1. List: Harry of the Macintyre River (Black Harry)
    Harry of the Macintyre River (Black Harry) thumbnail image
    Public

    Alias Sippey (Also Shippy, Sippy, Sheepy, Lippy and Lippey [typo]):
    Native Policeman, tracker, serial axe murderer, thief, kidnapper, rapist, cunning bushman, escape artist, and after hanging, the subject of phrenological & grave robbing speculation and figured in Madame Sohier's Wax-Works Chamber of Horrors.

    223 items
    created by: Stephen.J.Arnold on 2013-11-04 12:50:51.0
    User data
    Tags: Add tag(s)
    Comments: Show comments (2)
    Rating: 3/5

List items:

Showing: 1 - 223 of 223

  1. Web page: Police of the Pastoral Frontier Native Police 1849-59. Chapter 8: pages 117-119
    http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/eserv/UQ:193014/HV8280_A2_S55_1975.pdf
    Web page
    Note

    2014-02-15 21:47:47.0


    Police of the
    Pastoral Frontier
    Native Police 1849-59
    L. E. SKINNER
    UNIVERSITY
    OF Queensland Press


    Chapter 8: pages 117-119

    Further Indications of Walker's Intemperance



    On 2 August 1853, H. T. Euston, of Billa Billa near Callandoon, wrote to the colonial secretary regarding the murder of a German woman on his station by an Aborigine called Sippy. Euston blamed the Native Police for not proceeding against Sippy long beforehand. He referred back to October 1852 when Sippy had been employed by him on a lambing station where he was residing. One morning Sippy had absconded taking with him "a complete set" of Euston's clothes. Proceeding to Smith's station about 18 miles away, Sippy robbed one of the shepherds there of his blankets and rations. About a month later Sippy had visited one of Euston's shepherd huts and robbed the shepherd of his rations, razors, and other articles. Sippy had then proceeded to Young's station, fifteen miles away, and robbed one of the huts of a gun and rations. A month later, Sippy returned to Euston's station and robbed one of the huts of rations and other articles.[21]

    Euston stated he had applied to Walker in person for a warrant for the apprehension of Sippy. When Sippy took Euston's own clothes Euston, with the assistance of another Aborigine, had tracked Sippy to a scrub where Euston's clothes were found. The Aborigine tracking Sippy had showed Euston where Sippy had put on the stolen clothes and also the track of Euston's boots worn by Sippy. Aborigines later got the clothes from Sippy and delivered them to Euston.

    Walker had refused to grant a warrant on this evidence nor in relation to the stealing by Sippy on Smith's station. Euston claimed that Walker had treated those cases lightly stating that theft was not frequent among the Aborigines. Euston was firmly convinced that, if Walker had acted to take Sippy at that time, "the life of a fellow-being would have been saved". Euston added that Sippy had not been taken since the recent murder though he had certain proof that Sippy was always hanging around one of his sheep stations. In consequence he was having difficulty in keeping white men on the run, for whilst this young murderer was allowed to roam at large their lives were in danger.


    Euston then referred to the great inconvenience felt in the neighbourhood through the want of a court house and a few constables, "the Native Police being seldom or never at Callandoon". Euston stated that only because Lieutenant Marshall was at Callandoon when the murder was committed he had been saved a ride of two hundred miles to report the murder to a magistrate. He requested the erection of a court house at Callandoon or in its vicinity in conjunction with the stationing there of an officer of Native Police and six native troopers.


    Walker, to whom Euston's letter was referred by the colonial secretary, replied from Traylan on 14 October 1853.[22] Walker stated it was rather difficult to make out what Euston really wanted. If it was a court house without a court of petty sessions, the quarters of the Native Police officers at Callandoon were quite sufficient for any magistrate acting in his ministerial capacity and consequently no court house was required. However, Walker believed that Euston really wanted a court of petty sessions with its constabulary. Walker stated he had not acted in the stolen clothes case as Euston had brought him nothing but hearsay evidence. Sippy, he added, was a boy about fourteen years of age and, having been apprehended meanwhile by the second section under Sergeant Graham, was then in Brisbane Gaol. FitzRoy did not think it necessary to do anything further in the matter.

    continued on next list item

    Hide note
  2. Web page: Letters relating to Moreton Bay & Queensland: A2 se ries – Reel A2.28 www.slq.qld.gov.au Last revised: Dec 2013 Page 1 of 45 NEW SOUTH WALES – COLONIAL SECRETARY LETTERS RELATING TO MORETON BAY AND QUEENSLAND RECEIVED 1822 – 1860
    http://www.slq.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/254529/SLQ-A2-SERIES-Reel-A2.28-2013-12-Part-2-of-3.pdf
    Web page
    Note

    2014-02-14 09:36:10.0

    Official notes regarding H. E. Eustons letters.

    page 10 and 11





    continuation of previous list item

    Euston wrote again to the colonial secretary on 21 December 1853. He asked the favour of Walker's objections, "which appeared to have had so much weight in the Governor General's decision in the matter", to the erection of a court house at Callandoon or in its vicinity. He regretted that the governor general had asked Walker for information on the subject as Walker had not the slightest interest in the locality and, in his opinion, was incompetent to judge in the matter.[23] FitzRoy directed that Euston be informed it was not usual to furnish the information applied for.[24]


    Sippy was committed from Callandoon by Lieutenant Marshall for trial at the circuit court at Brisbane for the murder of the German woman. He was escorted from Callandoon by Sergeant Graham and two troopers on 15 September 1853. Graham had entered into a recognizance before Marshall to give evidence as a witness against Sippy at the Brisbane trial.[25]


    On the night of 10 November 1853, Sippy escaped from the Brisbane Gaol. He was recaptured the following year. In May 1854, Sippy was convicted at the Circuit Court at Brisbane for robbery with violence. He was sentenced to imprisonment in Darlinghurst gaol for three years with hard labour.[26] The reasons are unknown why he was not indicted for the murder for which he was committed for trial. No record appears to be now available as to whether the evidence was insufficient to proceed on such a charge as murder, or whether or not other considerations prevailed in not pursuing the charge.



    Notes to Pages 120-30


    21 . Euston/Col. Sec., 2 August 1853, reel A2/28, COL, OL.

    22. Walker/Col. Sec., 14 October 1853, replying to Col. Sec. 22 September 1853, 53/7654, reel A2/28, COL, OL.

    23. Euston/Col. Sec., 21 December 1853, ibid.

    24. Noting on Euston's letter, ibid.


    25. Marshall/Walker, 15 September 1853, NMP; B/J1, QSA.


    26. Civil and criminal cases tried at Moreton Bay, NSW VP ( 1856):820, no. 98, OL.








    After page 383
    plate 20 Map of Ballonne and Macintyre areas



    *Henry Euston was appointed magistrate of Callandoon in 1859, he also married that year.

    Hide note
  3. Hunter River District News. [FROM OUR CORRESPONDENTS.] WARIALDA.
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Wednesday 10 August 1853 p 2 Article
    Abstract: I am informed by the Calandoon postman that a woman has been murdered by the blacks on Jones's River. She is the wife of a shepherd in the employment ... 274 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-13 22:55:15.0

    WARIALDA

    I am informed by the Calandoon postman that a woman has been murdered by the blacks on Jones's River. She is the wife of a shepherd in the employment of Messrs. Easton [Euston] and Robertson; both are Germans. They have only one little boy, who fortunately had gone out with his father after the sheep that day, or in all probability he would have shared the same fate as his unfortunate mother. I believe her scull was entirely beaten in. These savages thirst for blood, and it is to be regretted so many of them escape detection.
    There is nothing new here. We have still strong frosts. The mail was detained by the
    M'Intyre [Macintyre] River for two weeks, and no mail has yet arrived from the Wee Waa this week.

    Warialda, Aug. 2 1853.

    Hide note
  4. WARIALDA.
    Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932) Saturday 13 August 1853 p 3 Article
    Abstract: I am informed by the Calandoon postman that a woman has been murdered by the blacks on Jones's River. She is the wile of a shepherd in the employment ... 158 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-28 13:42:59.0

    WARIALDA.

    (From a Correspondent of the Maitland Mercury.)

    I am informed by the Calandoon postman that a woman has been murdered by the blacks on Jones's River. She is the wife of a shepherd in the employment of Messrs. Easton [Euston] and Robertson; both are Germans. They have only one little boy, who fortunately had gone out with his father after the sheep that day, or in all probability he would have shared the same fate as his unfortunate mother. I believe her scull was entirely beaten in. These savages thirst for blood, and it is to be regretted so many of them escape detection.



    There is nothing new here. We have still strong frosts. The mail was detained by the M'Intyre. River for two weeks, and no mail has yet arrived from the Wee Waa this week, Warialda, Aug. 2, 1853.

    Harry admitted to this murder after murdering Mrs. Mills, both murders occurred 16th July, 8 years apart.

    Hide note
  5. No title
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 22 August 1853 p 3 Article
    Abstract: SOUTHERN, GOLD ESCORT.—This escort arrived at the Treasury on Saturday, but the only consignment was one of 75 oz. 7 dwts. from Briadwood, for C. Coo ... 357 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-31 20:16:45.0

    ROBBERY AND MURDER.—Information has been received in town of a robbery and murder in the Warialda district. On the 16th ultimo Shippy, or Sheepy, an aboriginal, stole from the station of Mr. **Cox [CORY] a double barrelled gun, and on that or the following day he proceeded to Mr. Henry Euston's station on the *stream known as Jones's River or Callago Creek, and murdered, by beating on the head with a tomahawk, a German woman whose husband is a shepherd on the station. Sheepy is well known, and will doubtless be ere long tracked out; he has frequently assisted the native police in their search for persons charged with offences.

    The *stream is probably that now called Yarrill Creek shown here on Bonzl Maps. Wyaga Creek, is a little South and parallel to Yarrill until they merge into Yarrill Ck. Billa Billa Creek also flows into Yarrill Creek from the North.


    Yarrill Creek Satellite image at Geographic.org


    **Another article says Mr. Cory, not Cox, and distance 18 miles.] Cory appears correct, as advertisements for finding a lost horse link the name H. E. Euston of Biilla Billa and Mr. CORY, Gostwyck. Gostwyck was the maiden name of CORY's grandmother, so became the second name of one of his brothers (Toowoomba Mayor), and the name of a station owned by his uncle(?) near Maitland?, and a station in Longreach, Qld by another brother.

    "Mr Cory" was possibly John Edward CORY, aged 15. He married in Warialda 1867, their first child Edward James CORY, b. 1867, Myall Creek, Warialda, NSW, so Myall Creek was possibly the station robbed by Sippy before the murder of the German woman.

    Alternatively "Mr. Cory" might have been Edward Gostwyck CORY, uncle of John Edward Cory.
    In The Maitland Express, Tuesday 11 October 1864, Mr. Cory is said to be Superintendent of Myall Creek.

    Hide note
  6. Web page: Bonzl and Google Maps for This List
    http://bonzle.com/c/a?a=p&x=150.58353408968&y=-31.6118567851732&w=20000&h=20000&i=554&j=554&p=13921&pp=13921&fc=1&mpsec=0#map
    Web page
    Note

    2015-01-31 20:10:27.0

    Maps designated here as stations are not necessarily correct, and may be only approximations, I am not an expert on these areas.


    Billa Billa Station, Queensland Google Maps


    Calandoon, Queensland Google Maps


    WARIALDA, NSW Google Maps


    Warrah Peak, NSW Bonzl



    Warrah Peak, NSW Google Maps


    Warrah Peak, NSW Google Maps showing terrain.


    Yagaburne Station, next to Billa Billa


    Yarrill Creek, Qld. (through Billa Billa) Bonzl


    Yarrill Creek Satellite image at Geographic.org (uses Google imagery)



    Murdering Hut Gully on Gundebrie Station (position is approximate only) Murdering Creek Gully is the gully named Middle Gully. This can be seen by looking at Middle gully on Google maps, where it crosses Merriwa/Scone Rd the sign says Murdering Hut Gully. In the trial of Harry, Thomas Mills mentions Little Creek, possibly Middle Gully, misheard by court reporter?

    Hide note
  7. NEWCASTLE SHIPPING. ARRIVAL.
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Saturday 20 August 1853 p 2 Article
    Abstract: AUG. 17.—Indus, barque, 368 tons, Poole master, from Melbourne, in ballast. DEPARTURE. AUG. 17.—Ann Lockerby, ship, 466 tons, 2224 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-18 11:11:59.0

    MURDER AND ROBBERY.—The murder and robbery of a German woman, at Billa Billa, the station of Mr. Henry Euston, district of Warialda, is reported in the last Hue and Cry of the Inspector General of Police. The suspected murderer is a civilised young aboriginal, named Shippy, or Sheepy, eighteen years old, well known in that neighbourhood as a stockman, who the day previous to the murder stole a double barrelled gun from Mr. Cory's station, 18 miles off. The unfortunate woman appears to have been killed at her hut, in her husband's absence, by repeated blows on the head from a tomahawk.



    Billa Billa is NE of Goondiwindi.
    In 1878 Henry Euston resided at Yagaburne, next to Billa Billa.
    Presumably Yagaburne is a combination of Wyaga Creek, and "burne" - a brook or stream.




    Yagaburne List on Trove

    Hide note
  8. WARIALDA.
    Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932) Saturday 3 September 1853 p 4 Article
    Abstract: The black fellow reported as having murdered a German woman in the service of Mr. Easton, in the district of Darling Downs, has been captured by the ... 559 words
    • Text last corrected on 28 January 2014 by ellarocks
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-13 22:58:53.0

    WARIALDA.

    The black fellow reported as having murdered a German woman in the service of Mr. Easton, [Euston] in the district of Darling Downs, has been captured by the native police, and is now in durance at this place. August 21st, 1853.

    Hide note
  9. DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE. DRAYTON.
    The Moreton Bay Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1846 - 1861) Saturday 1 October 1853 p 2 Article
    Abstract: OUR correspondent at Drayton has furnished as with a budget, of news from that quarter extending over the whole of last month, from which it appears ... 3427 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-13 22:59:34.0

    The aboriginal native committed by the Callandoon Bench, for the murder of an unfortunate German woman at Messrs. Easton [Euston] and Robertson's station, arrived at Drayton last Thursday week, escorted by two mounted troopers and a Sergeant of the Native Police, who are bringing him down to Brisbane gaol. It had been understood that this prisoner would be tried at Maitland, but this resolution seems to be changed, unless he is to be merely sent here for shipment to Sydney.

    Hide note
  10. SUPREME COURT.—FRIDAY, OCT. 14. (From the Sydney Morning Herald.) SITTINGS IN BANCO. (Before the full Court.) THE QUEEN v. BARKER.
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Wednesday 19 October 1853 p 4 Article
    Abstract: This was a special case from the Maitland Circuit Court. Prisoner was the mate of the ship Tory, and was indicted for manslaughter. The vessel had go ... 2940 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-13 23:00:15.0

    The aboriginal native committed by the Callandoon bench, for the murder of an unfortunate German woman at Messrs. Easton [Euston] and Robertson's station, arrived at Drayton last Thursday week, escorted by two mounted troopers and a sergeant of the native police, who are bringing him down to Brisbane gaol. It had been understood that this prisoner would be tried at Maitland, but this resolution seems to be changed, unless he is to be merely sent here for shipment to Sydney.

    Hide note
  11. LAND SALE AT DRAYTON. (From our Correspondent.)
    The Moreton Bay Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1846 - 1861) Monday 3 October 1853 p 1 Article
    Abstract: A sale of Crown [?]ands took place here on the 28th September, and went of well, with the exception of three lots which, being situated on a rock bar ... 474 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2013-11-04 13:11:51.0

    MURDER.—Sippey, the aboriginal native mentioned in our last Drayton correspondence, as having been committed by the Callandoon Bench to take his trial for murder, arrived in Brisbane under escort on Saturday, and was lodged in gaol. He is to be tried at next Brisbane Circuit Court.

    Hide note
  12. MORETON BAY.
    Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932) Saturday 22 October 1853 p 3 Article
    Abstract: The City of Melbourne steamer has brought Brisbane papers to the 11th inst. Great dissatisfaction is expressed by the people of that district with th ... 383 words
    • Text last corrected on 13 March 2014 by zdone
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-13 23:00:44.0

    MURDER.— The aboriginal Sippy, who was committed by the Callandoon Bench to take his trial for the murder of the German woman at Messrs. Easton [Euston] and Robertson's station, was brought into Brisbane on Saturday last, and safely lodged in gaol. He will be tried at the next Brisbane Court.

