — Came across a copy of your paper here the other day. Since reading it I have been wondering if any of your renders would send me and my mates in the trenches copies of any daily and weekly Australian papers, which they may have no further use for. Magazines are also welcomed. What may be wastepaper to your read-ers in Australia is to us a boon and a blessing. 'We are face to face wtth a bitter winter, also a rainy season. In the long days and nights before us papers and magazines will help to pass away many a weary hour and will tend to help keep our thoughts with the ones we left at home and on the best place on earth. 'Will you print a few lines of this letter in your paper, and I have no doubt but that the reading matter will soon me forthcoming. I should like the papers sent regularly. There is a demand for the following; 'Bulletin,' 'Sydney Morning Herald,' 'Lone Hand,' 'Life,' 'Australasian, ' 'Western Mail,' and 'Brisbane Daily Mail.' Perhaps some of your readers will be able to sup-ply these. They may be able to com-municate with you first as to their in-tention of sending me these papers so that I will not receive two copies of the same paper at the one time. 'In conclusion, any reading matter is a welcomed, no matter where it is print-ed. I shall also correspond with any of your readers who may care to receive letters from the firing line. ''I thank you in anticipation, and wish yourself and staff a Merry Xmas and New Year, as might be possible under present circumstances. — Yours sincerely, for the Empire. ''FRANK RE1D (No. 87).''

    Hide note
  7. LETTER FROM THE FRONT. TROOPER A. VENNARD. IN THE TRENCHES. Gallipoli, October 5, 1915.
    Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954) Friday 24 December 1915 p 3 Article
    Abstract: My Dear Father and Mother— This may never teach you, but one of our wounded men has promised to post it on his way to Egypt. Perhaps Bel. has 1405 words
    • Text last corrected on 15 June 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-18 15:33:11.0

    LETTER FROM THE FRONT. TROOPER A. VENNARD. IN THE TRENCHES. Gallipoli, October 5, 1915. (“Proserpine Guardian.") Very affectionately Your Son, ALEX. My Dear Father and Mother— This may never reach you, but one of our wounded men has promised to post it on his way to Egypt. Perhaps Bel. has in- formed you long ere this that the 18th, my battalion, has been, almost wiped out, af- ter two terrible bayonet charges in one week. Only a mere handful of men are left; the rest of my poor comrades, are all dead or wounded. The fighting life of our battalion was very short, and though we were said to be the finest body of drilled men that ever left Sydney, we had little chance to distinguish ourselves. Still we put up a glorious fight while it lasted. I have not the time to give you minute details of all I have gone through since landing here. We landed at Galli- poli at 2 a.m. on a Friday morning, and that night we marched six miles to Suvla Bay, where the English, Irish, Ghurkas and New Zealand troops were putting up a fierce fight against a much more super- ior force of Turks. On Saturday night we were ordered to sleep, as, there was a chance of us being in the firing line before morning. You may be sure that we were so nervous and excited that sleep was im- possible. At 2 a.m. Sunday morning we were called out and marched away under fire all the time, and as we had to crawl through prickly scrub, and over rocks, you can understand the difficulty we had to make any progress. About 3 a.m. we came upon a body of the Hampshire Regi- ment resting in a gully ; I shared, my to- bacoe with one of them, and as we had al- so received orders to rest, he and I smok- ed under cover. He told me that his bat- talion had just come out of the trenches dead beat after 36 hours continuous fight- ing, and that they had lost more than half of their men. It was breaking day when we were told to advance. We doubled along the side of a hill, and after a time crouched down under cover of a line of bushes. Here our captain was shot dead by a sniper, and soon after one of our cor- porals received a bullet through the lungs. Seeing our position the Turks op- need fire on us, and we were compelled to rush over a stretch of 200 yards to a gully. Following this up we suddenly emerged into the open, and received orders to charge. I fear I cannot describe what fol- lowed ; it was simply hell let loose. The Turks had us covered with machine guns and they quickly found our range with shrapnel. Our men simply fell in scores. I dashed on heeding nothing, and with others jumped into a Turkish trench. Facing me was a huge Turk about fifteen stone. I was simply mad and rushed him with the bayonet. He parried my stroke however, and lunged for my chest with his long sword bayonet. Seeing that he was too good, I made a feint with my steel and pulled the trigger as I did so ; the bul- let got him somewhere in the stomach and he dropped, he gave a couple of wriggles and died. I had killed my first man, and the action almost unstrung my nerves, which by this time were very shaky. We again jumped out of this trench and at- tempted to advance. We never had a hope, and seeing the absurdity of attempt- ing to gain more ground, several of us swerved round to the right where we came upon a couple of companies of Connaught Rangers in an abandoned Turkish trench. Here we found that we had no officers ; both were with us when we left the trench but had fallen in the dash for our present position, Presently, an English officer called out "Come on Australians, I want you badly !" He told us that over a low hill about eighteen New Zealanders were holding a trench by the skin of their teeth as it were, and that if they were not soon reinforced they would be all wiped out. He warned us that the hill was covered with Turkish snipers. The first tier of our men made a dash for the crest of the hill, but before they had reached half way they had all fallen. It was a fearful sight, but it did me good. I simply went mad again, and I am not ashamed to say it, that at that moment, I uttered a hur- ried prayer for you both, Bel, and the wee ones. I was sure that I was on the verge of meeting my God, and I prayed for help more than I over did before. And He an- swered my prayer. I dashed up that hill, followed by several others and I could hear the bullets tearing past me as I ran. When I reached the crest of the hill I simply hurled myself into a clump of bushes. Five of our little party were shot in that rush, and the rest joined me be- hind, the bushes. Now that we had reach- ed here we found ourselves in trouble for we could see no sign of the trench we were seeking, Presently an Australian rushed up to us from a bush on the right. He was not one of the eighteenth so we asked him where the New Zealanders trench was. He stood and gazed for a moment, ran ar ound in a circle, and raced, towards what we afterwards found was the Turkish trench. He was mad ; driven out of his mind in that awful hell of steel and bul- lets and shrapnel. Presently, a Maori raced towards us and led us to the trench we were seeking. We lost a couple more in that rush and still I was going strong. The sight when we reached the trench was awful, It was half full of dead and woun- ded Turks and New Zealanders. Here we stayed without food or water until 2 o'- clock when the Turks charged us, but by this time we had been strengthened on our left by the Ghurkas, so the Turks got it good and hard. I fired until my rifle was red hot, then picked up a dead Turk’s rifle and ammunition and gave them some of their own metal back again. We ascer- tained afterwards that the Turks retreated leaving 500 dead and wounded behind them, and when daylight came we could see them lying all over the ground in front of us. That evening at 7 o’clock the Con- naught Rangers and Australians managed to dig a communication trench to us, and we were relieved after being 36 hours with- out food, water, or sleep, and we were a sorry looking mob as we wended our way to our resting place. We were completely “done in,’’ and reaching our base, had a drink of water and threw ourselves with out even removing equipment and slept. The following day we were busily engage trench digging under fire all the time. Reinforcements came to us on Friday, and we again went in a charge which was well carried out under New Zealand officers. We found very few Turks in the trench when we reached it as they had ran back before we could reach them. However we lost a great many men. Since the above two charges we have been removed to the right where we are holding the trenches where the first landing was made. Both the enemy and ourselves are very strongly entrenched here end it is impossible for either side to advance. We expect to be removed to the charging line again this week, and if I get through safely I'll write another long letter and tell you much which want of time prevents here, If I do go under you can rest assured that I died hard, You both have my wishes for health and prosperity. Very affectionately, Your Son, ALEX. [Mr. Vannard informs us that he received a post card on Monday last from his son Alex, who is in the 19th General Hospital, Egypt, suffering from a bad attack of rheumatism, the post card is dated Nov- ember 2. 1915.]

