1. List: Aleister Crowley (2)
    Aleister Crowley (2) thumbnail image
    Public

    Australasian articles regarding the life and career of English poet Aleister Crowley (1875—1947).
    List 2: 1947—2013.

    81 items
    created by: accipiter.astralis.111 on 2015-01-23 23:58:43.0
    User data
    Tags:
    Add tag(s)
    Comments: No comments yet - Add one!
    Rating: unrated

List items:

Showing: 1 - 81 of 81

  1. "Wickedest Man In Britain" Dies At 72 From Our Special Representative LONDON, Dec. 3.
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Thursday 4 December 1947 p 1 Article
    Abstract: Aliester Crowley, the "wickedest man in Britain," who said that he Believed in blood sacrifices—'human sacrifices 450 words
    • Text last corrected on 13 February 2016 by ellarocks
    Digitised article icon
  2. Doctor Dies Soon After Man Who Cursed Him "Herald" Service
    Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954) Friday 5 December 1947 p 1 Article
    Abstract: LONDON, Dec. 4.—Dr. William Brown Thomson, 68, who used to prescribe morphia tablets for the black magician, Alister Crowley, died within 105 words
    Digitised article icon
  3. Claimed To Be "Invisible Man"
    The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1933 - 1954) Friday 5 December 1947 p 1 Article
    Abstract: LONDON, December 4 (Special).—Doctor William Brown Thomson, 68, who used to prescribe morphia tablets for the black magician, Aleister Crowley, has d ... 222 words
    • Text last corrected on 13 February 2016 by ellarocks
    Digitised article icon
  4. CABLE NEWS IN BRIEF Britain's Bid For World Car Racing Titles A.A.P. And Oar Special Representative LONDON, December 4.
    The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Friday 5 December 1947 p 6 Article
    Abstract: The British Motor Racing Research Trust has announced plans for constructing a team of 1½ litre "racing cars to capture 1037 words
    Digitised article icon
  5. Secrecy at Cremation
    The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954) Saturday 6 December 1947 p 1 Article
    Abstract: LONDON, Saturday.—Undertaker, mortuary attendant, and pledged to secrecy about the "magic rites" performed at the Brighton funeral of the alleged bla ... 217 words
    Digitised article icon
  6. Strange rites at funeral LONDON, Saturday.
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Sunday 7 December 1947 p 3 Article
    Abstract: So-called "magick" rites were performed at the Brighton funeral today of poet author and alleged 81 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-07-14 23:05:53.0

    So-called "magick" rites were performed at the Brighton funeral today of poet-author and alleged black-magician Aleister Crowley.
    An oddly assorted group of Crowley's "Magick Arts and Sciences" adherents assembled to hear extracts read from Crowley's "The Book of the Law."
    After the ceremony one mourner warned a reporter: "You had better be careful what you write — Crowley might strike at you."

    Hide note
  7. Black or white, his magic branded him as wicked
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Sunday 7 December 1947 p 1 Article
    Abstract: The invocation went on for two hours. Then a cat was brought in and laid on the seven-sided white altar, with a red star painted on the side, and sac ... 958 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-07-15 00:03:38.0

    FACT'S London News Bureau
    The invocation went on for two hours. Then a cat was brought in and laid on the seven-sided white altar, with a red star painted on the side, and sacrificed.
    Blood from the dead cat dripped into a bowl and a man stepped forward and drank the blood.
    An Englishwoman, Mrs. Betty Loveday, described the scene to an English court and said the man who drank the cat's blood was her husband, Frederick Loveday, known as Raoul.
    Mrs. Loveday gave evidence in 1934, for the defence in a libel action brought by Edward Alexander (Aleister) Crowley against authoress Nina Hamnett, and the publishers of her book, Laughing Torso. ...

    [From "Fact And OPINION", a supplement to the Sunday Sun.]

    Hide note
  8. A LONDON LETTER From Lady Margaret Stewart
    Truth (Brisbane, Qld. : 1900 - 1954) Sunday 7 December 1947 p 14 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: IN 1934 a judge—the late Mr. Justice Swift—uttered this condemnation: "I thought I knew of every conceivable form of wickedness, but I have never hea ... 1553 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-09-10 23:48:15.0

    IN 1934 a judge—the late Mr. Justice Swift—uttered this condemnation: "I thought I knew of every conceivable form of wickedness, but I have never heard such dreadful, horrible, blasphemous, abominable stuff as that produced by a man who describes himself as the 'Greatest Living Power.' " [Sic; a Brisbane Truth innovation.]
    That was said of the infamous Englishman Aleister Crowley, the man who combined the iniquities of a Marquis de Sade with the black magic of a necromancer, who believed in a degenerate celebration of the Black Mass, who declared: "I believe in blood sacrifices, human sacrifices being best of all."
    Once tall and good-looking, this fiend who loved obscene ritual and drugs, was described before his death last week as "fat, olive-skinned, with staring reptilian eyes, heavy jowl, wispy grey hair, the very embodiment of a repulsive Dorian Gray."
    Crowley was champion of unimaginable vice. He revived the ancient cult of Satanism, at one time widely publicised in England, and one which even today has secret worshippers. During the war this cult was again heard of practised in milder form in obscure parts of this country.
    Crowley was expelled from Italy after founding the Abbey of Thelema, where he sacrificed live cats. He was also thrown out of France.
    Although he spent £100,000 on devil worship, he became an undischarged bankrupt, dying last week a morphia addict.
    His doctor, William Brown Thomson, who prescribed the drugs for him, refused to increase the prescription three months ago, and was consequently cursed by Crowley, whom he followed to the grave within 24 hours of the "Master's" death!