    Hide note
  13. CLEVELAND. (From a Correspondent.)
    The Moreton Bay Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1846 - 1861) Saturday 12 November 1853 p 2 Article
    Abstract: AS the good folk of Brisbane may not be in possession of accurate accounts respecting this, the new intended port for the district, perhaps a few lin ... 2239 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-26 01:41:29.0

    ESCAPE OF A BLACK MURDERER FROM BRISBANE GAOL.—On Thursday evening, during a violent storm of rain and lightning that came down at about eight o'clock, Sippey, the aboriginal native committed by the Callandoon Bench to take his trial for the murder of a poor German woman at Messrs. Easton [Euston] and Robertson's station, took advantage of the noise and darkness caused by the strife of the elements, and, breaking out of his place of confinement, got over the wall of Bris- bane goal, and escaped. It appeared that in consequence of a revolting charge made against this prisoner since his confinement, it was considered necessary to place him alone, and accordingly he was locked up in a passage attached to the cells, and which is generally used as a chapel. This passage has a grated window looking upon the inner yard, where a turnkey keeps guard; and an air hole high in the wall at the opposite end, opening upon the outer yard in which also, we presume, a turnkey keeps watch. The black fellow appears to have removed, with the greatest ease, a bolt from one of the open cell doors, and climbing up by the door, used this implement to enlarge the air hole until wide enough to admit his body, when he passed through, dropping to the ground; climbed up to the partition wall by means of a shed most conveniently built for the purpose; crawled along the wall across the women's yard; and having dropped himself over the outer wall, made off in the darkness. All those proceedings must have been gone through without being witnessed by the turnkeys on duty; in whose favour, however, it must be repeated that the storm was extremely violent, and sufficient to drown the noise and obscure the view. The brick wall, also, through which the culprit broke, is a most rotten and flimsy structure; and the whole means apparently taken for the security of this accused murderer, seem to have been ludicrously insufficient. But although the prisoner eluded the vigilance of the turnkeys, he was observed in passing the wall by some of the female prisoners, who raised an alarm that a man was escaping. The prisoners in the ward were immediately mustered, and found all right, and then Sippey's place of confinement was entered and—the bird had flown, leaving a hole quite large enough to show the way he went. He had been so careful that not a brick or particle of mortar had fallen outside; and he had evidently intended to go in comfort, for he had packed up his blanket, but probably finding that this encumbered him, he dropped it before climbing the wall. Of course a diligent search was instantly set on foot; but of course without effect. Many of the inhabitants offered their assistance to the turnkeys, and the police; but the chance of white people catching a black-fellow running for his life on a dark night, was too remote to hope for success. Mr. Feeney, keeper of the gaol, leaving the principal Turnkey in charge, started off to some miles distance to apprise the natives of the escape, and to secure a guide to go on the track. Having secured the services of a black guide, he returned, and at daylight yesterday morning traced the fugitive from the outside of the gaol wall, up the river. Mr Sneyd, the Chief Constable, also set out in pursuit of the runaway. The only chance of capturing him seems to be through the aid of the Brisbane blacks, to whom and to this part of the country he is a stranger. The chance is but slender, but the arrest of this criminal is much to be desired. The district of Moreton Bay is famous for turning black murderers loose to continue their career of blood, and this case may be attended with disastrous consequences. Our readers will remember our repeated warnings respecting that ginger bread structure of the Brisbane Gaol, and the justice of our remarks has been too fully established by this escape.——It was reported in town last night that the pursuers were still on the track of the murderer, and that the latter had called and taken breakfast at Mr. Jno. M'Grath's station, Moggill Creek,
    yesterday morning.

    Hide note
  14. THE ESCAPED MURDERER.
    The Moreton Bay Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1846 - 1861) Saturday 19 November 1853 p 2 Article
    Abstract: WE presume that the late escape of an accused murderer from Brisbane gaol, will not pass over without inquiry. After having been long and diligently ... 295 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-28 13:42:42.0

    THE ESCAPED MURDERER.

    WE presume that the late escape of an accused murderer from Brisbane gaol, will not pass over without inquiry. After having been long and diligently sought, this daring ruffian was apprehended and lodged in gaol through the vigilance of the Callandoon Police; and the public have a right to know why he is not there still, and why outraged justice has been cheated of its due. If the goal is, as we fully believe, insecure, that fault should be remedied forthwith. In anticipation of this inquiry, it is not our intention to offer any remarks that may prejudice it in the slightest degree. Our business is with the repairing of the mischief done.

    A great criminal has been turned loose upon society. It only requires proof of his conduct since he escaped, to convince the greatest friend to the "poor blacks" of this fact; and it must not be forgotten that the barbarous attempt of the fugitive to break, the legs of the poor boy HARDGRAVE, accords with the circumstances of the murder wherewith the prisoner stood charged. The arms of the unfortunate woman murdered, were broken when the body was found. Now, the prompt apprehension of this villain may save more bloodshed, or outrages as bad; and every inhabitant is interested in bringing the miscreant to justice. The Government should at once offer a handsome reward for his arrest, and the inhabitants should liberally contribute for the same purpose. By these joint means a fund should be raised, sufficient to insure the most active exertions on the part of the country police. We might thus entertain a hope that the majesty of the law, so grossly outraged by this criminal, would ultimately be vindicated by his condign punishment.

    Hide note
  15. THE GOLD FIELDS. THE MEROO. (From the S. M. Herald.)
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Wednesday 30 November 1853 p 4 Article
    Abstract: MUDGEE.—Having had occasion to make a short excursion to Burrandong and Louisa, I found in the former place that gold was being procured in considera ... 3869 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-17 23:56:40.0

    Escape from Brisbane and assault on Hardgraves boy

    ESCAPE OF THE ABORIGINAL "SIPPEY" FROM GAOL—CRUEL OUTRAGE.—This black, who it will be remembered was committed by the Callandoon bench to take his trial for the murder of a German woman at Messrs Easton and Robertson's station, succeeded in effecting his escape from her Majesty's gaol on Thursday evening last, during the continuance of a violent thunder storm, accompanied by a heavy fall of rain. At daylight on the following morning, Mr. Feeney, the keeper of the gaol, having procured a black guide, set out in search of the fugitive. Chief constable Sneyd also went after him. They succeeded in tracing him to Mr. M'Grath's station, Moggill Creek, where he stopped and took breakfast, the pursuers arriving about half-an-hour after his departure. On leaving there he encountered the brother of Mr. Hargraves, the bootmaker of this town—a mere boy. He was on horseback, and Sippey begged for a lift on the road which the boy good naturedly granted, allowing him to get up behind him on the horse. They had not proceeded far when the black threw the poor boy from the horse, and finding that he still retained hold of the reins, and refused to give up the animal, he jumped off and belaboured the poor little fellow most unmercifully with a heavy stick; he then, horrible to relate, endeavoured to break the boy's legs by placing them across his knee and employing force for that purpose, but, fortunately, did not carry his purpose into effect. His object in this would appear to have been to prevent the boy from giving an alarm. He then stripped him of a portion of his clothes, took off his spurs, which he fastened on himself, and leaving the boy insensible, and as, it seems probable, he thought dead, made off on the horse as fast as he could. The wretch was traced as far as the crossing of Mr. R. J. Smith's, at Town Marie, where his track was lost in consequence of a mob of cattle having passed the same road after he did; and Mr. Feeney and Mr. Sneyd have returned without being able to get any further intelligence of him. In recovering his senses, young Hargraves succeeded in gaining his residence at Moggill Creek, whence he was brought into town on Saturday afternoon. Dr. Hobbs was immediately sent for, and having examined the wounds and bruises, pronounced no bones to be broken; and we are glad to say he is now doing well. The poor little fellow was severely beaten indeed, particularly about the head, on which were several severe lacerations, and there was a complete rent or tear in the flesh of the left wrist.—Moreton Bay Free Press, Nov. 15.

    Hide note
  16. Facts, Fiction, and Fac[?]ti[?].
    Colonial Times (Hobart, Tas. : 1828 - 1857) Tuesday 13 December 1853 p 3 Article
    Abstract: No Land for the People!—Is the public aware, or are the legislative representatives of that public aware, that in spite of all the agitation for unlo ... 1957 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-18 10:28:20.0

    Escape of the Aboriginal "Sippey" from Gaol.—This black, who, it will be remembered, was committed by the Callandoon Bench to take his trial for the murder of a German woman at Messrs. Easton and Robertson's station, succeeded in effecting his escape from Her Majesty's gaol on Thursday evening last, during the continuance of a violent thunder storm, accompanied by a heavy fall of rain. The following are the particulars. It appears that it had been deemed necessary to place the prisoner in solitary confinement, and that he was consequently locked up alone in what is used as a Chapel. In this place is an air hole high in the wall which enter into the outer yard. Possessing himself of an iron bolt, the black succeeded in reaching the air-hole, and therewith enlarging it sufficiently to admit the passage of his body, he then got through, lowered himself to the ground, passed across the women's yard, and getting over the outer wall thus effected his escape. In passing along the wall of the female's yard he was however observed by some of them, who gave the alarm; and on the prisoners being mustered, and Sippey's place of concealment examined, it was found that he only had got off. His mode of egress was sufficiently evident; and it appeared he had not been so unreserved or hurried in his operations as to render him unmindful of his personal comfort, for he had packed up his blanket for the purpose of taking with him, but probably, finding it inconvenient to climb with, left it behind him. Search was at once made, but of course without success. And at daylight on the following morning, Mr. Feeney, the keeper of the gaol, having procured a black guide, set out in search of the fugitive. Chief Constable Sneyd also went after him. They succeeded in tracing him as far as Mr. M'Grath's station at Moggill Creek, where he stopped and took breakfast, the pursuers arrived about half an hour after his departure. On leaving there, he encountered the brother of Mr. Hargraves, the bootmaker of this town—a mere boy. He was on Horseback, and Sippey begged for a lift along the road, which the boy good-naturedly granted, allowing him to get up behind him on the horse. They had not proceeded far when the black threw the poor boy from the horsed and finding that he still retained hold of the reins, and refused to give up the animal, he jumped off and belaboured the poor little fellow most unmercifully with a heavy stick; he then, horrible to relate, endeavoured to break the boy's legs by placing them across his knee, and employing force for that purpose, but fortunately did not carry his purpose into effect. His object in this would appear to have been to prevent the boy from giving an alarm, He then stripped him of a portion of his clothes, took off his spurs which he fastened on himself, and leaving the boy insensible, and as it seems probable, he thought dead, made off on the horse as fast as he could. The wretch was traced as far as the crossing of Mr. R. J. Smith's, at Town Marie, where his track was lost in consequence of a mob of cattle having passed the same road after he did; and Mr. Fenny [Feeny] and Mr. Sneyd have returned without being able to get any further intelligence of him. This cruel and barbarous outrage by the black treading on the heels of imputed murder, has created considerable excitement among the towns-people, and we understand that in the course of Saturday several private persons went out in pursuit of him; whilst yesterday morning a constable, accompanied by an aboriginal guide, started from Ipswich towards Drayton for the same purpose; but up to the time of our going to press no further account had been received in town on, the subject. On recovering his senses, young Hardgraves succeeded in gaining his residence at Moggill Creek, whence he was brought into town on Saturday afternoon. Dr. Hobbs was immediately sent for, and having examined the wounds and bruises, pronounced no bones to be broken; and we are glad to say he is now doing well. The poor little fellow was severely beaten indeed, particularly about the "head, on which were several severe lacerations, and there was a complete rent or tear in the flesh of the left wrist. Sippey appears to be a Jack Shepherd on a small scale, and the manner in which he effected his escape is highly creditable to his ability in prison breaking. At the same time, it strikes us that very insufficient means were taken to ensure his security, and it certainly does not speak well for the vigilance of the turnkeys that he was enabled to do so without having been observed or discovered by them, whilst he could be seen and the alarm given by some of the female prisoners. It may certainly be said in their favour that the noise occasioned by the storm, during which he effected his escape, was sufficient to prevent them from hearing any noise he made, and that the mist and darkness favoured him. But we can scarcely look upon these as sufficient reasons, and it is to be observed that the darkness was not such as to prevent him from being observed by some of the prisoners to whom the public are indebted for having given the alarm. We trust, however, for the sake of society, that this ferocious villain will be retaken, and that his ingenuity will not enable him to escape the ends of justice.—Ibid.

    Hide note
  17. Sydney News. THE GOLD FIELDS. BURRANDONG. (From the Bathurst Free Press, Nov. 26.)
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Saturday 3 December 1853 p 4 Article
    Abstract: On Thursday evening we had a thunderstorm which has restored the equilibrium of the atmosphere in our quarter, and, what is of equal importance, has ... 3861 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2013-11-04 16:48:39.0

    Sippey.—The latest intelligence of the aboriginal, "Sippey," who broke out of Brisbane gaol when imprisoned there on a charge of murder, is that he had rejoined his tribe. Moreton Bay Courier, Nov. 26.

    Hide note
  18. MORETON BAY.
    Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875) Thursday 1 December 1853 p 2 Article
    Abstract: We have intelligence from Moreton Bay to the 22nd Instant. Sippey[?] an aboriginal native, who had been confined in Brisbane Gaol on charge of murder ... 460 words
    • Text last corrected on 8 April 2019 by McConkey
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-03 09:48:08.0

    MORETON BAY.
    We have intelligence from Moreton Bay to the 22nd Instant.

    Sippey, an aboriginal native, who had been confined in Brisbane Gaol on charge of murder, broke loose from prison, and intelligence arrived that he had rejoined his tribe.

    Hide note
  19. WEEKLY SUMMARY.
    Illustrated Sydney News (NSW : 1853 - 1872) Saturday 3 December 1853 p 2 Article
    Abstract: A man named Dennis. Finn died suddenly at Bathurst, on the 16th ultimo, from a serious attack of apoplexy, brought on while in a state of intoxicatio ... 458 words
    • Text last corrected on 22 February 2014 by ellarocks
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-03 09:52:48.0

    The latest intelligence, says the Moreton Bay Courier, of the 26th ult., of the aboriginal native Sippey, who broke out of Brisbane gaol, when imprisoned there on a charge of murder, is, that he had rejoined his tribe.

    Hide note
  20. DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE.
    The Moreton Bay Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1846 - 1861) Saturday 10 December 1853 p 2 Article
    Abstract: LONDON WOOL SALES—We select the following from some of the sales reported in our files per City of Melbourne: By J. T. Simes & Co., July 30—Scott ove ... 1469 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-28 13:44:52.0

    CAPTURE OF "SIPPEY".— Intelligence was communicated by last overland mail, to the Chief Constable of Brisbane, of the apprehension of "Sippey" the aboriginal native whose escape from Brisbane gaol and subsequent proceedings, we have before reported. This daring ruffian was taken in the Callandoon district, by Mr. Goodfellow, who is worthy of all praise for the act. It is to be presumed that the Brisbane Bench will have this scoundrel examined and committed for the robbery and murderous assault upon young Hardgrave, so that should he escape on the charge of murder, for want of evidence, there may still be witnesses to convict him of a crime involving heavy punishment.

    Hide note
  21. DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE.
    The Moreton Bay Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1846 - 1861) Saturday 17 December 1853 p 2 Article
    Abstract: "SIPPEY"—This light-heoled gentleman, was brought down to Brisbane in, the steamer Swallow on Thursday. He was securely handcuffed, and was handed ov ... 1334 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-16 18:21:11.0

    DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE.

    "SIPPPEY"—This light-heeled gentleman was brought down to Brisbane in the steamer *Swallow on Thursday. He was securely handcuffed, and was handed over to the custody of the Police, it being intended to examine him this morning on the charge of robbery and violence to the lad Hardgrave. The prisoner is extremely slight and youthful in appearance, looking more like a young gin than the murderous savage he is—another proof of the fallacy of inexperienced persons in supposing that the young "kippers" are not dangerous.


    *Swallow was an Ipswich river steamer

    Hide note
  22. MORETON BAY.
    Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875) Tuesday 20 December 1853 p 2 Article
    Abstract: THE City of Melbourne, steamer, has brought Brisbane papers to the 13th instant. We extract the following paragraphs of local intelligence. INTERESTI ... 1145 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-05 00:01:02.0

    CAPTURE OF "SIPPEY."'—Intelligence was communicated by last overland mail, to the Chief Constable at Brisbane, of the apprehension of "Sippey," the aboriginal native whose escape from Brisbane Gaol, and subsequent proceedings, we have before reported. This daring ruffian was taken in the Callandoon district, by Mr. Goodfellow, who is worthy of all praise for the act. It is to be presumed that the Brisbane Bench will have this scoundrel examined and committed for the robbery and murderous assault upon young Hardgrave, so that should he escape on the charge of murder, for want of evidence, there may still be witnesses to convict him of a crime involving heavy punishment.

    Hide note
  23. MORETON BAY NEWS. (From Brisbane Papers, of December 24th and 27th ull.)
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 3 January 1854 p 3 Article
    Abstract: SURVEY OF THE BRISBANE AND BREMER.—It Will be recollected that, in our issue of the 1st November, we stated that the Sydney Executive had decided on ... 1742 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-03 10:35:29.0

    COMMITTAL.—Sippy, the notorious aboriginal marauder, was brought up at the Police Office on Saturday last, on the charge of having assaulted Robert Hardgrave, and robbed him of a bay horse. The prosecutor gave his evidence very distinctly, deposing that the prisoner, after riding behind him some time, threw him off the horse, and beat him severely on the head and legs with a stick, declaring his intention to kill him, after which he rode off with the horse. Dr. Hobbs deposed that the wounds by the boy were of a dangerous nature; and the bench committed the prisoner for trial. The former warrant against him for murder, of course, remained also in force.