    Hide note
  8. SUVLA BAY BATTLE. COME ON AUSTRALIANS, I WANT YOU BADLY. TRENCHES HALF FILLED WITH DEAD AND WOUNDED.
    Daily Mercury (Mackay, Qld. : 1906 - 1954) Wednesday 5 January 1916 p 4 Article
    Abstract: The following letter, written by his son, Alex, was received By Mr. Vennard (Proserpine), in which a vavid description is given of the battle at 1410 words
    Digitised article icon
  9. AUSTRALIAN'S BAG. Sniper Who Potted 200 Turks.
    Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918) Wednesday 8 March 1916 p 7 Article
    Abstract: A graphic account of the wonderful work of an Australian marksman on the Gallipoli Peninsula, written by Private Frank Reed, another 561 words
    Digitised article icon
  10. OUR FIGHTING CHAPLAINS. The Work of Faith and Duty.
    Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918) Wednesday 29 March 1916 p 3 Article
    Abstract: When the story of this great war comes to be written the historians will probably feel surprise that the heroism displayed by chaplains and fighting ... 1573 words
    • Text last corrected on 19 November 2012 by Charlie22
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-27 09:44:31.0

    OUR FIGHTING CHAPLAINS. The Work of Faith and Duty. By Private Frank Reid, A.I.F.

    Hide note
  11. Bill Brady From the Bush. A TRUE STORY OF ANZAC.
    The Don Dorrigo Gazette and Guy Fawkes Advocate (NSW : 1910 - 1954) Saturday 24 June 1916 p 6 Article
    Abstract: We take the following from the special Gailipoli Number of the "Egyptian Mail" which came to hand this week:— 1625 words
    • Text last corrected on 25 October 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
  12. The Insuring of Mrs Harrigan. The Insuring of Mrs. Harrigan.
    Critic (Adelaide, SA : 1897-1924) Wednesday 13 December 1916 p 14 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: IT was Fenwick’s first trip in the employ of the Federal Life 1399 words
    Digitised article icon
  13. The Dream Woman.
    The Land (Sydney, NSW : 1911 - 1954) Friday 22 December 1916 p 3 Article
    Abstract: "She was a dream woman, only a dream-woman," said the sentinel. "I wonder..." His eyes narrowed as he stared intently into the darkness of night. 793 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-25 20:15:15.0

    The Dream Woman, By Frank Reid

    Hide note
  14. Christmas After.
    The Forbes Advocate (NSW : 1911 - 1954) Friday 22 December 1916 p 12 Article
    Abstract: This was the dawn of Christmas Day; and yet, why did he not come? She paced the room in agitation that years of training had made outwardly composed. ... 2703 words
    Digitised article icon
  15. LETTER FROM THE FRONT. (“Proserpine Guardian,”)
    Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954) Saturday 23 December 1916 p 4 Article
    Abstract: In a letter to his parents, Mr and Mrs J. Vennard, Trooper A. V. Vennard, No 3 Company, Imperial Camel Corps, Egypt, writes 1737 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-18 15:51:28.0