    Hide note
  9. A LONDON LETTER
    Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954) Sunday 7 December 1947 p 25 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: IN 1943 the late Mr. Justice Swift uttered this condemnation: "I thought I knew of every conceivable form of wickedness, but I have never heard such ... 1832 words
    • Text last corrected on 13 February 2016 by ellarocks
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-09-10 23:22:16.0

    IN 1943 the late Mr. Justice Swift uttered this this condemnation: "I thought I knew of every conceivable form of wickedness, but I have never heard such dreadful, horrible, blasphemous, abominable stuff as that produced by a man who describes himself as the greatest living poet."
    He was speaking of an infamous Englishman, Aleister Crowley, a man who combined the iniquities of a Marquis de Sade with the black magic of a necromancer, who believed in degenerate celebration of the black mass, who declared, "I believe in blood sacrifices, human sacrifices being best of all."
    Once tall and good-looking, this fiend who loved obscene ritual and drugs, was described before his death this week as a fat olive-skinner with staring reptilian eyes, heavy jowl, wispy grey hair, the very embodiment of a repulsive Dorian Gray."
    Crowley revived the ancient cult of satanism at one time widely publicised in England and which even today has secret worshippers.
    During the war, this cult was again heard of and was practised in milder form in obscure parts of this country.
    Crowley was expelled from Italy after founding the Abbey of Thelema, where he sacrificed live cats. He was also thrown out of France.
    Although he spent £100,000 on devil worship he became an undischarged bankrupt, dying a morphia addict.
    His doctor, William Brown Thomson, who prescribed drugs for him, refused to increase the prescription three months ago and was consequently cursed by Crowley, whom he followed to the grave within 24 hours of the "master's" death.
    An oddly-assorted group of people, including five well-dressed women, attended the last rites over Crowley, at the undenominational chapel of the Brighton Crematorium.
    One woman placed a bunch of pink carnations on his coffin before it disappeared.
    There was no religious service, and Crowley's cremation, like his life, was mysterious.
    As the mourners stood around silently, one of Crowley's best friends opened a large volume and, in a powerful voice, read extracts from Crowley's own book "Magic in Theory and Practice."
    Then the mourners talked among themselves, lit cigarettes, and drifted quietly away. All were pledged to secrecy about the "rites."
    Half jocularly one mourner said to a reporter: "Better be careful what you write—Crowley might strike at you."

    Hide note
  10. Web page: "Worst Man In The World" Dies, Leaves Weird Pictures
    http://[Direct hyperlink disallowed(1)]
    Web page
    Note

    2018-01-13 23:50:24.0

    Malaya Tribune (Singapore, Federation of Malaya), 13 December 1947, p 3.

    [Find this article on this site: NewspaperSG.]

    Hide note
  11. Black Masses Are Now Banned In Brighton From Our Staff Correspondent
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 3 April 1948 p 3 Article
    Abstract: LONDON, April 2—The Brighton Corporation's Crematorium last December was the scene of a "debased ritual" 176 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-07-15 22:25:27.0

    From Our Staff Correspondent
    LONDON, April 2—The Brighton Corporation's Crematorium last December was the scene of a "debased ritual" performed by 20 people sworn to secrecy, members of the local council believe.
    The council met yesterday to discuss stories which had leaked out about the cremation of Edward Alexander Crowley, who during his life had been accused of practising black magic, celebrating the black mass and obscene rites, raising devils, making himself invisible, and taking drugs.
    He called himself "the great wild beast" and "the worst man in the world."
    The cremation ceremony, said one councillor, included a hymn to Pan, Collects from the Gnostic Mass, and readings from Crowley's own book, "Book of the Law," which, he claimed, a spirit dictated to him.
    "Whether agnostic, atheist, or Christian, we don't like to see consecrated ground so desecrated," said a councillor.
    The council agreed that future cremations should be accompanied by one of the orthodox services.

    Hide note
  12. Web page: Black magic at crematorium
    http://[Direct hyperlink disallowed(2)]
    Web page
    Note

    2018-01-13 23:47:04.0

    The Singapore Free Press (Singapore, Federation of Malaya), 12 April 1948, p 3.

    [Find this article on this site: NewspaperSG.]

    Hide note
  13. Truth To Tell
    Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954) Sunday 24 October 1948 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Palm Beach Surf Club is the most independent on the coast. The club is regarded as the wealthiest on the coast, too. 1279 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-30 23:56:53.0

    HELP? John Symonds, of 19 Arkwright Road, Hampstead, London, has dropped us a line in the following terms: "I am preparing a life of the late Aleister Crowley, poet, mountaineer and magician who made me his literary executor. I should be extremely grateful if any of your readers would let me see any early letters (before 1919), parts of 'Magical Diaries,' the page-proofs of the third volume of the Confessions which was never publlshed, or any other material." We always thought a literary executor was an editor.

    Hide note
  14. Once wealthy magician leaves £18
    News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Tuesday 1 March 1949 p 2 Article
    Abstract: London, Monday.—Aleister Crowley, mystic and author of books on black magic, who was once expelled from 91 words
    Digitised article icon
  15. ONCE RICH 'DEVIL MAN' LEAVES £22 IN WILL
    The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950) Tuesday 1 March 1949 p 1 Article
    Abstract: LONDON, Tues (AAP): A 72-year-old mystic who once inherited £A37,500 and styled himself "the worst man in the world" left only £A22 in his will. He w ... 93 words
    • Text last corrected on 13 February 2016 by ellarocks
    Digitised article icon
  16. Letters to the Editor CONDITION OF VIEW-STREET
    Queensland Times (Ipswich, Qld. : 1909 - 1954) Wednesday 2 March 1949 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Sir. —I read in the Queensland Tune", of Saturday that Ald. W. S. Hastie said that on the north side the concrete 254 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-07-15 22:37:21.0

    Mystic Dies.—Aleister Crowley, mystic and author of books on black magic, who once was expelled from Italy for practising private rituals and rites, left only £18 in his will.

    Hide note
  17. Worst Man In World Leaves £18
    The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) Wednesday 2 March 1949 p 9 Article
    Abstract: LONDON, Tues. (A.A.P.). — Aleister Crowley, mystic and author of books on black magic, who was once expelled from Italy for practising 100 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-24 00:07:14.0

    Raised Devils
    Lost £29,982

    London, March 4.—Aleister Crowley, mystic and author of books on black magic, who was once expelled from Italy for practising private rituals and rites, left only £18 in his will, published this week.
    Crowley, who styled himself "The worst man in the world," died in December, 1947, aged 72.
    During his lifetime, Crowley, who inherited £30,000, travelled in the Orient, and ran a "temple" in London, in which he claimed to raise devils in its mirror-lined walls.
    He went bankrupt in 1934 after losing a libel action.