    Hide note
  24. MORETON BAY.
    Bell's Life in Sydney and Sporting Reviewer (NSW : 1845 - 1860) Saturday 24 December 1853 p 1 Article
    Abstract: INTERESTING GEOLOGICAL DISCOVERIES.— Mr Stutchbury, the Government Geologist, has arrived in Brisbane, for the purpose, we understand, of enjoying a ... 1186 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-03 10:25:37.0

    CAPTURE OF "SIPPEY."—Intelligence was communicated by the last overland mail, to the Chief Constable of Brisbane, of the apprehension of "Sippey," the aboriginal native whose escape from Brisbane gaol, and subsequent proceedings we have before reported. This daring ruffian was taken in the Calandoon district, by Mr Goodfellow, who is worthy of all praise for the act. It is to be presumed that the Brisbane Bench will have this scoundrel examined and committed for the robbery and murderous assault upon young Hardgrave, so that should he escape on the charge of murder, for want of evidence, there may still be witnesses to convict him of a crime involving heavy punishment.—Ibid.

    Hide note
  25. IPSWICH RACES.
    The Moreton Bay Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1846 - 1861) Saturday 13 May 1854 p 2 Article
    Abstract: OWING to cricumstances beyond our controul, we are unable to publish in this issue more than an imperfect report of the annual race meeting at Ipswic ... 955 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2013-11-04 13:44:17.0

    CIRCUIT COURT.—The Assizes at Brisbane commence on Monday morning next, before his Honour Mr. Justice Dickinson. The calendar is the heaviest yet known in this Assize district, comprising the following cases .... Sippy, (aboriginal,) murder;

    Hide note
  26. BRISBANE CIRCUIT COURT. SATURDAY, MAY 20.
    The Moreton Bay Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1846 - 1861) Saturday 27 May 1854 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Davy an aboriginal native, was indicted for the wilful murder of Adolphus Henry Trevethan, at Rawbell in the Burnett district, on the 29th March, 185 ... 1983 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-28 23:26:30.0

    Sippy, an aboriginal, was charged with robbing one Robert Hardgrave of a mare and other property, at Moggill, on the 11th November last; using violence at the same time to the said Robert Hardgrave.

    The facts of this case will be fresh in the memory of our readers. The prisoner, who was confined in Brisbane gaol on a charge of murder, made his escape, and on his way up the country met the boy Robert Hardgrave, whom he robbed of the mare he was riding, beating him at the same time very cruelly with sticks, and leaving him apparently dead. Dr Hobbs, who dressed the boy's wounds, deposed that there were seven cuts on his head, which bled profusely. The scars of some of the wounds were exhibited to the jury. The Attorney-General, in opening the case, stated that the charge of murder for which Sippy had been committed could not be sustained then, in consequence of the absence of material witnesses. The jury without hesitation found the prisoner guilty, and he was sentenced to three years hard labour in Darlinghurst gaol.

    Hide note
  27. BRISBANE CIRCUIT COURT. (Abridged from the Moreton Bay Courier, May 20)
    Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875) Tuesday 30 May 1854 p 1 Article
    Abstract: This Court opened on Monday last, before his Honor Mr. Justice Dickinson. The barris'ers present were the Honorable the Attorney-General and Messrs. ... 4775 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-25 23:41:52.0

    ASSAULT AND ROBBERY.

    Sippey, an aboriginal, against whom stood a case of murder, which was departed from for want of evidence, was placed at the bar, accused of felonlously and violently having stolen from a boy, 13 years of age, named Robert Hardgrave a mare, saddle, stirrups, a shirt, and other goods, in his care, between Moggill Creek and Ipswich, on the 11th day of November last, and of beating said Robert Hardgrave, and wounding his person,
    The prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.
    Robert Hardgrave gave clear testimony to being unhorsed, robbed, and beaten.
    Dr. Hobbs gave evidence that he had attended the boy, as a surgeon, and that he had several wounds or bruises on his person, and seven cuts on his body.
    The jury, without retiring, returned a verdict, guilty of felony.
    Sentenced to to imprisoned in Darlinghurst gaol, and kept at hard labour for three years.

    Hide note
  28. THE MEROO AND ITS TRIBUTARIES. (From the Empire.)
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Wednesday 31 May 1854 p 4 Article
    Abstract: I should have written long ere this, but I was waiting the result of several new diggings lately discovered in this neighbou[?] hood, and also the ef ... 3151 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-04 21:19:06.0

    BRISBANE CIRCUIT COURT.—This court opened on Monday, May 15, before Mr. Justice Dickinson.—....

    ——Thursday and Friday were occupied with civil business
    ——Saturday, May 20. ...

    ——Lippy, an aboriginal, was indicted for robbing, with violence, Robert Hargraves, at Moggill, on the 11th November. Lippy met Hargraves riding after bullocks, and after some friendly conversation accompanied him for a distance, and then suddenly pulled him off the horse, and beat him with a blunt instrument on the head and legs to a dangerous extent, and robbed him of the horse and his clothing. Guilty; three years' imprisonment.——

    Hide note
  29. MOUNTED POLICE. To the Editor of the Herald.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 19 March 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: SIR,—I am colonised—I may say well colonised, I have tried every possible thing, from breaking stones to teaching children, and I have come to the co ... 587 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-16 18:54:50.0

    Possibly Black Harry, but it was a common epithet, this one is linked to Namoi River.
    If it is the Harry of this list, from this letter, and Mr. Humphries story 39 years later, Harry left the service of the police on bad terms about 4 months before the Mills murder for they were on the look out for him.

    Humphries quote: "Black Harry was a native of the M'Intyre River, afterwards going to the Merriwa district, where he was a tracker, and broke in horses for the police. He left the police, and shortly afterwards passed close to a sheep station, where a woman and her two children lived..."

    I don't place much faith in Mr. Humphries memory and his obvious embelishments. Harry was employed on the station up to a couple of days before the murder, so didn't "shortly afterwards pass close to a sheep station".

    ************



    MOUNTED POLICE.

    To the Editor of the Herald.
    SIR,—I am colonised—I may say well colonised, I have tried every possible thing, from breaking stones to teaching children, and I have come to the conclusion that my present vocation, in the mounted police, is the worst, most uncomfortable, and decidedly most unprofitable one that I have ever followed. In the first place (I speak particularly of that force to which I belong, irregularly paid, though I firmly believe that the money is sent regularly from Sydney. In the second place, badly clothed—if I may call an old jacket clothing. In the third place, badly mounted. And In the fourth place, badly—nay, ridiculously—armed. Can you, Sir, or can any one else, tell me why men in the bush—where all expenses are greater than in Sydney— receive, at some indefinite period, only 5s. 6d. per diem, when their brethren in Sydney receive 6s., paid regularly every Saturday. With regard to clothing, I heard, from very good authority, that there are three bales of new clothing lying in the commissariat stores. What are they doing there? Waiting till they are moth eaten, I suppose. With regard to the horses, they are generally that style of horse a man would buy if he were going to take a mob of cattle off the sand-hills, so as to sell horses and cattle together, at about three pounds ten a head. What chance has a trooper, with such a horse, after a man on horseback in the bush,—vide the exploits of troopers after Master Pat Connell, or Conners, in Jingerry. With regard to the arms, what is the use of of a sabre in the bush or on gold escort? What is the use of a carbine which won't carry straight, and what use of it when the horses won't stand firing off? And what are the use of the two old fashioned pistols that won't carry a ball in a direct line for ten yards? How many men in the three patrols could put his horse at a gallop over a four foot log in the bush riding in the ridiculous saddles that they do at present. The only benefit (If one it is) I can see attached to carrying all these foolish and useless things is, that it prevents the horse making a long journey in a short time by the useless weight, keeps the poor man longer out, puts him to great expense, and costs the magnificent government and public generally, two shillings for every night that the man is out, to say nothing of feeds of bad corn at twenty shillings a bushel, for his and the Government's old screw. I don't know a country in the world where an effective mounted police force is more required than in New South Wales, and I don't think you could find one less effective, both in regards bipeds and quadrupeds. If you want an effective mounted police force, don't receive into them a parcel of old soldiers and discarded constabulary, but take young and active men who can ride and will ride; give them food horses, a plain bush saddle, snaffle bridle, a revolver, and last, though by no means least, decent pay (about seven and sixpence a day), paid regularly, and then you will have a mounted force able, aye, and willing, to apprehend Black Harry, of the Namoi River notoriety, et hoc genus omne.
    TROOPER.

    Hide note
  30. Web page: Namoi River Map
    http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/image/0005/439772/FINAL_CombinedMapWithRoads.jpg
    Web page
    Note

    2014-02-05 00:02:53.0

    Namoi River catchment area (pale blue)

    Hide note
  31. MURDER.
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Saturday 20 July 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: The following letter was received on Wednesday evening, at half-past five, by the Chief Constable, Mr. Henry Garvin:- Hall's Creek, 16th July, 1861. 142 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-16 20:52:42.0

    MURDER.

    The following letter was received on Wednesday evening, at half-past five, by the Chief Constable, Mr. Henry Garvin:—

    Hall's Creek, 16th July, 1861.

    DEAR SIR—I hasten to inform you of a diabolical murder that has been committed on the person of Mrs. Mills, wife of a shepherd named Richard Mills, on this station, Gundebrie, district of Merriwa. There are also two children of the respective ages, a boy 9½ years and a girl 4½ years of age, missing, and cannot be found, dead or alive. The Merriwa police are here in search of the murderer and missing children. It is supposed to have taken place this day, about the middle part of the day. Suspicion rests on an aboriginal named Harry, supposed to be a native of the Macintyre River, and to have been in the Native Police.

    J. SHERIDEN, Chief Constable.

    Hide note
  32. MUSWELLBROOK. FRIGHTFUL MURDER AT HALL'S CREEK, NEAR MERRIWA.
    The Newcastle Chronicle and Hunter River District News (NSW : 1859 - 1866) Saturday 20 July 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: It is our painful duty to have to record the occurrence of another of those fearful tragedies which cast a gloom and feeling of despondency upon all ... 313 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-17 22:40:51.0

    First reports of the murder of Mrs. Mills at Gundebrie Station





    MUSWELLBROOK. FRIGHTFUL MURDER AT HALL'S CREEK, NEAR MERRIWA

    It is our painful duty to have to record the occurrence of another of those fearful tragedies which cast a gloom and feeling of despondency upon all communities wherever they are enacted, and which call for the only just retribution which the strong arm of the law can enforce. The fearful crime was committed a day or two since, at the locality above mentioned, near Muswellbrook, the murderer being an aboriginal (late of the native police), from the M'Intyre River, and the victim a Mrs. Mills, the wife of a shepherd on Hall's Creek. We regret that we are not at present in possession of the details of the harrowing event, but we can place implicit reliance on the source from which we have obtained our information; and we trust to be able in our next issue to lay before our readers some further particulars respecting the disastrous event, when, possibly, it will be found to resemble in some respects the recent Rockhampton calamity. We are sorry to state that the criminal is still at large, but the police are in active pursuit, and, we trust, may speedily effect a capture. Below we give the information which we received last evening from a correspondent at Muswellbrook. It bears date of Thursday last, and was doubtless forwarded immediately after the occurrence of the murder:— MUSWELLBROOK.—FEARFUL MURDER AT HALL'S CREEK, near Merriwa.— Intelligence arrived here last night of the murder of a Mrs. Mills, the wife of a shepherd, on Hall's Creek. The horrid crime is said to have been committed by a M'Intyre blackfellow, late of the native police. The police have been out scouring the bush, but up to the present without avail. I will forward you full particulars by your next issue. Thursday, July 18, 1861.

    Hide note
  33. Web page: Hall, Thomas Simpson (1808–1870)
    http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/hall-thomas-simpson-3696
    Web page
    Note

    2014-02-17 23:07:38.0

    Australian Dictionary of Biography:- Thomas Hall (or the Hall brothers?) owned Gundebrie Station, where Mrs. Mills was murdered.


    Nb. I cannot tell which is correct spelling for "Gundebrie" modern maps and web pages differ from these early accounts.

    Hide note
  34. MUNICIPAL COUNCIL.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 22 July 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: A MEETING of the Muncipal Council of Sydney will be held at the Town Hall, on Monday (this day), at three o'clock p.m., for considering the following ... 1914 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-17 22:31:56.0

    Nb. at the time of this murder the suspect aboriginal used the name "Harry", it would be some time before anyone twigged he was the notorious Queensland murderer "Sippey"



    MURDER.—The following letter was received on Wednesday evening, at half-past five, by the chief constable, Mr. Henry Garvin:—"Hall's Creek, 16th July, 1861. Dear Sir,—I hasten to inform you of a diabolical murder that has been committed on the person of Mrs. Mills, wife of a Shepherd named Richard Mills, on this station, *Gundebrie, district of Merriwa. There are also two children, of the respective ages, a boy nine and a half years and a girl four and a half years of age, missing, and cannot be found, dead or alive. The Merriwa police are here in search of the murderer and missing children. It is supposed to have taken place this day, about the middle part of the day. Suspicion rests on an aboriginal named Harry, supposed to be a native of the Macintyre River, and to have been in the Native Police. J. Sheriden, chief constable."—Maitland Mercury.


    *Gundebri Station about 13km E. of Merriwa

    Hide note
  35. COLONIAL EXTRACTS.
    The Newcastle Chronicle and Hunter River District News (NSW : 1859 - 1866) Wednesday 24 July 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: THE HIGH PRICE OF BUTCHERS' MEAT.—It has been the subject of general complaint for some time past, that the butchers arecharging a very high retail p ... 2955 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-25 23:54:21.0

    Murder. —Information has reached the police authorities that, on Tuesday, the 10th instant, Mrs. Richard Mills was found barbarously murdered in her hut at Hall's Creek, supposed to have been murdered by a black named "Harry," and that two of her children — a boy between nine and ten, and a girl between four and five—are also missing. The police of different localities are searching for the supposed murderer in every direction. The facts, as far as we can glean, are these: The deceased, together with her husband and family, were in the employ of the Messrs. Hall, of Dartbrook, as shepherds and hutkeeper, at their station Gunnerbry, Hall's Creek, about 40 miles westward of Scone; as usual, deceased's husband took his sheep out early on last Tuesday morning, leaving his wife and two children at the hut; later in the day his wife was found dead, and tho children gone; and up to the present no tidings have been heard of them. Whether they have met foul play no one can tell at present. An aboriginal named "Harry" is supposed to be the murderer, as he was seen during the day near the hut, and since then cannot be found. This is all we can at present learn of this melancholy case. Perhaps upon the inquest more particulars may be elicited, of which we will let your readers know, should we hear by way of Merriwa.—Since we have written the above, we hear that the boy has been found, with a cut in his head; that is all we can learn. The little girl has not been found yet. Scone, July 21.—

    Hide note
  36. DOUBLE MURDER AND ABDUCTION OF A CHILD BY AN ABORIGINAL.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 26 July 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: WRITING from Cassilis, on the 22nd instant, our correspondent Bays:- The mailman from Merriwa has reported that an atrocious murder was committed on ... 1657 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-28 23:32:18.0

    DOUBLE MURDER AND ABDUCTION OF A CHILD BY AN ABORIGINAL.

    Writing from Cassilis, on the 22nd instant, our correspondent says :—

    The mailman from Merriwa has reported that an atrocious murder was committed on the 17th, at a station belonging to Mr. Hall, about half-way between Hall's Creek and Merriwa, say about eight miles from the latter. One of the aborigines who was living at a station in the neighbourhood, called at a hut occupied by a shepherd named Mills, and finding him from home, he induced one of Mills' boys, aged six years, to accompany him into the bush on pretence of catching opossums, and after inflicting three dreadful wounds on the head with his tomahawk, left the child for dead, and returned to the hut. His next act was to murder the mother, nearly severing the head from the body, and then to carry off a little girl, four years old, into the bush. The boy has been found, and Dr. Morris has great hopes of his ultimate recovery. The blackfellow is reported to have a fowling-piece and double barrelled pistol with him. Of course all persons in the Merriwa district who can get a horse and gun are out in pursuit, but I regret to say hitherto without success. The best mode to effect a capture appears to be for each party in search to be accompanied by a blackfellow for the purpose of tracking. It is much to be feared, however, if he finds himself too hotly pursued, he may murder the child to effect his own escape.

    Hide note
  37. Web page: fairfaxregional.com.au
    http://specialpubs.fairfaxregional.com.au/scone/uhs2013/files/data/search.xml
    Web page
    Note

    2015-01-26 01:26:00.0

    A data sheet with a little info on murder location. (obvious inaccuracy, it was a woman murdered & child left for dead)

    An aboriginal “Black Harry” was alleged to have murdered a child at Gundebri and hence “Murdering Creek Gully” nine miles east of Merriwa, on the Scone Road, was named.