    (“Proserpine Guardian.”) In a letter to his parents, Mr and Mrs J. Vennard, Trooper A. V. Vennard, No 3 Company, Im-perial Camel Corps, Egypt, writes under date 29th October :— “Have not wrote to you for ages, don’t know why, too busy I sup-pose. There is few opportunities for correspondence while we are on camel work. I manage to find time to drop a weekly letter to Bel (his wife) but that is all. However, from now on you shall hear from me more oftener. I was sorry to hear of your ac-cident and that you had to dispose of the farm, still, under the cir-cumstances it was the only thing you could do. Farming work is too heavy for those advancing in years. After Anzac I had ten weeks in the Hospital and afterwards rejoin-ed my old unit at Tel - el - Kebir. The faces that greeted me were mostly those of reinforcements who were strangers to me— most of the original members of our unit having been killed or wounded at Anzac or Suvla Bay. After a long rest in hospital I did not take at all kindly to carrying a full pack over the desert sands and on the exact spot where the historic battle was fought in 1882. It was hard to have to dig trenches under instructions from an officer who had never been in the firing line more especially when I had done it for months on Gallipoli under shell, machine gun and bomb fire-Which reminds me that I have no time for bombs—at times—they had me well bluffed. I don’t mind shrapnel, rifle fire or high explos-ives. The bomb shattered the the nerves of a lot of our men. Was in Mule Gully one day when a German Taube dropped a bomb. Run, my word I did would be going still had the sea not pulled me up. I thought for the moment that old Gallipoli had beed blown up. However, to return to Egypt. After three days drilling at Tel-el-Kebir the authorities asked for twenty men from each battalion to join a Camel Corps that was to be formed. Believing that the Anzacs would garrison Egypt dur-ing the duration of the war, I join-ed the new unit in the hopes of being sent to some new locality. The late Lord Kitchener once, de-scribed camel riding. "It’s like a game of cup and ball,” said he. “You throw the ball into the air and try to catch it in the cup. Well, when you ride a camel the brute plays cup and ball with you and misses nearly every time.” Alas ! soon after I left there my battalion left for France. It was hard luck to miss such a trip. We went to Albassia for training but I was only there a few days when I was placed on the Headquarters Staff as typist. Tired of this later on, and tried to persuade my col-onel to allow me to join my orig-inal unit in France. Nothing doing Tried to join an officer’s class at Lietovre but there were too many applicants. Next had a fly at the Flying Corps and would have been transferred to that unit if I had been a mechanic. At last at my own request, I was sent to a Camel Corps stationed on the Tripoli border. I am glad I did so for I spent some of the best days of my soldiering career there. The place abounds with ancient historical sites. Our camp is placed where a fine Roman seaside resort once stood and it was a favourite visiting place of Cleo-patra’s. Although centuries of drifting sand has covered much of the ancient glory of the place, there are some beautiful stone rel-ics yet to be seen. Miles out in in the desert one will come upon crumbling ruins that were once forts in some forgotten age. The whole place is teeped with ro-mance and mystery. However we were not there to admire the scen-ery, but to quell the Senussi rising The Senussi are Bedouins though they have many Dervishers in their ranks. They were fairly well armed, and led by Turkish officers. At last we advanced on Sollune, which place the Senussi had previously captured from the British. It was a whirlwind fight while it lasted. They poured a a deadly artillery and machine gun fire into us for a time, but when things were looking bad for us the Duke of of Westminsters ar-moured cars entered the fray and routed the enemy. We were pro-vided with splendid sniping and he was a bad shot indeed who could not bag one or two of the Senussi as they dashed here and there trying to escape. When they saw they would have to evac-uate the town they blew up their arsenal, which was situated in the midst of their dwelling places. The result was one of the most ghastly sights I have yet gazed upon. Hundreds of women and children were killed and wounded. Some of them were staggering about with fearful wounds. From this time on most of our work consisted of patrolling the the shores of the Mediteranean and the Northern part of the Libyan Desert. Things ware fairly quiet with a few skirmishes here and there. Two weeks back we we re-ceived orders to pack up and since then we have completed a long journey by camel and train. Cen-sorship regulations will not permit me to state where we are now, but we are in a fine military camp on the fringe of the desert, but will moving forward shortly. This is a farming centre and just at present there is a record rising ing of the Nile and most of the country is one vast sheet of water-When it goes down the Arab will come forth, plant his sugar, corn and cotton, and then go to sleep again until it is fit for harvesting. A lazy beggar is Abdulla ! He takes life as it comes and thinks of today and hang tomorrow. He lives in a filthy hovel with numer-ous wives and his goats. They all eat and sleep together. Just at present he is coining money for the Government are giving him fancy prices for his crops. They grow sugar cane in many parts of Egypt, and I have taken some little interest in it. There seems to be only one variety — something like striped Singapore, but it contains very little sugar contents. The crops grown near the large cities such as Alexandria and Cairo are purchased by the natives for food. Many of them live on nothing else and purchase the cane for two to three sticks for one penny. Further up the Nile there are several crude sugar mills from sugar is sold retail in sold in solid blocks something like rock salt. No crystal sugar is manufactur-ed here, further more it takes about three times the amount of what it would of Queensland sugar to sweeten a cup of tea. Tomatoes and cucumbers are grown in most parts and are eager-ly purchased by natives ; they are tasteless things. Oranges and mandarins are equal to anything grown "down under’’ and can be purchased very cheaply. Irrigation here is wonderful and it would gladden the heart of any Australian farmer to visit this land and inspect same. It has made farming a very easy task. I have not met any Proserpine or Bowen lads over here with the exception of Paddy Pender. I was indeed very sorry to hea r that C. B. Massy had been killed and Lieutenant Lascelles wounded. l am now two years in khaki and good luck has been my boon com-panian right through, and I have been in some tight corners. I shall write again soon. In the meantime you both have my best wishes of good health and pros-perity.” PRIVATE W. E. SING, D.S.O. No 355. Private W. E. Sing, 7/ 31st Battalion, C Group, 8th Train-ing Battalion, writing to Mrs Fur-minger from Lark Hill, Salisbury, England, under date October 6th, states:— "Just a line to let you know that I am still alive and kicking. I sup-pose that you think that I have for-gotten you but I have been travel-ling a good deal and my move-ments have been uncertain. I have been transferred out of the Eight Horse into an Infantry Battalion. We had a very rough time of it on the Sinai Peninsula, just over the Canal, but I have had a good trip over here. We embarked at Alex-andria and came over to Marseilles, and camped there for eight days. I had a splendid time I can tell you. The people could not understand English, and I could not under-stand French, so it was a bit of fun making one’s self understood. Then we came across France by rail; such a lovely country. No wonder the French fight for it. it. We came across from Havre to Southampton, and then on to Salis-bury. I have had four days leave since I have been here. I went up to London and stopped there a night; I used to get lost about every five minutes, then I used to ask a policeman or take a taxi. The next day I went down to Devonshire to a place they call Torquay to visit some friends, and had such a splendid time, the only disappointment was it was hardly long enough. It is coming on winter, and it is nearly always raining. There is no place like Australia. I wish the war would end so I could come back to old Proserpine. I have had over two years of it now. I met Vic Rodda and Albert Green over here as well as a lot of other Proserpine boys. I am going to write every fortnight and if you do the same we are bound to get some of the letters. Sometimes the mail gets delayed. I don’t think there is any more news this time, and as I intend writing other letters for this mail I will draw to a close, hoping this letter finds you all in the best of health.”

    Hide note
  16. THE DESERT RIDERS. PATROLLING THE FRONTIER.
    Echuca and Moama Advertiser and Farmers' Gazette (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Tuesday 20 March 1917 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Against the blinding brazon glare of the Egyptian sky the green tops of the palms in the Oasis wave gratefully and throw their precious chado over th ... 1081 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-25 20:13:31.0

    The Desert Riders, Patrolling the Frontier. By Frank Reid

    Hide note
  17. THE DESERT RIVERS. PATROLLING THE FRONTIER.
    The Riverine Herald (Echuca, Vic. : Moama, NSW : 1869 - 1954; 1998 - 2002) Tuesday 20 March 1917 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Against the blinding brazen glare of the Egyptian sky the green tops of the palms in the Oasis wave gratefully and throw their precious shade over th ... 1049 words
    • Text last corrected on 26 September 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-25 20:11:14.0

    Frank Reid

    Hide note
  18. A DESERT CHARGE. IN THE FRONT LINE AT RAFA (Specially written for the "Egyptian Mail").
    Shepparton Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1953) Monday 26 March 1917 p 1 Article
    Abstract: Sent by Lieut. Gilbert Bryant (son of Mr. J. Bryant, of the Shepparton Flour Mills) who has been in the thick of the fighting in Egypt. 1203 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-27 09:47:08.0

    IN THE FRONT LINE AT RAFA, By Frank Reid

    Hide note
  19. AUSTRALIANS IN SINAI PRESSING ON TO PALESTINE
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Thursday 29 March 1917 p 8 Article
    Abstract: In Sinai Peninsula these days our troops ma[?]ch and ride over the sand rich with the reli[?]s and graves of the great warriors of the past. At times ... 966 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-27 09:55:32.0

    AUSTRALIANS IN SINAI PRESSING ON TO PALESTINE (By Frank Reid.)