    Hide note
  18. Alister Crowley Left £18 "WORST MAN IN THE WORLD"
    Kalgoorlie Miner (WA : 1895 - 1950) Wednesday 2 March 1949 p 3 Article
    Abstract: London, Feb. 28.—Alister Crowley mystic and author of books on black magic who was once expelled from Italy for practicing 105 words
    Digitised article icon
  19. Raised Devils Lost £29.982
    Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954) Friday 4 March 1949 p 5 Article
    Abstract: London, March 4.—Aleister Crowley, mystic and author of books on black magic, who was once expelled from Italy 96 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-24 00:13:32.0

    Raised Devils
    Lost £29,982

    London, March 4.—Aleister Crowley, mystic and author of books on black magic, who was once expelled from Italy for practising private rituals and rites, left only £18 in his will, published this week.
    Crowley, who styled himself "The worst man in the world," died in December, 1947, aged 72.
    During his lifetime, Crowley, who inherited £30,000, travelled in the Orient, and ran a "temple" in London, in which he claimed to raise devils in its mirror-lined walls.
    He went bankrupt in 1934 after losing a libel action.

    Hide note
  20. Did 'flying broom' bring death? Hunt for witches is on in England Argus Special Service
    The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Monday 18 September 1950 p 2 Article
    Abstract: A LITTLE OLD LADY, who this week uncovered what she claims to be a case of 1226 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-24 00:14:00.0

    BEFORE the war police received a number of reports of Black Mass being celebrated in London.
    Most notorious of the self-confessed believers in witchcraft and black arts was Aleister Crowley, who died three years ago.
    He was called the "wickedest man in Britain," and said to be a believer in blood sacrifices — "human sacrifices being best of all."
    He celebrated Black Mass—or Satan worship—raised devils, and held obscene rituals.
    He was even accused of causing the death of a young man in Sicily whom he employed as a secretary.

    Hide note
  21. DEVOTED HIS LIFE TO EVIL AND SEX
    Mirror (Perth, WA : 1921 - 1956) Saturday 3 November 1951 p 6 Article
    Abstract: London, Today: A book just published here and causing great discussion lifts the lid for the first time on the horrible activities of real-life figur ... 327 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-24 00:14:33.0

    [Brief review, from the London Mirror, of The Great Beast.]

    Hide note
  22. Web page: 'The Beast' Drove Women To Suicide
    http://[Direct hyperlink disallowed(3)]
    Web page
    Note

    2018-01-13 23:46:45.0

    The Singapore Free Press (Singapore, Federation of Malaya), 6 December 1951, p 2.

    [Joint review of The Magic of My Youth, by Arthur Calder-Marshall, and The Great Beast, by John Symonds; with the full-length, 1934 photograph.
    Find this article on this site: NewspaperSG.]

    Hide note
  23. Web page: 'The Great Beast' Was A Trifle Bogus
    http://[Direct hyperlink disallowed(4)]
    Web page
    Note

    2018-01-13 23:46:07.0

    The Straits Times (Singapore, Federation of Malaya), 17 December 1951, p 8.

    [Joint review of The Magic of My Youth, by Arthur Calder-Marshall, and The Great Beast, by John Symonds.
    Find this article on this site: NewspaperSG.]

    Hide note
  24. SOMETHING PERSONAL The World's Wickedest Man
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 22 December 1951 p 8 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: TF it is inconvenient to go on vacation at this time of the year the next best thing is to take one vicariously. 1540 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-01-12 18:40:35.0

    AT Cefalu, on the north coast of the island, the Clarks encountered the deserted remains of Villa Santa Barbara, the ill-famed "Abbey" of Aleister Crowley, the licentious lad from Leamington, the self-styled "Wickedest Man in the World."
    The poet-magician's proud motto "Do What Thou Wilt" was still to be seen crudely inscribed on the door, now overgrown with weeds.
    Thirty years ago the pale young poets and poetesses spoke of Aleister Crowley with bated breath. ...
    To some people he was the living spirit of all the evil on the earth. To some he was a genius gone astray and a poet of considerable stature.
    To others he was just plain nuts.
    MR. CLARK recalls for us some of the forgotten data of the poet's life. ...
    STRANGELY enough Crowley was a sort of idealist. His motto "Do What Thou Wilt" was based on the idea that the individual should examine his nature as though it were a machine and allow it to work without obstruction in order that latent aptitudes be liberated.
    He enjoined his followers to conceal nothing from each other—a philosophy that had something in common with the "Oxford Group Movement." Out of this unrestricted state man lifted himself to the status of a demi-god!
    From Cefalu to California his orders and lodges were founded.
    Nevertheless it is difficult to assess how much was deliberate ballyhoo and how much was serious belief, for Master Crowley was not without a keen sense of humour. ...
    He still remains an enigma but at least he can be classed as the Arch Exhibitionist of his day. He just loved to "dress up." Under strict surveillance he would have made an admirable Santa Claus at a city store!

    Mr. Clark found the famous "Abbey" something of a disappointment. It was little larger than a farmhouse. The door was blistered and the shutters were cracked. Nothing of splendour remained in that unholy place save the glorious vista over the Tyrrhenian Sea. He camped beside its walls for one night and moved on.

    [Long review of Swordfish And Stromboli, by Denis Clark. The book described a visit to Cefalu and gave an account of Crowley.]