    Hide note
  38. Web page: Examination of a Proposal for creation of a new Warrumbungle Shire Local Government Area ...
    http://www.dlg.nsw.gov.au/DLG/Documents/Boundaries/BC_Report_Warrumbungle_Shire_LGA.pdf
    Web page
    Note

    2014-01-28 16:02:03.0

    An aboriginal "Black Harry" was alleged to have murdered a child


    August 2004 Page 39 of 65

    at Gundibri and hence "murdering Hut Gully" 9 miles east of Merriwa, on the
    Scone Road, was named.
    [Source: (former) Merriwa Shire Council]

    Hide note
  39. NEW SOUTH WALES.
    The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Friday 26 July 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: The MEG[?]ETHON.—This famous locomotive was sold on Monday last, by order of the sheriff, and brought 150 [?]—a sum less, we imagine, than the expens ... 213 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-09 23:47:51.0

    MURDER.—The following letter was received on Wednesday evening by the chief constable:—"Hall's Creek, 16th July, 1861.—Dear Sir,—I hasten to inform you of a diabolical murder that has been committed on the person of Mrs. Mills, wife of a shepherd named Richard Mill's, on this station, Gundebrie, district of Merriwa. There are also two children—of the respective ages, a boy nine and a half years and a girl four and a half years—missing, and cannot be found, dead or alive. The Merriwa police are here, in search of the murderer and missing children. It is supposed to have taken place this day, about the middle part of the day. Suspicion rests on an aboriginal named Harry, supposed to be a native of the Macintyre River, and to have been in the native police. J. Sheridan, chief constable." Maitland Mercury, July 20.

    Hide note
  40. COLONIAL EXTRACTS.
    Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW : 1856 - 1950) Tuesday 30 July 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: On the morning of the 11th instant the sentence of death was carried into effect upon Henry Cooley, convicted on the 20th May last of the murder of h ... 3227 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-09 19:50:22.0

    Murder.—The following letter was received on Wednesday evening, at half past five, by the chief constable, Mr. Henry Garvin:—"Hall's Creek, 15th July, 1861. Dear Sir.—I hasten to inform you of a diabolical murder that has been committed on the person of Mr. Mills, wife of a shepherd named Richard Mills, on this station, Gundebrie, district of Merriwa. There are also two children, of the respective ages, a boy nine and a half years and a girl four and a half years of age, missing, and cannot be found, dead or alive. The Merriwa police are here in search of the murderer and missing children. It is supposed to have taken place this day, about the middle part of the day. Suspicion rests on an aboriginal named Harry, sup- posed to be a native of the Macintyre River, and to have been in the Native Police. J. Sheriden chief constable."—Maitland Mercury.

    Hide note
  41. NOTES OF THE WEEK. Friday, 26 th July.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 29 July 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: We have nothing new of importance from Lambing Flat.Everything seems quiet there. The police having all left, a vigilance commitee has been establish ... 1968 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 15:53:03.0

    An aboriginal native has barbarously murdered, near Merriwa, the wife of a shepherd named Mills, and has so maltreated her son, a boy between nine and ten years of age, that his recovery is doubtful. Her daughter, aged between four and five, he has carried away with him. Every one who has a horse is out in pursuit of the murderer. He was last seen by a Chinaman making towards Liverpool Plains with the child still in his company. There is great reason to fear that if hard pressed he will murder the poor little girl in order to have a better chance of escaping.

    Hide note
  42. NEWS AND NOTES. CLXV.
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Tuesday 30 July 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: [A portion of our Correspondent's communication appeared in yesterday's paper.] THE Burke exploring parties are all now nearly under way. The little ... 3904 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-17 23:25:18.0

    A letter dated Monday night last gives the following particulars of a shocking outrage by a quondam native policeman, an aboriginal named Harry, at Hall's Creek, near Muswellbrook—being no less than the murder of the wife of a person named Mills, the probable murder of her son, and the abduction of her little girl. Fancy that poor infant in the wild bush last night—raining and bitter cold as it was—with that brutal blackfellow:—

    The victim was the wife of a shepherd named Richard Mills, in the employ of Mr. Hall, on a station called Gundebry. On the morning of the 16th instant Mills and his son, a young man about sixteen or seventeen years of age, left the hut to attend to their flock, and left his wife and two other children, one nine and the other four years of age, and a blackfellow named Harry, in the house. Previous to leaving the hut, young Mills noticed Harry sharpening his tomahawk. The blackfellow has been employed by Mr. Hall, as stockman, for the last three months, and his engagement was out the day before the outrage was committed. The circumstances attending this fearful outrage are more appalling than the crime of murder itself, for when Mills returned to the hut at night, he saw his wife, whom in the morning he left in good health, lying a corpse on the floor of the hut, and his two children nowhere to be found, dead or alive. The feelings of the husband and father can be better imagined than described, his wife lying brutally murdered, and his children nowhere to be found, perhaps shared the same fate as their defenceless mother. The news of the murder soon spread to the head station, and active search was soon made for the missing children all that night, but without avail, when, on Thursday, the 18th, the notice of parties in search near the hut was attracted by the sound of low moans like some one in a very feeble state, and found the almost lifeless body of the oldest of the two children, horribly mutilated, as if with a tomahawk or some sharp instrument. The unfortunate child lay in a state of unconsciousness, exposed to the cold piercing winds, from Tuesday until Thursday following. He was still, up to last night, in too feeble a state to articulate anything respecting the crime, and very little hope is entertained of his recovery. The youngest, a little girl four years of age, is still missing, and the blackfellow being nowhere to be found, suspicion at once rested on him as the perpetrator of this fearful outrage. The Merriwa, Cassilis, Muswellbrook, and Scone police are out on his track, for a Chinaman (a shepherd) on a neighbouring station saw this same blackfellow (Harry) with the child in his arms, making for the Liverpool Plains. Chief constable Sheridan, of the Muswellbrook police, sent, on receiving the fearful report of the murder, on Wednesday evening, the 17th two of his constables in search (Macauly and Macdonnell), and sent a report off at the same time by the up and down mails. Up to this constable Macauly has not returned, Several gentlemen in the neighbourhood, as well as the police, are on his track, headed by Mr. J. Bodington and Mr. Weaver, and I hope by your next issue to inform you of his capture.


    Now, my good Christian friend — my brotherly-love inculcator—you, I mean, of African warming-pan advocacy, and Upper India violet-powder liberality—don't you wish that you had a good Whitworth in your hands at point-blank range, with the sight prettily covering the place where the heart ought to be in this dearly-beloved black brother of ours? If you don't, I do. Wouldn't I pull the trigger? Oh no, not at all! This morning's Empire says:—"Not a moment should be lost in attempting to arrest the wretch who stands charged with these crimes; but, above all, it is desirable to seek the rescue of a child from a fate too horrible to contemplate. The suspected murderer, it is said, has been seen on the way to Liverpool Plains. It will be no easy matter to overtake him if he gets into the broken country; but, besides putting every possible resource of the police in motion, it is desirable to stimulate activity on the part of the stockmen and aborigines of the locality, by the immediate offer of rewards for the apprehension of the mur- derer, and for the recovery of the child."

    Hide note
  43. SCONE. (From our own Correspondent.)
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Tuesday 30 July 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: THE WEATHER.—Since my last report, rain has set in in real earnest; it is to be hoped that we shall not have too much of it. On Tuesday evening last ... 892 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-10 00:32:22.0

    Text


    THE LATE MURDER.—We have heard nothing fresh as yet, but are promised some information as given by the boy found, which we will let your readers know of as soon as we are in posssssion of it.

    Scone, Thursday, ½ past 4 a.m.—Raining very hard.

    THE LATE MURDER AT HALL'S CREEK.—From a letter from chief constable Weston, dated Merriwa, 22nd July, and other authentic sources, we are enabled to give the following particulars of this truly melancholy tragedy:—It appears that Harry had been employed on the Hall's Creek station for three months, which time was up about the 13th or 14th instant, and that he was premeditating returning to his own tribe on the M'Intyre, but, before leaving, called at the hut of the unfortunate deceased woman, who, wishing him to stay for a day or so to dig up some ground in her garden, having often seen him before whilst employed on the station. She took him into the garden, showing him what she wanted him to do, telling him she would get permission of the overseer for him to do so. Afterwards they went into the hut, when Harry asked the son of Mrs. Mills (a boy 9 years of age) to go with him into the bush to catch opossums. The boy (as he states) consented to go willingly, having been in the blackfellow's company before. They started, Harry taking his tomahawk. Half a mile from the hut an opossum was caught, when they made a fire to roast it. During this time, and whilst the boy's attention was withdrawn, he was felled to the ground by a blow from the tomahawk (which was in Harry's hand) on the forehead; a second blow was then given him with the same weapon on the back of the head, rendering him insensible. The black, it appears, then went to the hut, taking the tomahawk with him, leaving the boy lying where he struck him down. Upon entering he ill-used the deceased, and then struck her a blow on the back of the neck, nearly severing the head from the body. He then, with the tomahawk, broke open every box, and abstracted a silver watch, &c. He then decamped, taking with him a double-barrel gun and ammunition; and also the little girl (4½ years of age), leaving his deadly weapon, the tomahawk, behind on the floor of the hut. When her husband returned home at sunset he found his wife lying dead on the floor of the hut, with the tomahawk beside her, covered with hair and blood, and both boy and girl gone. From the position of deceased's clothes, when her husband, discovered the body, there can be no doubt of the demons ostensible purpose. Mr. Mills cannot say how much money has been taken, nor indeed yet can properly say what he has lost as regards property. Two days afterwards the lad was found within half-a-mile of the hut, in an insensible state and conveyed to the station, and placed under the care of Dr. Morrris, and we are glad to learn is slowly recovering from the wounds inflicted. Up to the present nothing further (except that Harry was tracked as far as the mountain station) has been heard of the child or blackfellow. He is supposed to have gone in the direction of the McIntyre, to join his tribe.
    Great credit is due to the active exertions of the police of the various localities in this matter.

    Hide note
  44. THE LATH MURDER AT HALL'S CREEK.
    Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875) Wednesday 31 July 1861 p 8 Article
    Abstract: The Maitland Mercury's Scons correspondent writes as follower:- From a letter from chief constable. Weston, dated Merriwa, 22nd July, and other authe ... 805 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-17 23:38:03.0

    THE LATE MURDER AT HALL'S CREEK.

    The Maitland Mercury's Scone correspondent writes as follows:—From a letter from chief constable Weston, dated Merriwa, 22nd July, and other authentic sources, we are enabled to give the following particulars of this truly melancholy tragedy:—It appears that Harry had been employed on the Hall's Creek station for three months which time was up about the 13th or 14th instant, and that he was premeditating returning to his own tribe on the M'Intyre, but, before leaving, called at the hut of the unfortunate deceased woman, who, wishing him to stay for a day or so to dig up some ground in her garden, having often seen him before whilst employed on the station. She took him into the garden, showing him what she wanted him to do, telling him she would get permission of the overseer for him to do so. Afterwards they went into the hut, when Harry asked the son of Mrs. Mills (a boy 9 years of age) to go with him into the bush to catch opossums. The boy (as he states consented to go willingly, having been in the blackfellow's company before. They started, Harry taking his tomahawk. Half a mile from the hut an oppossum was caught, when they made a fire to roast it. During this time, and whilst the boy's attention was withdrawn, he was felled to the ground by a blow from the tomahawk (which was in Harry's hand) on the forehead; a second blow was then given him with the same weapon on the back of the head, rendering him insensible. The black, it appears, then went to the hut, taking the tomahawk with him, leaving the boy lying where he struck him down. Upon entering he ill-used the deceased, and then struck her a blow on the back of the neck, nearly severing the head from the body. He then, with the tomahawk, broke open every box, and abstracted a silver watch, &c. He then decamped, taking with him a double-barrel gun and ammunition, and also the little girl, 4½ years of age, leaving his deadly weapon, the tomahawk, behind on the floor of the hut. When her husband returned home at sunset he found his wife lying dead on the floor of the hut, with the tomahawk beside her, covered with hair and blood, and both boy and girl gone. From the position of deceased's clothes, when her husband discovered the body, there can be no doubt of the demons ostensible purpose. Mr. Mills cannot say how much money has been taken, nor indeed yet can properly say what he has lost as regards property. Two days afterwards the lad was found within half-a-mile of the hut, in an insensible state, and conveyed to the station, and placed under the care of Dr. Morris, and we are glad to learn is slowly recovering from the wounds inflicted. Up to the present nothing farther (except that Harry was tracked as far as the mountain station) has been heard of the child or black- fellow. He is supposed to have gone in the direction of the M'Intyre, to join his tribe. Great credit is due to the active exertions of the police of the various localities in this matter.

    Hide note
  45. TELEGEAPHIC DESPATCHES. [FROM THE MELBOUBNE PAPERS.] SYDNEY, TUESDAY, JULY 23.
    The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) Saturday 3 August 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: The Hotham, having been thoroughly repaired, resumed the voyage to Carpentaria today. Letters from storekeepers at Burrangong 871 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-07 17:58:22.0

    Near Merriwa the wife of a shepherd named Mills has been murdered by a blackfellow, and her son nearly murdered. The blackfellow also carried off a daughter, aged four years. He was seen by a Chinaman making towards Liverpool Plains. A great many are pursuing him.

    Hide note
  46. PROTECTION AND ITS PRODUCTS. TO THE EDITOR OF THE ARGUS.
    The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 6 August 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Sir,—It was my unhappy lot when a child to be particularly well protected; and I am inclined to think that protection, now so much called for in the ... 601 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-17 23:42:29.0

    DOUBLE MURDER AND ABDUCTION OF A CHILD BY AN ABORIGINAL.—Writing from Cassilis, on the 22nd instant, our correspondent says:—"The mailman from Merriwa has reported that an atrocious murder was committed on the 17th, at a station belonging to Mr. Hall, about half way between Hall's Creek and Merriwa, say about eight miles from the latter. One of the aborigines, who was living at a station in the neighbourhood, called at a hut occupied by shepherd named Mills, and finding him from home, he induced one of Mill's boys, aged six years, to accompany him into the bush, on pretence of catching opossums, and after inflicting three dreadful wounds on the head with his tomahawk, left the child for dead, and returned to the hut. His next act was to murder the mother, nearly severing the head from the body, and then to carry off a little girl, four years old, into the bush. The boy has been found, and Dr. Morris has great hopes of his ultimate recovery. The blackfellow is reported to have a fowlingpiece and double-barrelled pistol with him. Of course all persons in the Merriwa district who can get a horse and gun are out in pursuit, but, I regret to say, hitherto without success. The best mode to effect a capture appears to be for each party in search to be accompanied by a black fellow for the purpose of tracking. It is much to be feared, however, if he finds himself too hotly pursued, he may murder the child to effect his own escape.—

    Sydney Morning Herald, July 26.

    Hide note
  47. The Courier. THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1861. LATEST INTELLIGENCE.
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Thursday 8 August 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: By the Telegraph last evening we have news from Sydney to Monday evening last. In this issue we are only able to summarise the particulars of the new ... 270 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2013-11-04 13:58:07.0

    The blackfellow who murdered Mrs. Mills at Merriwa, and carried off her child, is said to be still at large.

    Hide note
  48. NEWS AND NOTES. CLXVII.
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Friday 9 August 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: I AM most happy to inform all who feel interested in the matter, that gloomy winter is about to leave us, the last few days having been very clearly ... 5506 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 21:05:34.0

    A correspondent at Cassilis writes to a daily paper:—"I regret to say that the last accounts from Merriwa state that the blackfellow who murdered Mrs. Mills and carried off her little girl is still at large, although every exertion has been and is being made by the inhabitants to effect his capture."

    The following further particulars of this horrible case have been made public since my last communication. Strange to say, no reward has yet been offered for the apprehension of the black scoundrel:—

    It appears that Harry, the cowardly assassin, had been employed on the Hall's Creek station for three months, which time was up about the 13th or 14th instant, and that he was premeditating returning to his own tribe on the M'Intyre, but, before leaving, called at the hut of the unfortunate deceased woman, who wished him to stay for a day or so to dig up some ground in her garden, having often seen him before whilst employed on the station. She took him into the garden, showing him what she wanted him to do, telling him she would get permission of the overseer for him to do so. Afterwards they went into the hut, when Harry induced Mrs. Mills' eldest child (a boy nine years of age) to go with him into the bush to catch opossums. The boy (as he states) consented to go willingly, having been in the blackfellow's company before. They started, Harry taking his tomahawk. Half a mile from the hut, an opossum, was caught, when they made a fire to roast it. During this time, and whilst the boy's attention was withdrawn, he was felled to the ground by a blow on the forehead from the tomahawk; a second blow was then given him with the same weapon on the back of the head, rendering him insensible. The black, it appears, then went to the hut, taking the tomahawk with him, leaving the boy lying where he struck him down. Upon entering he ill-used the deceased and then struck her a blow on the back of the neck, nearly severing the head from the body. He then, with the tomahawk, broke open every box; and abstracted a silver watch, &c., and decamped, taking with him a double-barrel gun and ammunition, and also the little girl (four and a-half years of age), leaving the tomahawk behind on the floor of the hut. When her husband returned home at sunset, he found his wife lying dead on the floor of the hut, with the tomahawk beside her, covered with hair and blood, and both boy and girl gone. From the position of deceased's clothes, when her husband discovered the body, there can be no doubt of the demon's ostensible purpose. Mr. Mills cannot say how much money has been taken, nor indeed yet can properly say what he has lost as regards property. Under the care of Dr. Morris, the poor lad is slowly recovering from the wounds inflicted. Up to the present nothing further (except that Harry was tracked as far as the mountain station) has been heard of the child or black fellow. He is supposed to have gone in the direction of the M'Intyre, to join his tribe.