    Hide note
  20. The Anzac in Palestine
    The W.A. Record (Perth, WA : 1888 - 1922) Saturday 21 July 1917 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Frank Reid, a Queenslander, writes as follows in the "Egyptian Mail":-- "In my little room in the Queensland bush when I was a boy there was a 1205 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-27 09:39:28.0

    The Anzac in Palestine, Frank Reid

    Hide note
  21. Fighting The Senussi. A STORM OF SAND AND BULLETS.
    Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Friday 11 August 1916 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Sand, [?]and [?]and! We [?]ought in [?]and and slept in sand; we ate [?]nd and we drank sand, but I [?]nk it will be admitted that 1041 words
    Digitised article icon
  22. IN SACRED PLACES. WITH OUR TROOPS IN ANCIENT CANAAN.
    Shepparton Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1953) Monday 27 August 1917 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Mr Joseph Bryant (of Shepparton Flour Mills); has received the following from his son, Lieut Gilbert Bryant), contributed to the 1339 words
    Digitised article icon
  23. RELICS OF DEFEAT. HOW GERMAN GUILE WAS THWARTED.
    Shepparton Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1953) Monday 3 September 1917 p 4 Article
    Abstract: The following, sent by Lieut. Gilbert Bryant, to his father, Mr Joseph Bryant (of the Shepparton Flour Mills), was written for the 1030 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-27 10:05:06.0

    RELICS OF DEFEAT. HOW GERMAN GUILE WAS THWARTED.

    Hide note
  24. With the Light Horse in Palestine.
    The Armidale Express and New England General Advertiser (NSW : 1856 - 1861; 1863 - 1889; 1891 - 1954) Friday 5 October 1917 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Trooper F. L. Simpson, son of Mrs. A. W. Simpson, of Armidale, forwards us the following highly interesting article from the 'Egyptian Mail,' adding 1202 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-27 10:28:26.0

    A HISTORIC WATERCOURSE. The Wady Ghuzze, in the neighbor hood of Gaza, has figured prominently in the war news si nee the advance of our troops into Palestine.

    Hide note
  25. THE WADY GHUZZE. A HISTORIC WATERCOURSE.
    The Kangaroo Island Courier (Kingscote, SA : 1907 - 1951) Saturday 13 October 1917 p 6 Article
    Abstract: The Wady Ghuzze, in the neighborhood of Gaza, has figured prominently in the war news since the advance of our troops into Palestine. I question 1253 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-25 20:12:29.0

    THE WADY GHUZZE, A HISTORIC WATERCOURSE. Frank Reid

    Hide note
  26. MY CAMEL AND OTHERS.
    Gnowangerup Star and Tambellup-Ongerup Gazette (WA : 1915 - 1944) Saturday 3 November 1917 p 2 Article
    Abstract: My first glance at my camel quickly convinced me that it was not altogether one of the most graceful and fascinating of animals; though 751 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-27 09:41:51.0

    MY CAMEL AND OTHERS. By Private Frank Reid, in Barrak.

    Hide note
  27. SOLDIER'S BETTER. TROOPER ALEX, VENNARD. ("Proserpine Guardian.”)
    Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954) Saturday 16 February 1918 p 1 Article
    Abstract: Writing His parents (Mr and Mrs J. Vennard (from "In the Field," under date 22nd November 1917, Trooper Alex Vennard 597 words
    • Text last corrected on 29 September 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-28 13:58:13.0

    TROOPER ALEX, VENNARD. ("Proserpine Guardian.”)

    Writing His parents (Mr and Mrs J. Vennard (from "In the Field," under date 22nd November 1917, Trooper Alex Vennard narrates :— Here I am after two and a half months of hospital monotony. For a time I thought that I would be sent back to Australia, but it is very difficult for old hands to get home nowadays. A few weeks back I went before a Classification Board and was marked “B2” other, wise base work for a time. I am now in a military camp somewhere on the Suez Canal, and I have a first rate job bossing several natives on pumps. I do nothing and have plenty of time for reading and writing. I even have a native to make my bed and do my washing, so you will see that things are not too bad with me. ’Tis just as well that I am placed as above for four successive attacks of malaria has left me in a very shaky condition, and it will be some considerable time before I am my old self again. There is a mistaken idea that we Australians here are having a glorious time. One can see it in every Australian paper. Well, I know that there are very few of the men here who would not change places with our comrades in France. Certainly the fighting here is not so consistent as on the Western Front, but desert life and hardships play hell with one’s constitution. A Colonel recently arrived here from France and he said that the men here looked more played out and thinner than the infantry in France. It’s the long rides over dreary sandy wastes and long stretches without sleep that tells in the long run. As the months roll by and the end of the war draws no nearer one feels that he can take no interest in the game. I’m mighty glad that I came over at the beginning of the trouble and I know, that you are proud that I have done my bit. A father whose son has fought for his country can hold his head up anywhere and if I had not come over I would never face you again for I know darned well that if you were young enough you would be hero also. God spare me from ever mixing with any of the crowd who refused to fight. There have been times on Gallipoli and even in Sinai and Palestine when one lived through an eternity of hells, and where he watched his pals being blown to little pieces and has even had to bury those little pieces. But it’s worth it all to finally beat Germany. You cannot read too much about the Germans dirty work. We here have witnessed it several times. At the battle of Rafa they hoisted the white flag and when we advanced to take them prisoners they turned their machine guns on us and shot us down. Is not the Turk who is doing the dirty work but the Germans who are with them and who always handle the guns and machine guns. Remember me to Mr Banks ; I did not get his letter. In conclusion, now that I have plenty of spare time you will hear from me often. In the meantime do accept my very best wishes for health, etc., and cheer Bel (his wife) up until I return. You see you can do your bit for the Empire by looking after a soldier’s wife and children.

