1. List: Angus, Lorraine
    Angus, Lorraine thumbnail image
    Public

    No description yet...

    92 items
    created by: Lynniebear on 2015-06-13 15:11:34.0
    User data
    Tags:
    Add tag(s)
    Comments: No comments yet - Add one!
    Rating: unrated

List items:

Showing: 1 - 92 of 92

  1. CRUELTY TO A HORSE.
    The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Wednesday 24 May 1922 p 4 Article
    Abstract: John Luxton, sen., a justice of the peace, was charged, in the Adelaide Police Court on Tuesday, with having, on May 10 ingly worked a horse, which w ... 364 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 15:10:10.0

    CRUELTY TO A HORSE.
    John Luxton, sen., a justice of the peace, was charged, in the Adelaide Police Court on Tuesday, with having, on May 10, knowingly, worked a horse, which- was unfit for work.

    Ella Maude Angus, married woman, of Kensington Gardens, said she saw a youth driving the horse, which was attached to a cart, loaded with lime. The animal appeared to be knocked up, and in a very distressed condition. It was 'steaming,' and its front legs were twitching as if it were in pain. There were three sores under 'the collar, one on the right side, and on the left side were the other two — one about as large as a shilling piece, and the other about the size of a penny. There were three breaks in the collar, and horse hair was protruding from them. The lining was hardened with blood.

    Hide note
  2. MISS WANDA EDWARDS' PUPILS.
    The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954) Saturday 4 November 1922 p 17 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: The Victoria Hall was crowded on Wednesday, when the pupils of Miss Wanda Edwards gave an evening of dancing and a short play, "Ahou Hassan." The 964 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-13 15:25:15.0

    MISS WANDA EDWARDS' PUPILS. The Victoria Hall was crowded on Wed- nesday, when the pupils of Miss Wanda Edwards gave an evening of dancing and a short play, 'Abou Hassan.' The proceeds of the entertainment were in aid of the School for Mothers and the Solders' Immediate Relief Fund.' There was abundant evidence of the artistic mind and careful, training of Miss Edwards in the work of her pupils, and a special word of praise must given to the beautiful costumes. No matter what nationality or period was represented there was the strictest attention to even the smallest detail, and the harmonious blending of colours was delightful. The programme began with some fasci- nating dances by ''the littlest ones.' Clair Golding appeared as Bo-Peep - a dainty little Dresden China shepherdess with her crook — and she tripped here and there looking for her lost sheep in the most serious manner.
    A winsome mite was Lorraine Angus as Little Miss Muffet, who with much aplomb seated herself on the tuffet and ate her curds and whey. The appearance of a mammoth spider gave her a chance for some really clever acting, and she was vociferously applauded.

    Hide note
  3. SOCIAL ROUND. AN EVENING OF DANCING.
    The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Friday 21 November 1924 p 13 Article
    Abstract: The cleverness and originality of .Miss Wanda ? Edwards was fully demonstrated at the Norwood Town Hill on Thursday evening, when her dancing pupils 637 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 00:16:41.0

    SOCIAL ROUND.
    AN EVENING OF DANCING.
    The cleverness and originality of Miss Wanda Edwards was fully demonstrated at the Norwood Town Hall on Thursday evening, when her dancing pupils performed 'a garden fantasy, a ballet which was not only composed, by Miss Edwards, but she also designed the costumes and delightfully made the flower dresses. The whole thing is a charmingly poetic inspiration, with an effective dash of the dramatic. The scene depicted a garden, all agrowing and ablowing with flowers and fluttering with gay butterflies (all made by Miss Edwards). Into it skimmed eight little fairies (K. Francis, G. Hall, P. and H. Harcus, N. Hutton, B. Moncrieff, P. Turner, and S. Wigg) in white muslin ballet frocks powdered with flowerets, wearing hair wreaths to match. They danced with wonderful lightness and most engaging grace. Then Dawn (Phyllis Hele) arrived in pale blue and rose pink draperies, with a wealth of beautiful brown hair rippling down her back. Her arrival made the birds begin to stir, so the Blue Wrens, (I. ANGUS, A. Cook, J. FalIon, C. Golding), just the sweetest things in black and white with blue heads and jaunty tails, roused an absolute furore by their quaint and skilful flitterings. Next came the Sun (Minna Bauer) in a wonderful suit of gold tissue, and danced with much finish. The Morning Breeze (Ruth Robinson) blew in, looking the very spirit of gracefulness in pale blue draperies, a wreath of green leaves on her head above a mass of the loveliest fair curls. Two wonderful tots, sweet, pink-tipped Daisies (L. ANGUS, C. Golding) in white muslin edged with pink skirts and short green bodices (one blonde, the other brunette): both had a glory of hair. They danced like two graceful sprites, so free the movements of their little limbs. Wonderfully skilful was the skipping-rope dance of the Sweet Peas (E. Beckwith (I. and M. Bond, P. Critchley, A. Dixon, M. Hayes, and H. Hodgson), and their sweet pea costumes in different colours, most original and charming. Other graceful flower dancers were— Marguerite (Mavis Blythe), Fuchsia (Dorothy Botten), Convolvulus (Phyllis Davidson), Daffodil (Joyce Goode) Sunflower (Patricia Goode), Iris (Dorothy Wier), Carnation (Joan White), Rose (Mavis Sandercock). The Pretty Maids (Misses Cochrane, Hume, Piper, Ware, White, Wyld) danced delightfully. Mary Quite Contrary (Mrs. Armstrong), in a ballet frock of faintest pink tulle, with capeline of cream satin straw padded with flowers at the back, anad tied on the right side with royal blue ribbon, danced with utmost refinement and grace. The Boy (Alfa Robinson), in pale blue silk trousers and dark blue velvet jackets, was her charming dance partner. A Summer Shower' (Beryl Hele), in silver tissue hung with silver raindrops, danced most cleverly. The curtain fell before a storm of applause, and on being raised, floral tributes of every description and ribbon-tied boxes were literally showered on the young performers. The second part of the programme consisted of a fine selection of solo dances, most of them done to classical music; a Greek quintette (J. Moncrieff. A. and R. Robinson, B. and P. Hele), Russian folk dance (D. Botten, M. Blythe, J. and P. Goode, P. Harcus, M. Sandercock, J. White, D. Wier. and Jack Uffendell), Coquetry (B. Moncrieff, P. Turner', M. Blythe, B. Hutton, H. Harcus K. Francis, G. Hall, S. Wigg). Solo dancers were Claire Golding, LORRAINE ANGUS, Phyllis and Beryl Hele, Joan Moncrieff, Ruth Robinson, Naomi Hutton, Minna Bauer, D. Hiscock, and Irene Wyld. The orchestra was under the direction of Captain Hugh King. Conveners of the flower stall were- Mesdames Botten and R. Elliott, assisted by Mrs. Robinson, Mrs. Moncrieff, Mrs. Paul Goode,' Miss Joyce Bailey, Miss Joan Moncrieff, and a bevy of young people who sold posies.

    Hide note
  4. ADELAIDE NOTES.
    The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 29 November 1924 p 54 Article
    Abstract: In spite of the fact that a large number of Adelaide visitors to Melbourne for Cup festivities have not yet returned, there was a good attendance at ... 1594 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 00:22:02.0

    The Norwood Town Hall was crowded on Thursday evening when the pupils of Miss Wanda Edwards gave "a garden fantasy," in which they delighted the audience. The theme was charmingly carried out, Miss Edwards having composed and arranged the whole affair. The curtain rose on a garden Scene, and a chorus of little fairies (K. Francis, G. Hall,. P. and H. Harcus, N. Hutton, B. Moncrieff, P. Turner, and S. Wigg), who wore white tulle ballet frocks and wreaths of flowers. Next came Miss Phyllis Hele as Dawn, in Pale pink and blue. Then the Blue Wrens, wee mites—T. ANGUS, A. Cook, J. Fallen, C. Goldine—dressed to represent little birds, with the quaint swishing tail. Everyone applauded vigorously. The rest of the programme was equally happily conceived and staged. The second half of the programme was a selection of solo dances, the clever performers being Misses Claire Golding, LORRIANE ANGUS, Phyllis, and Beryl Hele, Joan Moncrieff, Ruth Robinson, Noonie Hutton, Minna Bauer, D. Hiscock, and Treve Wyld. Concerted groups also danced. Mesdames Botten and Elliott were convenors of the heavily stocked flower stall, assisted by Mesdames Moncrieff, P. Goode, and Robinson, Misses Joan Moncrieff, and Joyce Bailey, while posies purchased to shower the performers were sold by a number of girls.

    Hide note
  5. FANCY DRESS DANCE.
    The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Saturday 18 April 1925 p 7 Article
    Abstract: On Friday evening Miss Wanda Edwards arranged a delightful fancy dress dance for her pupils in her new studio at the Y.M.C.A. Hall. It is a charming ... 314 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 22:02:10.0

    FANCY DRESS DANCE.
    On Friday evening Miss Wanda Edwards arranged a delightful fancy dress dance for her pupils in her new studio at the Y.M.C.A. Hall. It is a charming room; the walls done in pale grey, and the lights covered with pale gold shades, delicately painted with dancing, figures and fringed with crystal beads. A delicious supper was served at the back of the main hall; the tables decorated with mauve cosmos.
    Before the dancing started the children paraded, and the judges had a hard time deciding who were to receive the prizes. Some charming and original costumes were worn. Among them were Dutch boys and girls, fairies, ballet girls, pierrots and Pierrettes, Indians, and gollywogs all marching past together.
    Prizes were awarded as follows: — Best Fancy Costume — 1; Jazz Twins, Phyllis and Beryl Hele; 2, Baby Fairy, Evelyn Storer; 3, Serviette, Shirley Shakespeare : 4, Crinoline, Mavis Oliver; 5, 'Yes, We Have No Bananas,' Mavis Golding. Best Sustained Character. Crossword Puzzle.
    Best Boy's Character— 1. Dutch Boy, Dewar Good; 2, White Rabbit. Murray Sherman; 3, Fairy, Alec Moncrieff.
    Best Costume (made by the wearer)— 1, Queen of Hearts, Margaret Cooper; 2, Indian, Kelvin Loader.
    Best Original Costume— 1, House to Let, Lois Bales; ,2, Christmas Tree, LORRAINE ANGUS.
    Best Costume costing half a crown or under— Hawaiian Girl, Evelyn Hardy.
    Several fancy dances were given when the judging was over. Five girls, charmingly frocked in green, gave a Greek quintette. Those who danced so gracefully were Phyllis and Beryl Hele, Ruth and Alfa Robinson, and Joan Monfcrieff. Miss Minna Bauer (wearing a frock of golden brown) danced delightfully in a Greek lyric dance. Toe dances were given by Ruth Robinson and Lorraine Angus, and a tiny little girl in a quaint frock of blue gave a powder puff dance.

    Hide note
  6. "PANDORA'S BOX."
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Saturday 7 November 1925 p 17 Article
    Abstract: Miss Wanda Edwards achieved a great success with her dance recital at the Norwood Tom Hall on Friday evening. "Pandora's Box" is one of the most 685 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 22:34:22.0

    "PANDORA'S BOX."
    Miss Wanda Edwards achieved a great success with her dance recital at the Norwood Tom Hall on Friday evening. "Pandora's Box" is one of the most
    familiar stories in Greek mythology, and Miss Edwards's pupils gave the dance scene in elective style. The action takes place outside the house of Epimetheus, who is about to wed Pandora. Maidens are seen carrying water for the nuptial bath. These included Misses P. Goode, P. and B. Hele, A. Robinson, D. Robinson, J. White, D. Holten, who, laying wide their water urns and their veils, danced and posed gracefully. These were followed by the suppliant maidens bearing "suppliant branches," who dance before the statue at Hera, the protectress of married women, imploring her protection for Pandora. These were Misses M. Blyth, Mr. and N. Crawford, A. Dixon, M. and E. Hardy, M. Hayes, B. Moncrieff, and D. Weir, whose dancing, arm gestures, and grouping were most graceful. Epimetheus (Miss Joan Moncrieff) conducts his bride, Pandora (Miss Ruth Robinson) to his home, preceded by flower bearers (Misses D. Botten, P. Critchley, P. and H. Harcus, and N. Hutton), who strew roses in the path of the wedded pair. Epimetheus and Pandora dance to express their joy and happiness, and this dancing duct was delightful. The coyness of Pandora and the ardor of Epimetheus were excellent. Here the curtain is dropped to denote the passing of time, and when it rises Pandora is seen reclining in the garden playing astragals (known to moderns as Knuckle-banes. Hermes, the messenger (Mr. Jack Uffendell) appears bringing the box Bent by the gods. He tells Pandora that she is forbidden to open it, and her eager curiosity was well expressed, "as was her terror" when, overcome by curiosity she disobeys the command. The dancing of Mr. Uffendell as Hermes was distinctly good. The spirits of evil liberated by Pandora were L. Angus, K. Barter, A. Cook, P. Critchley, P. Green, C. Golding, A. Feuerheerdt, G. Hull, H. Harcus, J. Hawke, B. Hutton, and S. Storer, who were realistic little imps. They danced with spirit, and their awe on the appearance of Hope was well depicted. Hope (danced by Miss Phyllis Hele) appears with her harp, comforts Pandora, drives away the evils, and creates happiness amongst all. The whole conception of this ballet was charmingly original, and showed a wealth of imagination and inventive power. Great attention was paid to detail. The costumes were all copied from Greek pictures and statues. The second part of the programme consisted of operatic, solo, and group dances. Suppleness and grace were the keynote throughout. The toe dancing of Mrs. Armstrong, Miss Beryl Hele, and little Miss LORRAINE ANGUS showed strong point work, the dancers being well up on the toes. A Greek number, with scarfs and cymbals was danced with much abandon by P. Goode, J. Hemstridae. P. and B. Hele, J. Moncrieff, and J. White. In an early Victorian costume, Miss Gwen Hall, with a posy, danced attractively. Miss Alfa Robinson managed her large fan of yellow feathers successfully, and her dancing was good. Miss Gladys Piper revived the old-fashioned skirt dance. A difficult Egyptian dance was well done by Miss Minna Bauer, who portrayed well the angular arm movements of these dances. A difficult Hungarian rhapsody portraying the characteristic dances of this nation, in which the acting of the performers was excellent, concluded a programme which was distinctly above the average. The evening began with the nursery story of "Snowdrop and the Seven Dwarfs," charmingly done by Miss Saxon Storer, who was an attractive Snowdrop, and by some of the youngest pupils as the dwarfs. "The Sandman," done by Miss Corrinne Boundy, a baby of four years, delighted the audience. Among those present, were Mrs. Pearce, Mrs. St. John Poole, Mrs. Corrington, Mr. King, Mr. Harry Lawrence, Mr. Alec Moncrieff, Mrs. Evans, Mrs. Atkins, Miss Jean Atkinson, Miss Betty Atkins, Mr. and Mrs. John Anderson, Mr. and Mrs. O. Ziegler, Miss Beaver, Mr. Matthews.

    Hide note
  7. Evening of Dancing
    The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954) Saturday 7 November 1925 p 14 Article
    Abstract: Last night in the Norwood Town Hall, Miss Wanda Edwards and her students gave an entertainment in aid of the Y.M.C.A. Building Fund. Miss Edwards 411 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 22:47:03.0

    Article text, suitable for copy and paste

    Evening of Dancing
    Last night in, the Norwood Town Hall, Miss Wanda Edwards and her students gave an entertainment in aid of the Y.M.C.A. Building Fund. Miss Edwards
    is the pioneer in Adelaide of the revived interest in the Greek classic dances, and arranged the Greek ballet, especially for her pupils. The first half of the programme consisted of a 'Snow- drop and the Seven Dwarfs,' which was artitically conceived and executed. 'Pandora's Box,' a presentation in dancing of the Greek myth, was a fascinating number. The second half of the programme consisted of an operatic solo, danced by Beryl Hele; a charming number, 'The Posy,' by Gwen Hall; 'The Captive Butterfly,' by Mrs. Armstrong'; 'Cymbals and Scarves,' by six of Miss Edwards' pupils; 'The Pan,' by Alfa Robinson; a skirt dance, by Gladys Piper; an Egyptian dance, by Miss Minnie Bauer; a clever toe dance by a tiny girl, LORRAINE ANGUS. The full Hungarian costume was worn in the concluding number, 'Rhapsody Hungroise.' The whole performance reflected great credit on Miss' Edwards and her pupils, the standard of dancing and producing being of a high order.

    Hide note
  8. THE SOCIAL ROUND.
    The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Tuesday 3 August 1926 p 14 Article
    Abstract: All invitations, tickets, accounts of social functions, and announcements for the social columns, should be addressed "Lady Kitty. 4116 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 22:51:11.0

    On Thursday morning, July 29, Miss Lorraine Angus, daughter of Sir. and Mrs. W. S. Angus, of Kensington Gardens, was given a private interview by Madame Pavlova at the Theatre Royal. The little girl, who is a pupil of Miss Wanda Edwards, danced for Madame, who was so pleased with her performance that she arranged for Lorraine to be present at M. Pianowski's class, and to have private lessons from him.

    Hide note
  9. SOCIAL NOTES.
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 6 August 1926 p 22 Article
    Abstract: Reports of Weddings and other items Intended for insertion in the Social Columns of "The Advertiser" should be forwarded as 547 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 11:46:15.0

    Lorraine Angus, aged 8 years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Angus of Kensing- ton Gardens, and a pupil of Miss Wanda Edwards, was granted a private interview with Madame Pavlova at the Theatre Royal on July 29, and she danced before her to the pianoforte accompaniment of M. Lucien Wurmser. Madame Pavlova was delighted with Lorraine's performance, and considered she showed decided talent, and gave her permission to attend the classes of M. Pianowaki, and to receive private tuition from him.

    Hide note
  10. Social News and Events ADELAIDE LETTER
    The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954) Saturday 7 August 1926 p 19 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Dear Readers— Though there has been a lull in the hostessed dances this week, the various palais have been the haunt of the younger 1247 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 22:53:49.0

    Clever Child Dancer
    During the Pavlova season there have been interviews sought with Madame by the terpshicorean enthusiasts of Adelaide. Pavlova has been the witness of many, performances from, those of tiny tots, whose little legs are just learning the essentials of rhythmical movement, to the grown tips whose work is more or less indifferent. One little girl of eight was lucky enough, to dance before Pavlova, and to be congratulated on her performance. Little Lorraine Angus, a pupil of Miss Wanda Edwards had an interview with Pavlova at the Theatre Royal on Thursday.,July 29, and danced to the the accompaniment of M. Lucien Wurmser. Madame Pavlova expresses herself delighted with the child's grace of movement and spoke of a future ahead. Lorraine was granted permission to join the classes of M. Pianowski and is also' receiving private lessons. Adelaide may hear of this little girl again.