    Hide note
  25. Wicked Girls Who Worship Satan In Secret Temples FABIAN OF THE YARD EXPOSES BLACK MAGIC RITES
    Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954) Sunday 23 December 1951 p 23 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: I know that black magic exists because I have seen it. The practice of diabolical sacrilegious rites in the heart of London is undoubtedly on the inc ... 1511 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-24 00:20:21.0

    By Ex-Supt. Robert Fabian of Scotland Yard who has written a new series for Truth.
    I know that black magic exists because I have seen it. The practice of diabolical sacrilegious rites in the heart of London is undoubtedly on the increase. And the Satan worship which goes on today is a survival of the Dark Ages when witches were publicly burned on Tower Hill. ...
    And when Aleister Crowley (The Beast 666) died near Brighton the rites of Pan were solemnly used instead of a Christian funeral service. In the secret temples of South Kensington, Paddington—and, I believe, Bloomsbury, too—men and women gather every full moon to worship Satan with ritual and sacrifice that would shame an African savage!
    SOME firmly believe the world is a battle-ground between God and Satan, and if they declare themselves with the Devil, he will aid their success in life, and even a certain amount of comfort in Hell, with the chance of being reborn periodically as leaders of earthly wickedness. Others—probably the majority—attend a Black Mass to get a cheap thrill. They have heard of obscene ceremonies—half-naked girl "priestesses," blood sacrifices of cats and goats and unholy ritual dances to the rhythm of drums. They do not realise—until it is too late—that in these temples of Satan, brain-stealing, herbal incenses and hypnotic devices are mercilessly used, until the man or girl who came just to stare and giggle may find themselves trapped. ...
    The door to black magic is through the back offices of certain London bookshops that specialise in volumes on the occult diabolism, alchemy. Satan worshippers also get their new victims among likely-looking students at lectures on spiritualism, necromancy, tribal rites. ...
    THE horrible cleverness of all this is that—at a cost of probably less than £300—the black magic disciples have set their stage to capture not merely the adolescent instinct that is in most of us for "secret societies"—but also the adult hunger for some strong religious impulse, and the immemorial superstitious fear of "devils." ...
    There is a witchcraft ritual in which young girls or susceptible boys are dedicated to Pan, that is indescribable. It is followed by a "fertility ceremony;" involving the African idol.
    THERE is also a "Rite of Abramelin"—supposedly to raise devils—that requires a girl to be bound to the replica of the church altar. ...
    The difficulty of the police is that, in England, it has never been their duty to suppress religious sects. Nor can they easily get "spies" into the black magic orgies. For the initiates are cleverly taken, step by step, through various stages of ritual. Only by co-operating whole-heartedly in the early, trivial obscenities can they win their way into the more vile ceremonies. Evidence from such witnesses could be made to seem dangerously like that of an "agent provocateur." Watch the local news papers. You may see the signs of witchcraft—reports of robberies of churches where coins in the poorbox are left untouched, but Holy Eucharist wafers and wine are stolen. ...

    Hide note
  26. SHEER BOOKSMANSHlP CLIFFORD BAX'S MEMORIES
    The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Saturday 5 January 1952 p 9 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Clifford Box is a master of the art of booksmanship, or how to write charmingly about books and writers without actually saying anything in particula ... 976 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-07-16 00:48:29.0

    THE CHIEF STRENGTH about Mr. Bax's book is its contents list. There are the names, in this order, and with these epithets, of James Agate, critic and diarist; Stephen Phillips, poetic dramatist; Havelock Ellis, humanist; Gordon Bottomley, poet and dramatist; Aleister Crowley, black
    magician; Arnold Bennett, novelist-reporter; W. H. Davies, the super tramp; Ernest Rhys and Arthur Symons, representing, "the fastidious nineties"; Æ. (George Russell), the strayed angel; W. B. Yeats, chameleon of genius; C. B. Fry, all-rounder, Graham Robertson, E. V. Lucas, Leon Lion, Allan Bennett, Edward Thomas.
    The second strength of the book is the 16 illustrations, which are chiefly photographs, but include also a reproduction of Augustus John's splendid pencil head of Davies. Confronted with these facades, an Australian is astonished at the visible care these British intellectuals take over their appearance. Their care is not merely cosmetic, in the sense of tidiness and decorum. It is adornment. They decorate themselves. They are bedizened (it is the only word) with large rings, special sorts of necktie, huge curly pipes, natty gents' suitings. ...

    Hide note
  27. Web page: This Is What I Need To Convince Me ...
    http://[Direct hyperlink disallowed(5)]
    Web page
    Note

    2018-01-13 23:45:01.0

    By Prof. J.B.S. Haldane
    The Straits Times (Singapore, Federation of Malaya), 20 Jan 1952, p 2.

    A magician.
    There are things we don't understand.
    I have had at least one communication in home experiments from what purported to be a damned soul. A pupil of mine, who was something of a medium, was occasionally possessed by a devil which wrote blasphemies in a curious crabbed hand-writing.
    When asked where it came, it replied "From Aleister Crowley's, this is our evening out." ...

    [An article on Spiritualism; one in a series of articles on the possibility of contacting the deceased.
    Find this article on this site: NewspaperSG]

    Hide note
  28. BOOKS Success story of a Sydney larrikin A CANDID LOOK AT THE NEW BOOKS BY THE BOOKWORM
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Sunday 3 February 1952 p 29 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: JIMMY BROCKETT was going places and no one was going to stop him. Anyone who stood in Jimmy's 1207 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-07-15 01:12:43.0

    While they were at Cefalu, the Clarks visited the old house once occupied by the English practitioner of the black arts, the late Aleister Crowley, who collected a harem of other men's wives.
    Denis Clark records the experiences of local inhabitants who recalled the strange happenings in the magician's house.

    [Review of Swordfish and Stromboli, by Denis Clark.]

    Hide note
  29. Advertising
    The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 29 March 1952 p 14 Advertising
    286 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-31 00:07:57.0

    [Advertisement for the biography of Crowley: The Great Beast.]

    Hide note
  30. A New Slant on Sicily Puppets, Bandits and the Thrills of Tunny Fishing
    The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Saturday 19 April 1952 p 11 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: FEW ISLANDS OF THE WESTERN MEDITERRANEAN HAVE HAD AS MUCH WRITTEN ABOUT them as Sicily. It is richly endowed with temples, cathedrals and architectur ... 1356 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-12-05 21:28:14.0

    More Adventures
    Puppets, tunny, bandits. Even after those experiences the curious Mr. Clark was not satisfied. From the mountains which hid Guiliano he went to Cefalu, and dared to camp at the Villa Santa Barbara.
    Who will recall the Villa Santa Barbara today? It provided one of the most sensational stories of the late twenties, when Aleister Crowley, an Englishman, set up an establishment there and proclaimed himself "the wickedest man in the world."
    "Now there was nothing to see," said Mr. Clark in a moment of disappointment. "The walls had been scraped of the terrible murals and then limewashed, after an outraged carabinieri had requested Crowley to leave the island." ...