    Hide note
  28. The Army that Marched by Night.
    The Don Dorrigo Gazette and Guy Fawkes Advocate (NSW : 1910 - 1954) Saturday 9 February 1918 p 3 Article
    Abstract: In my little room in the Queensland bush when I was a boy there was a picture that hung above my bed. It was the picture of a woman and a 1178 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-27 09:48:11.0

    The Army that Marched by Night, By Frank Reid

    Hide note
  29. KIA=ORA COOEE! THE BOYS PUBLISH A PAPER
    The Mirror (Sydney, NSW : 1917 - 1919) Friday 24 May 1918 p 2 Article
    Abstract: From Cairo comes the first number of The Kia-ora-Cooee, the official magazine of the Australian and New Zealand Forces in Egypt, Palestine, Salonika, ... 500 words
    • Text last corrected on 27 October 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-27 12:08:50.0

    KIA=0RA COOEE ! THE BOYS PUBLISH A PAPER From Cairo comes the first number of The Kia-ora-Cooee, the official magazine of the Australian and New Zealand Forces in Egypt, Palestine, Salonika, and Mesopotamia. The paper is published by The Sphinx Press of Cairo, the editor is Trooper Frank Reid, and the sub- editors are W.O. D. Barker, A.I.F., and Sergt. L. S. Griffiths, N.Z.E.F. The committee of management is: — Lieut.- Col. D. Fulton, A.I.F., Lieut.-Col. D. Chaytor, N.Z.E.F., Major J. H. Ham- mond, A.I.F., Capt. W Stillman, A.I.F., and Lieut. C. P. Mackenzie, N.Z.E.F. It would be a backhanded compliment to the editor and his subs, and staff to say the production is a creditable one. All associated with it are known in the world of Australian and New Zealand journalism, and if they had not turned out a good paper — even at the first attempt — they would have been liable to caustic criticism. SOME CLEVER DRAWINGS. The cover picture, in line drawing, is by David Barker : Comrades. It gives us two Dominion soldiers, strongly drawn. One is holding his cigarette, and the other is firing his bumper from his mate's fag. D.B. is given hon. men- tion for this. Other drawings are good, and cover jokes of the more modern vintages. For instance : In the shadow of the Pyramids a two-up school is in session. In the near distance the pickets are seen hurrying in, and shells are bursting. The coins are in the air, when the alarm is given, and we have the speaker: 'Ring orf . . . 'Ere they come. . . . An'' don't forget y' owe me 'arf a dollar,! Ginger.' Then, it is to be taken, the kip is dropped and the fighting tackle taken in hand. Trooper Blue- gum contributes verse and pars ; Bill Bowyang (wonder as this McIntyre of Australia generally?), pars — he can punch out a decent jingle. IMMORTALISING THE MULE Corp. Geebung comes to light again, Banjo (A. B. Patcrson, The Man from Snowy River, etc.) immortalises the Army mule — presented elsewhere in this issue. Capt. MacDonald also gives the mule a boost in prose, and quite a number of penmen whose writings are identified contribute verse, paragraphs, and articles Gerardy should have attached his name to The Man Who Went to Sleep — he has not written anything more appealing, Four lines of it : Jack Denver, and the man who fired to get him, only know The reason way three horsemen sleep where desert breezes blow; And somewhere, out of uniform, Jack pray's that he may keep The soul-corroding secret of The Man Who Went | to Sleep. One could extract much good matter from the paper. It deserves success ; it is entitled to it. in full measure.

    Hide note
  30. Return of the First Division. WHAT THE ORIGINAL ANZACS THINK.
    Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954) Saturday 6 July 1918 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Contained in the first issue of the ‘‘Kia-Ora Coo-ee,’’ the, official organ of the A.I.F. and the N.Z.E.F. in Egypt, Palestine and Mesopotamia— 1518 words
    • Text last corrected on 27 October 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-02-13 09:17:39.0

    Return of the First Division.
    WHAT THE ORIGINAL ANZACS THINK.
    Contained in the first issue of the ‘‘Kia-Ora Coo-ee,’’ the, official organ of the A.I.F. and the N.Z.E.F. in Egypt, Palestine and Mesopotamia—which Sister Irwin, of Brisbane, has sent from her present, address, l4th Australian Hospital, Port Said—is a travesty, decidedly humorous, on the ‘‘Return of the First Division” to Australia. The article, which is from the pen of Tpr. F. Reid, A.1.F., is reproduced below..........................

    Hide note
  31. THE INSPECTION.
    The Swan Express (Midland Junction, WA : 1900 - 1954) Friday 13 September 1918 p 6 Article
    Abstract: “Just a second, Sergeant,” said Lieut. Davis. “Yes, sir!” “I want you, before you dismiss the 448 words
    Digitised article icon
  32. WARWICK Examiner & Times [Established 1867.] Published Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1918. Soldiers' Newspapers
    Warwick Examiner and Times (Qld. : 1867 - 1919) Wednesday 18 September 1918 p 2 Article
    Abstract: A peculiarity of the war has been the tendency of the soldier to seek literary expression of his changed surroundings and of his own experiences in r ... 768 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-27 15:12:43.0

    Soldiers Newspapers

    Hide note
  33. Prisoners of War.
    Crookwell Gazette (NSW : 1885 - 1954) Tuesday 1 October 1918 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Frank Reid writes in " The Kia Ora Cooee," printed at Cairo: -- The average Turkish prisoner is a humorous individual. He generally 565 words
    • Text last corrected on 26 September 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
  34. PRISONERS OF WAR
    The Sun (Kalgoorlie, WA : 1898 - 1919) Sunday 13 October 1918 p 4 Article
    Abstract: The average Turkish prisoner is a humorous individual. He generally has a smiling face instead of the surly scowl of the Bosche. A 585 words
    Digitised article icon
  35. PRODUCE MARKETS.
    Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954) Saturday 19 October 1918 p 2 Article
    Abstract: The Sydney Manager Q.P.I.T. Society reports on Monday as follows:- Paringa consignments were effected with salt water Buyers did not operate freely, 291 words
    • Text last corrected on 15 June 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-28 13:52:12.0

    SOCIAL,
    Sergeant A. Vennard, Proserpine,
    is returning to Australia and is expected by the Bingera to-morrow.

    Hide note
  36. MILL CDOSING.
    Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954) Tuesday 22 October 1918 p 2 Article
    Abstract: The Proserpine Sugar Mill will close down on Friday next, 25th. DISTRICT COURT. No cases have been listed for the 264 words
    • Text last corrected on 9 October 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
  37. Proserpine Notes. PROSERPINE, October 16.
    Townsville Daily Bulletin (Qld. : 1907 - 1954) Friday 25 October 1918 p 2 Article
    Abstract: The weather conditions [?] very dry in this district at present. The [?] have been very busy for the [?] months planting and two or three 770 words
    • Text last corrected on 18 October 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-02-13 09:19:14.0

    Mr J. Vennard, of this town, has received word that his son Alex, who had over three years' campaigning at Gallipoli, the Libyian Desert, Sinai, and Palestine, is returning to Australia. Sergeant Vennard was one of the very few men who emerged from the great battle of Gaza (Palestine), without a scratch on April 19th, 1917. His coat was riddled with machine-gun bullets, and for several minutes he lost the use of his right leg owing to concussion. During the past few months Sergeant Vennard has been employed on journatlistic work in connection with the A.I.F. in Egypt, and we believe that after a short holiday in Proserpine, he will return to Melbourne, where he will be employed on similar work in connecton with the recruiting campaign.