    Hide note
  49. THE MURDER AT HALL'S GREEK.
    Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875) Thursday 8 August 1861 p 8 Article
    Abstract: THE Maitland Entign, of yesterday, says: Mr. Chief Constable Garvin has favoured us with the following communication relative to the perpetrator of t ... 1344 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 20:41:52.0

    THE MURDER AT HALL'S GREEK.

    THE Maitland Ensign, of yesterday, says: Mr. Chief Constable Garvin has favoured us with the following communication relative to the perpetrator of this murder, received by him from the chief constable at Muswellbrook:—Police Offices, Muswellbrook, 3rd August, 1861. Sir,—I beg to send you a copy of a report received on Friday night, from chief constable Weston, at Cassilis: I beg to send you further information concerning the blackfellow who is suspected to have murdered the woman Mills. He is a native of the Ballonne River country, and formerly went by the name of Lippy, who was a few years since convicted of the murder of a German woman, and served three years in Darlinghurst gaol; his age is now about 28 years. P.S.—By telegram from the Page, received at 1 p.m., on the 3rd instant, I learn that the black- fellow was seen two days ago at Yanamanbar Creek, near Savill's Gap, thirty miles from the Page. Information sent to Merriwa police at 2 p. m., on the 3rd. The blackfellow might recross the range.'"

    The following is from our daily contemporary of yesterday:—Writing on the 3rd instant from Merriwa, a correspondent says, "I am sorry to inform you that the blackfellow, Harry, who murdered Mrs. Mills, of Little Creek, between Hall's Creek and this town, is still at large, and there is good reason for supposing that it is he who committed an outrage upon a young female named Williams, at two o'clock last Thursday afternoon, at or near the foot of M'Donald Gap, of the Liverpool Range on the north side, only about twenty-eight or thirty miles from the scene of the horrid butcheries of Mills' family. The poor girl is only about fifteen years of age.


    This is a long article, continued in next list item

    Hide note
  50. THE LATE MURDER AT LITTLE CREEK.— ANOTHER ATROCITY.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 7 August 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: WRITING on the 3rd instant from Merriwa, a correspondent says:—"I am sorry to inform you that the black fellow, Harry, who murdered Mrs. Mills, of Li ... 4295 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 21:58:42.0

    continued from previous list item

    The poor girl is only about fifteen years of age. Her mother's second husband is named Murray, and he is a shepherd, in the employ either of Mr. Weaver or Mr. Blaxland. Last Thursday she was sent by her stepfather to look after his flock of sheep for the afternoon, while he stayed at home. The black fellow seeing the poor girl alone, rushed upon her, and committed the capital offence. As soon as she escaped from the grasp of the foul fiend, she ran home to her mother, leaving the flock in the bush, and related to her the shocking tidings which the afflicted parent found to be but too true. Murray went out to the bush, and remained there with the sheep; and it was only last night that the fact was reported to the authorities. Early this morning, Mr. J. B. Benington, J. P., with a number of his men, Mr. White, of the Fitzroy Hotel, and the constables Potts and Munro, started in pursuit of this miscreant, whose life is a pollution to the earth. About nine o'clock on the morning after murdering Mrs. Mills, Harry called at the Mountain sheep station hut, kept by a Chinaman, and asked the way to the next station, for the purpose, no doubt, of avoiding it. Mrs. Mills' little girl was trotting at his feet. He was not seen again till last Thursday, when he committed the outrage on the poor girl Williams. She says Harry was barefooted, and wore a new cabbage-tree hat without a ribbon on it. This hat corresponds with one stolen from a hut of Messrs. Marlay and Hutchings, at the south side of the range, on Friday, after the murder of Mrs. Mills. So it seems that he has robbed two huts since the murder. Great fears are entertained for the safety of the poor child he stole away from Mills' hut after murdering her mother. It may, perhaps, be wondered why, ....

    continued in next list item

    Hide note
  51. THE BLACK-FELLOW, HARRY.
    Goulburn Herald (NSW : 1860 - 1864) Wednesday 14 August 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: The following particulars of the aboriginal murderer Harry, are from the S. M. Herald:—"Writing on the 3rd instant from Morriva, a 954 words
    • Text last corrected on 8 February 2014 by Stephen.J.Arnold
    • 1 comment on 8 February 2014
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 22:02:35.0

    continued from previous list item

    It may perhaps be wondered why, despite so many efforts to capture him, the wretch is still at large. But those who know Liverpool Range say that now, when water can be had everywhere, anyone who can live on water, opossums, native-cats, bears, &c., could live there for years, in spite of *five thousand men. A subscription list, which lies at the Merriwa Inn, to aid the reward for Harry's apprehension, contains the amount of £72 10s., and more will soon be added. It is hoped that the government will immediately offer a reward, for it is feared he will do more damage yet, if not caught soon. Mr. Weaver will start from this place to-morrow morning, and will join his brother at the scene of this last act of Black Harry's. These gentlemen will have with them a black fellow who is a good tracker, and also several people who know the locality. This is of the utmost importance to insure success. The gentlemen now out, as well as the Messrs. Weaver, will remain on the range for eight or ten days, watching at night and searching in the day time for the villain. And no doubt they will be aided by the people of the district over and at the base of the range. I saw Mills' little boy about an hour after he was found when left for dead by Harry. The poor boy was then asleep. The shepherd who discovered him was present also. After partially recovering from the effects of the blow, the poor child had walked about thirty yards from the fire where the black-fellow assaulted him; but finding his sight gone and his strength nearly so, he sat down again. The shepherd asked him where the black fellow was: he replied, "I do not know, nor do I know where I am either." He was carried home, and after having a little tea and rice related what the black-fellow did to himself; but the poor child had no idea that the murdered corpse of his mother lay on a stretcher beside him, and that his little sister was in the clutches of the murderer. The tomahawk lay on the floor of the hut, completely besmeared with blood, as if it had been steeped, handle and all, in a bucket. On examining the head of the murdered woman, one thing struck me as somewhat remarkable, i.e., that the wound was larger than the head of the tomahawk. This probably arose from contraction of the parts after death; but it might also have arisen partly from the peculiar way in which the blacks use their tomahawks, in striking with a slanting blow. Harry is of a light colour for a black, about twenty-six years of age, dresses very smartly, shaves, speaks good English, and is supposed to have been in the native police. I hope that all conjectures will speedily be set at rest by the wretch falling into the hands of justice.



    *"five thousand" is a misquote, should be "500"

    Hide note
  52. THE LATE MURDER AT LITTLE CREEK. ANOTHER ATROCITY. I
    Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal (NSW : 1851 - 1904) Saturday 10 August 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: WAITING on the 3rd instant form Merriwa, a correspondent says:—"I am sorry to inform you that the black fellow, Harry, who murdered Mrs. Mills, of Li ... 1153 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-12-26 01:12:32.0

    This article is similar to the previous article

    Hide note
  53. General Intelligence.
    The Golden Age (Queanbeyan, NSW : 1860 - 1864) Thursday 22 August 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: THE LATE MURDER AT LITTLE CREEK.—ANOTHER ATROCITY.—The following is from the S. M. Herald August, 7th. Writing on the 3rd instant from Merriwa, a cor ... 1540 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 21:30:48.0

    This article is similar to previous long article



    General Intelligence.

    THE LATE MURDER AT LITTLE CREEK.—ANOTHER ATROCITY.—The following is from the the S.M. Herald August, 7th. Writing on the 3rd. instant from Merriwa, a correspondent says:—"I am sorry to inform you that the blackfellow, Harry, who murdered Mrs. Mills, of Little Creek, between Hall's Creek and this town, is still at large, and there is good reason for supposing that it is he who committed an outrage upon a young female named Willliams, at two o'clock last Thursday afternoon, ....

    Hide note
  54. THE BLACK-FELLOW, HARRY.
    Goulburn Herald (NSW : 1860 - 1864) Wednesday 14 August 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: The following particulars of the aboriginal murderer Harry, are from the S. M. Herald:— Writing "Writing on the 3rd instant from Merriwa, a 941 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 21:28:55.0

    same as a previous long article

    Hide note
  55. COUNTRY NEWS.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 10 August 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: THE MURDER OF MRS. MILIS.—In connection with the recent murder near Merriwa, a letter from chief constable Sheridan, of Muswellbrook, has been receiv ... 2868 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-13 18:45:48.0

    COUNTRY NEWS.

    THE MURDER OF MRS. MILLS—In connection with the recent murder near Merriwa, a letter from chief constable Sheridan, of Muswellbrook, has been received, enclosing a report from chief constable Weston, of Cassilis, on the night of the 2nd instant. It was to the effect, that the blackfellow suspected of the murder of Mrs Mills was a native of the Balonne River country, who formerly went by the name of Sippey, was convicted a few years ago of the murder of a German woman, and served three years in Darlinghurst gaol. He was about twenty-three years of age. Information was received at Muswellbrook on the 3rd at one o'clock, by telegram, from the Page, that the blackfellow was seen two days before at Yanamanba Creek, near Sevill's Gap, thirty miles from the Page, and at two o'clock information was sent to Merriwa police, as he might recross the range.—Maitland Mercury.

    Hide note
  56. NEW SOUTH WALES. GREAT FLOODS ON THE HUNTER,
    The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) Saturday 24 August 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: The Maitland Mercury of the 10th instant says:- "The height of the river at West Maitland was about three or four inches nbove that of the 1505 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-11 20:40:12.0

    THE MURDER OF MRS. MILLS.—In connexion with the recent murder near Merriwa, a letter from chief constable Sheridan, of Muswellbrook has been received, enclosing a report from chief constable Weston, of Cassilis, on the night of the 2nd inst. It was to the effect, that the blackfellow suspected of the Murder of Mrs. Mills was a native of the Balonne River country, who formerly went by the name of Sippey, was convicted a few years ago of the murder of a German woman, and served three years in Darlinghurst Gaol. He was about twenty-three years of age. Information was received at Muswellbrook on the 3rd at one o'clock, by telegram, from the Page, that the blackfellow was seen two days before at Yanaman bluff Creek near Sevill's Gap, thirty miles from the Page; and at two o'clock information was sent to Merriwa police, as he might recross the range.—Maitland Mercury.

    Hide note
  57. NEW SOUTH WALES.
    The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 17 August 1861 p 6 Article
    Abstract: SHOCKING DEATH.—The Orange correspondent of the Bathurst Times writes:—A young woman, named Margaret Doyley, was burnt to death on Sunday ovening las ... 1023 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-12 23:16:30.0

    THE MURDER OF MRS. MILLS. — In connexion with the recent murder near Merriwa, a letter from chief constable Sheridan, of Muswellbrook has been received, enclosing a report from Chief-constable Weston, of Cassilis, on the night of the 2nd inst. It was to the effect, that the blackfellow suspected of the murder of Mrs. Mills was a native of the Balonne River country, who formerly went by the name of Sippey, was convicted a few years ago of the murder of a German woman, and served three years in Darlinghurst Gaol. He was about twenty-three years of age. Information was received at Muswellbrook on the 3rd at one o'clock, by telegram, from the Page, that the blackfellow was seen two days before at Yanamanba Creek, near Sevill's Gap, thirty miles from the Page; and at two o'clock information was sent to Werriwa police, as he might recross the range.— Maitland Mercury.

    Hide note
  58. NEWS AND NOTES. CLXVIII.
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Wednesday 14 August 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: PERMIT me to congratulate you on the making of your literary andpolitical fortune. Responsible government. has brought to the press the honors of mar ... 4620 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 21:23:38.0

    The scoundrel Harry, the aboriginal who abused and murdered Mrs. Mills, left her son for dead in the bush, and carried off her little girl, is not only still at large, but has since attacked and violated a young girl named Williams, fifteen years of age, whom he found tending some sheep near the foot of Liverpool Range:—

    Her mother's second husband is named Murray, and he is a shepherd in the employ either of Mr. Weaver or Mr. Blaxland. Last Thursday she was sent by her stepfather to look after his flock of sheep for the afternoon, while he stayed at home. The blackfellow seeing the poor girl alone, rushed upon her, and committed the capital offence. As soon as she escaped from the grasp of the foul fiend, she ran home to her mother, leaving the flock in the bush, and related to her the shocking tidings which the afflicted parent found to be but too true. Murray went out to the bush, and remained there with the sheep; and it was only last night that the fact was reported to the authorities. Early this morning Mr. J. B. Bettington, J.P., with a number of his men, Mr. White, of the Fitzroy Hotel, and the constables, Potts and Munro, started in pursuit of this miscreant, whose life is a pollution to the earth. About nine o'clock on the morning after murdering Mrs. Mills, Harry called at the Mountain sheep station hut, kept by a Chinaman, and asked the way to the next station, for the purpose, no doubt, of avoiding it. Mrs. Mills' little girl was trotting at his feet. He was not seen again till last Thursday, when he committed the outrage on the poor girl Williams. She says Harry was barefooted, and wore a new cabbage-tree hat, without ribbon on it. This hat corresponds with one stolen from a hut of Messrs. Marlay and Hutchings, at the south side of the range, on Friday, after the murder of Mrs. Mills. So it seems that he has robbed two huts since the murder. Great, fears are entertained for the safety, of the poor child he stole away from Mills hut after murdering her mother. A correspondent of the press says:—It may, perhaps be wondered why, despite so many efforts to capture him, the wretch is still at large. But those who know Liverpool Range say that now, when water can be had everywhere, any one who can live on water, opposums; native cats, bears, &c., could live there for years, in spite of 500 men.

    Hide note
  59. RIFLE MATCH.
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Tuesday 20 August 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: In accordance with an advertisement that appeared in a former issue, several volunteers and others met about one o'clock, on Saturday last, in Mr. Gr ... 7066 words
    • Text last corrected on 3 May 2015 by mcdonagh
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-26 20:34:57.0

    Text


    "BLACK HARRY," THE MURDERER—It was rumoured yesterday in Maitland that this desperate villain had been apprehended; but our Murrurundi correspondent, writing on Saturday, and the Tamworth Examiner of that date, speak of him as being still at large. One of the Tamworth police had just been despatched to Carroll, on the Namoi, a rumour being raised that Harry had been seen in that neighbourhood.

    Hide note
  60. Advertising
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Thursday 15 August 1861 p 1 Advertising
    5674 words
    • Tagged as: Woodall Joseph
    • Text last corrected on 27 August 2014 by anonymous
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-11 21:20:46.0

    ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY POUNDS REWARD.

    WHEREAS "HARRY," an Aboriginal Native, stands charged with the murder of Mary Mills, at Gundebri, in the police district of Scone, on the 16th 16th JULY last, and with abduction, attempt to murder, and rape:—Notice is hereby given, that the SUM of ONE HUNDRED POUNDS has been subscribed by the inhabitants of Scone and Merriwa, in addition to the sum of FIFTY POUNDS offered by the Government, which will be paid to such person or persons as will apprehend and lodge the said "HARRY" in safe custody, either at Merriwa or Scone, and for the recovery of the child, 4½ years of age, taken away by him.

    Harry is said to be a native of the M'Intyre or Ballone Rivers, speaks English, and it is supposed will endeavour to make his way to his tribe.

    JAMES SMITH, P.M.

    Police Office, Scone, August 10, 1861.

    Hide note
  61. Advertising
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 16 August 1861 p 1 Advertising
    7573 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-11 21:00:41.0

    £150 REWARD.—WHEREAS, "HARRY," an aboriginal native, stands charged with the Murder of Mary Mills, at Gundebri, in the Police District of Scone, on the 16th JULY last, and with abduction, attempt to murder and rape:—Notice is hereby given, that the sum of ONE HUNDRED POUNDS has been subscribed by the inhabitants of the District of Scone and Merriwa, in addition to the sum of FIFTY POUNDS offered by the Government, which will be paid to such person or persons as will apprehend and lodge the said "HARRY" in safe custody, either at Scone or Merriwa, and for the recovery of the child, 4½ years of age, taken away by him.

    Harry is said to be a native of the Ballone or M'Intyre Rivers, speaks English, and it is supposed will endeavour to make his way to his tribe.

    JAMES SMITH, P.M. Police Office, Scone, August 10th, 1861.

    Hide note
  62. Advertising
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 17 August 1861 p 10 Advertising
    8536 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-12 18:27:05.0

    £150 REWARD.—WHEREAS, "HARRY," an aboriginal native, stands charged with the Murder of Mary Mills, at Gundebri, in the Police District of Scone, on the 16th JULY last, and with abduction, attempt to murder and rape:—Notice is hereby given, that the sum of ONE HUNDRED POUNDS has been subscribed by the inhabitants of tho District of Scone and Merriwa, in addition to the sum of FIFTY POUNDS offered by the Government, which will be paid to such person or persons as will apprehend and lodge the said "HARRY " in safe custody, either at Scone or Merriwa, and for the recovery of the child, 4½ years of age, taken away by him.

    Harry is said to be a native of tho Ballone or M'Intyre Rivers, speaks English, and it is supposed will endeavour to make his way to his tribe.

    JAMES SMITH, P.M. Police Office, Scone, August 10th, 1861.