    Hide note
  31. HALLOWE'EN TO-NIGHT.. Black magic is still practised
    The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1933 - 1954) Friday 31 October 1952 p 2 Article
    Abstract: AS eleven o'clock strikes to-night, a group of "witches" from all over Britain will celebrate Hallowe'en in an old windmill high on a lonely hillside ... 638 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-24 00:38:34.0

    [Paragraph on Crowley in an article about Halloween celebrations in Britain.]

    Hide note
  32. Advertising
    The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Saturday 14 March 1953 p 16 Advertising
    844 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-12-05 21:43:24.0

    THE GREAT BEAST-LIFE OF ALEISTER CROWLEY (Symonds), lllust.: £1 15/3. Postage extra.

    Hide note
  33. Sunday Times WOMEN'S MAGAZINE Black magic film shocks censor | LONDON:
    Sunday Times (Perth, WA : 1902 - 1954) Sunday 6 February 1955 p 43 Article
    Abstract: British film censor Arthur Watkins is yearning to get his hands 283 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-24 00:39:15.0

    [Article on the film: The Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome.]

    Hide note
  34. GORDON STEWART reviews the week's novels YOU'LL BE SICK OF THAT FIRE
    The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 27 October 1956 p 16 Article
    Abstract: IN "Cloud by Day," Ward Moore has attempted a technique which hasjried the literary skill of many other, and better known writers. It is that of usin ... 551 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-24 00:39:40.0

    [Review of a re-issue of Maugham's The Magician.]

    Hide note
  35. Web page: Black Magic
    http://[Direct hyperlink disallowed(6)]
    Web page
    Note

    2018-01-13 23:44:48.0

    The Singapore Free Press (Singapore, Federation of Malaya), 23 February 1957, p 1.

    [Article purportedly on Malay Magic with a few paragraphs on Crowley.
    Find this article on this site: NewspaperSG]

    Hide note
  36. Papers of Katharine Susannah Prichard
    Prichard, Katharine Susannah, 1883-1969
    [ Unpublished : 1851-1970 ]
    View online
    At National Library
    Papers of Katharine Susannah Prichard
  37. MACBETH AT NIMBROD ST
    Tharunka (Kensington, NSW : 1953 - 2010) Tuesday 23 March 1971 p 13 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: ABOUT TEN years ago at Sydney University there was an elite which wrote and edited the university paper and magazines, wrote, produced and acted in 1594 words
    Digitised article icon
  38. What's it all about, Alf? THE OCCULT. By Colin Wilson. Hodder and Stoughton. 601 pp. $13.20.
    The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) Saturday 8 January 1972 p 13 Article
    Abstract: YOU have to admire Colin Wilson. He just won't let that old Universe get him down. 894 words
    Digitised article icon
  39. GREER, SARTRE & GOD
    Tharunka (Kensington, NSW : 1953 - 2010) Tuesday 14 March 1972 p 8 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Meaning and Morality The inspiration for this article was the recent ABC screening of a Cambridge Union Debate on the subject "Modern 2625 words
    Digitised article icon
  40. the wickedest man in the world
    Woroni (Canberra, ACT : 1950 - 2007) Monday 31 July 1972 p 6 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Aleister Crowley, The Master Therion, The Great Beast 666, the man the newspapers called the wickedest man in the 1300 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-05-26 22:15:29.0

    By Ian Young

    Aleister Crowley, The Master Therion, The Great Beast 666, the man the newspapers called 'the wickedest man in the world' and 'a man we'd like to hang' — 'black' magician, poet, artist, mountaineer, womanizer, homosexual and prophet: his occult works are now enjoying something of a revival, but the man and his writing are still generally under-rated or dismissed. But Crowley, as well as being one of the most bizarre personalities of the 20th century, was an important minor writer, a consistent ethical philosopher, and one of the first modern artists to deal unashamedly, even exultantly, with homosexual eroticism. ...

    [Reprinted from The Body Politic (Toronto, Canada), No. 4, May/June 1972, p 11.
    A pdf of this issue of this "gay liberation newspaper" is available here:
    The Body Politic.
    And see here: Ian Young.]

    Hide note
  41. THE AAHS AND YUKS OF SCIENTIFIC CATOLOGY CATS AND CAT CARE. An international encyclopedia edited by G. N. Henderson and D.J. Coffey. David & Charles. 256 pp. $12.50. Reviewer: DAVID SWAIN.
    The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) Friday 21 June 1974 p 10 Article
    Abstract: THE cat on the cover conveys the message of the book. This creature looks severe. It has high standards. It 864 words
    Digitised article icon
  42. P. R. Stephensen and Aleister Crowley
    Roe, Michael
    Meanjin Quarterly
    [ Article : 1974 ]
    View online (conditions apply)
    Note

    2015-01-24 00:44:25.0

    By Michael Roe.
    Meanjin Quarterly, v.33, no.2, June 1974, p.180.

    Hide note
  43. STIRRING IN MURKY WATERS
    The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) Friday 30 August 1974 p 10 Article
    Abstract: WHILE genres come and go as swiftly as fashion, the horror story still seems to appeal to some oddity in 1532 words
    Digitised article icon
  44. Books The Saint returns — but with a tarnished halo | Paperback issues
    The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) Sunday 14 January 1979 p 10 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: The Saint has, as they say, gone off. Despite protestations to the contrary from his creator, Leslie Charteris, the modernday 883 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-07-16 00:55:59.0

    'A History of Magic' (Richard Cavendish, Sphere, 203pp, $4.75) ranges across the centuries from Orpheus of the underworld to Aleister Crowley.
    Cavendish looks at the whole history of the magic art in Western civilisation. From the early days of the pagan and classical religions he progresses to druidism, sorcery, alchemy, witchcraft, the rise of Christianity and the persecutions of the Middle Ages. He looks particularly at the famous—and infamous—practitioners of the occult arts. Finally he considers the new revival of magic, the way modern young people are turning to the Tarot and the I Ching, and considers the reasons for it.