    Hide note
  11. AN EVENING OF DANCING. PUPILS OF MISS WANDA EDWARDS.
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Saturday 27 November 1926 p 14 Article
    Abstract: The Norwood Town Hall was filled last evening by an audience which greatly enjoyed a. programme of dancing given by the pupils of Miss Wanda Edwards, ... 471 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 23:30:52.0

    AN EVENING OF DANCING.
    PUPILS OF MISS WANDA EDWARDS.
    The Norwood Town Hall was filled last evening by an audience which greatly enjoyed a programme of dancing given by the pupils of Miss Wanda Edwards, in aid of Minda Home. Many of the performers were young children, who went through various movements with grace and charm, which showed that they had received careful training. The enthusiasm with which they entered into the spirit of their work was surprising. Some of the items were of a descriptive character, and represented stories in the form of actions and tableaux. In this respect an interesting number was "A Christmas dream" (Scott-Edenbury), in which a child, tired out after a wonderful day is visited by dreams, in which Santa Claus, Christmas dinner, and play in the garden mingle in strange confusion. The parts were taken as follow:- Santa Claus, N. Burgess; dreamer, C. Cuady; goose. F. Anderson; Christmas pudding, A. Stone; box of chocolates, B. McGowan; dish, M. Goldfinch: bonbons, M. Smith, S. Leppinus, B. Morcombe, E. Jeffs, M. Andrews, and M. Humphries. A little polka was given by Yvonne Sannders, the school baby, who had just attained the age of four years. "The picnic in the woods" (Rosse) was prettily represented by the following:—Maidens, B. Armstrong, D. Holton, P. Goode, H. McKenzie, P. Collins, P. Garner, and J. Roberts; gallants, A. Dixon, M. Field, H. Gunn, J. White, J. Collins, D. Hackett and M. Newland; highwaymen, the Hele twins. "The dance of supplication," representing a scene in ancient Greece, by Coleridge-Taylor, was given by M. Blyth, D. Botten, M. and N. Crawford, A. Dixon, E. and M. Harvey, M. Hayes, N. Sanger, and C. Landon. The programme was completed with the following items:—'The toadstool elf' (Greig), Joy Hawke: "Miss Muffett," Madge Smith; "La Pluie" (Helmund), Saxon Storer and Naomi Hutton; "The faun"'(Chopin), Phyllis Hele; "The little housemaid" (Ambroise), Helen Harens; "Woodland sprites" (Kirchner), J. Paull, M. Bradford, M. Stevens, N. Cayer, B. Wiltshire and P. Carbis; 'The letter" (Fletcher)," LORRAINE ANGUS; "The news boy" (Youmans), Pen Critchley; "An old fan" (Delibes). Beryl and Phyllis Hele; "Cymbals" (Mendelssohn), Patty Goode; "Octette' (Golblier), girls, L. ANGUS, P. Critchley, H. Harens, P. Green; boys, S. Storer, N. Hutton, G. Hall, C. Golding; "The two proposals" (Bosch), Dora Holton: "Greek maidens" (Sterndale Bennett), P. Goode, P. and B. Hele, M. Hancock, J. Moncneff and J. White; "La danseuse" (Busch), B. Armstrong; "Eiselio"' (Austrian), Nancy Crawford; 'Dance Egyptienne (Luigini), Corry Landon; "Balloons" (Borowski), Mavis Blyth; "Rhapsodie Hongroise" (Liszt), B. Armstrong, W. Holton, P. and B. Hele, P. Goode, and T. White. A sweets stall was in charge of St. Peters branch Minda Committee, convened by Mrs. D. B. Thomas, and a flower stall was conducted by Mesdames Botten, Elliott, Goode, and White.

    Hide note
  12. AN EVENING OF DANCING.
    The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Saturday 27 November 1926 p 13 Article
    Abstract: In the Norwood Town Hall on Friday evening, before an enthusiastic audience an attractive entretainment was given by the pupils of Miss Wanda Edwards ... 654 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 15:41:05.0

    AN EVENING OF DANCING.
    In the Norwood Town Hall on Friday evening, before an enthusiastic audience an attractive entertainment was given by the pupils of Miss Wanda Edwards, the proceeds being devoted to the funds of minda. This 'evening of dancing' was especialy interesting, for every dance was original— planned by Miss Edwards; who was also responsible for the design of the dresses, which were varied and picturesque. A sylvan- scene made a charming setting to the various groupings of the young dancers. The programme opened with 'A Christmas dream,' danced by the little ones N. Burgess (Santa Claus), C. Boundy (Dreamer), F. Anderson (Goose), A. Stone (Christmas Pud- ding), R. McGowan (Box of Chocolates), M. Goldfinch (Dish), and Bonbons (M. Smith, S. Leppinos, B. Morecomb, R. Jeffs, M. Andrews, and M. Humphries). 'A little polka' was charmingly danced by Yvonne Saunders, the school's baby— four years old that day. Joy Hawke as 'The Toadstool Elf' was lightsome of foot, and tiny Madge Smith most charming as Miss Muffett. Gwen Hall in scarlet coat danced 'The huntsman.' 'La-phue' was a graceful and quaint dance between a little lady in flounced frock, and a smart gallant in grey with, an umbrella (Saxon Storer and Naomi Hutton). Helen Harcus impersonated 'The little house maid;' LORRAINE ANGUS was capital in 'The letter;' and Pen Critchley particularly good as 'The newsboy.' The group dances were picturesquely arranged. One quite simple but pretty was 'Woodland sprites' by Jean Paull, M. Bradford, M. Stevens, N. Clayer, B. Wiltshire, and P. Carbis. More elaborate was 'The picnic in the woods.' The maidens were B. Armstrong, D. Holton, P. Goode, H. McKenzie, P. Collins, P. Gurner. and J. Roberts; gallants A. Dixon, M. Field, H. Gunn, J. White, J. Collins, D. Hackett, and M. Newland. The highwaymen were Beryl and Phyllis Hele, who appeared in several other numbers, notably in rosy dancing frocks in 'An old fan,' while Phyllis was effective as 'The faun.' Others of the older girls were seen in a 'Dance of supplication' reminiscent of ancient Greece— D. Botten, M. and N. Crawford, A. Dixon, E. and M. Harvey, M. Sayes, N. Sanger, and C. London. 'Greek maidens ' (P. Goode, P. and B. Hele, M. Hancock, J. Moncrieff, and J. White) was especially graceful. Smaller Pupils appeared in an octet (L. ANGUS, P.Critchley, H. Harcus, P. Green, S. Storer, N. Button; O. Hall, and C. Golding). Solo dances by senior students included 'Cymbals-' (Patty Goode); a graceful and effective bit of work; 'The two proposals' (Dora Holton), 'La danseuse' (B. Armstrong), 'Giselle' (Nancy Crawford), 'Dance Egyptienne' (Corry Landon), and 'Balloons' (Mavis Blyth). The programme closed with 'Rhapsodie hon-groise,' by special request. During the interval the Mayor of Kensington and Norwood (Mr. J. J. Woods) congratulated Miss Edwards upon what she had done, and thanked Mrs. and Miss Edwards for all they had done on behalf of Minds. The new treasurer of the institution (Mr. C. T. Barnes) spoke of the objects and work of Minda, the demands which the fame of its usually good methods caused, and the urgent need for funds. Tempting sweets and beautiful flowers were on sale. The sweets were provided by the St. Peters branch of Minda committee, convened by Mrs. D. B. Thomas. Among those assisting were Mesdames Woolnough and W. Thomas, and Misses G. Matheson, Ruth Helling, Helen Woolnough, and Madge Shiem. The flowers were managed by Mesdames Bolten. Elliott, Goode, and White, and a number of energetic helpers. The Mayoress' (Mrs. J. J. Woods) gave valuable help to the flower stall. The music was very good— a piano, flute, and violin. Also a dulsitone kindly lent by Cawthorne's. The wigs were by Alma Welch.

    Hide note
  13. ADELAIDE COMPETITIONS. SINGING CONCLUDED.
    The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Monday 12 September 1927 p 7 Article
    Abstract: There was a large audience at the Adelaide Town Hall on Saturday night, when the Adelaide competitions were continued and the singing sections comple ... 565 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 01:33:17.0

    ADELAIDE COMPETITIONS.

    SINGING CONCLUDED.
    There was a large audience at the Adelaide Town Hall on Saturday night, when the Adelaide competitions were continued and the singing sections completed.
    ....
    Classical Dance (under 12). — LORRAINE ANGUS, Frances Green, Hon. mention — Eileen Gropler Impromptu Conversation.— Marjorie Ottaway and Cyril Stacey, David Benjamin and Miriam Rochlin.

    Hide note
  14. MUSIC AND ART. MADAME DELMAR HALL CONCERT
    The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 6 October 1927 p 15 Article
    Abstract: Mr. Gus Cawthorne (hon. manager of the grand concert given by Madame Delmar Hall in the Adelaide Town Hall on September 19) has handed a cheque for 1009 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 01:27:20.0

    ADELAIDE COMPETITIONS. A concert of prizewinners has been arranged for the final night, and presenta tion of prizes of the Adelaide musical and literary competitions at the Adelaide Town Hall on Wednesday, October 12. Those who will take part are:— Mr. Frank McCabe (winner of the grand vocal . ag gregate), Miss Pauline Abrahams (winner of the grand elocutionary aggregate), Master Leonard Omsby (winner, of the boys' elocutionary aggregate under 16), Miss Margery Walsh, Misses Maisie Trenerry aud Ruth Gitsham, Miss Peggy Rowe, Miss Esme Roach, Lyric Quartet, Mr. Coiner, Messrs. Lowe and Baldock (brass duet), Miss Mona Zepple (toe dance), Misses Gwen Walsh and Lottie Blanden (duet), Miss Phyllis Eddy (song), Miss Beryl Pearce (piano), Miss LORRAINE ANGUS (classical dance), Misses Jean and Phillis Laver (piano duet), humorous song, Master Harry Norman, Miss Florence Clement (recitation), character recital (Mr. Dean Langsford). Richmond School Choir. The plan is at S. Marshal and Sons.

    Hide note
  15. THEATRE ROYAL. "THE WALTZ DREAM."
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Monday 8 August 1927 p 14 Article
    Abstract: Particular interest attached to the presentation of "The Waltz Dream" at the Theatre Royal on Saturday, as it is one of the first of the 664 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 16:10:05.0

    THEATRE ROYAL.
    "THE WALTZ DREAM."
    Particular interest attached to the presentation of "The Waltz Dream" at the Theatre Royal on Saturday, as it is one of the first of the special Continental films to be released in Australia by the Cinema Arts Film Company. The pomp and pettiness of the small kingdoms and duchies which abounded in Europe before the war have given the director, Dr. Berger, an excellent opportunity for subtly comedy, and the views of old Vienna are delightful. Throughout the picture the photography is remarkably good, and the stately buildings, the festive crowds, and the magnificent interiors are presented with a wonderful attention to detail, and a light and shade that are almost uncanny. The picture is based on the Strauss Opera, ''The Waltz Dream," and the music of this and the lilting old Viennese melodies set scores of feet a-tapping in the theatre on Saturday, as the quaint story of the little princess, who was, alas, a frump, was unfolded. How she learned to be a sparkling, dainty woman instead, is all part of an intriguing production, in which the self- sacrifice of Franzi. the violin player, who taught her how to win the man she loved herself, provided a note of pathos, thrown into high relief by the comedy of the rest. There were refreshingly few subtitles in the piece, and it is a tribute to the art of the Continental players that they are not needed, for they convey their meanings almost wholly by facial expression. There is no over-emphasis of gesture, and it is this very subtlety that makes the story so real and appealing. The sight of the young aide-de-camp showing the Princess Alix the sights of Vienna, with due attention to all the famous tombs, while the lady-in-waiting nods in solemn dignity, conveys the young man's sorrowful boredom to a nicety. The views of the gloomy castle at Flausenburg, with the dreary marriage ceremonial, the quaint customs in connection with a royal marriage with maids of honor disrobing the bride, and presenting the bridal veil to the groom to tear-up and distribute for luck, all serve to give a glimpse of a life that has passed away for- ever. It is to be hoped that most royal grooms were more polite than Lieutenant Nicholas, who tears the veil into shreds and jumps on it, and then goes off to enjoy himself at a biergarten, when the duke has announced that the young couple are alone, and the city of Flausenberg is alive with lights and feasting in celebration of "the love match." The gay simplicity of the people is in startling contrast to the etiquette-ridden court, but there is a hope of happiness for Nikki and his princess, and everyone but Franzi, before the end, and probably with her temperament and the Flausenburg weather, some other nice young man will be making love to her under a dripping umberella again before long. Miss Mady Christians is a charming Princess Alix, and the result of her unaccustomed wine drinking is delightfully shown. It is a remarkable comedy study throughout. Miss Xenta Desni is an appealing Franzi, and Mr. Willy Fritsch, as Lieutenant Nicholas, is a debonair young lover and a sulky young husband. Mention must also be made of Mr. Julias Falkenstein, as the Lord Chamberlain. Miss Beryl Hole and Mr. James Glennon showed the old-time waltz in appropriate costume, and Misses Pen Critchley and LORRAINE ANGUS were a miniature pair, who followed them in a replica of the costumes. A life of Balfe was a picture which appealed to all music lovers. Mr. Arthur Williamson sang "The Paradise in Mother's Eyes" with good effect. Much of the success of the main Picture was undoubtedly due to the beautiful musical score rendered by the theatre orchestra, under Mr. W. R. Cade.

    Hide note
  16. MUSIC AND ART. SUCCESSFUL CONCERT.
    The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Saturday 13 August 1927 p 14 Article
    Abstract: An attractive concert was given on Friday evening at Loreto Convent, Marryatville. There was a good attendance, and the programme was enthusiasticall ... 860 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 17:46:47.0

    ADELAIDE COMPETITIONS
    The seventh annual Adelaide musical and literary competitions will be opened at the Victoria Hall on Saturday, August 20, by the Lord Mayor (Sir Wallace Bruce). The following competitors will take part:— Humorous Monologue.— Marjory Ottaway, Florence Brown, Lorna Hosking, Phyllis Tier, Doris Black, Ivy Hutchinson, Nellie Kerr, Florence Clement, Eva Plint, George Grocke, and Pauline Abrhams. Humourous Dialogue.— Nellie Kerr and Tina Dunstone, Gwen Strickland and Jean Spinkston, Lena Love and Mavis Tuck, Phyllis Tier and partner, and Ethel Battye and partner. Dancing.— Vanda Quinlway, Eileen Gropler, Arlie Graham, Daphne Smith, Grace Pratten, Dorothy Jacques, Helen Harcus, Francis Green, Evelyn Jones, Marjorie Halliday, Diana Earle, Jean Magor, Margaret Hogg, LORRAINE ANGUS, Nora Jensen, and G. LeMarr.

    Hide note
  17. ADELAIDE COMPETITIONS.
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 17 August 1927 p 8 Article
    Abstract: The humorous monologue will be a special feature of the opening of the Adelaide musical and literary competitions at the Victoria Hall on Saturday ni ... 189 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 17:54:59.0

    ADELAIDE COMPETITIONS.
    The humorous monologue will be a special feature of the opening of the Adelaide musical and literary competitions at the Victoria Hall on Saturday night, those taking part will be Miss Marjorie Ottaway, Florence Browne, Lorna Hosking, Phyllis Tier, Doris Black, Ivy Hutchison. Nellie Kerr, Florence Clement, Era Plint, Pauline Abrahams, and Master George Grocke. There will also be sections for the and demi-character dancing under 12, in which the following competi- tors will be competing: — Misses Helen Harcus, Dorothy Jacques, Grace Pratten, Daphne Smith, Arlie Graham, Eileen Gropler, Vanda Quinlway, Jean Magor, Margaret Hogg, Deane Earle, LORRIANE ANGUS, Daphne Smith, Evelyn Jones, Frances Green, and Marjorie Halliday. Demi-character dance under 16— Misses Gem LeMarr, Kora Jensen, Mona Zepple, Doris Gambling, Anstra Beenham, Beryl Jenner, Gwen Walsh, and Saxon Storer. Those taking part in the humorous dialogues will be Misses Kellie Kerr and Tina Dunstone, Gwen Strickland and Jean Spinkston. Lena Love and Mavis Tuck. Phyllis Tier and partner, and Ethel Battye and partner. Programmes will be available on Thursday. Plan at S. Marshall

    Hide note
  18. MUSIC AND ART. STAFF CONCERT.
    The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 18 August 1927 p 12 Article
    Abstract: Members of the taff of the Elder Conservatorium will give a concert in the Elder Hall on Monday evening. "Fantaisic appassionata" (Dalezze) for violi ... 678 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 23:35:48.0

    ADELAIDE COMPETITIONS. The humorous monologue will be a special feature of the opening of the Adelaide Musical and Literary Competitions at the Victoria Hall on Saturday night. Those taking part will be Marjorie Ottaway, Florence Browne, Lorna Hosking, Phyllis Tier, Doris Black, Ivy Hutchison, Nellie Kerr, Florence Clement, Eva Plint, George Grocke, and Pauline Abrahams. There will also be sections for toe and demi-character dancing under 12, in which the following will compete: — Helen Harcus, Dorothy Jacques, Grace Pratten, Daphne Smith, Arlie Graham, Eileen Gropler, Vanda Quinlay, Jean Magor, Margaret Hogg, Deano Earle, LORRAINE ANGUS, Daphne Smith, Evelyn Jones, Frances Green, and Marjorie Halliday. In demi character dance under 16: — Gem. LeMarr, Nora Jensen, Mona Zepple, Doris Gambling, Austra Beenham, Beryl Jenner, Gwen Walsh, and Saxon Storer will appear. Those taking part in the humorous dialogues will be Nellie Kerr and Tina Dun- stone, Gwen Strickland and Jean Spinkston, Lena Love and Mavis Tuck, Phyllis Tier and partner, and Ethel Battye and partner. Programmes will be available on Thursday. Plan at S. Marshall

    Hide note
  19. ADELAIDE COMPETITIONS Opened by Lord Mayor
    The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954) Saturday 20 August 1927 p 4 Article
    Abstract: The Adelaide Competitions for 1927 began tonight at Victoria Hall, when character, and toe dancing, humorous, recitations, and dialogues were judged. 181 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 16:22:40.0

    ADELAIDE COMPETITIONS
    Opened by Lord Mayor
    The Adelaide Competitions for 1927 began tonight at Victoria Hall, when character and toe dancing, humorous recitations, and dialogues were judged. Mr. E. Anthoney, M.H.A., chairman, introduced Sir Wallace Bruce (Lord Mayor). Sir Wallace, in declaring the competitions open, referred to their great value to the rising generation. When the competitions were first organised seven years ago there were a few hundred competitors. This year there were three thousand. This was an indication of the increasing interest being manifested in literature and music by the younger people. The toe dancing was cleverly executed, even the youngest competitors performing the intricate steps with grace and poise. The humorous items were well received by the audience, the humorous dialogues being especially popular. Results: — Humorous Recitation (girls and boys 14 and under 16 years). — Mavis Tierney, 1; Edna Rettig, 2; Myra Noblet, 3. Toe Dance (girls and boys 8 and under 12 years) .—LORRAINE ANGUS, 1; Eileen Gropler, 2; Grace Pratten, 3; Daphne Smith, hon. mention.

    Hide note
  20. ADELAIDE COMPETITIONS. The Final Concert.
    The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Wednesday 12 October 1927 p 7 Article
    Abstract: Seats will be bard to obtain at the Adelaide Town Hall to-night, when the final concert and presentation of prizes in the Adelaide competitions, unde ... 198 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 16:28:01.0

    ADELAIDE COMPETITIONS.
    The Final Concert.
    Seats will be hard to obtain at the Adelaide Town Hall. to-night, when the final concert and presentation of prizes in the Adelaide competitions, under the direction of the Band Association of South Australia, will be conducted. Mr. Anthoney M.P., will present the certificates, and the prizes will be handed over by the Minister of Education (Hon. M. Mclntosh). The programme will consist of the following items:— Piano duet, Jean and Phyllis Laver; recitation, Leonard Omsby; toe dance, Mona Seppel; song, Phyllis Eddy; dialogue, Maisie Trenerry and Ruth Gitsham; violin solo, Esma Roach; dance, Gwen Walsh and Lottie Blanden, and Cyril and Alan Morrison; song (humourous), Harry Norman; recitation, Florence Clement; school choir, Richmond Public School; piano solo, Beryl Pearce; recitation, Peggy Rowe; song. Mr. Frank McCabe (winner of the grand vocal aggregate); classical dance, LORRAINE ANGUS; recitation, Miss Pauline Abrahams (winner of the grand elocutionary aggregate); song, Marjorie Walsh; duet, in character, Gwen Walsh and Lottie Blanden; mouth organ solo, Mr. H. A. Colmer; character recital (humourous), Mr. Dean Langsford; quartet. Lyric Quartet Party; brass duet, Messrs. A. Lowe and S. Baldock.