    Hide note
  63. THE SYDNEY MONTHLY OVERLAND MAIL. By the Benares. SUMMARY OF MONTHLY NEWS. PROM 19TH JULY, TO 20TH AUGUST, 1861. Friday, 19th to 26th July.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 21 August 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: WE have nothing new of importance from Lambing Flat. Everything seems quiet there. The police having all left, a vigilance committee his been establi ... 8413 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 18:44:16.0

    The Government has offered a reward for the apprehension of the murderous aborigine, Harry. Quite apart from this inducement, the residents of the district have held a public meeting, have offered a further reward of £100, and have organised two parties to scour the country in search of him.

    Hide note
  64. SUICIDE OF DR VAN ROSSUM.
    Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875) Monday 26 August 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: On Saturday morning, says Wednesday's Western Post, Dr. King, the coroner for the district, held an inquest at the Carrier's Arms, on the body of Joh ... 3425 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-12 23:15:24.0

    A resident of Merriwa furnishes the Western Post with the following particulars in reference to "Black Harry," August 7.—Black Harry seems to baffle all the attempts of his pursuers since he committed the shocking affair at the Little Creek, near this place. He has twice robbed one of Messrs. Marlay and Hutching's sheep stations. On the afternoon of Thursday last, at two o'clock, he violated the person of a child about eleven years of age, step daughter of a man named Murray, who resides on the Liverpool side of M'Donald's Gap. After effecting his purpose, he told the girl he would fetch a knife and cut her throat. He ran off, as if to get a knife, and the little girl ran home. The stepfather, with indescribable apathy, went out and remained, with the sheep (the little girl had been shepherding), and it was not until ten o'clock on Friday night that a stranger brought the tidings to this place. Early on Saturday morning, Messrs. Bettington, White, and a few of Mr. Bettington's men, with the constables, started off to aid in pursuing the vile wretch. On Sunday, a party of some fifteen or sixteen had assembled on the Liverpool Range. These divided into two sections, and stealthily proceeded to search the secluded nook. About noon one of the parties heard a shot, then another, and another. They now felt convinced the other party had fallen in with Black Harry, and that he was showing fight. They made off in hot haste for the supposed scene of conflict, and after nearly exhausting themselves in a race up the mountain, found the whole affair to be nothing more than a Murrurundi man, who aught to have known better, amusing himself shooting wallabies. After this intimation to the black, if within hearing, to hide well, our gentlemen thought their presence there no longer necessary, and they returned home. On Tuesday night word brought into town that nearly twenty miles from Murray's he had robbed another hut, a pistol being part of the plunder he had carried off. Afterwards he passed a man on the plains; but the man being unarmed, he feared to attack the black, who carried a double barrelled gun and a pistol. Shortly after he approached a hut, and, by discharging his gun, summoned those, within to appear : none answering his call but a woman, he entered, and ordered the trembling creature to make ready dinner for him, and lose no time about it. The woman having obeyed his order, Harry sat down, placing his pistol before him and gun beside him. The poor women, under pretence of going out for a piece of wood for the fire, ran off, and hid herself in the cedar scrub close by. The woman watched him go away from the hut and make for the mountains. Shortly after leaving the hut he fired four shots, perhaps to deter, any one from following him. As Mills' little girl has not been seen with him since the morning of the 17th ultimo, I fear much that he has murdered the poor little thing. The subscriptions to aid the reward the Government may offer for his apprehension amounted, on Saturday last, to £83 10s. I saw Mills little boy last Sunday evening. The boy is quite sensible, but very weak. I think his recovery is very doubtful. The father showed me a piece of the skull about the size of a fourpenny piece, which oozed out from the wound in the back of the neck.

    Hide note
  65. NEWS AND NOTES. CLXX.
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Tuesday 3 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: THE Telegraph of course arrived in ample time to get your English mail duly depatched by the Benares, which sailed punctually at her appointed time; ... 6151 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-12-26 09:43:19.0

    Similar to previous list item, but a little addition follows



    Mr. Lippey, or Black Harry, continues at large, and fresh depredations are reported of him. The following are the latest particulars. A letter from Merriwa, dated 7th August, says:—"On Tuesday night word was brought into town that nearly twenty miles from Murray's he had robbed another hut, a pistol being part of the plunder he had carried off. Afterwards he passed a man on the plains; but the man being unarmed, he feared to attack the black, who carried a double-barrelled gun and a pistol. Shortly after he approached a hut, and, by discharging his gun, summoned those within to appear: none answering his call but a woman, he entered, and ordered the trem- bling creature to make ready dinner for him, and lose no time about it. The woman having obeyed his order, Harry sat down, placing is pistol before him and gun beside him. The poor woman, under pretence of going out for a piece of wood for the fire, ran off, and hid herself in the cedar scrub close by. The woman watched him go away from the hut and make for the mountains. Shortly after leaving the hut he fired four shots, perhaps to deter any one from following him. As Mills' little girl has not been seen with him since the morning of the 17th ultimo, I fear much that he has murdered the poor little thing. The subscriptions to aid the reward the govern- ment may offer for his apprehension amounted, on Saturday last, to £83 10s. I saw Mills' little boy last Sunday evening. The boy is quite sensible, but very weak. I think his recovery is very doubtful. The father showed me a piece of the skull about the size of a fourpenny-piece, which oozed out from the wound in the back of the neck."




    From Castlereagh river a correspondent writes:—"Some excitement has been created in our own immediate vicinity within these four days, from the fact of the blackfellow, who committed the murders lately at Hall's Creek having been seen, and forcibly abducted a girl, aged about fourteen years, who was in charge of a few sheep. She is a half-caste. Her two brothers, several blacks, the police from the Page, and some from Cassilis, immediately started in pursuit of the miscreant, who is represented as being armed to the teeth."

    Hide note
  66. Advertising
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 20 August 1861 p 8 Advertising
    5407 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-21 11:37:33.0

    £150 REWARD.—WHEREAS, "HARRRY," an aboriginal native, stands charged with the Murder of Mary Mills at Gundebri, in the Police District of Scone, on the 16th JULY last, and with abduction, attempt to murder and rape :—Notice is hereby given, that the sum ONE HUNDRED POUNDS has been subscribed by the inhabitants of the District of Scone and Merriwa, in addition to the sum of FIFTY POUNDS offerred by the Government, which will be paid to such person or persons as will apprehend and lodge the said "HARRY" in safe custody, either at Scone or Merriwa, and for the recovery of the child, 4½ years of age, taken away by him.

    Harry is said to be a native of the Ballone or M'Intyre Rivers, speaks English, and it is supposed will endeavour to make his way to his tribe.

    JAMES SMITH, P.M.

    Police Office, Scone, August 10th, 1861.

    Hide note
  67. Advertising
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 19 August 1861 p 1 Advertising
    7135 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-12 20:05:58.0

    £150 REWARD.—WHEREAS, "HARRY," an aboriginal native, stands charged with the Murder of Mary Mills, at Gundebri, in the Police District of Scone, on the 16th JULY last, and with abduction, attempt to murder and rape :—Notice is hereby given, that the sum of ONE HUNDRED POUNDS has been subscribed by the inhabitants of the District of Scone and Merriwa, in addition to the sum of FIFTY POUNDS offered by the Government, which will be paid to such person or persons as will apprehend and lodge the said "HARRY" in safe custody, either at Scone or Merriwa, and for the recovery of the child, 4½ years of age, taken away by him.

    Harry is said to be a native of the Ballone or M'Intyre Rivers, speaks English, and it is supposed will endeavour to make his way to his tribe.

    JAMES SMITH, P.M.

    Police Office, Scone, August 10th, 1861.

    Hide note
  68. Advertising
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Tuesday 20 August 1861 p 1 Advertising
    6222 words
    • Text last corrected on 7 February 2018 by marlened
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-21 11:40:00.0

    ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY POUNDS REWARD

    WHEREAS "HARRY," an Aboriginal Native,
    stands charged with the murder of Mary Mills, at Gundebri, in the police district of Scone, on the 16th July last, and with abduction, attempt to murder, and rape: Notice is hereby given that the SUM of ONE HUNDRED POUNDS has been subscribed by the inhabitants of Scone and Merriwa, in addition to the SUM of FIFTY POUNDS offered by the Government, which will be paid to such person or persons as will apprehend and lodge the said Harry in safe custody either at Merriwa or Scone, and for the recovery of the child, 4½ years of age, taken away by him.

    Harry is said to be a native of the M'Intyre or Ballone River, speaks English very well, and it is supposed will endeavour to make his way to his tribe.
    JAMES SMITH, P.M.
    Police Office, Scone, August 10, 1861.

    Hide note
  69. Advertising
    Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875) Tuesday 20 August 1861 p 1 Advertising
    6598 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-21 11:40:27.0

    £150 REWARD.—WHEREAS, "HARRY," an aboriginal native, stands charged with the murder of Mary Mills, at Gundebri, in the Police District of Scone, on the 16th JULY last, and with abduction, attempt to murder and rape:—Notice is hereby given, that the sum of ONE HUNDRED POUNDS has been subscribed by the inhabitants of the District of Scone and Merriwa, in addition to the sum of FIFTY POUNDS offered by the Government, which will be paid to such person or persons as will apprehend and lodge the said "HARRY" in safe custody, either at Scone or Merriwa, and for the recovery of the child, 4½ years of age taken away by him.

    Harry is said to be a native of the Ballone or M'Intyre Rivers, speaks English, and it is supposed will endeavour to make his way to his tribe.

    JAMES SMITH, P.M. Police Office, Scone, August. 10th, 1861.

    Hide note
  70. Advertising
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 21 August 1861 p 12 Advertising
    8322 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-11 21:31:50.0

    £150 REWARD.—WHEREAS, "HARRY," an aboriginal native, stands charged with the Murder of Mary Mills, at Gundebri, in the Police District of Scone, on the 16th JULY last, and with abduction, attempt to murder and rape:—Notice is hereby given, that the sum of ONE HUNDRED POUNDS has been subscribed by the inhabitants of the District of Scone and Merriwa, in addition to the sum of FIFTY POUNDS offered by the Government, which will be paid to such person or persons as will apprehend and lodge the said "HARRY" in safe custody, either at Scone or Merriwa, and for the recovery of the child, 4½ years of age, taken away by him.

    Harry is said to be a native of the Ballone or M'Intyre Rivers, speaks English, and it is supposed will endeavour to make his way to his tribe.

    JAMES SMITH, P.M.

    Police Office, Scone, August 10th, 1861.

    Hide note
  71. Advertising
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 22 August 1861 p 1 Advertising
    7316 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-11 21:32:38.0

    £150 REWARD.—WHEREAS, "HARRY," an aboriginal native, stands charged with the Murder of Mary Mills, at Gundebri, in the Police District of Scone, on the 16th JULY last, and with abduction, attempt to murder and rape—:-Notice is hereby given, that the sum of ONE HUNDRED POUNDS has been subscribed by the inhabitants of the District of Scone and Merriwa, in addition to the sum of FIFTY POUNDS offered by the Government, which will be paid to such person or persons as will apprehend and lodge the said "HARRY" in safe custody, either at Scone or Merriwa, and for the recovery of the child, 4½ years of age, taken away by him."

    Harry is said to be a native of the Ballone or M'Intyre Rivers, speaks English, and it is supposed will endeavour to make his way to his tribe.

    JAMES SMITH, P.M. Police Office, Scone, August 10th, 1861.

    Hide note
  72. MAITLAND.
    The Newcastle Chronicle and Hunter River District News (NSW : 1859 - 1866) Wednesday 21 August 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: WHITE v. BANK OF NEW SOUTH WASLES.—This was an action brought by William Henry Whyte, of Newcastle, against the Bank of New South Wales at Newcastle, ... 1187 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 19:04:59.0

    BLACK "HARRY" THE MURDERER. —It was rumoured yesterday in Maitland, that this desperate villain had been apprehended; but our Murrurundi correspondent, writing on Saturday, and the Tamworth Examiner of that date, speak of him as being still at large. One of the Tamworth police had just been despatched to Carroll, on the Namoi, a rumour being raised that Harry had been seen in that neighbourhood.

    Hide note
  73. NEW SOUTH WALES.
    Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899) Thursday 22 August 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: Our files extend to the 13th inst. The black, Harry, the murderer of Mrs. Mills, is still at large. An interesting lecture on the writings of Chas. 513 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-11 20:30:42.0

    NEW SOUTH WALES.
    Our files extend to the 18th inst. The black, Harry, the murderer of Mrs. Mills, is still at large.

    Hide note
  74. TUESDAY, AUGUST 20. (Before District Judge W. A. Purefoy, E[?]q;) The court opened at a few minutes after ten o'clock. NEW TRIAL MOTION.
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Thursday 22 August 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: With regard to the motion for a new trial in the case of Kelly v. Gorrick, which was argued on Monday by the counsel for the parties, his Honor said ... 6152 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-12-26 10:32:15.0

    Not Harry


    HARRY, THE ABORIGINAL MURDERER.—We have heard enquiries made whether the black, Harry, who committed the Gundebry murder, had not been arrested at or near Armidale. On referring to the Armidale Express, we find that an aboriginal named Harry had been brought before the bench, charged with murder at the Nimboi, on the M'Leay upper waters; and was at first charged on suspicion also of being the Gundebry murderer. But a comparison of dates proves that they must be different men, bearing the same name. The Armidale Harry was apprehended by Lieut. Poulden, some weeks since, on the M'Leay waters, and he escaped while Mr. Foulden and Aldrick were searching for the drowned man, Alexander; he was then at large till Saturday, the 3rd August, when Sergeant Keegan and Aldrick captured him near Guy Fawkes. All this is quite inconsistent with the late career of the Gundebry Harry. He, it will be remembered, had been for some time, three months we think, employed at the Gundebry station, and committed the murder of Mrs. Mills a day or two only after leaving the employment; and since the first murder, the inhabitants about the Liverpool Range have been kept in continual excitement by tales of further atrocities committed by him in that quarter —we should suppose 150 miles from the locality of the Armidale Harry's outrages. The Armidale Harry was still in custody at the latest date, the magistrates waiting for additional evidence against him, in reference to the Nimboi murder.

    Hide note
  75. COLONIAL EXTRACTS.
    Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW : 1856 - 1950) Tuesday 27 August 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: ATTEMPT TO UPSET A RAILWAY TRAIN.—We learn with regret that another attempt to overturn a train on the Murray River Railway was made at an early hour ... 2872 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-12 18:55:30.0

    (Not Harry)

    HARRY THE ABORIGINAL MURDERER.—We have heard enquiries made whether the black, Harry, who committed the Gundebry murder, had not been arrested at or near Armidale. On referring to the Armidale Express, we find that an aboriginal named Harry had been brought before the Bench, charged with murder at Nimboi, on the Macleay upper waters; and was at first charged on suspicion also of being the Gundebry murderer. But a comparison of dates proves that they must be different men bearing the same name. The Armidale Harry was apprehended by Lieutenant Poulden, some weeks since, on the Macleay waters, and he escaped while Mr. Poulden and Aldrick were searching for the drowned man, Alexander; he was then at large till Saturday, the 3rd August, when Serjeant Keegan and Aldrick captured him near Guy Fawkes. All this is quite inconsistent with the late career of the Gundebry Harry. He, it will be remembered, had been for some time (three months, we think) employed at the Gundebry Station, and committed the murder of Mrs. Mills a day or two only after leaving the employment; and since the first murder, the inhabitants about the Liverpool Range have been kept in continual excitement by tales of further atrocities committed by him in that quarter—we should suppose 150 miles from the locality of the Armidale Harry's outrages. The Armidale Harry was still in custody at the latest date, the magistrates waiting for additional evidence against him, in reference to the Nimboi murder.—Maitland Mercury.

    Hide note
  76. NEWS AND NOTES. CLXIX. [A portion of our Correspondent's communication appeared in yesterday's paper.]
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Tuesday 27 August 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: A POOR fellow named Thomas Youll, a stonemason, has been killed by falling from the top of a quarry in Duke-street. He was picked up, dreadfully crus ... 3394 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-12 22:19:31.0

    You are probably aware that the scoundrel Harry, who has been committing so many outrages on the Upper Hunter, is no other than that black snake Sippey, of Queensland fame, who ought by right to have been hanged on the Factory Hill in Brisbane some years ago, but escaped it for the time. The following is the latest I can glean respecting the wretch :—"The parties who volunteered their services to search after the murderer Harry, have all returned; some have been out a week, others four and five days. The only intelligence they have been able to get of the villain is, that he robbed a hut at the Woolshed on Thursday last, and that he then took to a scrub (very dense) called Black Jack, which runs beside the Namoi River for 150 miles. He cannot cross the river at present, as the flood has made it a mile wide. Very great credit is due to the parties who have been out; they have all had some difficulties to encounter. It never ceased raining the whole time, and the creeks were so high that to cross them was to ensure a sound ducking. There was not one of the party that did not jeopardise his life in crossing some of the large streams."

    Hide note
  77. COUNTRY NEW. THE CATHOLIO CHURCH; RAYMOND TERRACE. (From a correspondent of the Maitland Mercury.)
    Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875) Wednesday 28 August 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: THIS noble looking church, built in the Gothio style of architecture, is now advanced towards completion so for as to be ready to receive the roof, f ... 2774 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-30 17:42:23.0

    BLACK HARRY, THE MURDERER,—Yesterday's Mercury says:—That Mr. chief constable Garvin, of Maitland, has received the following information from the chief constable, Muswellbrook:—" Last night I received information from the district constable, Gunnedah, that Black Harry on Friday last was making for the Big River and Gwydir River."