    Hide note
  45. Alphabetical occult
    The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) Sunday 29 July 1979 p 10 Article
    Abstract: PETER Underwood has had 30 years experience in scientific psychical research. For the past 18 years he has been 363 words
    Digitised article icon
  46. WITCHES AND THEIR WAYS
    The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) Saturday 12 December 1981 p 17 Article
    Abstract: THE, phenomenon of witchcraft has interested me for some years, ever since my mother was told she'd make an, 678 words
    Digitised article icon
  47. Wild man of letters : the story of P.R. Stephensen / [Craig Munro]
    Munro, Craig
    [ Book, Audio book : 1984-1992 ]
    View online
    At 61 libraries
    Wild man of letters : the story of P.R. Stephensen / [Craig Munro]
    Note

    2015-01-30 23:07:50.0

    [Includes a chapter on Stephensen's period as Crowley's publisher.
    The full text of the 1992 edition is available for free download here:
    Inky Stephensen: Wild man of letters.]

    Hide note
  48. WRITERS' WORLD STEPHENSEN, EXTREMIST AND ENEMY OF THE SECOND-RATE
    The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) Saturday 28 July 1984 p 16 Article
    Abstract: IN 1965, Sydney's Savage Club invited "Inky" Stcphensen to address them in the state ballroom in Market Street. 1380 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-07-16 01:20:14.0

    In 1929, Stephensen got involved with another Nietzschean anarchist like himself — Aleister Crowley, the sex-crusading satanist the Sunday papers called "the wickedest man in the world". His agreement to publish Crowley's works helped him go broke.
    So he became a ghostwriter and ghosted Walford Hayden's memoir of Pavlova, then wrote a book about a master of hounds — quite a move across the political spectrum for an old Bolshie. ...
    As he died to a standing ovation perhaps some words he had written 30 years before came back to haunt him: "Stern self-criticism is the mark and privilege of an honest man, as stern national self-criticism is the mark of duty and privilege of a patriot . . . The criticism which arises within Australia, as self-criticism, inspired by
    love of the country and belief in it, may be even more bitter than that from outside; but it will be valid, it will be genuine, it will ultimately become constructive."
    That was true, at least, of his remarkable polemical essay, 'The Foundations of Culture in Australia'. His words ring as true today as they did then: "Sheep-culture, agriculture, physical culture, have reached high standards in Australia, but intellectual culture has been neglected."

    Hide note
  49. Woroni 'nice' (& censored)
    Woroni (Canberra, ACT : 1950 - 2007) Monday 9 March 1987 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Dear Eds, I have just finished reading the first edition of WORONI, congratulations, pat on the back, cheers and all other 305 words
    Digitised article icon
  50. Overselling creates a 'pasteboard imperium' Death of the tarot by greed
    The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) Sunday 21 June 1987 p 7 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: TAROT cards arc dead. Killed in the same way as many other traditional survivals have been killed — by greed and overselling. The death of tarot beca ... 1610 words
    Digitised article icon
  51. Avant guardian of cinema obsessed with evil
    The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) Saturday 20 January 1990 p 22 Article
    Abstract: "I'VE always considered movies evil; the day that cinema was invented was a black day for mankind." A paradoxical remark for a man who 1256 words
    • Text last corrected on 20 March 2017 by Valmouth
    Digitised article icon
  52. A Sunny Afternoon.., Linda Bugarin.
    Tharunka (Kensington, NSW : 1953 - 2010) Monday 20 May 1991 p 17 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: It is hot humid. I am at the local shopping centre returning with my two packages to the car. The heat is unbearable, the force of the sun hitting my ... 971 words
    Digitised article icon
  53. Beastly / Ordo Templi Orientis Inc
    Ordo Templi Orientis (Australia)
    [ Periodical : 1991-1993 ]
    At 2 libraries
  54. SUNDAY FEATURES The PAGANS of CANBERRA
    The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) Sunday 30 October 1994 p 19 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: IT WOULD be a typical Saturday afternoon gathering of friends if it weren't for the young man in the centre of 2315 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-24 00:47:52.0

    As Halloween approaches Chris Uhlmann discovers there are many different groups of occult followers practising around Canberra. ...
    On the darker side of modern occult practice is Aleister Crowley, an Englishman born into a rigid Plymouth Brethren family in 1875. Crowley, dubbed "the wickedest man in the world" by the Press of his era, wrote extensively on the occult and magic — or magick as he called it. ...
    ONCE I started to contact pagan and occult groups the list of people to contact kept growing and only a few can be mentioned here. The vast majority of the people I spoke to seemed not only harmless but delightful. At their core, they say their neo-pagan beliefs are simply a celebration of life.

    Hide note
  55. Logging into Satan on Internet
    The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) Sunday 30 October 1994 p 19 Article
    Abstract: THERE are a lot of disturbed people in the world with computers. During an early conversation 611 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-24 00:49:05.0

    THERE are a lot of disturbed people in the world with computers.
    During an early conversation with the director of the Centre for the Study of Religious Movements, Bruce Wilkinson, he says that if I really want to get more information about possible links between pagan and satanic groups I should hop on the international computer network, Internet. That is, apparently, where a lot of them hang out and rap.
    The very next day (and there have been a lot of eerie coincidences recently) I run into someone who has access to Internet. ...
    An hour spent reading this computer junk mail leaves me wondering what the world will be like when everyone is hooked up to the communications superhighway.