    Hide note
  21. ADELAIDE COMPETITIONS. Final Concert.
    The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Thursday 13 October 1927 p 10 Article
    Abstract: The cream of the talent brought to light at the Adelaide Competitions, composed a creditable concert company, which delighted a large audience in the ... 548 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 17:35:21.0

    ADELAIDE COMPETITIONS.
    Final Concert.
    The cream of the talent brought to light at the Adelaide Competitions; composed a credible concert company, which delighted a large audience in the Adelaide Town Hall on Wednesday evening. Few people, not directly associated with the executive of the competitions, know what extensive preparations and organization is required to bring such an undertaking to fruition, and although from the point of view of the number of entries received, the 1928 competitions exceeded those of last year, the receipts have been considerably less. Bearing in mind the fact that none of the officials receive any compensation for their labours of love, it must be somewhat disappointing to them when their efforts do not meet with the financial success they warrant. The principal officials, to whom the greatest credit is due include Messrs. W. Levy (President), H. G. Dall (secretary), E. A. Ellis (assistant secretary), and S. D Kerr (treasurer). Quite a number of the successful performers at the Ballarat com- petitions have also competed locally. Many, of the items given at the final concert on Wednesday were of a quality that would grace any programme. Among the performers whose work was notable were Frank McCabe, the winner of the grand vocal aggregate of four first prizes and two seconds, who gave a fine rendition of the Pagliacei 'Porologue;' Miss Pauline Abrahams, the winner of the grand elocutionary aggregate, who won six firsts and one second, and the President's gold medal, valued at £3 3/, gave an artistic interpretation of Edgar Allan Poe's 'The Bells.' Master Leonard Omsby, the winner of the boys' aggregate under 16, with two firsts and two seconds, successfully submitted, 'The Thousandth Man' (Kipling). Then, too, Miss Marjorie Walsh, whose singing recently elicited such high praise from Dame Nellie Melba gave great' pleasure in Peccia's 'Little birdies',' while Miss LORRAINE ANGUS, a child dancer of exceptional promise, demonstrated unquestioned talent in 'Happy youth.' A delightful conception space forbids more than the bare mention of others in 4 generous and entertaining programme. They included, piano duet, Misses Jean and Phyllis Laver, toe dance. Miss Mona Seppel; song, Miss Phyllis Eddy; dialogue, Misses Maisie Trenerry and Ruth Gitsham; violin solo. Miss Esma Roach: dance, Misses Gwen Walsh and Lottie Blauden and Masters Cyril Cruse and Alan Morrison; song, Master Harry Norman: recitation. Miss Florence Clement: choral items, Richmond Public School Choir; piano solo. Miss Beryl Pearce; recitation. Miss Peggy Rowe: duet in character. Misses Gwen Walsh and Lottie Blauden; mouth organ solo, H. A. Colmer; character recital. Mr. Dean Langsford; quartet, Lyric Quartet Party and brass duet.' Messrs. A. Lowe and S. Baldock. Certificates and prizes were presented by Mr. Anthony, M.P., who congratulated the secretary of the competitions, his fellow officers; and committee on the success which had followed their extremely hard work. He commended the winners of the competitions, and emphasized the educational value of the undertaking. Mr. E. L. Gratton. who was instrumental in having the school choirs included in the programme, added his congratulations and commented especially on the work in that section. Five schools, he said, had competed this year, and he was hopeful that the number would be doubled next year.

    Hide note
  22. ADELAIDE COMPETITIONS. THE FINAL CONCERT.
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Thursday 13 October 1927 p 16 Article
    Abstract: There was a large attendance at the Town Hall last night, when the final concert in connection with the Adelaide competitions was held. The programme 592 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 23:58:52.0

    ADELAIDE COMPETITIONS.
    THE FINAL CONCERT.
    There was a large attendance at the Town Hall last night, when the final concert in connection with the Adelaide competitions was held. The programme
    was varied and the high standard of performance throughout was an indication of the quality at the talent in many branches of art which was attracted to the annual competitions promoted by the Band Association. A great deal of the success of the competitions was due to the president (Mr. W. Levy), secretary (Mr. H. G. Dall) distant secretary (Mr. L. A. Ellis), and treasurer (Mr. S. D. Kerr), and last night the chairman of the committee (Mr. E. Antoney, M P.) paid a tribute to the energy and the roughness of all concerned in the festival He said the adjudicators, most of whom were new to Adelaide, had spoken in high praise of the performances in all sections of the competitions. That judgment was gratifying to the officials, students, teachers, and parents, who had all done their part in the attainment of the high standard. (Applause.) Mr F. L. Gratton, the musical supervisor in the Education Department who was referred to as being responsible for the introduction of the contest for school chairs, said five schools had competed this year, and he hoped the number would be ten next year. The competitions were valuable because of the study and attention to detail incidental to preparation. He said the concert was one of the finest of its kind he had attended, and the singing of the Richmond school choir was especially good. (Applause.) Prizes and certificates were presented to the winners by Sir Anthoney, but some were absent, competing at Ballarat. Several of the most successful performers in the competitions appeared on the programme. Mr. Frank McCabe, the winner of the vocal aggregate with four first and two second prizes, sang the prologue from "I Pazliacci," and displayed a baritone voice of fine quality. Miss Pauline Abrahams, who won six first and one second prizes and the president's gold medal, and secured the elocutionary aggregate, recited "The Bells" (Allen Poe) with dramatic effect. Master Leonard Omsby, who won two first and two second prizes and the boys' aggregate (under 16), was successful in his recitation "The Thousandth Man" (Kipling). Miss Marjorie Walsh, who possesses a pure soprano voice of unusual beauty and culture, sang "Little Birdies" (Peccia). The rest of the programme was:—Piano duet -Gakos 'ec bobemienae" (Sardis), Misses Jean and Phyllis Laver; toe dance, "The Joy of Life," Miss Mona Seppel; song; "The Little Brown Owl," Miss Phyllis Eady. dialogue (humorous), "Making a Mason." Misses Maisie Trenerry and Ruth Gitshan ; violin solo. "Hejre Kati," Miss Essra Roach: dance. "Reel O'Tulloch," Misses Gwen Walsh and Lottie Blanden, Masters Cyril Cruse and Alan Morrison: song (humorous). "The Fanner's Boy," Master Harry Norman: recitation. "The Pearl Diver." Miss Florence Clement; school choir. "There's a Land." "Calm in the Sea" (unaccompanied) Richmond Pubic School; piano solo. "Coquetula." Miss Beryl Pearce; recitation (humorous) '"Harry and the Family at the Zoo." Miss Peggy Rowe; classical dance, 'Happy Youth," Miss LORRAINE ANGUS; duet in character, "The Spider and the Fly'" Misses Gwen Walsh and Lottie Blanden; mouth organ solo. "The Twister." Mr H. A. Collmer: character recital (humorous), "The Scene Shifter," Mr. Dean Langsford; quartets, '"On the Sea." "Little Tommy." Lyric Quartet Party: brass duet, "Watchman, what of the Night?" Messrs. A. Lowe and S Baldock.

    Hide note
  23. PHYSICAL CULTURE. An Excellent Display.
    The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Wednesday 26 September 1928 p 15 Article
    Abstract: Under the patronage of His Excellency the Governor (Sir Alexander Hore-Ruthven, V.C.) and the Lord Mayor (Mr. J. Lavington Bonython), one of the most 522 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 12:17:16.0

    PHYSICAL CULTURE.
    An Excellent Display.
    Under the patronage of His Excellency the Governor (Sir Alexander Hore-Ruth- ven, V.C.) and the Lord Mayor (Mr. J. Lavington Bonython), one of the most
    pleasing physical culture displays that has been given here for some time was presented to a large audience in the Adelaide Town Hall on Tuesday by members of the Y.M.C.A. and Miss Wanda Edwards, assisted by Miss Heather Gell, Mr. J. J. Correll, and the Hadyn Quartet. The programme was as varied as it was excellent, and the items were received with a deservedly marked approbation. Folk dances, national dances, caprices, balancing feats, acrobatic novelties, and club swinging numbers were included, while the orchestral selections were contributed by Mrs. Hines (piano), Alias Vera Jurs (violin), and Mrs. Savage ('cello). None in the audience could have failed
    to be impressed by the admirable illustration of the practical work being achieved by the Y.M.C.A. in its endeavour to combine spiritual, mental, and physical training. There was not an item in a 27-number programme which was not worthy of some special notice, but it is only practicable to mention a few. These, however, were but typical of the remainder. Miss Beryl Hele gave an interpretation of a futuristic dance entitled 'Blossoms,' 'in which she skilfully portrayed the human emotions by natural movement. Mimes S. Chapman, O. Chase, J. Hawke, B. Mathews, B. Munro, and G. Webb gave a delightful costume dance entitled 'Welsh Lassie', and Miss Patricia Goode created a Spanish atmosphere in 'Pas d'Espagne.' 'Cockle Gatherers' was danced by Misses Pen Critchley and LORRAINE ANGUS, and portrayed two sisters searching for cockies on the seashore. Misses Knight, Lewis, and Thomas, in 'Oreads,' cave an ex- ample of the classic style. Hoop games and ladder pyramids, by Y.M.C.A. boys afforded abundant evidence of the value to be derived from the gymnasium. The art of balance wan excellently exemplified by the senior Y.M.C.A. men. Some of the turns looked so easy— but doubt less any who tried them afterwards would be speedily disillusioned, finding that patience and systematic training are necessary adjuncts to such accomplishments. Something in the nature of 'stunts' under the designation of acrobatic novelties were submitted by Miss Beryl Hele and Messrs. Stan Cheeseman and Max Grubble. Their number included some very clever poises. Tiger leaping and bar work of a most interesting kind were contributed by Y.M.C.A. members. The Haydn Quartet, comprising Messrs. Gerald Healy, Robert Sim. Arthur Bartle, and Walter Wright; rendered vocal items, including 'The Vintage Song' (Thompson) and 'All on a Sunday Morning.' Other items comprised:— Tableau. 'Our Ideal.' Y.M.C.A.; ''Two Strings to His Bow,' Misses Goode, Hele, and Landon; Hungarian Dance. Miss Corry Landon; , eurhythmics, pupils of Miss Heather Gell and Y.M.C.A. men; 'Caprice,' Misses Critchley, Goode, Hele, and Landon; 'A Victorious Maiden,' Saxon Storer: parallel bare and pyramid, senior men; 'Gipsies,' Misses Abotomey. Burrett, Lyons, Martin, Norman, and Simpson: band-balancing and tumbling. Messrs. Ryan and Harrison; 'Pastorale,' Misses Hele,' Goode, MuIIer. and Norman; and Messrs. Cheeseman, O'Donnell, Jenner, and Uffindell.

    Hide note
  24. FULL OF LIFE DISPLAY. DANCING AND PHYSICAL CULTURE.
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 26 September 1928 p 10 Article
    Abstract: His Excellency the Governor (Sir Alexander Hore-Ruthven) attended by Captain G.H. Verney, was present as the Full of Life Display given by the pupils ... 597 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 12:29:08.0

    FULL OF LIFE DISPLAY.
    DANCING AND PHYSICAL CULTURE.
    His Excellency the Governor (Sir Alexander Hore-Ruthven) attended by Captain G.H. Verney, was present as the Full of Life Display given by the pupils of Miss Wanda Edwards and the Y.M.C.A. at the Town Hall last night. A varied programme was presented, including special dancing and gymnastics. The horse, horizontal, and parallel bar and pyramid work of the senior Y.W.C.A. division indicated the interest taken in this class of work, by the association. The high standard attained by Miss Wanda Edwards's pupils is well Known to frequenters of their periodical dis- plays. The classics interpretive school was represented by three numbers—a solo, a duet, and a trio. Miss Beryl Hele's representation of "Blossoms" was the spontaneous expression of the joy of life, and was danced with a natural movement and posture, and a supple grace and ease. The same spirit was seen in "Cockle-gatherers" by Misses P. Critchley and Lorraine Angus, who gave a delightful interpretation of two children, who having finished their task, dance and play on the sea shore. "Oreads," by Misses Knight, Lewis, and Thomas, was a graceful item in which artistic use was made of flimsy scarfs. "Gipsies," a gay and vigorous dance, was given in a spirited manner by Misses Abotomey, Barrett, Martin, Norman, and Simpson. Gay ribbons fluttered from their cinnamon colored skirts as they danced to the rhythmic play of their tambourines. Another dance in national costume was "Welsh Lassies," by juniors. Misses O. Chase, S. Chapman, L. Hawke, B. Mathews, and B. Munro. The picturesque dresses gave a demure air to the little dancers, the pointing of whose toes was particularly effective. "Pas d' Espagne," by Miss Patricia Goode, was danced with abandon and met with warm applause. Miss Corrie Landon depicted the racial characteristics of Hungary, revealing capriciousness, defiance, and fiery dignity. As an early Victorian, Miss Saxon Storer danced charmingly, her long fair curls adding to the effect. Especially interesting were two operatic dances, a trio and a quartet The first "Two Strings to His Bow" with Patricia Goode, Beryl Hele, and Corry Landon. was a delightful number in which feet twinkled in and out, and executed many "beaten" steps. "Caprice" was a beautiful dance, and the performers, Misses Critchley, Goode, Hele, and Landon, looked charming in their tulle ballet frocks and silk wigs of exquisite colors worn with flowers of the same shades. There was a distinctly professional touch about this dance, which reflected much credit on Miss Edwards: "Pastorale," by Misses Hele, Goode, Muller, and Norman, was presented with four members of the Y.M.C.A., Messrs. Cheeseman, Jenner, O'Donnell and Ufflndell, all trained by Miss Edwards. The steps said groupings were most effective, and the acrobatic lifts executed with ease and suppleness, the girls' lines being distinctly good. Messrs. Ryan, Harrison, Bottomley, Cheeseman, and Gribble, with Miss Beryl Hele, provided novelty tumbling and daring trapeze and balancing work, displaying many beautiful poses and remarkable equilibrium. An interesting club swinging exhibition was given by Mr. Norman B. "Wellington, who, prior to the war, was the champion amateur club-swinger of Australia. Mr. J. J. Cornell showed groups of girls and Y.M.C.A. boys well trained in folk dancing, and Miss Heather Gell's young women pupils with Y.M.C.A. men, gave a charming demonstration of eurhyth- mics. The Haydn Quartet, Messrs. Gerald Healy. Robert Sim, Arthur Bartle, and Walter Wright, was well received. The orchestra comprised Mrs. E. W. Maymon Hines (piano), Mrs. N. Savage (violin cello), and Miss Vera Jurs (violin).

    Hide note
  25. BOY SCOUT CONCERT.
    The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929) Saturday 1 December 1928 p 7 Article
    Abstract: The committee of the recently inaugurated 1st Henley Scout Troop arranged a concert, which was given in the Henley and Grange Town Hall on Thursday e ... 226 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 01:22:43.0

    BOY SCOUT CONCERT.

    The committee of the recently inaugurated 1st Henley Scout Troop arranged a concert, which was given in the Henley and Grange Town Hall on Thursday evening. The proceeds were in

    aid of the troop funds. The concert was under the patronage of the mayor and mayoress of Henley and Grange (Mr. and Mrs. Walter Barrey). Members of the committee are:— Dr. E. J. Millhouse (president), Messrs. G. E. Willoughby, C. M. Yeomans., Underwood, For- man, Knight, Lloyd and Metcalf. The main item on the programme was a motion picture travel film of Jerusalem, Algiers, Vienna, Swiss Alps, Austrian Tyrolis, the Danube, Venice, and Paris, and north of South Australia, given by Mr. C. .W. Laubman, who recently returned from world tour. Acrobatical acts by pupils .of Y.M.C.A. were enjoyed, as was a clever conjuring act. 'Mysteries of the Orient,' by Ah Chong' Foo, A .S.M. Mr. J. Reece gave violin selections, and Mrs. F.W. Maymon Hines. L.A.B., rendered a pianoforte item. The dances were gracefully rendered by Misses Beryl Hele, and Miss LORRAINE ANGUS, and a classical dance by Misses B. Lewis, L. Thomas, and A. Knight was enjoyed. Mrs F. W. Haymon Hines was pianist. Members of the 1st Henley Troop were present, in the charge of 'Acting-Scout' master F. Metcalf.

    Hide note
  26. Theosophists' Camp at Bridgewater
    The Register News-Pictorial (Adelaide, SA : 1929 - 1931) Monday 25 February 1929 p 9 Article
    Abstract: The Order of the Star in the East began a religious, camp at Bridgewater during tho week-end. Besides outside visitors there ore 60 118 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 01:03:04.0

    Theosophists' Camp at Bridgewater

    ' The Order of the Star in the East began a religious, camp at Bridgewater during the week-end. Besides outside visitors there are 60 members in residence and about 80 who attend daily. The camp was officially opened on Friday night, when reading and discussion took place. On Saturday night there was a large attendance around a huge fire, and Professor Earnest Wood gave an address. Professor Wood, who is a well-known Indian educationist and author, arrived by the Ormonde on Saturday , and is staying at the summer residence of Mrs. Fowler Stewart.
    Last night an open-air entertainment was, given by Misses M. Archer and LORRAINE ANGUS.

    Hide note
  27. CONCERT ON WEDNESDAY
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Monday 17 June 1929 p 8 Article
    Abstract: Student Costume Company will give a concert in the Leavitt Hall, Wakefield street, on Wednesday evening in aid of Rev. W. J. Magor's soup kitchen for ... 74 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 00:57:51.0

    CONCERT ON WEDNESDAY Student Costume Company will give a concert in the Leavitt Hall, Wakefield street, on Wednesday evening in aid of Rev. W. J. Magor's soup kitchen for the children of the unemployed. An interesting and varied programme has been arranged. 'Miss Lorraine Angus; the young and talented pupil of Miss Wanda Edwards, who was highly commended -by Mme Pavlova, will give two solo dances.

    Hide note
  28. CHARITY CONCERT Soup Kitchen Helped
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Thursday 20 June 1929 p 4 Article
    Abstract: In Leavitt Hall, Wakefield street, Adelaide, last night, a concert in aid of Rev. W. J. Magor's soup kitchen for children of the unemployed was given 135 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-13 15:11:34.0

    CHARITY CONCERT Soup Kitchen Helped In Leavitt Hall, Wakefield street, Ade- laide, last night, a concert in aid of Rev. W. J. Magor's soup kitchen for children of the unemployed was given by the Student Costume Company, which comprises pupils of Miss Winifred Eitel. Assisting artists were Misses Effie Day, Lorraine Angus, Mary Hamon, and Messrs. Dean Langsford, Stanley Hunkin, Hartley Sparks, Percy Orchard, and Lind- say Hunkin. Miss Eitel was accompanist and Mr. Lloyd Prider stage manager. The programme consisted of songs, duets, choruses, recitations, dances, and a pianoforte solo. Members of the company were Mes- dames A. James and J. Symons, Misses Margaret Best, Florence Bleeze, Audrey Catford, Madge Cooper, Effie Day, May Fitch, Gladys Hodges, Edna Hunt, May Johnson, Lulu Koch, Joan Langsford, Gwen Lewis, Melba Marshall, Marjorie Taylor, and Marjorie Weber.