    Hide note
  78. REVIEW.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 28 August 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: UPON the vexed question of Baptism, the reverend author has published a very temperate and judicious discourse. The design of the work is to show tha ... 1665 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-03 13:33:46.0

    HARRY, THE MURDERER.—Yesterday's Maitland Mercury states that Mr. Chief Constable Garvin, of Maitland, received, on Monday, the following information from the chief constable, Muswell Brook:—"Last night I received information from the district constable, Gunnedah, that Black Harry on Friday last was making for the Big River and Gwydir River."

    Hide note
  79. NEW SOUTH WALES.
    Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1860 - 1947) Thursday 12 September 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: THE Duke of Wellington has made a splendid passage of five and a-half days, having left Sydney on 31st ult. We are indebted to Capt. Cluloo for 436 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-12-26 10:50:54.0

    Black Harry was apprehended on last Wednesday at Murrurundi. No particulars are given.


    Correct capture date is Sunday 25th Aug., 1861

    Hide note
  80. THE CAPTURE OF "HARRY."
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Saturday 31 August 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: General excitement had existed for a considerable time past in respect to this scoundrel, more particularly as it became known that he would pass thr ... 1833 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-12-26 09:57:03.0

    Text

    GALLANT CAPTURE OF THE MURDERER "HARRY," THE ABORIGINAL, BY MR. JOHN HUMPHRIES, AT BORAH STATION, NEAR MELVILLE PLAINS.


    The search, capture and deposit into Gunnedah lockup.

    Hide note
  81. CAPTURE OF "HARRY," THE ABORIGINAL, BY MR. JOHN HUMPHRIES.
    Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW : 1856 - 1950) Friday 6 September 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: We are indebted to a correspondent for the following particulars of the chase, and ultimate capture, on the morning of Sunday, the 25th ultimo, of th ... 2010 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-21 11:49:56.0

    Capture

    Hide note
  82. GALLANT CAPTURE OF THE MURDERER " HARRY," THE ABORIGINAL. (From saturday'a Maitland, Mercury.)
    Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875) Monday 2 September 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: GENERAL excitement had existed for a considerable time, past in respect to this scoundrel, more partioalarly as it became known that he would pass th ... 1894 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-21 19:23:34.0

    Capture

    Hide note
  83. CAPTURE OF "BLACK HARRY." Maitland Mercury's Gunnedah Correspondent. August 26th.) CAPTURE OF THE MURDERER [?]HARRY." THE ABORIGINAL, BY JOHN HUMPHRIES, AT BORAH STA[?]NEAR MELVILLE PLAINS.
    The Newcastle Chronicle and Hunter River District News (NSW : 1859 - 1866) Wednesday 4 September 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: [?] had existed for a considerable time [?] to this scoundrel, more particularly as it be[?] that he would pass through this part of the [?] Balonne ... 4142 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-21 20:20:58.0

    Capture



    Same as preceding article

    Hide note
  84. CAPTURE OF "HARRY," THE ABORIGINAL MURDERER.
    Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1860 - 1947) Thursday 26 September 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: WE (S. M. Herald) are indebted to a correspondent for the following particulars of the chase, and ultimate capture, on the morning of Sunday, the 25t ... 1765 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-12-26 10:54:39.0

    Similar to preceding accounts of Harry's capture

    Hide note
  85. SYDNEY. Friday 2.30 p.m.
    Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal (NSW : 1851 - 1904) Saturday 31 August 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Considerable interest is manifested in the approaching meeting of Parliament. A Government telegram from Sofila today announces the discovery of a 121 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-30 17:46:14.0

    Black Harry is in custody and on his way down to Maitland.

    Hide note
  86. SYDNEY Tuesday afternoon.
    Goulburn Herald (NSW : 1860 - 1864) Saturday 31 August 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: COLONEL KEMPT, Mr. Mc Lerie, and Lieutenant Richardson returned to Sydney last night, and Mr. Mc Lorie had an interview with the colonial secretary s ... 1019 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-30 17:49:30.0

    Black harry, the aboriginal murderer and violator, is in custody, and on his way down to Maitland.

    Hide note
  87. TELEGRAPHIC DESPATCHES.
    Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918) Friday 6 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: SYDNEY, Wednesday.—The Belfast Hotel Anck-land, has been burnt. The Bredalbane has left. The black, Harry, has been committed for trial, and has conf ... 223 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 15:21:03.0

    The black, Harry, has been committed for trial, and has confessed to the murder of Mrs. Mills, and other crimes.

    Hide note
  88. NOTES OF THE WEEK. Friday, 6th September.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 7 September 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: PARLIAMENT is again sitting, and there is every prospect of a stormy session. The opening Speech of the Governor-in-Chief was as bare of real informa ... 2193 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-09 20:00:02.0

    The aboriginal murderer Harry has been committed for trial. He confesses freely to the murder of Mrs. Mills, as also to having done his best to kill her son; also to two rapes and eleven robberies.

    Hide note
  89. THE SYDNEY MONTHLY OVERLAND MAIL. B[?] the Salsette. SUMMARY OF MONTHLY NEWS. FROM 21ST AUGUST, TO 20TH SEPTEMBER 1861. Wednesday, 21st August.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 21 September 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: OUR last notes were completed up to the day of the mail's departure: since then there has been little to record. The 31st instant being the anniversa ... 8292 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-09 19:14:56.0

    Harry, the blackfellow, for whose apprehension so many efforts have been made, was apprehended in the early part of the week, by Mr. Humphries, a squatter.

    The aboriginal murderer Harry has been committed for trial. He confesses freely to the murder of Mrs. Mills, as also to having done his best to kill her son; also to two rapes and eleven robberies.

    Hide note
  90. SYDNEY Saturday afternoon.
    Goulburn Herald (NSW : 1860 - 1864) Wednesday 4 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: The appointment of Mr. Charles Cowper junior as clerk of the executive council, and the subsequent proclamation that he might be re-elected to the As ... 2729 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-30 17:57:00.0

    The particulars which the Maitland papers furnish of the capture of the monster Black Harry, alias Sippey, reflect the utmost credit upon the tact and bravery of his captor. Mr. Humphries, of Melville Plains. It is worthy of remark, as illustrative of the cunning of this villain, that he had a telescope, with which he viewed closely his pursuers, and was thereby enabled to secrete himself.

    Hide note
  91. SYDNEY. Wednesday afternoon.
    Goulburn Herald (NSW : 1860 - 1864) Saturday 7 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: YOU will see that in the debate on the address, Mr. Cowper was attacked and defended himself. The assault was very lame, and the premier had decidedl ... 1112 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 15:43:22.0

    The scoundrel Black Harry has undergone a magisterial examination, and is on his way to Merriwa. He own[s] to the rapes and murders. He says that he killed Mrs. Mills because she refused him a drink, and threw hot water over him. He persists in saying that the little girl strayed away from him in the bush, while he was asleep.

    Hide note
  92. NEWS AND NOTES.
    The Star (Ballarat, Vic. : 1855 - 1864) Friday 6 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: We hear that Grant, the man who absconded from Geelong some few weeks ago, after embezzling a considerable amount of money, the property of the Porta ... 1559 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 14:11:31.0

    The following is a Sydney telegram of Wednesday's date, from the Argus:- .... The black, Harry, has been committed for trial, and has confessed the murder of Mrs Mills, and other crimes. He says the little girl escaped while he was asleep in the bush, but nothing has been heard of her.

    Hide note
  93. The Courier. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1801. LATEST FROM SYDNEY.
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Monday 2 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: BEING compelled to deer the insertion of our Sydney correspondent usual budget of "Notes" until to-morrow, we compile' the following principal items ... 1558 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 14:44:05.0

    MURRURUNDI.

    Wednesday, 12.15 a.m.

    Harry, the blackfellow, was apprehended on his road down.

    Hide note
  94. TELEGRAPHIC DESPATCHES. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENTS.) SYDNEY, WEDNESDAY.
    The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 5 September 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: The Belfast Hotel, Auckland, has been burnt. The Breadalbane has left. The black, Harry, has been committed for trial, and has confessed the murder o ... 358 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-21 19:40:48.0

    The black, Harry, has been committed for trial, and has confessed the murder of Mrs. Mills, and other crimes. He says the little girl escaped while he was asleep in the bush, but nothing has been heard of her.

    Hide note
  95. COLONIAL NEWS. THE MURDERER "HARRY."
    The North Australian, Ipswich and General Advertiser (Ipswich, Qld. : 1856 - 1862) Friday 13 September 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Writing on the 29th ultimo, the Gunnedsh correspondent of the Haitland Mercury says:—After being safely deposited in the lock-up here, Harry was beav ... 1681 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-12-26 10:10:28.0

    COLONIAL NEWS.

    THE MURDERER "HARRY."

    Writing on the 29th ultimo, the Gunnedah correspondent of the Maitland Mercury says:— After being safely deposited in the Lock-up here. Harry was heavily leg-ironed in addition to the handcuffs he had on, and though at first he appeared cast down, yet these last two days he has frequently joked and laughed, not only with prisoners in the adjoining cells, but also those persons who, led by curiosity, went to look at him. He was brought up before the bench on Tuesday. There were present, Messrs. C. W. Lloyd, John Johnstone, and Thomas Parnell, J.P.'s. The chief constable of Cassilis (Mr. William John Weston) preferred the charge against the prisoner, of being the murderer of Mrs. Mary Mills, at Gundebri, in the district of Merriwa, on 16th July last—this being the principal, out of numerous charges to be preferred against him. Mr. John Humphries, squatter, of Borah, deposed to the apprehension of the prisoner near Borah, on the morning of the 25th, on the charge of having murdered Mrs. Mary Mills. Mr. Constable Gibson, of Coonabarabran, deposed to having been the first police officer to come up after the prisoner's apprehension, and to his having escorted him in company with Mr. Humphries to the lock-up here. The swag which the prisoner had with him when apprehended was produced, together with other articles picked up on his tracks. On being asked in the usual way, after being duly cautioned, if he had anything to say, in answer to the charge, he replied, "I have nothing to say". A warrant was hereupon given to Chief Constable Weston to convey the prisoner to Merriwa, in the neighbourhood of which the horrid crime was committed. Prisoner's demeanour was of seemingly jaunty in- different disposition, he replying with much levity when asked concerning the little girl of Mrs. Mills, whom he took away after the murder of her mother. "Harry," alias "Sippy," is a native of the M'Intyre River tribe of aboriginals, is about 5 feet 7 inches high, not very bad looking; has a scar of an old incised wound nearly an inch in length under right eye, and another on forehead about half an inch long, extending towards the nose; his hair was curly and long, but he says he cut it with a pair of shears, with a view of disfiguring himself, and avoid detection. When brought to the lock-up he had on a pilot cloth jacket, red nightcap, pair of coarse corduroy trowsers, a white shirt, Scotch twill shirt, and a Crimean check shirt; no boots. His swag consisted of a double-barrel pistol, powder, caps, bullets, and shot, tweed coat, pair new moleskin trowsers, a grey guernsey, two razors looking-glass, comb, a hammer, pair blankets, two handkerchiefs, pocket-knife, a saddle-strap, and some silver. These were found on him when caught; besides which a double-barrel gun was found by Mr. Weston some weeks back, at a station he (Harry) had called at, near Warrah, called Harrison's station, and which he left there; also other things dropped here and there on his pas- sage through the country. In proof of the systematic manner in which the villain eluded the vigilance of his pursuers, though diligently and untiringly searching for him, it may be stated that he would sometimes follow on the heels, as it were, of his pursuers—then, to avoid being tracked, he would take off his boots, and tie grass or leaves to his feet, so as to leave no vestige of his advance; at other times he would wear his boots, and step away from his tracks for some distance, placing his blanket under his feet the while; at other times he would drop some portions of his swag here and there, so as to make his pursuers believe they were close at his heels, at same time he would bound on twenty miles or more. At one time he would ascend the top of a mountain, and espy those in chase of him on the plains; at others he would get up a tree and allow his pursuers to pass by. Since he has been in the lock-up he recognised Mr. Chief Constable Murray, and Mr. Alexander Thomson, and their blackfellow, Yarri, who were tracking him at Borah, and said they passed close to him when in a tree. In like manner did he perceive others of his pursuers. He has voluntarily confessed to the murder of Mrs. Mills, and says that he asked her for a drink, when she refused to give it to him, and threw hot water about him; he then attacked her with the tomahawk. He also confesses to the assault on the boy, and the abduction of the little girl, but adds that be did not kill her, but that she got away from him when he was asleep on Warrah Ridges, about four miles from a sheep station. He also acknowledges having committed the rape on the person of the girl at Murray's station, near Kickerbill; and lastly the abduction of the half-caste girl from Borah station. He appears quite indifferent to his fate, and says "I suppose they'll hang me." He says that he was three years in gaol. two of which were in Sydney, about four years ago. He is intelligent looking, and speaks good English. He started to-day in custody of Chief Constable Weston and Constable Potts, who will escort him to Merriwa, distant 100 miles from here. A large number of persons collected to see him.

    Hide note
  96. CAPTURE OF "HARRY," THE ABORIGINAL, BY MR. JOHN HUMPHRIES.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 2 September 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: WE are indebted to a correspondent for the following particulars of the chase, and ultimate capture, on the morning of Sunday, the 25th ultimo, of th ... 1888 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-23 22:30:37.0

    CAPTURE OF "HARRY," THE ABORIGINAL,

    BY MR. JOHN HUMPHRIES.

    WE are indebted to a correspondent for the following particulars of the chase, and ultimate capture, on the morning of Sunday, the 25th ultimo, of the bloodthirsty miscreant "Black Harry," at Borah Station, near Melville Plains, by Mr. John Humphries, whose tact, and cool determination, in bringing Harry to bay merit the warmest commendation. The writer says:—

    General excitement had existed for a considerable time past in respect to this scoundrel, .....

    Hide note
  97. THE CAPTURE OF "HARRY."
    Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932) Wednesday 4 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: GALLANT CAPTURE OF THE MURDERER "HARRY," THE ABORIGINAL, BY MR. JOHN HUMPHRIES, AT BORAH STATION, NEAR MELVILLE PLAINS. 2356 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-21 20:27:21.0

    Capture



    General excitement had existed for a considerable time past in respect to this scoundrel, .....

    Hide note
  98. CAPTURE OF "HARRY" THE ABORIGINAL.
    The Star (Ballarat, Vic. : 1855 - 1864) Monday 9 September 1861 p 1 Article
    Abstract: We are indebted to a correspondnet for the following particulars of the chase, and ultimate capture, on the morning of Sunday, the 25th ultimo, of th ... 1625 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-21 21:06:13.0

    Capture




    CAPTURE OF "HARRY" THE ABORIGINAL.


    General excitement had existed for a considerable time past in respect to this scoundrel, ....

    Hide note
  99. CAPTURE OF " HARRY," THE ARORIGINAL, BY MR. J. HUMPHRIES.
    Examiner (Kiama, NSW : 1859 - 1862) Tuesday 10 September 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: We are indebted (says the Herald) to a correspondent for the following particulars of the chase, and ultimate capture, on the morning of Sunday, the ... 1542 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-22 10:43:48.0

    Capture by Humphries



    General excitement had existed for a considerable time past in respect to this scoundrel, .... etc

    Hide note
  100. CAPTURE OF "HARRY," THE ABORIGINAL, BY MR. JOHN HUMPHRIES.
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Monday 9 September 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: We are indebted to a correspondent for the following particulars of the chase, and ultimate capture, on the morning of Sunday, the 25th ultimo, of th ... 1902 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-22 10:50:55.0

    Text




    CAPTURE OF "HARRY," THE

    ABORIGINAL, BY MR. JOHN

    HUMPHRIES

    We are indebted to a correspondent for the following particulars of the chase, and ultimate capture, on the morning of Sunday, the 25th ultimo, of the bloodthirsty miscreant "Black Harry," at Borah Station, near Melville Plains, by Mr. John Humphries, whose tact, and cool determination, in bringing Harry to bay, merit the warmest commendation. The writer says:—

    General excitement had existed for a considerable time past in respect to this scoundrel, .... etc

    Hide note
  101. CAPTURE OF "HARRY" THE ARORIGINAL. BY MR. JOHN HUMPHRIES.
    The North Australian, Ipswich and General Advertiser (Ipswich, Qld. : 1856 - 1862) Tuesday 10 September 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: We are indebted to a correspondent for the following particulars of the chase and ultimated capture on the morning of Sunday the 25th ultimo of the b ... 1839 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-22 10:58:40.0

    Text



    General excitement had existed for a considerable time past in respect to this scoundrel,.... etc

    Hide note
  102. TELEGRAPHIC DESPATCHES. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENTS.) SYDNEY, THURSDAY.
    The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Friday 6 September 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: The Land Bills have been introduced in the Upper House in the same shape as they formerly left th Assembly, excepting that it is proposed that they s ... 98 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-21 19:42:48.0

    The black, "Harry," has confessed to two rapes and eleven robberies, besides the murder of Mrs. Mills, and the attempted murder of her son.