    Hide note
  56. Sydney O.T.O. information booklet : 1994-1995 E.V. / Oceania Oasis, Ordo Templi Orientis
    Ordo Templi Orientis (Australia)
    [ Book : 1994 ]
    At 2 libraries
    Sydney O.T.O. information booklet : 1994-1995 E.V. / Oceania Oasis, Ordo Templi Orientis
  57. Waratah (Ordo Templi Orientis (Australia))
    Ordo Templi Orientis (Australia)
    [ Periodical : 1996-2005 ]
    At 3 libraries
  58. The occult visions of Rosaleen Norton / Keith Richmond ; [photographs by Walter Glover ; Tony Johanson, curator
    Richmond, Keith
    [ Book : 1996 ]
    At 2 libraries
  59. Simulated.Alchemy
    Tharunka (Kensington, NSW : 1953 - 2010) Tuesday 25 February 1997 p 14 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Hello Sailor... "1909: In the United States, H. Spencer Lewis "reawakens" the Anticus Mysticus Ordo. Rosae Cruris, and in 1916, in a hotel, 1240 words
    Digitised article icon
  60. The occult : an exhibition of material from the Monash University Library rare book collection 4 June -24 July 1998 / exhibition curator Richard Overell; catalogue written by Keith Richmond and Richard Overell
    Monash University. Library
    [ Book : 1998 ]
    At 4 libraries
    Note
    Hide note
  61. Aleister Crowley: A Magick Life.(Review)
    Haigh, Gideon
    The Bulletin with Newsweek
    [ Article : 2000 ]
  62. Esoteric Masters: Part Three - Aleister Crowley and the Return of Magic
    Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Radio National
    [ Sound : 2000 ]
    View online
    At ABC Radio National
    Esoteric Masters: Part Three - Aleister Crowley and the Return of Magic
    Note

    2015-01-24 01:06:40.0

    He would endure an oppressive childhood as the only son of Plymouth Brethren parents, and grow up to become the champion of the Devil and the Black Arts in Edwardian England.
    Roger Hutchinson, author of Aleister Crowley: The Beast Demystified, Tanya Luhrmann author of Persuasions of the Witches' Craft, and Anthony Storr, author of Feet of Clay: A Study of Gurus join Rachael Kohn. ...
    Rachael Kohn: ... And now back to his biographer, Roger Hutchinson.
    I want to ask you about 1904 when he has a crucial experience that he says changed his life and which prompts him to proclaim a new millennial religion, Crowleyanity. And not surprisingly, he is the God of this new religion. ...

    Hide note
  63. shITe Infernal Rubbish www.PersonalSatan.com www.ChurchOfSatan.org www.Maledicta.com
    The Chaser (Glebe, NSW : 1999 - 2005) Wednesday 29 August 2001 p 9 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Insane webshites dedicated to one religion or another have been a staple of shITe, but we've never before journeyed as Dante 1074 words
    Digitised article icon
  64. Web page: Do What Thou Wilt: A Life of Aleister Crowley
    http://pandora.nla.gov.au/pan/10072/20030203-0000/www.uq.net.au/_enhdemid/crowley.html
    Web page
    Note

    2015-12-05 23:56:29.0

    Book review
    By Helen Darville
    2003.

    [Later republished here: Do What Thou Wilt: A Life of Aleister Crowley.]

    Hide note
  65. W.B.Yeats: Poet and Magus
    Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Radio National
    [ Sound : 2004 ]
    View online
    At ABC Radio National
    Note

    2015-05-26 22:10:08.0

    The occult involvement of W.B. Yeats was a sustaining element of his life and poetry, although scholars have largely downplayed this fact. Susan Johnston Graf, whose interest in the occult led her to the Magical Diaries of the Irish bard, reveals the complex of ideas and practices which gave his poetry a layer of meaning often hidden to the reader.

    Hide note
  66. Wizards
    Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Radio National
    [ Sound : 2004 ]
    View online
    At ABC Radio National
    Note

    2015-05-26 22:10:34.0

    Harry Potter is the latest version of the dark art of sorcery. Alan Baker tells the history of Wizardry.

    Hide note
  67. Tarot : an evolutionary history / Helen Sara Farley
    Farley, Helen Sara
    [ Thesis : 2006-2007 ]
    Possibly online
    At 2 libraries
    Note

    2015-01-24 00:51:32.0

    This thesis will constitute a cultural history of tarot, tracing the changing patterns of use and the symbolism displayed on tarot cards from the deck's first appearance in Early Modem Italy until the present day. It begins with a description of the structure and the origins of tarot and the ordinary playing card deck from which it evolved. Some popular theories of tarot's origin are briefly examined, including the hypothesis that grants tarot an Egyptian provenance. An investigation of the documentary sources detailing tarot's first appearances follows, pinpointing its beginnings to Milan in the first quarter of the fifteenth century. An accurate time and place of origin, and a knowledge of the prevailing attitudes and beliefs current in Early Modem Italy, help to determine the significance of the symbolism at that time. ...
    The next significant development of esoteric tarot occurred in England under the influence of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn which counted among its members William Butler Yeats, Aleister Crowley and Arthur Edward Waite. Waite's deck became the most popular deck ever in the history of tarot. Noteworthy contributions added by the English authors included revised lists of correspondences which remain in use today and the association of the deck with the Grail legends erroneously ascribed a Celtic provenance. Under the influence of the Golden Dawn, the positions of trump VIII and trump XI were exchanged in order to better facilitate the trump correspondences with the kabbalah. Also, Waite was responsible for illustrating the minor arcana cards in order to facilitate divination; the first time this had ever been attempted. ...

    Hide note
  68. Zoso : a ritual of rock, runes & magick / Ian Haig, Philip Samartzis, Daren Tofts
    Crowley, Aleister, 1875-1947
    [ Book : 2007 ]
    At State Library VIC
  69. On the Nature of Light: The Cinematic Experience as Occult Ritual
    Raymond Salvatore Harmon
    [ Article : 2008 ]
    View online (access conditions)
  70. Rosaleen Norton's Contribution to the Western Esoteric Tradition
    Drury, Neville Stuart
    [ Thesis : 2008 ]
    View online
    At 2 libraries
    Note

    2015-05-11 00:34:03.0

    This thesis explores the contribution of the Australian witch and trance artist Rosaleen Norton (1917-1979) to the 20th century Western esoteric tradition. Norton’s artistic career began in the 1940s, with publication of some of her earliest occult drawings, and reached a significant milestone in 1952 when the controversial volume The Art of Rosaleen Norton – co-authored with her lover, the poet Gavin Greenlees – was released in Sydney, immediately attracting a charge of obscenity. Norton rapidly acquired a reputation as the wicked ‘Witch of Kings Cross’, was vilified by journalists during the 1950s and 1960s, and was branded by many as evil and demonic. Norton’s witchcraft coven was dedicated to the practice of heathen worship and ceremonial sex magic and attracted a small number of dedicated inner-circle followers, most notably the renowned musical conductor Sir Eugene Goossens (1893-1962), whose personal and professional career would be irrevocably damaged as a result of his contact with Norton’s magical group. ...