    Hide note
  29. STUDENT COSTUME COMPANY CONCERT
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 21 June 1929 p 13 Article
    Abstract: A concert in aid of Rev. W. J. Magor's soup kitchen for the children of the unemployed was given at Leavitt Hall. Wakefield-street, on Wednesday nigh ... 262 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 11:58:32.0

    STUDENT COSTUME COMPANY CONCERT
    A concert in aid of Rev. W. J. Magor's soup kitchen for the children of the un- employed was given at Leavitt Hall, Wakefield-street, on Wednesday night by the Student Costume Company, assisted by other artists. The members of the company are Mrs. James, Mrs. Symons, Misses Margaret Best, Florence Bleeze, Audrey Carford, Madge Cooper, Effie Day, May Fitch, Gladys Hodges, Edna Hunt, May Johnson, Lulu Koch, Joan Langsford, Gwen Lewis, Melba Marshall, Marjorie Taylor (secretary) and Marjorie Weber (secretary). The programme opened with an overture by Miss E. Day and Messrs. Hartley Spice and Percy Orchard, who played 'Neapolitan.' Misses M. Johnson and L. Koch sang the duet 'Before the Sun Awakes' (Goate), the chorus being rendered by the company. Mr. Stanley Hunkin sang 'Two Grenadiers,'' and 'Wake Up' was contributed by Miss Marjorie Taylor. Misses F. Bleeze, A. Catford and company supplied the duet, and chorus, 'Gondola Song.' Mr. Dean Langsford gave a humorous recitation. Other Items Included a song, 'In the Garden of My Heart,'' Mrs. A. James; part song, 'Night of Stars.' the company; dance. 'The Two Proposals,' Miss LORRAINE ANGUS; song. 'Brownbird Singing,' Miss Gladys Hodges: pianoforte solo. 'Scherzo Valse,' Miss Effe Day; duet and chorus, 'Ah the Lips,' Misses M. Johnson and M. Marshall and company; recitation. 'Home, Sweet Home.' Miss Mary Hamon; dance. 'Moonbeams.' Miss Lorraine Angus; part song, 'Bella Napoli,' the company; song. 'With Courtly Grace '' Miss Edna Hunt; song 'Parted.' Mr. Stanley Hunkin; part song. 'Sons of the Scythe.' the company.

    Hide note
  30. A YOUNG DANCER
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 10 July 1929 p 22 Article
    Abstract: Lorraine Angus. 11 years of age. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Angus. Myall-avenue. Kensington Gardens, and pupil of Miss Wanda Edwards, danced befor ... 138 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 00:46:56.0

    A YOUNG DANCER
    Lorraine Angus. 11 years of age, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Angus. Myall-avenue, Kensington Gardens, and pupil of Miss Wanda Edwards, danced before Madame Pavlova during her first visit here three years ago. and Madame was much interested in her. She again sent for her while in Adelaide on her second visit lately and gave her a delightful interview, in which she urged her to study drawing and painting. Pavlova said it was essential to everyone who had ability to become a great artist, as was also careful study in scholastic work, saying. "Remember always that the greater the scholar the greater the artist." Madame Pavlova says the child is extremely artistic, as well as a clever dancer and added that she would always remember Lorraine and be interested in her progress.

    Hide note
  31. No title
    The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954) Saturday 20 July 1929 p 23 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: LORRAINE ANGUS, aged 11, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Angus, of Kensington Gardens, who danced for Madame Pavlova during 138 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 00:50:00.0

    LORRAINE ANGUS, aged 11, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Angus, of Kensington Gardens, who danced for Madame Pavlova during the season three years ago, and for whom Madame again sent on her recent visit. Pavlova urged Lorraine to make the most of her time at school —'Remember, the greater the scholar the greater the artist,' and said she would remember her and her work.

    Hide note
  32. SOCIAL NOTES
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Saturday 14 September 1929 p 23 Article
    Abstract: Reports of Weddings and other items intended for insertion in the Social Column of "The Advertiser" should be forwarded as early as 8342 words
    • Text last corrected on 1 October 2018 by BruceJN
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 13:39:25.0

    Mrs. W. S. Angus and her daughter Lorraine are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Pickering, of the Bank of Australasia, Kooringa.

    Hide note
  33. CHILD DANCER Praised by Pavlova
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Saturday 26 October 1929 p 9 Article
    Abstract: A striking feature of "Florodora," the delightful musical comedy to be produced by the South Australian Operatic Society at the Prince of Wales 197 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 18:03:16.0

    CHILD DANCER
    Praised by Pavlova
    A striking feature of "Florodora," the delightful musical comedy to be produced by the South Australian Operatic Society at the Prince of Wales Theatre next month is the really high quality of the music. There is nothing of thin tinkle of so many contemporary musical pieces which are amounted satisfactory if there is but one catchy tune to be repeated ad lib. In particular the part of "Dolores" makes tremendous demands on any singer. When the choice of the producers had fallen on Matre Pank for this role, it was no easy task to persuade her to undertake the arduous task. Those who have heard her powerful dramatic soprano rising above the fortissimo work of the huge chorus in the climax of the first act of "Florodora" and the rich contralto quality in some of her other numbers, are satisfied however. The production of "Florodora" will bring forward a gifted child dancer in LORRAINE ANGUS, of whom Pavlova herself said, "She is clever; she dances not only with her feet but also with her heart. When she dances she is the dance."

    Hide note
  34. WANDA EDWARDS Brilliant Ballet Divertissement
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Friday 1 November 1929 p 29 Article
    Abstract: Excellent technique marked the ballet divertissements presented by Miss Wanda Edwards and pupils at the Norwood Town Hell on Thursday night, 575 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 18:38:04.0

    WANDA EDWARDS
    Brilliant Ballet Divertisement
    Excellent technique marked the ballet divertissements presented by Miss Wanda Edwards and pupils at the Norwood Town Hall on Thursday night,
    to swell the funds of the Tubercular Soldiers' Aid Society. The crowded audience followed each exposition of terpsichorean art with close attention, testifying its appreciation by plaudits loud and long. First came on original ballet in two acts, arranged by Miss Edwards, and adapted from a story by Miss I. A. Shead, "The Legend of the Flannel Flower." This was delightfully done. In the divertissements that followed, the Egyptian plaque and cymbal dances were especially noteworthy. Their fidelity to the real Egypt of old, their sedulous attention to details, frequently overlooked or misrepresented, were remarkable. In these, as in other items, it was clear that considerable thought research, and care lay behind the presenation. Good team work by the participants, together with the wise direction of Miss Edwards, resulted in highly creditable renderings of such diverse themes as a Chinese love story, a tale of two cats, a Chelsea China episode bolero, and bow and arrow happenings. A Greek prayer dance was superbly done. Potent aid of good music was forth coming from Mrs. Maymon Hines (piano), Mrs. F. Pilgrim and Miss Mary Hancock (violin). Miss Constance Pether (flute). Miss Eleanor Harri. ('cello), and Mr. F. G. Hooter (double bass). The stage settings, by Mr. R. A. Kennedy and assistants, were remarkably good. Parts in the ballet were sustained or the following:—P. Critchley, H. Harcus, B. Hutton, S. Storer, B. Wiltshire (stars of the Southern Cross). M. Richardson, M. Walter (pointers). B. Greenland, P Hele, B. Lewis, L. Luxmoore, L. Thomas, D. Williams (cloud wisps). Beryl Hele (queen moon) Lorraine Angus (sixth star). Patricia Goode (zephyr), B. Greenland, B. Lewis, L. Luxmoore, A. Knight, D. Williams (moon sprites), B. Falkiner, E Heysen. M. Knight, R. Sedgwick (blue wrens). Pen Critchley (sun god). P. Darwent, N. Bale, M. Humphrey, Y. Hutton, Y. Saunders, M. Smith, D. Thompson, P. White (butter- flies). Patricia Goode (Nacooma), O. Crase, P. Darwent, P. Dunstone, H. Ralph, A. Roberts, B. White (gum blossoms), S. Chapman, B. Matthews, B. Munro (gum nuts). H. Harcus, N. Hutton, M. Richardson, S. Storer, M. Walter, B. Wiltshire (spirits of the bush flowers). Divertissements:— Pas de Deux, Patrcia Goode and Beryl Hale; Bolero, D. Benson, M. Hounslow, B. Lewis, L. Luxmoore, D. Lyons, E. Martin. R. Mclnnes, D. Williams; Pas Seul, Pen Critchley; Chinese Love Story, P. Goode, B. Greenland. B. Hutton: Bow and Arrow. Belle Lewis; Tarantelle, B. Humberstone, G. Lempriere, G. Lewis, M. Martin, W. Welch; Greek Prayer Dance, M. Blyte, B. Greenland. P. Good,. B. Hele, A. Knight, B. Lewis, L. Thomas; The Shoe Black, Naomi Hutton: The Two Cats, LORRAINE ANGUS and Pen Critchley: The Flame and the Tree, Beryl Hele and Belle Lewis; Chelsea China. P. Anthony. L Blades. B. Gerry, P. Harcus, M. Hargrave, P. and C. Ikin, B. Moncrieff; Lyric, Saxon Storer; Egyptia, Danse de Plaques. E. Benson P. Goode, B. Greenland, B. Hele. M. Hounslow, B. Lewis, L. Luxmoore, E. Lyons, E. Martin, G. Norman, L. Thomas, D. Williams. B. Humberstone. G. Lempriere, G. Lewis, M. Martin, W. Welch: Cymbal Dance, Beryl Hele, R. Mclnnes. A flower stall was conducted by Mes dames Goode, Moncrieff, Storer, and helpers, and a sweet stall by Miss Cleggett and helpers.

    Hide note
  35. LORRAINE ANGUS
    The Register News-Pictorial (Adelaide, SA : 1929 - 1931) Friday 1 November 1929 p 29 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: The clever child dancer, who took the solo part in the Australian ballet, The Dance of the Flannel Flowers at Wanda Edwards's students' performance l ... 58 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 18:39:38.0

    PHOTO
    LORRAINE ANGUS
    the clever child dancer, who took the solo part in the Australian ballet, The Dance of the Flannel Flowers at Wanda Edwards's students' performance last night.

    Hide note
  36. "FLORODORA" OPERA OF DELIGHTFUL MEMORIES
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Saturday 9 November 1929 p 13 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Accompanists are born, not made. Without a certain feeling for the mood of the artist they accompany they can accomplish nothing but a solo 394 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 23:14:35.0

    "FLORODORA"
    OPERA OF DELIGHTFUL MEMORIES
    Accompanists are born, not made. Without a certain feeling for the mood of the artist they accompany they can accomplish nothing but a solo performance. Many spirited accompanists for that matter insist on superimposing their own personality on a rendition of a song, while a weak one can spoil the best performance in the world with a musical background that lacks tone and color. Olive Lyons has enough academic distinctions, but there is a delightfully human touch in her work.
    As honorary accompanist to the South Australian Operatic Society, she has been responsible for a great deal of painstaking work. She has inspired beginners with confidence, and those who are used to the footlights know that in her they have a sympathetic accompanist, who will bring out the best in their work. At the
    (PHOTO: Miss Olive Lyons)
    scores of rehearsals, which have already been held, Miss Lyons has always been in her place, ready to help. "Florodora' is a musical comedy of delightful memory, and the amateur cast taking part has a good deal to live up to. Ralph Squire will be Cyrus W. Gilfain; Alhard Yon der Borch is cast as Frank Abercoed, manager of the Island of Florodora; Lloyd Taylor is Leandro: and Jack Ham follows in George Laura's footsteps as Anthony Tweedlepunch.
    Matre Pank is Dolores, and Iris Chenoweth, Angela Gilfain, with Violet George as Lady Holyrood, Grace Palotta's old role. The cast calls for six English girls, six English clerks, six Spanish dancers, four Spanish show-girls, and six "Florodora" girls, the famous sextette. Little LORRAINE ANGUS will be the solo dancer, and Phyllis Leitch, who is in charge of the ballets, has a particularly fine military number to present. There will be over 100 people on the stage and Seymour Pank, the musical director, is getting brilliant results from his well-trained chorus, most of whom have had exceptional musical opportunities. Malcolm Symons is the honorary producer, and L. Tiptaft honorary secretary. The charities to benefit are the Adelaide Children's Hospital, Adelaide Hospital Auxiliary, District Trained Nursing Society, Kindergarten Union Mothers and Babies' Health Association, Queen's Home, Tubercular Soldiers' Aid Society, and Society for Prevention Of Cruelty to Animals.

    Hide note
  37. DAINTY DANCING Featured in "Florodora"
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 13 November 1929 p 7 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: When "Florodora" is presented by the South Australian Operatic Society at the Prince of Wales Theatre on November 23, there will be scores of 208 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 18:49:03.0

    (PHOTO)

    DAINTY DANCING
    Featured in 'Florodora'
    When 'Florodora' is presented by the South Australian Operatic Society at the Prince of Wales Theatre on November 23, there will be scores of people in the audience who will greet every number with 'Do you remember?' Those who saw the dainty musical comedy have never forgotten, and Leslie Stuart's work is as bright and tuneful now as it was 20 years ago. The singing is far above that of any ordinary company, for nearly every member is trained as a musician and Miss Lorraine ANGUS, singer, and the musical director, Seymour Pank, gets a marvellous response from his huge chorus. The dancing, of course, will be a feature of this production, and little Lorraine Angus, a clever youngster, for whom Pavlova predicted a great future, will be seen in several specialties. Her toe work is extraordinarily good. Tiny Eileen Gropler, who constitutes herself Phil Peake's shadow in the military ballet, is another clever youngster who seems capable of standing on the tips of her toes as long as any professional ballet dancer. Phyllis Leitch, who is in charge of the ballets, is presenting special numbers. Several charities will benefit as the result of the week's season.

    Hide note
  38. "FLORODORA" REVIVAL Favorite of 27 Years Ago BRILLIANT LOCAL TALENT
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Thursday 21 November 1929 p 9 Article
    Abstract: Memories of 27 years ago and the florid curves of "the big six" will be awakened in Prince of Wales Theatre on Saturday, South Australian Operatic So ... 706 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 21:30:48.0

    "FLORODORA" REVIVAL Favorite of 27 Years Ago BRILLIANT LOCAL TALENT Memories of 27 years ago and the florid curves of "the big six"will be awakened in Prince of Wales Theatre on Saturday, when 'Florodora" will be staged by the South Australian Operatic Society. Time will show many changes from the days when 'Forodora" first startled Adelaide and then delighted it. "The big Six" will be fined down to slim lasses, every one a typical specimen of modern youth, aid as far removed from the billowing damsels of yesteryear as possible. There will be some ghosts on the stage, too-perhaps the shade of poor Wallace Brownlow will hover near when Mr. Alhard von der Borch raises his voice in "Shade of the Palms.' Every theatre patron of the older generation will remember Brownlow as he was in his heyday here, literally the "darling of the gods." the pet of the contemporary press-and the subject of a grim little obituary" notice for the newspapers of a few years back. But the sad memories will be fleeting ones particularly when Jack Ham dons the motley of Antony Tweedlepunch. The clever young comedian of "The Quaker Girl," and of many Repertory Theatre shows, is said to be at his brightest and best in "Florodora." One of his most sparkling scenes is in a romantic burlesque with Miss Matre Pank-in private life Mrs. Seymour Pank., wife of the musical director of the show. As Dolores, this dramatic soprano will be the cynosure of all eyes for a large part of the performance. The role calls not only for exotic interpretation, with occasional flashes of rich humor, but for a vocal range of prima donna calibre. From low A to high B she soars. Even a chorus of 100 voices does not overwhelm Mrs. Pank's remarkable organ. Own Ballet Trained In lighter vein will be the work of Mr. Phil Peake in "The Military Man." Another who will be remembered for sterling work in "The Quaker Girl" is Miss Vi George. An unusual policy has been pursued by the society regarding its dancing. Instead of importing a ballet it trains its own. For some time this was done by Miss Juanita Booth, but when she left the State Miss Phyllis Leitch took over the work with excellent results. A particularly bright light of the dance scenes will be little Miss LORRAINE ANGUS, for whom Madame Anna Pavlova predicted a great future. "We want to give local talent a chance, and incidentally to help deserving charities," said Mr. Seymour Pank. "That is why the South Australian Operatic Society was formed in March, 1928. "Too often is it the case that promising singers train for years, and then find that they have little or no scope for their ability. The same applies to dancers." The society was formed as the upshot of an informal conversation among six musically inclined people. First secretary was Mr A. S. G. Stevens, to whose energy and optimism much of the success of the society was due. Present secretary is Mr. L. Tiptaft. "The Quaker Girl" was the first venture of the society. It scored brilliantly, and more than £1.660 was taken. This resulted in the distribution of £850 to five charities. This year the number has been increased to eight. The extra three will be taken care of, judged from the record-breaking rush for booking for the first 24 hours after the plans open, when 1,200 reservations were made. Enthusiastic Company The ultimate aim of the society is a "Green Room," similar to that established in Western Aristralia. This year Mr Pank is again musical director, giving the company the fruits of many years of experience, and Mr. Malcolm Symons is producer. Mr. D. Waterhouse is chairman of com- mittees.
    Life is one long rehearsal, by the way, for the South Australian Operatic Society. For eight months members have devoted at least one night a week to "Florodora," and now that the performance is coming nearer, rehearsals occupy two and some times three nights weekly. The opening performance on Saturday will be attended by Brig.Gen. the Hon. Sir Alexander Hore-Ruthven, V.C., the Hon. Lady Hore-Ruthven, the Hon. R. L. Butler (Premier and Mrs Butler.

    Hide note
  39. "FLORODORA" OPERATIC SOCIETY'S GREAT EFFORT LARGE AUDIENCE DELIGHTED
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Monday 25 November 1929 p 14 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: There is a saying thai the best amateur production is worse than the worst professional one. In the case of the South 1687 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 21:48:15.0

    Beautiful Chorus Singing
    The singing of the chorus was something to remember. There were few professional shows which could muster such an array of talent in this direction, and they showed the sound training they had received by their fine team work. There was a rich musical background to the whole show, and the singing was as colorful as the scenery, which was also far above the standard of the usual amateur production. The bevy of pretty girls who contributed the dances showed something more than mere ability, for their work was performed with intelligence, particularly in the Pavlova-like ballet at the end. There was about the whole production a spontaneity which was refreshing, even when it led to an enthusiastic youngster breaking out of the line of clerks to recapture one stray lamb who seemed likely to wander into the foot lights. The dancing of little LORRAINE ANGUS was a charming interlude. At the conclusion of the show, when Mr. David Waterhouse, on behalf of the committee, thanked the public for their appreciation of the effort on behalf of charity, the applause which greeted him was sufficient assurance that the public had had its money's worth, apart altogether from the sentimental aspect. The Lady Mayoress (Mrs. Lavington Bonython) could fairly claim to speak for the public as well as for the various charities which will benefit as the result of the week's season, when she thanked every member of the company for their unselfish work.