    Hide note
  38. INTERVIEW WITH AN ASZAC AT BOWEN.
    Townsville Daily Bulletin (Qld. : 1907 - 1954) Tuesday 29 October 1918 p 3 Article
    Abstract: It would be difficult to exaggerate the feeling of pleasure the writer had in an interview with Sergeant Vennard who had just returned after four yea ... 445 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-18 15:56:19.0

    Interview with an Anzac at Bowen

    Hide note
  39. Personal.
    Gympie Times and Mary River Mining Gazette (Qld. : 1868 - 1919) Tuesday 17 December 1918 p 5 Article
    Abstract: Among released Australian war prisoners who have arrived in England from Germany are:—J. W. Anderson (Pialba), Lance Corporal H. 377 words
    • Text last corrected on 26 October 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-02-13 09:20:24.0

    'Camelero' to the ''Bulletin' ; We were just about to roll into our blankets one evening in the Jordan Valley when a stranger dressed in shirt and shorts strolled into the camp. ''How's things, boys ?'' he said. One of our sergeants recognised the interloper, and surprised us by answering, 'Fine, sir, and all these coots reckon that you will do us.' 'Yes?' said the visitor ; 'and by G— you chaps will do me.
    Good-night, lads.' ''Good-night, General Allenby,' saluted the sergeant ; and then we tucked down more comfortably.

    Hide note
  40. THE CALL.
    The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Friday 20 December 1918 p 5 Article
    Abstract: It came out of the air on a wonderful night in June. Ward could not tell what woke him. He rose from the canvas stretcher end walked to the window. A 1197 words
    Digitised article icon
  41. OVER THE RIVER.
    The Land (Sydney, NSW : 1911 - 1954) Friday 20 December 1918 p 10 Article
    Abstract: In health, Jim Powers was a trooper in the Australian Light Horse "Somewhere in Palestine." Now, aflame with malaria fever, he tossed restlessly on f ... 1043 words
    • Text last corrected on 26 September 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-27 09:36:35.0

    OVER THE RIVER. By Frank Reid, A.I.F., Palestine

    Hide note
  42. THE CALL THAT WAS HEARD TEN THOUSAND MILES OFF BROTHER IN THE ISLANDS HEARS THE CRY FOR HELP SOUNDED IN OLD JUDEA
    The Mirror (Sydney, NSW : 1917 - 1919) Friday 24 January 1919 p 4 Article
    Abstract: It came out of the air on a wonderful night in June. Ward could not tell what woke him. He rose from the canvas stretcher and walked to the window. A 1237 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-27 09:49:49.0

    BROTHER IN THE ISLANDS HEARS THE CRY FOR HELP SOUNDED IN OLD JUDEA (By Frank Reid, in The Kia Ora Coo-ee.)

    Hide note
  43. From the Bulletin. The Nightmare.
    The Cobargo Chronicle (NSW : 1898 - 1944) Saturday 1 March 1919 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Faintheart : "Well, wot if I didn't go ? I'll bet I dreamt worse things about the war than you ever saw. " 746 words
    • Text last corrected on 26 October 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-02-13 09:22:22.0

    "Camelero" : Relatives need not fear that the graves of their heroes will be neglected in Palestine. At Duran, near Jerusalem, where two Lighthorsemen were killed when the town was captured from the Turks, the Jewish inhabitants have erected a fine monument, and the children of the village keep the graves in splendid order and covered with wreaths. At Richon le Zion several Maorilanders are buried, and here also the Jews have erected fine granite monuments and fenced the graves. Some of the Jews in these villages took part in the Coolgardie gold rush, and when they returned to the Holy Land they introduced eucalyptus-trees, which surround our little cemeteries. Entering Duran for the first time one of the Light-horsemen noticed the oldest inhabitant ploughing in a field, and greeted him in Arabic. He was astonished when the Jew replied, "Cut out the Arabic! I carried a swag to Broken Hill before you were born."

    Hide note
  44. THE STORYTELLER. THE FLY.
    The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 26 April 1919 p 40 Article
    Abstract: A half choking haze hung over the Jordan Valley, but the sun piereed through from the brazen heaven overhead and beat down with relentless rays till ... 1990 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-25 20:14:32.0

    The Fly, By Frank Reid

    Hide note
  45. WAR SKETGHER. WITH THE ARMOURED CARS.
    The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 31 May 1919 p 44 Article
    Abstract: Up till the beginning of the war cavalry had always been regarded as the eyes and ears of an army, but from the very first day of hostilities it was ... 1733 words
    Digitised article icon
  46. THE SUNDAY "DAILY MAIL."
    The Daily Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1903 - 1926) Saturday 14 June 1919 p 6 Article
    Abstract: To-morrow's issue of "The Daily Mail" will consist of 16 pages of entertaining and instructive reading, well illustrated by photographs and drawings. 116 words
    Digitised article icon
  47. BLACK TRACKERS.
    The Daily Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1903 - 1926) Saturday 20 September 1919 p 12 Article
    Abstract: In the past there has been many a lively controversy in tho Press as to the comparative powers of the black tracker and the white man bred in the 1510 words
    • Text last corrected on 6 February 2019 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-25 20:14:04.0

    Black Trackers, By Frank Reid

    Hide note
  48. SOCIAI.
    Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954) Tuesday 25 November 1919 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Mr and Mrs C. Collins and infant arrived on Sunday per Bingera. Mr Collins will remain in the district until after the Federal Elections. Ho will vis ... 99 words
    • Text last corrected on 18 October 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-02-13 09:22:51.0

    Mr. and Mrs. A. Vennard arrived on Sunday per Bingera from Sydney. Mr. Vennard is engaged by “Smith’s Weekly” to write up the far North and after spending a few days here will proceed on that mission. Mrs Vennard will remain in Bowen for some time.