    [Examines the influence Crowley had upon Norton. Though they never met, Goossens had, it is claimed, known Crowley.]

    Hide note
  71. Handbook of contemporary Paganism / edited by Murphy Pizza and James R. Lewis
    Pizza, Murphy
    [ Book : 2008-2009 ]
    Read online at Open Library/Internet Archive
    View online
    At 5 libraries
    Handbook of contemporary Paganism / edited by Murphy Pizza and James R. Lewis
    Note

    2015-12-05 22:21:37.0

    By Nevill Drury
    "The Modern Magical Revival".

    Hide note
  72. Web page: Walk Like an Egyptian:
    Egypt as Authority in Aleister Crowley's Reception of The Book of the Law
    http://www.equinoxpub.com/journals/index.php/POM/article/view/7594
    Web page
    Note

    2015-01-24 00:55:48.0

    By Caroline Tully.
    Pomegranate: The International Journal of Pagan Studies,
    Vol. 12, Issue 1, May 2010, pp 21-48.

    This article investigates the story of Aleister Crowley’s reception of The Book of the Law in Cairo, Egypt, in 1904, focusing on the question of why it occurred in Egypt. The article contends that Crowley created this foundation narrative, which involved specifically incorporating an Egyptian antiquity from a museum, the "Stèle of Revealing," in Egypt because he was working within a conceptual structure that privileged Egypt as a source of Hermetic authority. The article explores Crowley’s synthesis of the romantic and scholarly constructions of Egypt, inherited from the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, as well as the uses that two prominent members of the Order made of Egyptological collections within museums. The article concludes that these provided Crowley with both a conceptual structure within which to legitimise his reformation of Golden Dawn ritual and cosmology, and a model of how to do so.

    Hide note
  73. Horus in the Crowleyan succession of the aeons / by Fr. Lvx/Nox
    Lvx/Nox, Frater
    [ Book : 2011 ]
    At State Library of NSW
  74. The nightmare paintings, Aleister Crowley : works from the Palermo Collection / edited by Robert Buratti ; with additional essays by Marco Pasi ... [et al.]
    Crowley, Aleister, 1875-1947
    [ Book : 2012 ]
    At 2 libraries
    The nightmare paintings, Aleister Crowley : works from the Palermo Collection / edited by Robert Buratti ; with additional essays by Marco Pasi ... [et al.]
  75. Buyers abound as the Beast hits Perth
    Australasian Business Intelligence
    [ Article : 2012 ]
    View online (conditions apply)
  76. Windows to the sacred : an exploration of the esoteric / written by Robert Buratti
    Buratti, Robert
    [ Book : 2013 ]
    At UWA Library
    Windows to the sacred : an exploration of the esoteric / written by Robert Buratti
  77. Occult figures.(Spectrum)
    The Sydney Morning Herald (Sydney, Australia)
    [ Article : 2013 ]
    View online (conditions apply)
  78. Aristokratia III : Hellas / edited by K. Deva
    Deva, K.
    [ Book : 2013-2014 ]
    At 2 libraries
    Aristokratia III : Hellas / edited by K. Deva
    Note

    2015-11-24 22:08:58.0

    The Political Aspects of Crowley's Thelema
    By K. R. Bolton
    Manticore Press (Victoria), 2013.

    [And see here:
    Aleister Crowley as Political Theorist, Part 1
    Aleister Crowley as Political Theorist, Part 2
    And see here: K. R. Bolton.]

    Hide note
  79. Aleister Crowley, Buddha and windows to the sacred
    Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Radio National; Rachael Kohn; Dr Rachael Kohn
    [ Article : 2015 ]
    At ABC Radio National
    Aleister Crowley, Buddha and windows to the sacred
    Note

    2015-12-05 22:50:43.0

    From the occult esoterica of Aleister Crowley to ancient Buddhist story banners depicting the life of the Buddha, Rachael Kohn visits two current Victorian exhibitions which show the very different roles that art can play in spiritual life.
    ‘Just call me Little Sunshine,’ Aleister Crowley was purported to have said when he was asked about the number 666 emblazoned on his red cloak.
    The ‘magick’ enthusiast dubbed ‘the wickedest man in the world’, Crowley (1875-1947) was easily identified with ‘the Beast’ of the Book of Revelation, whose number is 666. He had an explanation, however: in pre-Christian mythologies and in the mystical system of the Cabalah, 666 was associated with the sun.
    Either way, Robert Buratti, curator of the Windows to the Sacred exhibition at the Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, believes that the two Crowley artworks he has on show are testament to the original intention of art as a ritual of spiritual freedom. According to Buratti, the surrealist movement founded by Andre Breton also believed in art as a window to the sacred. ...

    Hide note
  80. Art as a spiritual practice
    Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Radio National
    [ Sound : 2015 ]
    At ABC Radio National
    Art as a spiritual practice
    Note

    2015-12-05 22:52:09.0

    Art as a spiritual practice
    Audio program
    The Spirit of Things, Radio National, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 2015.

    Gods, Heroes, Clowns and Satan make their appearance in this week's program that celebrates art as a spiritual practice.
    Curator Robert Buratti believes the esoteric spirituality of magus of magick Aleister Crowley (1875-1947) provided a way forward for art to 'set you spiritually free.'
    His exhibition Windows to the Sacred at the Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery features artists like James Gleeson, Rosaleen Norton and Kim Nelson as well as two of Crowley's works. ...

    Hide note
  81. NOVEL OF THE WEEK Our superheated yesterdays THE NARROW GATE, by Reginald Kirby. London and Sydney: Collins.
    The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 - 1954) Saturday 12 June 1948 p 12 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: I SUPPOSE, so long as there are novelists, there will be historical novelists--and 889 words
    Digitised article icon