    Hide note
  40. SOCIAL NOTES
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Friday 7 February 1930 p 6 Article
    Abstract: Contributors to the social columns of "The News" are asked to give the initials of all persons mentioned. Reports of dances, weddings, and social 192 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 01:42:07.0

    Mrs. W. S. Angus and Miss Lorraine Angus will return to Adelaide by the Katoomba next week from a holiday in Western Australia.

    Hide note
  41. SOCIAL
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Thursday 6 February 1930 p 15 Article
    Abstract: Reports of Weddings and other items intended for insertion in the Social Column of "The Advertiser" should be forwarded as early as 255 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 13:42:16.0

    Mrs. W. S. Angus and her daughter, Lorraine, will return to Adelaide by the Katoomba next Wednesday. They have spent a holiday in Western Australia.

    Hide note
  42. SOCIAL NOTES
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Saturday 8 February 1930 p 13 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Reports at Weddings and other Items intended for insertion In the social column of "The Advertiser" should be forwarded as early as 544 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 00:02:33.0

    Mrs. W. S. Angus and Miss Lorraine Angus will return from Western Australia by the Katoomba.

    Hide note
  43. Here & There
    The Register News-Pictorial (Adelaide, SA : 1929 - 1931) Wednesday 13 August 1930 p 21 Article
    Abstract: Mrs. G. P. Hutchinson was unable to be present at The Big Store Charity Hall on Monday night owing to indisposition. Miss M. Creswell who has been on ... 163 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 16:18:42.0

    Here ©'TheRe

    Mrs. G. P. Hutchinson was unable to be jreeent at The Big Store, Charity Ball on Monday night owing* to indisposition. ' Miss M. Creswelli who hhs Tieen on nn overseas wap, is en route tor nome. ana wui arrive in Adelaide on August 27. The hostesses at the' English Speaking Union Club room on .Friday afternoon will be Mrs. McMaster Haigh and Miss Haynes. Miss K. de N. Lucas, hou. secretary. ' Miss Chrfstobel Cocks, of Sydney, is . in South Australia on a few weeks' visit to her mother. Mrs. A. W. Cocks, and - her brother. Dr. Sidney Cocks, at Mount Barker.
    At the new WoodviEe Hall on Tuesday next Miss Wanda Edwards and pupils will give a performance of ballet' and classical dancing in aid of the district relief -fund: They will perform the Egyptian dance done in ' The Warrior, also Greek and Spanish dances. Miss LORRAINE ANGUS will dance a solo.

    Hide note
  44. CLASSICAL DANCING
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Wednesday 3 December 1930 p 14 Article
    Abstract: Despite the warmth of the evening, pupils of Miss Wanda Edwards gave an excellent display of classical and operatic dancing at the Victoria Hall 230 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 00:37:13.0

    CLASSICAL DANCING
    Despite the warmth of the evening, pupils of Miss Wanda Edwards gave an excellent display of classical and operatic dancing at the Victoria Hall, Gawler-place, last night. The programme was a lengthy one, no two items of which were alike, and all gave evidence of careful training. 'Peter's Friends,'
    the opening: dance, gave LORRAINE ANGUS, as Peter Pan, an opportunity for some excellent solo dancing. She was equally effective later as a captive princess and an elf. Pen Critchley, as a London messenger boy, gave an exhibition of eccentric dancing that was deservedly popular, and she scored also as the drum major in 'The Drummers,' and as a woodnymph. With LORRAINE ANGUS and Isabel Cooke, she was effective in 'Pas-de-trois.' Isobel Cooke was also seen to advantage in 'Pas Seul.' Doreen Williams and Belle Lewis did well in 'Pastorale,' the latter dancer being seen later in an well-rendered Russian peasant dance, and as the solo dancer in 'The Dance of Miriam.' Betsy Matthews (French Gavotte) and Jean Robertson (Polketta), both gave finished exhibitions. Miss Edwards gave a brief explanation of the guards and attacks in fencing, after which an exhibition of loose play was furnished by two of her pupils. The music for the dances was supplied by an orchestral trio under the direction of Mrs. E. W. Maymon Hines.

    Hide note
  45. SOUTH AUSTRALIA'S WONDER CHILD Lorraine Angus And Her Dancing Pupils
    The Register News-Pictorial (Adelaide, SA : 1929 - 1931) Wednesday 10 December 1930 p 22 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: The youngest teacher of dancing in Australia brought her pupils before the public at the Norwood Town Hall on Monday evening. She is exactly twelve y ... 626 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 16:31:29.0

    (PHOTO)
    SOUTH AUSTRALIA'S WONDER CHILD
    Lorraine Angus And Her Dancing Pupils
    The youngest teacher of dancing in Australia brought her pupils before the public at the Norwood Town Hall on Monday evening. She is exactly twelve years old. It was a modest gathering, compared with the audiences which may one day await Lorraine Angus, but many who were there realised that it might some day be historic. If one ever saw genius in the bud it is unfolding in this vivid child of twelve, with the imagination of a mature artist, and the unconscious grace of childhood. Her solo dances were naturally the great feature of the evening, but even more astonishing to all those familiar with her art was the management of her first ballet, written, arranged, and produced by herself, with children from three years old to twelve.
    STAGE MANAGEMENT Lorraine has had for a year a dancing class of ten pupils — she began much earlier with solo performers — and has taught them both ballet and solo dancing, entirely unaided, with the result that she was able to present them in a programme which would have, done justice to any adult teacher of dancing. To teach babies of three to eight to dance at all is a feat of some difficulty, but it is nothing to arranging a ballet performance in public, where they must dance, not at their own sweet will, but as the programme demands it, making exits and entrances with precision, and behaving as if they were grown artists, used to laughter and applause. As it was, the whole concert was perfectly arranged, and every child in the class, with adoring eyes on the youthful mistress, went in determined to do her credit. The three year-old baby as a Japanese doll made one of the hits of the evening, and even the shyest small boys came boldly out in their tiny solo dances, and took their share in the toy ballet with gusto and intelligence.
    THE PIPER PLAYS To anyone with imagination, it was all a little uncanny, when one visualised the twelve-year-old teacher in the wings, and at the climax of the evening, when she danced her queer Pan dance and pined for each little tripping figure to follow, like an elfin musician of Hamelin, there might well have seemed some magic in it. Nobody would have been surprised if Little Miss Muffet, Mickey Mouse, the Sandman, and the rest had gone tripping after her into a stranger and lovelier world. And equally, of course, this child of genius is not all fire and dew. On one side she is a born showwoman. That was the Lorraine who waited in the wings, timing the applause to the exact second, and bidding the enraptured performer, 'Now run in and bow,' and later, as the applause welled up again, 'Now run right across the stage!
    THE OTHER LORRAINE There is the Lorraine who is loved but also respected at rehearsals, with her 'Everybody on please! Now I can't speak while everyone is talking!' The Lorraine who, still in her Pan costume, and looking more like a woodland elf than a child, marshalled the smallest children with maternal care after the concert, and sent them off home with their friends. There is also the other Lorraine, childishness itself, who was reduced to shining-eyed ecstasy by the unexpected gift of bouquets of flowers. Nothing in her brilliant little career has spoiled this child of the loving heart and natural ways.

    Lorraine Angus, who, at 12 years of age, has her own dancing class.

    Hide note
  46. Of Interest to Women FROM CITY TO COUNTRY GOSSIP OF THE WEEK OUTBACK READERS SEND CHEERY LETTERS
    Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954) Thursday 17 December 1931 p 56 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Dear Country Readers— The city is so smoky and hot today that every letter from the bush that I open brings a tantalising reminder of 4135 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-14 00:27:23.0

    Lorraine Angus, student of the Wanda Edwards school of dancing, in the Indian dance which she gave at the school recital at the Australia hall.

    PHOTO

    Hide note
  47. BIDDING IN CONTRACT Initial Call of Two Important
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Saturday 30 January 1932 p 6 Article
    Abstract: AT contract, no less than at auction bridge, the necessity of making an initial bid when such can be made, is 487 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 13:43:45.0

    Mrs. W. S. Angus and her daughter Lorraine have returned to their home at Kensington Gardens after spending a holiday at Largs Bay.

    Hide note
  48. SOCIAL
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Saturday 31 December 1932 p 10 Article
    Abstract: To ensure Insertion, wedding reports most reach "The Advertiser" within a week of the ceremony, and must be signed by both 578 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 13:46:19.0

    Mrs. W. S. Angus and her daughter Miss Lorraine Angus, left by the express yesterday for Melbourne to spend a, holiday at Marysville, Victoria.

    Hide note
  49. SOCIAL NOTES Conducted WEDDINGS Clarke—Standish
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Saturday 4 February 1933 p 10 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: To ensure insertion, wedding reports must reach "The Advertiser" within a week of the ceremony, and most be signed by both 991 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 14:57:36.0

    Mrs. W. S. Angus and her daughter Lorraine have returned to Kensington Gardens, after a holiday at Marysville.

    Hide note
  50. Round The Bridge Table
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Wednesday 17 January 1934 p 7 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: At The-Mount.—Mrs. W. Gilbert and daughters have purchased an attractive house at Mount Lofty and are settled there for the summer. 1012 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 14:59:48.0

    At Glenelg.—Mrs. W. S. Angus and her daughter, Lorraine, have gone to St. Olave's, Glenelg for a fortnight. Lorraine, no doubt, will find swimming as effective an exercise in "limbering" as the intricate movements she uses in her dancing studies.

    Hide note
  51. Social Doings Of The Week
    Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954) Thursday 25 January 1934 p 60 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Miss Rosemary Fleischmann, niece of Lady Hore-Ruthven, who has been staying with her aunt in Adelaide, left for Durban and London last week. 2349 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 11:51:35.0

    At Glenelg. — Mrs. W. S. Angus and her daughter, Lorraine, have gone to St. Olave's, Glenelg for a fortnight. Lorraine, no doubt, will find swimming as effective an exercise in 'limbering' as the intricate movements she uses in her dancing studies.

    Hide note
  52. CONCERT AT GOODWOOD ORPHANAGE TIVOLI FOLLIES' FINE EFFORT.
    Southern Cross (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1954) Friday 23 August 1935 p 8 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: THE proverb says that "coming events cast their shadows before," and if last Sunday's function at the Goodwood Orphanage can be taken 938 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 16:05:14.0

    Miss Lorraine Angus, one of our clever Adelaide girls, gave the taking Tivoli Theatre item, an operatic toe solo, which revealed the very poetry of motion.

    Hide note
  53. Advertising
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Saturday 27 February 1937 p 2 Advertising
    34 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-13 23:19:18.0

    LORRAINE ANGUS
    TEACHING AT THE MIDGET THEATRE.
    48 FLINDERS STREET. C3246.
    SPECIAL 1/ PANTOMIME CLASS
    SATURDAY. AT 2.30. FOR CITY PRODUCTION.
    Pupils Prepared for Competitions and Exams.
    Terms. Monthly, Quarterly, Weekly.

    Hide note
  54. Family Notices
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Saturday 20 November 1937 p 14 Family Notices
    6110 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 16:08:00.0

    ELDRIDGE (nee Lorraine Angus). —On the 19th of November, at the Memorial Hospital, North Adelaide, to Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Eldridge —a daughter (Jania). Both well.

    Hide note
  55. Family Notices
    Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954) Thursday 25 November 1937 p 25 Family Notices
    9912 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 16:13:04.0

    ELDRIDGE (nee Lorraine Angus). — On the 19th of November, at the Memorial Hospital. North Adelaide, to Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Eldridge — a daughter Jania. Both well.

    Hide note
  56. C.W.A. FANCY DRESS BALL GREAT SUCCESS
    The Longreach Leader (Qld. : 1923 - 1954) Friday 6 September 1946 p 28 Detailed Lists, Results, Guides
    642 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 16:16:23.0

    C.W.A. FANCY DRESSBALL GREAT SUCCESS The children had a wonderful time at the fancy dress ball organised by the Longreach Branch of the Q.C.W.A. on Tuesday night. They turned out in force, there being about 90 children pre sent in fancy costume, and easily as many again in plain dress. The costumes were of a high standard of at tractiveness and originality; there were several new ideas, as well as the old favourites. The judges, Mesdames J. Cory and Mr. Crombie and Matron Wilson, had a difficult task; but everyone was satisfied with their decisions. Mrs. Crombie, who has only been in Australia about two months, was surprised at a children's entertainment being held at such a late hour. In England, she said, fancy dress parties are held in the afternoon, or at fetes, fairs or carnivals; there are no balls as these. How ever, she thought it was a very good idea, and the children seemed to enjoy them selves very much. She thought the costumes very good indeed, and said the judging had been most difficult. The prizes awarded were: Best set, The Dead End Kids; best couple, Old English Lavender Ladies, with specials to the 'first prize winners, Micky and Minnie Mouse, and the flower girls; best girl, Dolly Varden; best boy, Swagman; most original girl, Rebecca at the Well; most original boy, skeleton; specials to the Hawaiian girl; gollywog, Queen of Hearts, Mandrake, night, fairy, eighteenth century gentleman, Bo-Peep, C.W.A. chef. golden butterfly, Dutch boy, cowboy (Noel Wilson), Miss Valentine, drummer boy (Kenneth Quinn), woodland fairy. After the Grand March at 8.30 the chdliren continued dancing until supper, which consisted of cakes and rapberry drink. The adults took the floor at 10 o'clock. The children present in costume were: Set: John Hatton, Bob Howard, Gerrard Williams, Allan Wilson, Dead End Kids. Pairs: Barbara Doyle and Yvonne Pul lar, flower girls; Janice Frazer and Judith King, Old English lavender ladies; lan Gleeson and Barry Hegarty, Mickey and Minnie Mouse; Helen God kin and Helen Grieve, 'Two Little Girls in Blue"; Jean Kelly and Marie Meyers, pierot and pierette; Kathleen Lye and Jean Wells, Gipsies; Delma and Dorelle Smith, St. Louise Belles. Singles: LORRAINE ANGUS, golden but terfly; Heather Baker, Little Bo-peep; Gay Brooks, Gipsy; Barbara Butler, flower seller; Elsie Carson, Queen of Clubs; Ethel Carson, dancer; Frances Clutterbuck, fortune teller; Margaret Cox, Dolly Varden; Lorraine Faulkner. cigarette girl; Pecdly Gleeson, Queen of Hearts;'Janet Harris, ballet dancer; Dell Hearl, Usherette; Jean Jackson, lady in blue; M1ay Kelly, sunflower; Janice Ken nedy, Red Riding Hood; Maureen Lye, English dansy; Norma Mahoney, Alsatian peasant; Winnie Martie, Hawaiian girl; Patricia McGrath, Little Red Riding Hood; Jill Meyers, 333 Cigarettes; Kay Meyers, Gipsy; Betty Mills, Peace; Maureen Pont, "Beautiful Lady in Blue"; Patsy Pyne, fairy; Lynette Ramsden, night; Ann Searles, Dutch girl; Betty Springer, woodland fairy; Dorelle Swan, lady of colours; Pam Tanks, spinning top; Beth Toon, Rebecca at theWell; Pay Watson, Santa Claus; Viola Watson, lavender and lace; Joan Wiers, Miss Valentine; Beth Williams, skater; Jean Woodfield;,- Oriental dancing girl; Billy Affoo, America; Leslie Austin, cowboy; Warren Alcock, Boy Blue; Barry Bailey, eighteenth century gentleman; Pred Batzloff, boxer; Stanley Batzloff, cow boy; Charles Chapman, Mandrake; John Cox, drummer boy; Clive Poley, golly wog; John Gaden, Indian; David Green, pierot; Brian Greer, C.W.A. chef; Harry Johnson, cowboy; Kevin Johnson, Swagman; Billy Kelly, cowboy; Ian Kneen, drummer boy; Rupert Kneen, R.A.A.F.; Peter Lye, Turkish gentle man; G. McGrath, Red Indian; Val main McGuirk, Duch boy; .Leslie Mc Lean, skeleton; John Meyers, Superman; John Nehmer, Old English gentleman; Eric Quinn, Grinaldi, the clown; Kenneth Quinn, Drummer boy; Ian Ramage, Turkish boy; Barry Rose, Pixie; Trevor Rose, clown; Allan Swan, cowboy; Ray mond Swan, cowboy; Gerald Wilson, drummer boy; Jamines Wilson, Tyrolean; Jeffrey Wilson, cowboy; Noel Wilson, cowboy.

    Hide note
  57. Elderly fire victim dies
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Friday 1 December 1950 p 6 Article
    Abstract: An elderly woman who was severely burnt when she knocked over a candle and set fire to her clothing early last 74 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 15:13:24.0

    An elderly woman who was severely burnt when she knocked over a candle and set fire to her Clothing early last month, died in Royal Adelaide Hospital last night. Ella Maud Angus, 70, of Myall avenue, Kensington Gardens was admitted to hospital after the accident on November 2, suffering from first and second degree burns to the limbs and lower part of the body. She died from toxaemia fol lowing the burns.

    Hide note
  58. Still on the job Have had jobs for 50 years
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Friday 2 March 1951 p 4 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Fifty years with the same frim and still on the job—that is the record of Messers. W. S. Angus and W. H. Roberison, employes of Goode, Durrant and Mu ... 197 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 12:58:23.0

    Still on the job
    (PHOTO)
    MESSRS. W. S. ANGUS (left) and W. H. Robertson today completed 50 years' service with Goode, Durrant

    Hide note
  59. Family Notices
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Monday 27 December 1954 p 12 Family Notices
    9039 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 15:11:59.0

    ANGUS.— On December 24 at a private hospital, William Samuel loved husband of the late Ella Maude Angus, and brother-in-law of Winifred (Mrs. Dickinson), of 42 Magill avenue, Kensington Gardens.

    Hide note
  60. Advertising
    Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954) Thursday 30 December 1954 p 32 Advertising
    8631 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-15 13:32:30.0

    ANGUS.— On December 24 at a private hospital. William Samuel, loved husband of the late Ella Maude Angus, and brother-in-law of Winifred (Mrs Dickinson), of 42 Magill avenue, Kensington Gardens.

    Hide note
  61. AT THE VICTORIA HALL Pupils Danced Delightfully
    The Register News-Pictorial (Adelaide, SA : 1929 - 1931) Wednesday 3 December 1930 p 20 Article
    Abstract: SEVERAL most unusual notes were introduced in the classical and operatic dancing programme of the pupils of Miss Wanda Edwards, at the Victoria Hall ... 774 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:15:18.0

    AT THE VICTORIA HALL

    Pupils Danced Delightfully

    SEVERAL most unusual notes were intro duced in the classical nnd operatic danc ing programme of the pupils of Miss Wanda Edwards, at the Victoria Hall last nieht.