    Hide note
  49. DIGGER DAGS OF THE WAR ZONE THE STORIES THE AUSTRALIAN SOLDIERS TOLD EACH OTHER IN THEIR BREATHING SPELLS BEHIND THE LINES. THE HUMOR OF THE FIGHTING FRONT.
    The Farmer and Settler (Sydney, NSW : 1906 - 1955) Tuesday 23 December 1919 p 13 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: In the army the humorist—sometimes the unconscious humorist—of the section, or ,the platoon was called the dag and there was often groat 1625 words
    • Text last corrected on 27 October 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-02-13 09:23:48.0

    The Camel at His Best. I know something about camels Travelled with the hump around the Libyian Desert, the Baheria Oasis, Sinai and Palestine. Camels are useful bits of furniture, and fill the camp with loving phrases, and the hospitals with half-chewed hands and arms. There are two sets of men in the A.I.F. hereabouts.— those who are in the hospitals, and those who are not in the Camel Corps. I have put up with a lot of things since I joined, the A.I.F., but the camel is the last straw. I don't mind few acres of sand in my tea — accidents will happen— and I don't mind having a neat hole drilled through me by 'Jacko's' machine-guns; but to jump off the summit of the Pyramid of Cheops is sheer cowardice compared with attending a camel. Mind you, the camel is all right in its place, but it is never there; it is always somewhere else. It has four feet or pads, and these are supposed to rest on the ground, but are more often found embedded in Bill-jim's fifth rib. The camel is a beast that does everything the horse leaves undone. There are men who will tell you that they are like camels, and I reckon that they ought to be put in the Dingbat Home at Abbassia. There's something wrong with their brains, or perhaps they fell on their heads when they were young. The only way to put a halter on a camel is to tell him funny yarns, and get him in a good humor. Then, when he is looking peaceful, quickly slip the halter over his nose, when he will raise his left foot; and the next thing you will remember is the orderly in the dressing station saying: 'Drink this, old chap.'' — Bill Bowyang in 'Kia Ora Coo-ee.''

    Hide note
  50. RETURNED SOLDIERS AND SAILORS LEAGUE, (Bowen Branch.)
    Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954) Saturday 21 January 1922 p 2 Article
    Abstract: The annual meeting of the above branch was held in the School of Arts on Tuesday, 17th inst. at 8 p.m. Present – Messrs W. V. 249 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-20 16:42:15.0

    RETURNED SOLDIERS AND SAILORS LEAGUE, (Bowen Branch.)

    Hide note
  51. KENNEDY HOSPITAL.
    Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954) Saturday 17 November 1923 p 8 Article
    Abstract: Usual monthly meeting of committee, Thursday evening, 8th Nov. Present—Messrs J. E. Kelly (President), T. W. 1789 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-20 16:44:37.0

    RETURNED SOLDIERS AND SAILORS LEAGUE, (Bowen Branch.)

    Hide note
  52. GATES OF MEMORY. SWING SOLEMNLY OPEN. Anniversary of Ninth Anzac Day.
    Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954) Tuesday 29 April 1924 p 5 Article
    Abstract: Eloquent little white crosses may still stand upon the shores of Gallipoli, the sanda of Egypt and Palostine, and upon the plains of Flan 4400 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-02-12 13:35:24.0

    Aniversary of Ninth Anzac Day

    Hide note
  53. ANZAC DAY. RETURNED SOLDIERS’ DINNER.
    Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954) Saturday 1 May 1926 p 3 Article
    Abstract: A large number of returned soldiers attended the dinner prepared by the members of the Country Womens’ Association. 2333 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-28 13:43:21.0

    ...........Sgt. A. Vennard, in replying to the toast, said during the recent great conflict the Press responded to the call equally and with as much enthusiasm as did these men. The Australian Journalists Association lost 48 men who made the supreme-sacrifice and 145 came back wounded and some from other causes...................

    Hide note
  54. ANZAC DAY CELEBRATIONS.
    Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954) Saturday 4 May 1929 p 6 Article
    Abstract: The celebration of Anzae Day in Bowen took the usual form, a dinner to the soldiers and service at the Soldiels' Memorial in the afternoon. There was 4603 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-20 17:13:52.0

    Anzac Day in Bowen

    Hide note
  55. CONTRIBUTION NO. 2.
    Dungog Chronicle : Durham and Gloucester Advertiser (NSW : 1894 - 1954) Friday 10 March 1933 p 5 Article
    Abstract: "Green and White": About midnight the picquet was startled by a bloodcurdling scream, and beheld "Snowy" waving his arms frantically and 1731 words
    • Text last corrected on 27 October 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-27 15:35:29.0

    'Bill Bowyang': It was during the battle of Rafa, and Trooper Cluney's camel had just been blown to pieces by an aerial bomb. Returning from the firing line, Cluney was informed of his animal's fate. Someone had found about two inches of his pay- book under a palm tree, about a quar- ter of a mile away. This was handed to Cluney, with the remark: 'Hard luck, Bill, losing your pay book— won't be able to draw any cash until you ge a new one.' 'Hard luck be blowed,' said Cluney. 'Why, that book was full of red ink. Now I'll get a brand new one, without any disfigurements in it.'

    Hide note
  56. 'THE KIA-ORA COO-EE MAGAZINE.' BRIGHT AND BREEZY WARTIME PRODUCTION Extracts Therefrom.
    The Gloucester Advocate (NSW : 1905 - 1954) Tuesday 30 May 1933 p 3 Article
    Abstract: "The Kia-Ora Coo-ee" was the Official Magazine of the Australian and New Zealand Forces in Egypt, Palestine, Salonica, and Mesopotamia during 1680 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-26 17:12:23.0

    Camelero

    Hide note
  57. Web page: Article by Bill Bowyang, Kia-Ora-Coo-ee
    http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-ReiKaOr-t1-g1-t2-body1-d9-d2b.html
    Web page
    Note

    2016-10-30 14:15:01.0

    Anyone know a cure for a jibbing camel?.....

    Hide note
  58. Web page: Dictionary of Biography
    http://pandora.nla.gov.au/pan/146709/20140825-0859/adb.anu.edu.au/biography/vennard-alexander-vindex-8912.html
    Web page
  59. With the CAMEL CORPS Another Angle of the War Australian's Vivid Book
    The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947) Saturday 28 April 1934 p 6 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: The story of the Imperial Camel Corps' share in the Great War from the Australian soldier's point of view has been vividly told by by Frank Reid in " ... 2040 words
    Digitised article icon
  60. The Men of Anzac 36 Hours of Fighting
    Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954) Friday 24 April 1936 p 1 Article
    Abstract: TWENTTY-ONE years How time flies! A little over a score of years ago we were fighting a war that was to end all wars. To-day they are talking war aga ... 2859 words
    Digitised article icon
  61. THE DIGGERS’ BALL
    Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954) Friday 15 May 1936 p 5 Article
    Abstract: I have been asked to write something about tile Diggers’ Ball, to be held in the Grand Theatre next Thursday night, 21st May. 626 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-12-18 11:14:02.0