    An exhibition of fencing with a little ex planatory talk by Miss Edwards was fascinat ing, and the fencers with their skilful rapier play showed what a wonderful exercise it was for grace, lissomenesa, and quickness of eye and movement. , The Biblical 'dance of Miriam,' the dancers in their rich coloured robes, with timbrels making a wonderful effect was most original and charming. The costume worn in a Russian peasant dance wonderfully embroidered in cross . stitch, was an authen tic costume purchased in Russia 30 years ago, and lent, for the occasion. It was a long and most varied programme, and one sensed the enormous nmount of work behind it all, from each well rehearsed step of the dancers to last correct detail of every costume. Particularly one noted the per fection of the toe work, the pointed foot, and the spring, with fairy lightness on to the tip of it .never bending knee or body. A most difficult thing to do, yet achieved with marvellous ease. The grace and the ease of the dancers were a great tribute to Miss Edwards for, it was the outcome of a. perfect mode of train ing. Mothers and relatives of the per formers ran a flower stall and at the end of each .dance great boxes filled with floral tri butes were handed up to the performers, whose costumes and make-up were most at tractive. . Delightful was the opening _ number, 'Peter's Friends,' showing Lorraine Angus as the well-known statue of Peter Pan on his rocky pedestal, while grouped below' were grey bunnies with pink lined ears and white tails— June Brooke, Jean Hall, Molly Knight, Laura. Mitchell, Aileen Roberts, Rhonda Sedgewick, and, lovely little fairies in ninon draperies ? -with gauzy .wingo — Loulie Hannam, Nancy Hole, Mary Hum phrey. Vonnio Hutton. Madge Smith, Ue siree Thompson, Patty White, who all danced chnrmingly. Pen Critchley danced as a London Mes senger Boy, and her neat, clever steps and a wonderful flair for broad comedy simply brought down the house. DANCES AND DANCERS Pierrettes — :Junc Brooke, Jean Callard, Fatty Dun. stone, Helen Ralph, Aileea Roberta, Barbara White. Pna Seul — Isabel Cooke. - 'Paleface' ' Golliwogs — J. Hall, M. Knight. R, Sedgewick. Our Dollies ? N. Hele, II. Humphrey, V. Hutton, M. Smith, D. Thompson, P. White. The Drummers — I* An gus, 0. Ohasc, I. Cookc, J. Kobortson. Drum Majoi ? p Critcliley. Pastorale — Dorcen Williams and Belle Lewis. Garlanda and Scarves — Shirley Chap man, Helen Harcus, Betay Matthews, Barbara Mun ro, Clyve Wilton. Bronte Wiltshire, Oriel Chose. Loulie Hannam, Jean Robertson. The Dance of Miriam — Dancers, L. Benson, B. Couch, P. Critch ley, A. Knight, L.' LuxmooTC, T. tainn, D. Lyons, R. Mclnnce, D. \Vllllam3; Miriam — B. Lewis. Quin tette — P. Critcliley, B. Greenland, B. Lewis, L. Thomas. D. Williams. A Captive Princess — Lor- raine Angus. Woodnymph — P. Critchley. French Gavotte — Betsy Matthews. Polkctta — Jean Hob ertson. Pas-dc-clnq. — I*. Benson, P. Critchley, B. Lewis, D. LyonB. D. Williams. The EH — Lorraine Angus.- Musical Comedy Sextette — 3. Chapman, II. Harcus, B. Matthews, B. Uunro, C. Wilton, B. Wiltshire. Russian Peasant Dance — Belle Lewis. Pas-de-trois — L. Angus, P. Critchley. I. Cooke.. Valse Artlstlque — Hisses Benson, Couch, Lunn, Liijr/oorc, Lyons, Hclnnes, Norman, Williams. An orchestral trio under the direction of lire. E. W. Slaymon nines played the dance music. ? ? — LADY KITTY.

    Miss C. E. Sells, president of the Advanced School ' for Girls' Old Scholars' Association, will reach Adelaide by the Bendigo, on De cember 12; from a trip abroad. Mrs. Fairfax, wife of Lance Fairfax, who was last seen in Australia in The Desert Song, is on the Hobsons Bay, which reaches lere on Friday on its way to London. Mrs. Toirfax says her husband is doing particu arly well in London, and will be opening at Drury Lane at Christmas time.

    The annual prize-giving of Riverside School, Fitzroy (headmistress, Mrs. H*. E. Hinde) will take place at the Australia, on Monday, December 15th, at 10.15 a.m. Mr. A. Gren fell Price will present the .prizes. ? ' Mrs. P, J. Pickering, who had been1 trea surer of the Country Women's Association at Burra for three years and is leaving for . Albury. N.S.W., has been presented on be half of members of the association, with a brooch.

    Hide note
  62. Dance Recital At Victoria Hall
    The Register News-Pictorial (Adelaide, SA : 1929 - 1931) Tuesday 2 December 1930 p 21 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: AT Victoria Hall, Gawler place, tonight, pupils of the Wanda Edwards School will give a recital of classical and operatic dancing 157 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:19:24.0

    Dance Recital At Victoria Hall

    AT Victoria Hall, Gawler place, tonight, pupils of the Wanda Edwards School will give a recital of classical and operatic dancing.

    The beautiful Dance of Miriam done at the All Souls' Church pageant will be repeated. Specially interesting is a Pastorale, snowing a traditional dance of the Russian Imperial School. Among the toe dances is the Wood Nymph, a Fas de Cinque, and The Elf.

    MISS WANDA EDWARDS

    MISS WANDA EDWARDS

    The first item, Peter Fan in Kensington Park, will show Lorraine Angus as Peter Pan, surrounded by fairies and bunnies, by pupils of the junior classes. Delicious will be the baby dances, and the small people are going to pirouette as Pale-faced Golliwogs. A Russian peasant dance will be a vivid toiimber. and the recital will finish with a Valse Aristocratique by eight girls. Miss Jessie Montague, who has been staying with friends in North Adelaide, has returned to Mintaro.

    Hide note
  63. Commerce Students' Annual Ball
    The Register News-Pictorial (Adelaide, SA : 1929 - 1931) Friday 15 August 1930 p 28 Article
    Abstract: The University commerce students are holding their annual ball at the Refectory Hall, the University, tonight. The guests for the evening will be rec ... 90 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:21:01.0

    Commerce Students' Annual Ball

    The University commerce students are holding thier annual ball at the Refectory Hall, the University, tonight. The gueats for the evening will be received by Mr. and llrs. E. W. Mills at 8 p.m.. and dancing will take place from 8.15 to 1 a.m. Music will be provided by the Maison de Dance Orchestra. A particularly bright programme has been arranged by the com- mittee, including many novelties and a specialty dance by Miss Lorraine Angus, a pupil of. Miss Wanda' Edwards.

    Hide note
  64. A BABY BALLET
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931) Tuesday 9 December 1930 p 10 Article
    Abstract: Lorraine Angus, at 12 years, is probably the youngest teacher of dancing in South Australia. A concert by her little pupils was riven in the Norwood 67 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:22:53.0

    A BABY BALLET
    Lorraine Angus, at 12 years, is probably the youngest teacher of dancing in South Australia. A concert by her little pupils was given in the Norwood
    Town Hall last night. She demonstrated her talent in an Egyptian conception, and her pupils danced an original doll ballet, and the Little People of Nursery Land. There were numerous solo dances.

    Hide note
  65. AT THE VICTORIA HALL Pupils Danced Delightfully
    Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931) Thursday 11 December 1930 p 66 Article
    Abstract: SEVERAL most unusual notes were introduced in the classical and operatic dancing programme of the pupils of Miss Wanda Edwards, at the Victoria Hall ... 575 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:25:25.0

    Pupils Danced Delightfully

    AT THE VICTORIA HALL

    SEVERAL most unusual notes were intro-

    duced in the classical and operatic danc- ing programme of the pupils of Miss Wanda Edwards, at the Victoria Hall last night.

    An exhibition of fencing with 'a little ex- planatory talk by Miss Edwards was fascinat- ing, and the . fencers with their skilful rapier play showed what a wonderful exercise it was for grace, lissomeness, and quickness of eye and movement.

    The Biblical "dance of Miriam," the dancers in their rich coloured robes, with timbrels making a wonderful effect was most original and charming. The costume worn in a Russian peasant dance wonderfully embroidered in cross stitch, was an authen tic costume purchased in Russia 30 years ago-, and lent for the occasion.

    It was a long and most varied programme, and one sensed the enormous amount of work behind it all, from each Well rehearsed step of the dancers to last correct detail of every costume. Particularly one noted the per fection of the toe work, the pointed foot, and the spring with fairy ligntness on to the tip of it never bending knee or body. A most difficult thing to do, yet achieved with marvellous ease.

    The grace and the ease of the dancers were a great tribute to Miss Edwards for it

    was the outcome of a perfect mode of train ing. Mothers and relatives of the per formers ran a dower'stall and at tbe end of each dance great boxes filled with floral tri butes were handed up to the performers, whese costumes and. make-up were most at tractive.

    Delightful was . the opening number, "Peter's Friends," showing Lorraine Angus as the well-known statue of Peter Pan on his rocky pedestal, _ while grouped below were grey bunnies with, pink lined ears and white tails—June Brooke, Jean Hall, Molly Knight, Laura Mitchell, Aileen Roberts, Rhonda Sedgewick, and lovely little fairies in ninon draperies with gauzy wings— Loulie Hannam, Nancy Hele, Mary Hum phrey, Vonnie Hutton, Madge Smith, De siree Thompson, Patty White, who all danced charmingly.

    Pen Critchley danced as a London Mes senger Boy, and her neat, clever steps and a wonderful flair for broad comedy simply brought down the house.

    DANCES AND DANCERS

    Pierrettes—June Brooke, Jean Callard, Patty Bun* etone, Helen Ralph. Aileen Roberts, Barbara White. Pas SeuU—Isabel Cooke. "Paleface" Golliwogs

    J Hall," M. Knight, R. Sedgewick. Our Dollies —N. Hele, M. Humphrey, V. Hutton, M. Smith. D. Thompson, P. White. - The Drummers—L. An gus, 0. Chase, I. Cooko, J. Robertson. Drum Major

    p. Critchley. Pastorale—Doreen Williams and Belle Lewis. ■ Garlands and ScarveB—Shirley Chap man, Helen Harcus. Betsy Matthews, Barbara Mun ro, Olyve Wilton, Bronte Wiltshire, Oriel Chase, Loulie Hannam, Jean Robertson. The Dance of Miriam—Dancers, L. Benson, B. Couch, P. Critch

    ley, A. Knight, L. Luxmoore, T. Lunn, D. Lyons,. R, Mclnnes, D. Williams; Miriam—B. Lewis. Quin tette—P. Critchley, B. Greenland, B. Lewis, L. TbomaB. D. Williams. A Captive Princess—Lor raine Angus. Woodnymph—P. Critchley. French Gavotte—Betsy Matthews. Polketta—Jean Rob' ertson. Pas-de-einq—L. • Benson, P. Critchley, B. Lewis, D. Lyons, D. Williams. The Elf— Lorraine ,Angus. Musical Comedy" .Sextette—S. Chapman, H. Harcus, B. Matthews, B. Munro, O. Wilton, B. Wiltshire: Russian Peasant Dance—

    Belle Lewis. Ps»-de-trois—L. Angus, P. Critchley. I. Cooke.. .Valse Arttstique—Misses Benson, Couch, Lunn, Lugmoore, Lyons, Mclnnes, Norman, Williams.

    An orchestral trio under the direction of Mrs.

    V Hf Uovmnn TTtniu nlovro/? fho danrn VmiRin

    —-LADY KITTY.

    Hide note
  66. "Blue Skies" at Norwood
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Thursday 27 August 1931 p 11 Article
    Abstract: In the Norwood Town Hall tonight "Blue Skies." a scout revue, will be presented by the combined Third Norwood and First Kensington Gardens Cub packs, 75 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:25:51.0

    "Blue Skies" at Norwood In the N-orwood Townrr Hall tonighti "Blue Skies." a-.scout revue, will be pre sented 'by the- bombined Thirdi Norivood and First Kensington Gardens Cub packs, Scout troops, aid Rover crews. With the help of Miss Sylvia Thomas and MIr. Gerald Healy (singers), Miss Lorraine Angus (dancer), and a ballet by pupils of Miss Paula Brownm, tlhe Scouts have prepared a unique programme. The pro ceeds will go to the troops' funds.

    Hide note
  67. "Grown-ups Get in the Way," Says Teacher, 13
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Saturday 17 October 1931 p 1 Article
    Abstract: "I WILL not have grown ups in the dressing room when I give concerts. They are only in the way as a rule." Thus 13-year-old Lorraine Angus, the 282 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:31:08.0

    'Grown-ups Get in the Way,' Says Teacher, 13

    I WILL -not have grown-ups in the dressing room when I give concerts. They are only in the way as a rule.". Thus 13-year-old Lorraine Angus, the youngest dancing teacher in the State. A big display by her pupils-some are older than their teacher-will be given in the Australia, Angas street. on Wednes day, November 11. Lorraine is very proud of her pupils. Among them are the four-year-old twins, Margaret and Helen Gryst. who will have important roles at the concert. "The young ones are not so nervous as the others," says Lorraine. Beginning at the age of four, the little dancer appeared before Pavlova at eight. and at 11 had two pupils. Now she has 28. Last year she gave her first pupils' concert in Norwood Town Hall.

    Not only does Lorraine coach her small charges, but composes the ballets and ar- ranges the costumes as well "When I compose my dances my mother looks up some music for me, and I arrange my ballets to it if I think it is suitable "I would like to dance all day and all night, and then some," says the young manageress. One of her proudest moments came when she danced "The Letter" before Pavlova. She also received lessons from the ballet master of the famous dancer When Pavlova arrived in South Australia again three years later she sent for Lor- raine, and gave her further lessons. The lure of footlights has already at tracted Lorraine. She took part in "Floro dora" when it was produced in Adelaide two years ago. She wants to continue her training in Eng!and in a few years' time.

    Hide note
  68. Advertising
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Monday 9 November 1931 p 2 Advertising
    1182 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:33:50.0

    'THE AUSTRALIA,' ANGAS-ST, Wed., NOV., 11, 8 P.M. DANCE RECITAL by LORRAINE ANGUS AND PUPILS ADMISSION. 1/, PLUS TAX.

    Hide note
  69. YOUNGEST TEACHER OF DANCING Lorraine Angus And Her Pupils
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Tuesday 10 November 1931 p 14 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: THE youngest, but not the least successful, teacher of dancing in Australia is Lorraine Angus, who will give a recital with her pupils at the 165 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:37:44.0

    (PHOTO)



    YOUNGEST TEACHER OF DANCING

    Lorraine Angus And Her Pupils

    THE youngest, but not the least suc- cessful, teacher of dancing in Australia is Lorraine Angus, who will give a recital with her pupils at the Australia. Angas-street, on Wednesday evening.

    Lorraine is only 13 years of age. Like Isadore Duncan, she began to teach other children to dance as soon as she showed her own marked talent. Last year she gave a demonstration

    with her pupils at the Norwood Town Hall, and the display would nave done credit to an adult teacher. She composed her own ballets for the occasion. Her pupils follow her lead as devotedly as if she were an infant Pied Piper of Hame- lin, and take their whole training most seriously. The Chocolate Shop ballet which she has written for Wednesday's recital is an indication of her originality and thoroughness. Pavlova took a great interest in Lorraine's work, and encouraged her to look for a great future.

    Lorraine Angus (photo)

    Hide note
  70. Advertising
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Tuesday 10 November 1931 p 2 Advertising
    886 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:39:30.0

    THE AUSTRALIA, ANGAS ST. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER II, 8 p.m. DANCE RECITAL BY LORRAINE ANGUS and PUPILS ADMISSION I/ (plus tax).

    Hide note
  71. Advertising
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Wednesday 11 November 1931 p 2 Advertising
    2938 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:41:55.0

    AUSTRALIA,' ANGAS-ST. WED, NOV. 11. 8 P.M. DANCE RECITAL LORRAINE ANGUS AND PUPILS ADMISSION 1/, PLUS TAX.

    Hide note
  72. Advertising
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Wednesday 11 November 1931 p 2 Advertising
    1232 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:44:30.0

    AUSTRALIA, ANGAS ST. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 11. 8 p.m. DANCE RECITAL BY LORRAINE ANGUS and PUPILS ADMISSION 1/ (plus tax).

    Hide note
  73. SOCIAL Conducted by Idra
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Thursday 12 November 1931 p 13 Article
    Abstract: To ensure insertion, wedding re-v ports must reach "The Advertiser" within a week of the ceremony, and must be signed by both 912 words
    • Text last corrected on 20 July 2016 by DEBBIEG50
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:46:42.0

    Miss Lorraine Angus and pupils gave a delightful programme of dancing at Australia Hall last night, when the scene was laid in a sweet shop, Miss Lorraine Angus playing the shop keeper. Several fascinating dances and ballets were introduced. The children represented various sweets. A concert in aid of the Prospect Unemployment Christmas Cheer Fund will be held at the Prospect district hall on November 25.

    Hide note
  74. Dancing Programme by 13-year-old Teacher
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Thursday 12 November 1931 p 7 Article
    Abstract: Lorraine Angus, 13-year-old dancing teacher of Kensington Gardens supported by 23 of her young pupils, flitted through an entertaining programme of d ... 83 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:48:55.0

    Dancing Programme by 13-year-old Teacher Lorraine Angus, 13-year-old dancing teacher, of Kensington Gardens, supported by 23 of her young pupils, flitted through an entertaining programme of dances at the Australia, Angas street, Adelaide, last night. Lorraine was the star of the show. She appeared in 'Egyptian Dance," "Japanese Fantasy," and "Coquette," three varied solo numbers. She composed the many ballets and other dances in which she and her pupils appeared. Lorraine, who started dancing when she was four, received part of her tuition from Pavlova.

    Hide note
  75. Lorraine Angus's Pupils
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Thursday 12 November 1931 p 13 Article
    Abstract: A programme of dancing by pupils of Lorraine Angus was held in "The Australia" Hall last night. The dancing was of a high standard, and many 101 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:51:56.0

    Lorraine Angus's Pupils
    A programme of dancing by pupils of Lorraine Angus was held in "The Australia" Hall last night. The dancing was of a high standard, and many
    charming scenes were presented. Those taking part were:—Lorraine Angus, Warren Emery, Jeff Angus, Patricia Collier, Margaret Higgins. Peggy Larkins, Ruth Larkins, Peggy Harral, Mildred Emery, Merle Walkington, Sara Gregory, Peggy Brown. Rill Walshe, Geraldine Thomas, Pamela Lewis, Betty Everard, Margaret Gryst, Helen Gryst, Elaine Smith, Keith Walshe, Helen George, Yvonne Saunders, and Eda Williams. Mr. Esmond George was stage manager, and Mr. Harold Broadbent played the piano accompaniment.

    Hide note
  76. "Hiawatha" By Junior Legacy Club
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Monday 7 December 1931 p 10 Article
    Abstract: At The Australia cm Saturday evening an evening was given by members; of the Junior Legacy Club, to raise funds to assist those boys whose 191 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:56:28.0

    'Hiawatha' By Junior Legacy Club
    At The Australia on Saturday evening an evening was given by members of the Junior Legacy Club, to raise funds to assist those boys whose means would not enable them to at tend the forthcoming ten days' annual camp at Mylor. The entertainment, in which about 50 boys and girls belonging to the club took part, consisted in the presentation of ten scenes from 'Hiawatha.' The production reflected the highest praise on Mrs. Colin B. Colquhoun, who was responsible for the entertainment. About six months have been devoted to preparation, and the results were very good. The elocution and declamatory powers of the young pupils were surprising. The dresses and appointments were excellent, and there was not the slightest hesitancy in the delivery of their lines by any of the performers. The dancing was a feature. Among those who stood out prominently were Merven Roper as Hiawatha. Dorothy Speare as Nokomis, Regina Caesarowicz as Minnehaha, Tom Lishman as the Arrow Maker, Fred Ellis as Chibiabos. Lorraine Angus as Pau-puk-kee-wis the dancer, and H. Spencer as Iagoo.

    Hide note
  77. WANDA EDWARDS' PUPILS Bright Dancing Display
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Wednesday 9 December 1931 p 16 Article
    Abstract: Creditable alike to teacher and taught was the dancing entertainment given by pupils of Miss Wanda Edwards at Australia Hall last night in aid of 153 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 11:59:14.0

    WANDA EDWARDS' PUPILS
    Bright Dancing Display

    Creditable alike to teacher and taught was the dancing entertainment given by pupils of Miss Wanda Edwards at Australia Hall last night in aid of the Royal Institution for the Blind and Whitefield's Institute. In a pleasantly varied programme of 21 items, particularly effective episodes were "At Hiawatha's Wedding Feast," "In An Ancient Temple," and "At the Beach," the solo dancing of Lorraine Angus being a feature of the two first. "Kept In" was delightfully danced by three little girls, with a fourth demurely acting the schoolmistress, the whole well done by M. Knight, R. Sedgwick, V. West, and N. Sellick. A graceful dance by S. Chapman, C. Wilton, and B. Wiltshire, "to Coquette," by Jean Robertson, ala "Johnnie's In Town,'" by Pen Critchley, were among other well-received items. Music was provided by Mrs. Maymon Hines (pianoforte). Miss K. Yoerger (violin), and Miss H. Harris ('cello).

    Hide note
  78. Concert For Dogs' Home
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Friday 10 June 1932 p 20 Article
    Abstract: To raise funds for the Dogs' Rescue Home, Mitcham, a splendid concert was given in the A.N.A. Hall last night. Mr. Jelley, Minister for Local 201 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 12:06:03.0

    Concert For Dogs' Home
    To raise funds for the Dogs' Rescue Home, Mitcham, a splendid concert was given in the A.N.A. Hall last night. Mr. Jelley, Minister for Local Government, who is chairman of the Rescue Home committee, outlined the history of the borne, and described the excellent community services being per formed by the committee. Most of the success of the home, he said, was due to the efforts of Mr. Sanderson. He stated that during the past 11 months, 865 dogs had been received by the home; for 236 of these good homes had been found. A large number of dogs found in the streets or sent to the home had been returned to their owners. Those who contributed to the programme were:— Miss Clarice Wooding, L. Angus, P. Critchley, O. Chase, I. Cook, J. Robert son, Miss Sylvia Thomas, Mr. Dick Bailey, Mr. Jamas Pritchard, Miss Lorraine Angus, Miss Brenda Keswick, Isabelle Cook, Mr. Tom King, Mr. Howard Bauerochse, Miss Pen Critchley, Mr. Harold Bauerochse, Isabel Newmarch, Herbert Aldridge and Merv Connell. Moving pictures of interest to dog lovers were shown by Mr. Moody and Mr. Silifant.

    Hide note
  79. Harris, Scarfe's Ball
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Thursday 21 July 1932 p 11 Detailed Lists, Results, Guides
    398 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 12:08:56.0

    Harris, Scarfe's Ball
    The Social Club of Harris. Scarfe, Ltd., will hold its annual ball at the Palais Royal tonight. Miss Lorraine Angus will give a solo dances, and there will be several novelty items. The committee comprises Mr. E. J. Fisher (acting chairman), Mrs. E. B. Har- rington), Messrs. J. K. Probert, H. G. S. Wyatt, T. G. Fisher, A. E. Birka, A. Johns, R. D. Nairn. A. M. Ellery (trea- surer), and L. B. Daymond (secretary). Official guests oi the committee will be members of the board of directors and their parties, including Mr. F. G. Scarfe. Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Robertson, Mr. a:id Mrs. P. J. A. Lawrence, Miss Lairel Lawrence, Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Deeley, Mr. Harold Law Smith, Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Trowse, and Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Barr Smith. Others present will include Mr. and Mrs. S. Lightburn, Mr. and Mrs. T. G. Fisher. Mr. and Mrs. A. 3. Ellery, Mr. and Mrs. I. Noyes, Mr. and Mrs. Laurie Phillips, Mr. and Mrs. Alwin Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Stokes, Mr. and Mrs. Cook, Mr. and Mrs. A. Johns, Mr. and Mrs. Stone, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Connelly, Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Daymond, Mr. and Mrs. H. G. S. Wyatt. Misses Lilian Thomas, W. Thorpe, A. M3ut ton, D. Chenoweth, Vera Thorpe, V. Smiti. K. Leonard, 31. Ryan, Q. Luockwood, Johns. Molly Sieber, Beryl Holthouse, Jean Russell. Daphne Levitzke, 3Marcl Homburg, Mrs. Krawinkhil, Dot Dunhill, Jean Sphere, Sylvia Coles. Joan McClure, B. McClure. Nancy 3lulha!l, Nancy Mildren, Jean Lush, Stella Gross. Elsa Gross, Phyl Vorwerk, Ethel McHaffe, Aldey MceHaflie, Francle Boyle, Edith Watson, Connie Jagoe, Mrs. Leverington, 31.sses Wood, B. Hamilton, K. Brazel, V. Hodgson, S. Roberts, Glenys Roberts, G. Lane. J. McGrath, Margaret Hay,i M. Roberts, Mavis' Webber, Alice Ryan. Messrs. Stuart Thorpe, J. Clarke, R. - J. White, M. Camens, E. O. Wuttke,. A. 3oyne ham. A. E!phick, P. Morton. J. Richards, G. Wood, A. Waterman, M. Fischer. S. Munro, Reg Feehan, R. J. Bowden. Colin Featherstone. Cecil Gross, Gil White, Lance Drew, John Briggerman, Frank Young, J. Sweeney. J. Hentsehke, Leo Carey, J. Holloway, D. Kin;, D. Coad. Ron Hayes. P. Law Smith.' Rennie Homburg, Brewster Jones, Geo. Lawrle, E. Borchers, D. Nettle, W. Rowe. Edgecombe, Saw tell, Merricke. P. Rollo. J. Dawe, Charles Holst, M. Pontifex, B. McMillan, V. Patia, Dr. Schneider.

    Hide note
  80. The Woman's World RELIEF WORKERS SEE DISTRESSING THINGS Child Dancer Composes Ballet Story Of An Old Parsley Sprig
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Tuesday 9 August 1932 p 14 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: "SISTER ANNE," who encloses a contribution for cases of poverty mentioned by "Sister Beth" of St. Luke's, Whitmore square, writes a thoughtful little ... 1813 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 12:27:58.0

    The Woman's 'World
    Conducted by ELIZABETH GEORGE
    Child Dancer Composes Ballet

    Many readers are interested in Lorraine Angus, the child who has danced almost since she could walk. CHILD and who has been teaching ARTIST other children to dance for the last three years. They will like to see this excellent picture of the little artist at work on one of her latest conceptions of the ballet. Lorraine is now 14 years old and — while still keeping up her own studies — has 40 dancing pupils. During the week-end she gave a studio demonstration to some artists and other friends, of the work of the most advanced pupils in technique, miming. and solo dancing. For her next demonstration, to be given at the Australia Hall, near the end of the year, she has composed a ballet called 'The Tulip Garden,' and it is characteristic of her eager thoroughness that she has made a complete colored model of the set in plasticine, carefully indicating costumes and positions. The pose of the tiny figures, the suggestion of life and movement, are extraordinarily convincing. The forty pupils, who look upon their small teacher with devoted admiration, are thrilled at the prospect of taking part in her latest work.

    Hide note
  81. Exploits Of Odysseus As "Glorious Screen Narrative"
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Saturday 5 May 1934 p 11 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: ANTHONY Armstrong's mystery drama. "Ten minute Alibi." now playing at the Theatre Royal, still continues to draw good 3634 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 13:00:32.0

    Exploits Of Odysseus As "Glorious Screen Narrative"

    ANTHONY Armstrong's mys- tery drama. "Ten minute Alibi." now playing at the Theatre Royal, still continues to draw good

    houses. The season will close on Wednesday, when the company will go to Sydney to cpen on May 19. "Ten Minute Alibi' has been de scribed as "the play chosen for 24 nations;" the rights of this suspense play have been purchased in the follow ing countries:—Australia, New Zea land, Austria. Canada, Czecho-Slova kia, Spain. Switzerland, Sweden South Africa, the United States, South Ame rica, and Yugo-Slavia. George Thirlweil, a well-known Eng lish actor, plays the part of Colin Der went; Arundel Nixon is Philip Sevilia, and Thelma Scott is Betty Findon. Others include Frank Bradley. Russell Chapman, Guy Hastings, Ronald Atholwood, Alan Rankin. Plans at Allan's. "On Secret Service" At Majestic Today "QN Set-ret Service 7' (British International) will begin at the Majestic today. It is a drama, according to the publicity announce ments, 'of the strufe^le in the hearts of two levers, an Austrian officer and' an Italian girl, when w.ir breaks out be tween the two countries, and they find that, being connected with the espionage system of ths two countries, they must choosa brtvvocn love and duty." The cast is:— Marebesa MarcelU Galdi .. Gretx Nissen Captain yon nombcrtk .. Carl Lndvie Uiebl Colonel Ton Waldmallcr .. ..CM. HalUtd Captain Larco. A.D.C. to Waldmollrr, Austin Vrcvor B. 18 .... WsUaoe CeoSrry Colonello RonunelU .. .. Lester Matthews Blesnut*, a Reporter . . . . .. .. feme Perry Davila Cecil Bamacc ValenU Don Alvarado There are some 6trangers to Adelaide cinema-goers Jn this film The most netabie is Carl Diehl. a German actor. Greta Kissen's part is the only feminine one in th? film- The Majestic will aiso show the com edy. "The Hawleys of High Street,'" wish Judy Kelly and Leslie Fuller. Third Week Of "Red Wagon" At Mayfair '"THE Bed Wagon," Lady Elea nor Smith's story, will con tinue at the Mayfair for a third week. The film, which provides remarkable entertainment in its circus scenes as well as in the story it unfctfds. is prov ing very successful. Charles Bickford, Greta Nissen. and Raquel Torres have ihe chief parts. The Mayfair is also showing the comedy "The Love Nest," with Gene Gerrard and Gus McNaughton.

    Ozone Programmes OZONE films for today are:— Semaphore—'T Believed in You" (Irene Dunne) and "Ever Since Eve" (George O'Brien). Port Adelaide—"l Believed in You" (Irene Dunne) and "Mr. Skitch" (Will Rogers). ?Alberton—"Midnight Club" (dive Brook and George Raft) and "Para chute Jumper." Enfield—"Failinpr For You" (Jack Hulbert and Cicely Courtneidge) and "Bureau of Missing Persons." Prospect—?'Falling For You" and "Emergency Call." Marryatville—"Falline For You" and "Sleeping: Car" (Madeleine Carrali). Star Talkies £jTAR Theatre programmes for to day are:— Unley—Warner Baxter in "As Hus bands Go": William Poxrell in "Private Detective 62." Goodwood—Alice Brady in "Stage Mother"; George O'Brien in "Ever Since Eve." Thebarfcon—Lilian Harvey in "My W^eakness": Richard Dix in "The Day of Reckoning." Norwood—Warner Baxter in "As Hus bands Go"; Spencer Tracy in "The Power and the Glory." St. Peters—Lionel Barrymore in "Lookuis: Forward'": James Dunn in "The Girl in Boom 419." Parkside—Lilian Harvey in "My Weakness": Richard Dix in "The Day of Reckoning." Woodville—Lionel Barrymore in "Looking Forward"; George O'Brien in "Ever Since Eve." Hindmarsh—Madeleine Carrol in "I Was a Spy"; Henry Kendall in "Great Stuff." Port and Semaphore—George Wal lace in "A Ticket in Tatts"; Ruth Chat terton in " 'Frisco Jenny."" Repertory Show X ril" Adelaide Repertory Theatre's second major pro duction for the 1934 season is Oscar Wilde's "Importance of Being Earnest." This comedy has just been revived suc cessfully in' London. The play will be presented by a stron? Repertory cast. mc:udin.2 Robert Matthewi. C:rril Ri'.ey. Hubert Sando, Muriel Mark?. Eliza beth Campbell. Betty Diamond. Nell Mrhill. Max Caddy 'and Ron Corney. The production is in the hands of Jack Ham. Box plans are at Cawthoma's. Tile dates of presentation are today. Wednesday, and next Saturday. W.E.A. Little- Tlioatn- The W.E.A. Litfe The = tre o,rn ' it? season tonight by present,' ??? a I tliree-a-t comedy by Sir James 8.-rrip. "Alice Sit by the Fro." at StoT Memo rial Hall. Flindprs street. The producer is Miss Essie Hack.

    JN its search for new material for the screen Ihe film world h;\a lately delved fairly well into his tory, as an example of which Ihm-e are "The Private Life of Henry ym.," "Queen Christina." and "CaHie rine the Great." Very successful aims these are reported to be. too. for we have not seen them yet. But I'ne cinema in treating modern histcry received a rude shock with the libel damages awarded in the case of "Rasputin and the Empress." This has prompted the London "Times"' to publish a leader asking. Why not film the Odyssey, for, it says, the field of epic has been left strangely unex ploited. It mentions the Volsunga Saga, the Song of Roland, and Arthurian Cycle. all of which contain magnificent ma terial; but. above all. commends to film producers the Odyssey from which "tile supreme film might be made." "It is the greatest of all travellers' tales; and in the power to traverse all the ways of the world lies the peculiar excellence of the cinematograph Its scene includes heaven, earth, and heli, regions that cannot be localised an the stage, but may be penetrated by the imaginatH'c eye of the camera. Its theme includes tragedy and comedy, splendor and homeliness, love and bate, adventure and pathos, and passion and romance, and. behind all and ennobling all the ever-present sense of mystery and doom.'' Glorious Narrative The writer says that the Odyssey is no slice of intractable history, needing to be manipulated and tortured to make a story of it. but a glorious nar rative already shaped to this purpose by the master of story-telling. It will, of course, need the highest ski.': aiat the profession can command. There are parts for one supreme actor and for at least three great actre-sos. "Not to the mere picture-postcard beauty can be given the trust of representing the best-beloved of ancient heroines: Nausicaa may speak as few lines as Cordelia but her part is no less vital to the whole. The most famous of the screen "vamps' might long to play Circe, or even Calypso; while the patient Penelope must command the affection of all right-minded audiences throughout. As for Odysseus himself, his sufferings and liis pros-ess, his destiny and his triumph must require the exercise or the highest and mest versatile art that any actor can bestow upon their interpretation." And dealing with the episodes so suitable for the camera:— "There are episodes in the Cdyssey that only the film can portray to the eye. By the miraculous power of the camera it is now possible to bring its marvels to life—the giant rage of Polyphemus and the escape of his victims clinging to the bellies of his =-.on strous sheep: the sprouting of hons' bristles on human flesh beneath the enchantments cf Circe: the restoration of the squeaking ghosts to living semblance by the draught of blood. These preternatural happenings would be in terspersed with simpler episodes-—the beauti ful scene of Nausicaa and her maidens play- Ing on the rippled sands, the comic discom fiture of the bully Irus, tile pathos of the dog Argus and his death: and the Sim would sweep at last to a tremendous climax in the grim scene of slaughter that follows the bend ing of the bow." Who Could Fill Parts? An interesting fact of this suggestion by the "Times" was the batch of let ters which were received on the subject. The ball was set rolling by the Greek Minister in London M. Caclamanos, who thought the suggestion a wonder ful one. and added to the list of epi sodes which might be included in the film: — Calypso in her "Garden of Violets" or in her grotto, which was located by Victor Berard and photographed by Boissonas, on the African coast, just opposite to Gibraltar. "The Gardens of Alcinons," in Corfu, close to the bine sea, which, after being the old residence of the British Bigb Com missioners, are now the Palarr, Mon Rcpos, and where luxuriant evergreen trees and odorant flowers spread their scents throughout the Tear. Penelope among her servants weaving her interminable tissue. One of the banquets of the suitors indulg ing continuously in feasts or eating and drinking from gold plates and cans. The Greek Minister expressed the hope that the singing of the Sirens would be entrusted to some gifted singers with beautiful voices, to repre sent truly the legendary attraction of their singing for the companions of Odysseus: and' he suggested that Charles Laughton or Frank Vosper should be an ideal Odysseus, and there could not be a better Telemachus than John Gielgud. Pictorial Accuracy The correspondence was taken up by Spenser Wilkinson, All Souls Col lege, Oxford, who made a plea for pic torial accuracy:—The accuracy of Homer's descriptions can hardly be appreciated without some acquaint ance with the Mediterranean. Many years ago on the voyage from Smyrna to Athens the ship was rounding a great headland just outside the Gulf of Smyrna and was saluted by a strong wind blowing from the headland. "Is this the beginning of a gale?" I asked the captain. "Oh, no." he said, 'there's always a wind like that blowing from that headland." The headland is de scribed in the Odyssey as "Windy Mimas." ~,Mv. w- Nemmitt. The Rectory. Blechley, Bucks, thought it would be a pity to spend all the riches of ttie Oayssey on a single hour-and-a-quar ter^=, entertaimn.ent- II might wea be a trilogy, he said, if the tenser week to-end serial is really dead. And then came a plea for horticul tural accuracy from Edward A. Bun yard, Allington, Maldstone. who praises the exactitude of producers in some details, but seems rather horrified with efforts in the gardens:

    ?n-iij ihi ." -.Bl." once *" the Barden. or the wild, historical niceties are thrown to the winds and we endure such anachronisms as seeing the walls of Paris In Tlllon's day mantled with the lush growth or Virginian creeper. Mediaeval knights offer enamoured if St A?er*cal? Beauty roses or a prodigious 'ength of stem. We have lately seen Anne ?r,.PL evf? to ft Sfrden of sunflowers, a flower which Europe did not know until 60 years after her arrival In England. ?We gardeners are a growing body and our influence in Filmland may be almost as great as that of the archaeologists. Let us not be outraged in any coining Homeric film by Nausicaa appearing in a forest of Australian eucalyptus or "mimosa," or Eu maeus proffering the returned Ulysses a dish —I should say a cylix—of banana;. Ulysses V. Irus This summary would not be complete without S- Miles Bouton's reference to the combat between Ulysses and Irus, the town beggar. He wrote of an analysis of Homer's brief account of the engagement, in which the writer declared that the report plainly indi cate that Ulysses won the battle with a right cross-counter, the most scien tific blow in boxing. The writer quoted Pope's translation:— On his right shoulder Irus laid the blow: Ulysses struck him just beneath the car. His jawbone broke and made the blood appear. "Obviously, said the analyst. Irus led with a straight left for Ulysses's head. Ulysses ducked to the ieft, catching the blow on his shoulder, and cross countered on Irus's jaw, ending the fight." This \'iew was disputed a day or so later by another writer, who said that if Mr. Bouton were to re-read the lines quoted from Pope he thought he would agree that it was a left-hook or swing that laid Irus low! And. after all this enthusiasm, can the film producers ignore these classic stories? "S.O.S. Iceberg" A succession of picture thrills and awe-inspiring beauty describes "5.05. Iceberg." the main attraction at Wal kerville Talkies tonight. Rod La Rocque is the star, and the European actress. Lena Reifenstahl sunplies the feminine imprest. "Rat'.io Patrol." a melodrama of rhe Chicago Police Force, starring Robert Armstrong and Lila Lee. is on the same programme.