    Diggers' Ball

    Hide note
  62. MY MAIL BAG.
    Townsville Daily Bulletin (Qld. : 1907 - 1954) Thursday 12 November 1936 p 4 Article
    Abstract: "Bonn Boy": Did you receive letter with verses encloses which I sent to you c/- Inkerman Station ? As postmark on your letter received this 342 words
    • Text last corrected on 27 October 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-04-16 15:01:03.0

    MY MAIL BAG.
    'Bogan Boy': Did you receive letter with verses enclosed which I sent
    to you c/- Inkerman Station ? As
    postmark on your letter received this
    week shows it was posted at Tangorin
    I take it you have changed your address . . . A.D.: Thanks for yarn.
    It is not often I receive a contribution from a publican. I'll put a
    couple on the slate when I come out
    your way ... M.H. (Wellington,
    N.Z.) : Thanks. Will forward verse
    to reader who required it ... E.B.R.:
    Pleased to hear from an old Camelier.
    Hope the change of locality will be
    beneficial. Will use some of the
    verses in your book. Drop me a line
    when you are settled down, and if you
    visit Cowra look up 'Jock' Davison.
    Mr. F. : Thanks, but another reader
    has already sent in the verses . . .
    'Campo' : Thanks for contributions
    and good wishes. You state we met
    in Cairo one day. I don't remember.
    That seems so very long ago ...
    L.E.K. : Glad to receive letter re buck-jump riders. Cannot give you any
    further information re Mt St John
    Rodeo next May, but understand it
    will not be held . . . 'Boonara' :
    Thanks. Yes, I remember receiving
    a contribution from you when I was
    editing the 'Kia Ora Coo-ee' In Egypt
    during the war years. Glad to see
    you are still going strong.

    Hide note
  63. THE MILITARY CAMP AT MIOWERA. (By Frank Reid, late A.I.F. (Author "The Fighting Cameliers")
    Townsville Daily Bulletin (Qld. : 1907 - 1954) Thursday 11 April 1940 p 11 Article
    Abstract: In the days when we grey-haired veterans of the A.L.F. were wearing khaki, many of us had our first experience of mud and water, and slush. 1301 words
    Digitised article icon
  64. Alexander Vindex Vennard / Doblo's
    Doblo, Stephen A.
    [ Photograph : 1934-1944 ]
    View online (access conditions)
    At State Library VIC
    Alexander Vindex Vennard / Doblo's
  65. Anzac Day CONTINUED FROM PAGE ONE.
    Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954) Monday 29 April 1935 p 4 Article
    Abstract: was proposed by Mr. A. Vennard, who told of an Imperial man, a Mons hero, who told him that the Imperial men did not receive enough consideration 764 words
    Digitised article icon
  66. XMAS AT THE SEASIDE. THE JOYS OF SINCLAIR BAY.
    Bowen Independent (Qld. : 1911 - 1954) Wednesday 20 January 1937 p 1 Article
    Abstract: “Beachonber” writes in the “Collinsville Star” as follows:— Some time ago 1 described a trip to the Whitsunday Islands. Over the 594 words
    • Text last corrected on 8 November 2018 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-08 16:53:12.0

    XMAS AT THE SEASIDE. THE JOYS OF SINCLAIR BAY. “Beachcomber” writes in the “Col linsville Star” as follows:—

    Hide note
  67. "AUNTIE'S" SONG
    Smith's Weekly (Sydney, NSW : 1919 - 1950) Saturday 5 July 1919 p 22 Article
    Abstract: Every soldier on leave at Cairo visited Ravelli's Cafe, one of the few places where English beer could be bought and good music heard. There 626 words
    • Text last corrected on 9 June 2019 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2019-06-09 13:24:07.0

    "AUNTIE'S" SONG Every soldier on leave at Cairo visited Ravelli's Cafe, one of the few places where English beer could be bought and good music heard. There they met Auntie, who stood on the little platform at the right of the bar to sing Tosti's "Good-bye," holding back her broad shoulders and pour- ing out the strident tones of an overworked soprano, with in it here here and there a note of thrilling sweetness that recalled to some of the civilian population the long-gone days when she had first visited the city with a French opera co. "Auntie" appraised her own voice as well as did any of the soldiers who sat at the little tables and drank their beer around her. She had no illu- sions. Life had been hard, but she could still sing more or less accept- ably in French and Italian, afternoons and evenings to the accompaniment of a worn-out piano and the clatter of empty glasses. She was a big woman, with some thing touching on homely affection in her aspect that had won her the name by which she was known to the khaki-clad customers of Ravelli's. Nearly everything about her, from her red-brown hair to the diamonds on her yellow-satin gown, was imitation. Only her voice, such as it had come to be, and her heart, such as it was, were genuine. And they were big, too. Wrapped in a drifting halo of ciga- rette-smoke. and waving her expres- sive arms "Auntie" wailed out her last "Good-bye — good-bye!" There was the usual burst of appre- ciation. Just as she stepped off the platform some of the soldiers noticed a small blue-clad figure diving through the crowd in her direction, and one man near by saw her snatch a bit of paper from the boy's hand. There was an instant's pause while the vio- linist who was to play the Barcarolle from the "Tales of Hoffmann" got into tune with the piano. Then, there was an interruption. It was from "Auntie." Her face showed white in places where lack of rouge exposed it. "The Marseillaise, quick!" she said. The accompanist stared open- mouthed, but something in her man- ner compelled him, and he began. To the great chords of the prelude "Auntie" walked to the front of the platform and raised high her arms. "Allons, enfants de la patrie!" she burst out in her biggest voice. Sol- diers stared. One or two dropped their glasses. Even the dusky waiters stood to regard "Auntie." She had never sung like that before. "Trem- blez, tyrans! et vous, perfides— " It was her grand-opera voice, the voice of her youth. In that moment they all saw and heard what she had been. And first they paid the tribute of complete silence, aud then, as one man, arose to their feet. The Frenchmen could contain them- selves on longer, and joined in the chorus. Three well-dressed Arabs glared at them and prepared to quit the scene. The manager looked worried and moved toward the singer. "Auntie's" voice was overwhelming. "Liberte, liberte, cherie — — " The place was in uproar, and all were shouting at the top of their voices. Suddenly, on the very high- est not, "Auntie's" voice broke, her head drooped slowly forward, and she sank beside the piano in a huddlel heap. Then the man who had seen the telegram took it gently from her clenched hand and spread it out. The accompanist leaned over to him, while the violinist raised poor tawdry "Auntie" in his arms. "Cable received. Jean killed in gallant action, at Verdun.'' There was no signature. "Mother o' God!" groaned the pianist. "She had four sons, and Jean was the last" — CAMELERO.

    Hide note