    Percy Grainger Concert Tonight TONIGHT in thfi Adelaide Town II;ill. IVivy (Jraiiijrop will be gin his season of four recitals Mr. Grainier will present programmes of unusual interest, including many com positions of his own. which have not previously been heard in Australia. Other compositions will, of course, be represented. Of the 38 items that figure on the programmes of his four recitals, 25 have not been played at any of his pre vious Australian recitals- Among these are the Bach-Busoni "Chaconne," and "Four Chorale-Preludes;" Chopin's "Funeral March Sonata; Cesar Franck's Prelude. Air and Finale; Albeniz's "El Albaicin;" Harold Rut land's "Billy Boy" (Sea Chant); Cyril Scott'e 3rd "Frivolous Piece;" several short pieces by Brahms and the fol lowing Grainger novelties: —"Blithe Bells," 'The Hunter in His Career," "Ramble on the love-duct from Richard Strauss." "The Rose-Bearer," and "Handel on the Strand." Some old favorites will again be heard, such as the B Minor Chopin Sonata: the F. Major Brahms Sonata; the Chopin A Flat Polonaise. Mr. Grainger will play his own popular items as encores, such as "Country Gardens." "Shepherd's Hey," "Irish Tune from County Derrv," "Molly on the Shore."' and so on.

    Arliss's "Working Man" At Regent GEORGE Arliss's "The Work ingl Mau" (Warner Brothers First National) will begin a season of two weeks at the Regent today. It is the story of a shoe manufacturer who wages the strongest competition against his rival- but when that rival is jdead, he makes himself the unofficial pro tector of the man's children, who seek to carry on the business. The cast is:— Reeres George Arliss Jenny .. Bette Davis Benjamin Burnett Bardic Albright Pettesion Gordon Westcott Tommy .. .. .. .. ?. .. Tbeodore Newton Henry Davidson .. .. 3. Farrell MaeDonald Haslitt Charles Evans Judge Larson Frederick Barton The Secretary Fat Wine Brigps Edward Van Sloan The Stenographer Claire McDowell Tommy's bridge partner . ? .. Harold BCinllr Mrs. Price Bnlhelma Stevens The Maid Gertrude Sotton The Butler Edvrard Cooper Hammersmith .. .. .. .- .. Wallis dark Already reviewed in these columns as a film of outstanding merit, "The Working Man" follows a substantial list of films which Arliss has made into first-rate entertainment. The sup porting cast, headed by Bette Davis, is a strong one. Miss Davis also played the insenue role with Arils? iv "The Man Who Played God," while Hardie Albright, the juvenile lead in "A Successful Calamity." has a similar part in the current tiicture. The Regent will also show "Female." Ruth Chatterton's latest film, in which ex-husband George Brent also appears. The Regent will introduce "The little Red Hen," a comi-color cartoon. Chevalier In Film Of Paris At Rex J^FTEE a rather long abseiica Maurice Chevalier returns in "The Way to Live" (Paramount) at the Rex today. And more important still, he is back in Paris, which should be all to the good. The cast is:— Francois Maurice Chevalier Madeleine

    Hide note
  82. Social Doings Of The Week
    Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954) Thursday 8 March 1934 p 61 Article
    Abstract: Gone To Ulooloo.—Mrs. Albion Tolley left the other morning for Ulooloo, Hallett, on a visit to Miss lily Melrose. Back In Town—Mrs. Frank Barritt 1978 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 13:01:39.0

    Social ZDoings Of ^he 'Week

    | £-y £ady diitty « i ? ?

    Gone To Ulooloo. — Mrs. Albion Tol ley left the other morning for Ulooloo, Hallett, on a visit to Miss Lily Melrose. Back In Town — Mrs. Frank Barritt, ?who has been spending some weeks at Glehelg, has now returned to Milford House, Jeffcott street.

    Been To Melbourne.— Mrs. Leonard Lindon. who has been on a visit to Melbourne and Geelong, has returned to her home at Prospect. A Country Visit. — Miss Jo Samuel, of Palmer place, who has been on a visit to her brother on Eyre Peninsula, returned to Adelaide last week. Afternoon Party.— Mrs. Dudley Tur ner has sent out invitations for an afternoon party today. Mr. and Mrs. Turner will sail 6hortly for England. Returned To Gilberton. — Mrs. Charles Downer has returned to Ste phen terrace, Gilberton, after having spent a few days at Victor Harbcur 'With Mrs. Prank Toms. Birthday Party. — Late afternoon parties become increasingly popular, On April 22 Miss Nan Gosse, of North Adelaide, will be hostess at a cocktail party to celebrate her birthday. Leaving For England.— Miss May Stewart is making plans for a trip to London to see her brother. Mr. Arthur Kingston Stewart, and will leave for England by the Franken, on April 17. Trip Planned.— Mr. and Mrs. Keith Brougham intend to come to town shortly from their home near Broken Hill. They have planned to sail by the Nieuw Zeeland on a trip to Java and Singapore. Young Doctors Depart. — Two young Adelaide doctors who are leaving for England this year are Dr. Noel Bon nin, of North Adelaide, who will leave on March 8, and Dr. John Hayward, of Gilberton, who will sail on May 4 Staying at 'Rosebank.'— Mrs. Ron ald Horwood, who has been staying at the Oriental Hotel for a fortnight, has left town, and is now the guest of Mr. R. T. Melrose, at 'Rosebank,' Mount Pleasant, for some weeks. At Grange.— Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Marriott, of Avenel Gardens, Medindie, with their two children, are staying at Grange for a few weeks. Mrs. C M. Todd (Mrs. Marriott's mother), of'Le fevre terrace, who lived at Grange for many years, is staying with them. Returning to Sydney — After having lived for about 18 months at Medindie, Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Goldfinch will leave for Sydney on March 14, and will make their home there again. Their eon, Malcolm, will remain in Adelaide for the present. In New South Wales.— Mrs. Nat Campbell and Miss Kathleen Camp bell, of North Adelaide, are having a most enjoyable holiday with relatives in New South Wales. They have been staying at 'Taralla,' Binnjendore, and are now with Lady Ryrie at 'Mica lago,' near Cooma.

    On Trousseau Affairs. — Miss Joan Tennant, who is one of the several well-known Adelaide girls engaged in fhe pleasant business of choosing a trousseau, is in town from Princess Royal station, and staying with Miss Peacock, of Brougham place, who is the aunt of her fiance, Dr. Brian Swift. Returning To Ealm Beach. — Dr. and Mrs. Walter Blaxland, who have been spending some weeks in Adelaide with Mrs. Blaxland's sister (Miss Marion Downer), at Walkerville, intend to re turn shortly to their home at Palm Beach (N.S.W.). Miss Downer is plan ning a visit to relatives in Western Aus tralia. On An Autumn Cruise. — Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Clutterbuck, of Spring wood Park, will be off this month for an autumn cruise on the Cathay, which will include Java and various islands, and, on the way home take in the Bar rier Reef and Tasmania. Mrs. Clut terbuck will board the ship at Mel bourne where she will first go to see her daughter, Pat, who is at school at 'Clyde.' Plans Altered!.— Mrs. William Lowe, who intended to return to Lefevre ter race from Western Australia at the end of last month, has postponed her return until the middle of this month. She has been spending some time at Middleton Beach, Albany, where she had a house for some weeks, and her son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Ridgwav Lowe, were staying with her. She has also been visiting Perth, where she has many friends. Date Chosen.— So many dates in the early, part of the season have been chosen for dances, particularly pri vate ones, that organisers of fund raising affairs are looking further ahead and making plans for later on. The committee of the Glenelg branch of the Mothers and Babies' Health As sociation has decided on Friday, June 8, for their annual dance, which is always a most cheery affair, with a home-made supper of the most deli cious description. Shipboard Fashions.— A violent re vulsion against the wearing of shorts, jazz pyjamas, and all that sort of thing on board ship has mercifully taken place. A lately returned traveller, speaking of the fashions worn by girls on one of the big liners, says that when the ship first left Tilbury docks some of the Bright Young Things wore very smartly cut navy blue woollen trousers and tailored blouses, but, apart from those, neither shorts, pyjamas, nor trousers were worn by any of the smart girls. It simply 'isn't done.' They wore chiefly cotton frocks, cut very plainly, and sleeveless. Latest News. — From Switzerland comes news that Lady Smith is slowly recovering from the effects of the motoring accident in which she and Sir Keith were involved. Sir Keith had to go to London on business, so Mrs. George Cowan joined Lady Smith at Zurich and accompanied her for a fortnight's stay in the sunny atmo sphere of Davos. Swiss doctors, who are so keen on the curative power of the sun, have much hope that it will do her good and cure the scars on her face. One of the nerves of her face was damaged, but not beyond repair, and a cut close to the eye was treated in time so that the eyesight is not im paired. Fete At Angaston. — 'It is just 50 miles from town, and bitumen all the way,' is the persuasive way in which Mrs. C. E. Stephens (who, with Mrs. D. Far mer, is secretary of a Girl Guide fete to be held at Angaston on Saturday, March 10), inspires town people to take the road for 'Yalumba' on that day, for Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Smith have lent their lovely garden for the fete, and their son, Mr. P. S. Smith, whose garden, with its attractive fern houses, is adjoining;, will also open liis grounds to the public. Lady Hore-Ruthven is going from town to open the fete, the Guiding arrangements of which are in charge of the divisional commissioner (Mrs. D. R. Shannon), district commis sioner (Mrs. E. T. Dean), and district captain ? (Miss P. M. Stephens). Of Our Prettiest.— A number of our prettiest girls will play the part of mannequins at the fashion parade in aid of the Lord Mayor's relief fund, which is being organised by John Mar tin's and will take place in the Town Hall on the afternoons of March 13, 14, and 15. There are to be other attractions of fascinating description, which I would dearly like to tell you about, but the agonised 'please don't' of the organiser has prevailed. After all, it is much more amusing for an unannounced 'stunt' to burst in on an audience. Taking part in the parade are Misses Ashley Melrose, Betty Bruce, Beryl Homburg, Joan Sandford, Connie Scott, Pattie Smeaton, Phemie Armstrong, Patsy Giles, Eileen Lane, Noni Mandeville, Audrey Pittman, Billie Maddern, Jean Morris and Dorothy Fidoch. A False Alarm.— The large and lovely collection of wedding gifts sent to Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey Angas Parsons (the latter being formerly Miss Colleen Cud more) was, of course, somewhat of a responsibility to the bride's grand mother, Mrs. D. H. Cudmore, in whose beautiful home the wedding reception was held, and where the presents were shown in one of the reception rooms. An all-night guardian was installed (a former member of the London police force) to take care of the presents. During the night a dull thud re sounded in the next room, which hap

    pened to be the dining room. In a moment he was 'up and at 'em' as it were, only to find that the alarming noise was caused by a large vase of flowers, beautifully arranged by Mrs. Lavington Bonython, which had toppled from the mantelpiece to the floor. Unusual, Of Course. — For some time now the powers-thatnbe of The Ab Intra Studio have promised to produce a play by Jacques Copeau,, and next week (probably, the exact date is not yet announced) will produce 'The house into which we are born.' It is the only play he has ever written, and took him twenty years to do it. It is a very sensitive and subtle thing, the 'house' being any house where any of us might have been born, each one trying to do the best he can with so little understanding of the other. With their flair for the unusual, Kester Baruch and Alan Harkness will pro duce it so that an audience gets the impression of looking into the house through a window or through a wall that has been removed. It sounds so intriguing that everybody is looking forward to seeing the production, which is the first long play produced at the studio. Taking part in it will be Kester Baruch, Alan Harkness, Brenda Kekwick, Lorraine ANGUS, David Daw son, Werner Hebart, and Anthony Young. Doing Away With Imposition.— The social science course, Miss Lathlean says, is theoretically the same as the

    almoners' course. Taking up a case, checking the person's story, investi gating and arriving at the true and complete story does away with all the imposition that is met with in charit able work and also gives instant re-r lief to those who really need it. 'In all the course nothing has impressed me more than psychology' (Professor Gunn, lecturer) says Miss Lathlean. 'It teaches how to find out the mal adjustments of environment and to get the persons to take the right slant. The knowledge of psychiatry (mental and nerves) too plays a big part in the system.' This year she will study kindergarten and child welfare, also hospital work on the practical side from the almoner's point of view. It all sounds extremely absorbing, yet shows how tremendously charity work has increased. We have no social science displqma course at the Ade laide University, although, of course, we have many charities. Dance and Cabaret.— The dance and cabaret to be held in aid. of the Wal kerville branch of the District Trained Nursing Society on March 13. in the charming home and garden of Mr. and Mrs. Guy Makin, at Strangways terrace, North Adelaide, promises to be one of the most cheery and amusing enter tainments possible. Mrs. Makin has definitely scrapped her original idea of having a dinner first. Dancing will take place in the ballroom upstairs and the large drawing-room downstairs, and between dances there will be attractive cabaret turns in the garden, arranged

    by Toe H men. who are also going to garland the garden— which is a very sheltered one. by-the-way — with gay colored lights. There will be some ex cellent tap dancing, a very funny clown, a juggler, and. of course, music. An added attraction is the fact that the dance will be held during Fleet week, so it will be an excellent party to take the naval men to. Tickets can be obtained only from Mrs. Makin, the name of each guest must be clearly written on them, and no one will be admitted without a ticket. ? ?

    Hide note
  83. THE MOVEMENT OF THE NATIVITY PLAY
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Wednesday 7 December 1932 p 12 Article
    Abstract: It is no doubt astonishing to some that rhythmic movement should be necessary or suitable in a Nativity Play. However, the whole setting of 253 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 13:02:27.0

    THE MOVEMENT OF TOE NATIVITY PLAY

    It is no doubt astonishing to some that rhythmic movement should be necessary or suitable in a Nativity Flay. However, the wbole setting of the play has been worked out by Miss Heather Gell, who, as an exponent of the Jacques Dalcroze method of Eurhythmies has used the principles

    of that great artist and composer, in arranging and desiening all movement to assist In creating an Impression and an atmosphere. Rhythm, which psrvades the whole play, is slowly but surely mpMng itself recognised as a vital force in modern stage produc tions. In this case, the movement is sometimes realistic, sometimes impres sionistic. At times, as when the move ments of the water lilies follows on the scene of the Annunciation, the idea is simply an expression of peace and beauty of the garden scene. Again, before the final scene in the stable, the restrained movement to a beautiful Bach Chorale is meant to symbolise the 'Spirit of Giving' at Christmas time An entirely different type of movement to percussion ac companiment precedes the Wise Hen scene. Again the idea is not to ex hibit a conventional Eastern dance, but rather to give an Impression of the East in strong rhythmic move ments. Advanced students lead these movements, including Ada Stephens, Shirley Stephens, Lorraine ANGUS, Margaret Cox, Lesley Cox, Dorothy Slane, Kai.htepn Short, Margaret. Richardson, Peggy Shaw, Mavis San dercock. Cecily Deering and Lucy WUloughby. The Nativity Play com mences on Friday evening, at Theatre Royal. ??

    Hide note
  84. Women's Pageant Planned
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Tuesday 2 May 1933 p 14 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: An original pageant play called "The Springs of Power" will be one of the features at the official reception which will open the fourth triennial 258 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 13:04:39.0

    MRS. JOHN GOODCHILD'S model of Lorraine Angus, which is one of many attractive exhibits in the Handicrafts Exhibition at Shell House.

    Hide note
  85. The Advertiser WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1933 Gardeners Look Ahead: Busy Christmas Shoppers: Wharfside Improvements
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Wednesday 6 December 1933 p 24 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: TRAMWAYS TRUST employes replacing worn-out wooden poles with steel ones fitted in a concrete base to carry high tension wires. A 342 words
    Digitised article icon
  86. In Town and Out
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Thursday 14 December 1933 p 14 Article
    Abstract: SOME of the performers in "The Bluebird" are making their stage debuts at a particularly tender age. One or two of the small children who fluttered 938 words
    Digitised article icon
  87. Chronicles of "Candida" At Keswick
    The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954) Saturday 23 December 1933 p 14 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: IT is nice to know at this time of festivity that those not so fortunate as to be in their own homes for the Christmas celebrations are not forgotten ... 3014 words
    Digitised article icon
  88. CHILD DANCERS Lorraine Angus' Recital
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Wednesday 30 November 1932 p 19 Article
    Abstract: A charming programme was presented by Lorraine Angus, the child dancer, to a crowded house at the Australia Hall last night, when her pupils 253 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 13:10:58.0

    CHILD DANCERS

    Lorraine Angus' Recital

    A charming programme was pre sented by Lorraine Angus, the child dancer, to a crowded house at the Aus tralia Hall last night, when her pupils appeared in her original ballet. 'The Sleepy Tulip' and divertissements. . A freshness and lack of sophistication

    arjouc me wnoie penonnance suggesw?u an elfin Intelligence, and although the characters of the ballet were the stock figures of flowers, fairies, and butter flies, they had an air of delightful er. joyment which belongs to happy chil dren In their native element of make believe. Lorraine Is a child of 14, tino nas been teaching other children to dance eince she was 12. With two exceptions the dances in the programme were her own invention. To have organised a public display by 40 children is no mean achievement, and the precision with which the arrangements were car ried out is a tribute to her practical qualities. Conscientious teaching was evident, and some of the pupils showed decided talent. The first part of the programme was devoted to Lorraine's ballet. 'The Sleepy Tulip,' and a Grecian dance, a Dutch dance, and several fairy and child studies followed. Solo work was particularly pood. The items by tiny children received special applause. Lorraine Angus herself dismayed her striking talent and versatility in a statue dance, Hungarian peasant dances and a Grecian study. The whole of the music, which was very bright and appropriate, was com oosed expressly for the performance by Mr. Haro'.d Broadbent. who was pianist.

    Hide note
  89. CROWDS FLOCK TO FASHION DISPLAY Lady Chaytor On Latest Styles
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Tuesday 9 August 1932 p 14 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Although Lady Chaytor's fashion lecture "Personality in Dress" was timed for 3 p.m. yesterday at the Myer Emporium, a queue of would-be listeners 1008 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 13:11:49.0

    PHOTO
    Lorraine Angus, working on the model of her ballet set, ''The Tulip Garden.''

    Hide note
  90. YOUNG DANCING TEACHER Girl Plans Ballets
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Wednesday 23 November 1932 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Youthful talent will be unusually prominent at a dance recital to be given at the Australia on November 29, by pupils of Miss Lorraine Angus. 235 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-06-16 13:12:27.0

    YOUNG DANCING TEACHER Girl Plans Ballets Youthful. talent will be unusually pro minent at a dance recital to be given at the' Australia on November 29, by pupils of Miss Lorraine Angus. A tall girl of 14. .with black pigtails. Lorraine .is one of Australia's- youngest dlancing teachers.. She. began teaching threyears'ago-with one pupil. Last year 27 children took part in her recital, and this year theie will be 40: Some of them are little more than toddlers, but there is one girl the same age as her teacher. The young teacher .took her own first dancing lessons at three, and is busy. in her own words. "still learning." She is studying. under three teachers. She took upteaching with the idea of raising sufii cienit funds to travel to Europe for fur ther studies. She is particularly anxious to study in some.of the modern English ballet schools. To enable her to carry on her work her ordinar3: schooling was superseded by siecial private tuition in English. French, and other subjects, when she was 12. Lorraine danced twice before Parlova. and during the great dancer's last Aus traian tour., and receivud lessons from her ballet master. I. Pianowski. Besides teaching, Lorraine plans out all her own ballets arind designs the costumes. For one of her largest new ballets she has'worked out the dancers' positions by a plasticene model, dotted with figures half an inch in height.

    Hide note
  91. Social Calendar Nov.
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Thursday 24 November 1932 p 13 Detailed Lists, Results, Guides
    79 words
    Digitised article icon
  92. Social Calendar
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Friday 25 November 1932 p 5 Detailed Lists, Results, Guides
    75 words
    Digitised article icon