    Hide note
  103. NEW SOUTH WALES.
    The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889) Saturday 7 September 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: The Land Bill has been introduced into the Council. The native "Harry" has confessed to two rapes and eleven robberies, besides the murder of Mrs. Mi ... 29 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-21 20:58:42.0

    The native "Harry" has confessed to two rapes and eleven robberies, besides the murder of Mrs. Mills.

    Hide note
  104. THE GOVERNOR ELECT OF NEW ZEALAND.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 6 September 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: ACCORDING to late New Zealand papers, his Excellency Sir George Grey, Governor elect of that colony, was expected to arrive in Auckland, from the Cap ... 1300 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-12-26 10:17:13.0

    BLACK HARRY.—Writing on the 2nd instant, from Merriwa, a correspondent says:—Yesterday morning, constable Potts and Mr. Weston brought in Harry the murderer, and lodged him safely in the lock-up here. He will be committed for trial from this place on Wednesday. It is not unworthy of notice that Harry freely relates all the particulars of his horrid tragedies and crimes, giving dates, with great exactness, but denies having contemplated the murder of Mrs. Mills or her son. He says the boy irritated him while possum hunting by calling him a black skinned cannibal, for which he struck him down with his tomahawk: he then returned to the hut, and told the boy's mother that he had pitched into her son, upon hearing which Mrs. Mills threw some hot water over him; that, on the impulse of the moment, he struck her one blow, felling her to the ground. The little girl, he says, ran out crying, and he followed, caught the child, and took her with him. This version of the first act in this deed of blood is believed to be a mere fabrication, Harry having already given two or three different versions of the occurrences of that dreadful day. Harry, I may add, has pointed out to the constables the place where, as he affirms, the little girl ran away from him; but the general impression is that she has been murdered. He exhibits not the slightest symptoms of regret, and recounts, with the most stoical indifference, the harrowing particulars of the two murders—for he left the poor lad Mills for dead, and is ignorant of his having survived the fearful injuries inflicted. He also admits having committed two rapes, and eleven robberies. The officers have brought with them different articles taken from the murderer, or found in tracking him, at his deserted camps, all of which were stolen, viz., a good double-barrelled gun, a double barrelled pistol, powder, shot, balls, pieces of lead, a hammer, some strychnine, tobacco, tea, sugar, coffee, looking, glass, soap, razors, new trousers, hats, lambswool shirts, and the little girl Mills' boots and pinafore. Harry occupies a great portion of his time in whistling and singing.

    Hide note
  105. INSOLVENCY PROCEEDINGS. NEW INSOLVENTS.
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Tuesday 10 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Sept. 7—John Campbell. Sydney, mariner, a pauper (a Confine for debt in Darlinghurst gaol). Liabilities, £4. Assets— value of personal property, £2. ... 6691 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-22 11:22:01.0

    Text



    Black Harry.—Writing on the 2nd instant, from Merriwa, a correspondent says:—Yesterday morning, constable Potts and Mr. Weston brought in Harry the murderer, and lodged him safely in the lock-up here. He will be committed for trial from this place on Wednesday. It is not unworthy of notice that Harry freely relates all the particulars of his horrid tragedies and crimes, giving dates with great exactness, but denies having contemplated the murder of Mrs. Mills or her son. He says the boy irritated him while possum hunting by calling him a black skinned cannibal, for which he struck him down with his tomahawk; he then returned to the hut, and told the boy's mother that he had pitched into her son, upon hearing which Mrs. Mills threw some hot water over him; that, on the impulse of the moment he struck her one blow, felling her to the ground. The little girl, he says, ran out crying, and he followed, caught the child, and took her with him. This version of the first act in this deed of blood is believed to be a mere fabrication. Harry having already given two or three different versions of the occurrences of that dreadful day. Harry, I may add, has pointed out to the constables the place where, as he affirms, tho little girl ran away from him, but the general impression is that she has been murdered. He exhibits not the slightest symptoms of regret, and recounts, with the most stoical indifference, the harrowing particulars of the two murders—for he left the poor lad Mills for dead, and is ignorant of his having survived the fearful injuries inflicted. He also admits having committed two rapes, and eleven robberies. The officers have brought with them different articles taken from the murderer, or found in tracking him, at his deserted camps, all of which were stolen, viz., a good double-barrelled gun, a double-barrelled pistol, powder, shot balls, pieces of lead, a hammer, some strychnine, tobacco, tea, sugar, coffee, looking- glass, soap, razors, new trousers, hats, lambswool shirts, and the little girl Mills' boots and pinafore. Harry occupies a great portion of his time in whistling and singing.—S. M. Herald,

    Sept. 6.



    Page 3

    ARRIVAL OF BLACK HARRY AT MAITLAND GAOL. The aboriginal murderer arrived at the Maitland gaol on Saturday afternoon. He was conveyed in the gig of the Chief Constable of the Singleton police—Mr. Horne himself driving, and escorted by two mounted police. As he passed through the Maitlands a good number of the inhabitants turned out to see him; and we doubt not that, if the hour of his transit had been known, it would have been witnessed by a larger crowd than would have been assembled to receive the Governor—so great an interest has been manifested in the movements and capture of this inhuman savage. He appears to be rather a small man, and we were told by one gentleman that he had seen him in Maitland some years ago, in the service of a stock-owner. It is uncertain yet on what day of the Circuit Court he will be tried, the evidence not being yet complete. He is now confined in the gaol, where, we understand, he continues to manifest the indifference which he has been described as having previously shown.

    Hide note
  106. PORT OF SYDNEY.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 9 September 1861 p 2 Detailed Lists, Results, Guides
    933 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-21 21:00:46.0

    Black Harry.—"We understand that information has been received by the authorities, that this notorious individual is on his way to Maitland, and believe it is expected he will arrive in time for the ensuing sittings of the Circuit Court. A considerable number of people crowded the platform at the railway station on Friday afternoon, in expectation of getting a glimpse of the villain, but they were disappointed, as he did not arrive by the train.—Maitland Mercury.

    Hide note
  107. UPPER CASTLEREAGH RIVER. [FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.]
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 10 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: SEPTEMBER 3.—On the 28th and 29th ultimo the worst fears of many of our settlers and their [?] were again excited to an alarming degree [?] the prosp ... 218 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 17:09:12.0

    In connection with the capture of the miscreant Black Harry, I may state that no tidings have yet been heard of the restoration or even discovery of the little girl Mills, who was first taken away by him; but the ''half-caste,'' whom I mentioned in my last communication, has been recovered by her friends, uninjured.

    Hide note
  108. SYDNEY. Tuesday Sept. 10.
    Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal (NSW : 1851 - 1904) Wednesday 11 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: The Champion paddlE-racE was won by Green easily. 5827 ounces of gold have arrived at Melbourne per Omco, from Ctago, and a 859 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 18:29:00.0

    SYDNEY.

    [By Electric Telegraph]

    FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.]
    Tuesday Sept. 10.

    Black Harry, the murderer, was lodged in Maitland gaol yesterday. Counsel has been assigned to him by the Chief Justice.

    Hide note
  109. SYDNEY. Saturday afternoon.
    Goulburn Herald (NSW : 1860 - 1864) Wednesday 11 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: ATTENTION has been called, in a prominent manner, to the sixth clause of the land alienation bill. This clause was not in the bill when it was first ... 2074 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 18:30:28.0

    To-day's Maitland Mercury reports the arrival of Black Harry at Maitland gaol.

    Hide note
  110. MAITLAND CIRCUIT COURT. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9.
    The Newcastle Chronicle and Hunter River District News (NSW : 1859 - 1866) Wednesday 11 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: FORGERY AND UTTERING.—Isaac Whittle was indicted for feloniously forging a warrant or [?]for the payment of £14 10s., and Wee Waa, on the 20th Februa ... 2954 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 18:34:48.0

    Tuesday, September 9. We have been favoured with the following particulars by a correspondent :-- .... Black Harry.— It was intimated during the day, that the whole of the evidence against the aboriginal murderer Harry had been found to be not yet complete, and it was probable, therefore, that his trial would not be gone into at these assizes.

    Hide note
  111. SYDNEY. [FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.] Thursday, September 12th.
    Clarence and Richmond Examiner and New England Advertiser (Grafton, NSW : 1859 - 1889) Tuesday 17 September 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: On Saturday last Mr. J. H. Atkinson entertained about two hundred friends at his residence, [?] Liverpool, on the occasion of the [?] of the innocent 712 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-01 20:35:36.0

    Black Harry, the murderer, has been conveyed to Maitland, where he is now securely lodged in gaol. If Black Harry had [been] some conquering hero, instead of the bloody-minded wretch that he is, his progress could not have been more minutely recorded than it has been. "Own correspondents" have sprang up at every stage in his journey to record his saying and doings, and looks, and every newspaper in and out of Maitland invariably produces its paragraph, commencing with "Black Harry.', But I suppose we will hear no more of him now until—to use my own word—"they hang, him."

    Hide note
  112. TELEGRAPHIC INTELLIGENCE. SYDNEY, Sept. 4.
    Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899) Thursday 12 September 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: The Belfast Hotel, Auckland, has been burnt. The black, Harry, has been committed for trial, and has confessed the murder of Mrs. Mills, and other cr ... 537 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 18:25:38.0

    The black, Harry, has been committed for trial, and has confessed the murder of Mrs. Mills, and other crimes, he says the little girl escaped while he was asleep in the bush, but nothing has been heard of her.

    Hide note
  113. FIRE ON BOARD THE SOVEREIGN OF THE SEAS.
    Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW : 1856 - 1950) Friday 13 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: About nine o'clock last night the fine ship Sovereign of the Seas, 1226 tons burthen, commanded by Captain Cruikshank, which arrived in our harbour l ... 6038 words
    • Text last corrected on 6 August 2017 by jlally
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-02 18:39:50.0

    ARRIVAL OF BLACK HARRY AT MAITLAND GAOL.—The aboriginal murderer arrived at the Maitland gaol on Saturday afternoon. He was conveyed in the gig of the Chief Constable of the Singleton police—Mr. Horne himself driving, and escorted by two mounted police. As he passed through the Maitlands a good number of the inhabitants turned out to see him; and we doubt not that, if the hour of his transit had been known, it would have been witnessed by a larger crowd than would have been assembled to receive the Governor—so great an interest has been manifested in the movements and capture of this inhuman savage. He appears to be rather a small man, and we were told by one gentleman that he had seen him in Maitland some years ago, in the service of a stock-owner. It is uncertain yet on what day of the Circuit Court he will be tried, the evidence not being yet complete. He is now confined in the gaol, where, we understand, he continues to manifest the indifference which he has been described as having previously shown.—Maitland Mercury.

    Hide note
  114. TELEGRAPHIC DESPATCHES. (FROM THE MELBOURNE PAPERS.) NEW ZEALAND, SYDNEY, TUESDAY, 7 PM.
    The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) Friday 13 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: The Breadalbane brings news from Auckland to the 24th ult. Tue session of the General Assembly was about to close. A resolution was passed recommendi ... 985 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 18:52:11.0

    The black, Harry, has been committed for trial, and has confessed the murder of Mrs. Mills, and other crimes. He says the little girl escaped while he was asleep in the bush, but nothing has been heard of her.

    Hide note
  115. BLACK HARRY.
    The Darling Downs Gazette and General Advertiser (Toowoomba, Qld. : 1858 - 1880) Thursday 19 September 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Writing on the 29th ultimo, the Gunnedah [?]pendnet of the Maitland Mercury says:—"After being safely deposited in the lock-up here, Henry was heavil ... 421 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-02 21:55:12.0

    BLACK HARRY.

    Writing on the 29th ultimo, the Gunnedah correspondent of the Maitland Mercury says:— "After being safely deposited in the lock-up here, Harry was heavily leg-ironed in addition to the handcuffs he had on, and though at first he appeared cast down, yet these last two days he has frequently joked and laughed, not only with prisoners in the adjoining cells, but also those persons who, led by curiosity, went to look at him. He was brought up before this bench on Tuesday, and charged with being the murderer of Mrs. Mary Wills—this being the principal out of numerous charges to be preferred against him. "Prisoner's demeanor was of a seemingly jaunty and indifferent disposition, he replying with much brevity when asked concerning the little girl of Mrs. Mills, whom he took away after the murder of her mother. He is a native of the M'Intyre River tribe of aboriginals, is about 5 feet 7 inches high, not very bad looking. When brought up to the lock-up he had on a pilot cloth jacket, red night cap, pair of coarse corduroy trousers, a white shirt, Scotch twill shirt, and a Crimean check shirt; no boots. His swag consisted of a double barrel pistol, powder, caps, bullets, and shot, coat, pair new moleskin trousers, a grey guernsey, two razors, looking-glass, comb, a hammer, pair blankets, two handkerchiefs, pocket-knife, a saddle strap and some silver. These were found on him when caught; besides which a double-barrel gun was found by Mr. Weston some weeks back, at a station he (Harry) had called at near Warrah, called Harrison's station, and which he left there; also other things dropt here and there on his passage through the country.

    As an instance of the systematic manner in which the villain endeavoured to elude the vigilance of his pursuers; though diligently and untiringly searching for him from the time of his committing the deed, it may be remarked that he had possessed himself of a telescope, with which, as he stated himself, he viewed his pursuers in the distance, and closely observed their movements in certain directions, he taking the opposite direction; at other times he would follow up on the heels, as it were, of them—then, to avoid being tracked, he would take off his boots, and tie grass or leaves to his feet, so as to leave no vestige of his advance; at other times he would wear his boots, and stop away from his tracks for some distance, placing his blanket under his feet, the while; at other times he would drop some portions of his swag here and there, so as to make his pursuers believe they were close at his heels, at the same time he would bound on twenty miles, or more. At one time he would ascend the top of a mountain, and espy those in chase of him on the plains; at others he would get up a tree and allow his pursuers to pass by. Since he has been in the lock-up he recognised Mr. Chief-constable Murray, and Mr. Alexander Thomson, and their blackfellow, Yarri, who were tracking him at Borah, and said they passed close to him when in a tree. In like manner did he perceive others of his pursuers. He has voluntarily confessed to the murder of Mrs. Mills; and says that he asked her for a drink, when she refused to give it to him, and threw hot water about him; he then attacked her with a tomahawk. He also confesses to the assault on the boy, and the abduction of the little girl, but adds that he did not kill her, but that she got away from him when he was asleep on Warrah ridges, about four miles from a sheep station. He also acknowledges having committed the rape on the person of the girl at Murray's station, near Kickerbill; and lastly the abduction of the half caste girl from Borah Station. He appears quite indifferent to his fate, and says "I suppose they'll hang me." He says that he was three years in gaol, two of which were in Sydney, about four years ago. He is intelligent looking, and speaks good English. "He started to-day in custody of chief constable Weston and constable Potts, who will escort him to Merriwa, distant 100 miles from here. A large number of persons collected to see him before leaving the lock-up."

    Hide note
  116. THE MURDERER "HABBY." [From the Mercury's Gunnedah Correspondent.)
    Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875) Thursday 5 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: IN my last I put you in possession of some particulars of the capture of the aboriginal "Harry," by Mr. John Humphries, of Borah, for the murder of M ... 1615 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 21:59:04.0

    This article is very similar to the previous list item, but too large to copy here, click the page link or text only link below.

    Text

    Hide note
  117. THE MURBERER "HARRY."
    Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW : 1856 - 1950) Tuesday 10 September 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Writing on the 29th ultimo, the Gunnedah correspondent of the Maitland Mercury says :—After being safely deposited in the lock up here, Harry was hea ... 976 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-22 13:28:07.0

    THE MURDERER "HARRY."



    Text

    Hide note
  118. THE MURDERER "HARRY."
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 4 September 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: WRITING on the 29th ultimo, the Gunnedah correspondent of the Maitland Mercury says:—After being safely deposited in teh lock-up here, Harry was heav ... 3159 words
    • Text last corrected on 17 November 2016 by ballytal
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-22 13:29:29.0

    THE MURDERER "HARRY."


    Text

    Hide note
  119. THE MURDERER "HARRY." (From our Gunnedah Correspondent.)
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Tuesday 3 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: In my last I put you in possession of some particulars of the capture of the aboriginal "Harry," by Mr. John Humphries, of Borah, for the murder of M ... 1610 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-22 13:30:48.0

    THE MURDERER "HARRY."


    Text

    Hide note
  120. Hetropolitan Correspondence. SYDNEY, Tuesday, afternoon.
    Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal (NSW : 1851 - 1904) Saturday 14 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: The Principal topic of gossip at this present writing undoubtedly is the drunken quarrel that took place on Saturday last at Liverpool, between Messr ... 3003 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 18:54:21.0

    At Maitland the Circuit Court is sitting, and Black Harry is expected there in time for trial.

    Hide note
  121. NEW SOUTH WALES.
    Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899) Thursday 19 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Our files are up to the 13th instant. The New Town Volunteer Riflemen have commemorated the first anniversary of the formation of their company. Seve ... 637 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 19:27:20.0

    The aboriginal murderer (Black Harry), has arrived at Maitland Gaol. He was conveyed in a gig. He continues to manifest the indifference which he has been described as having previously shown.

    Hide note
  122. MAITLAND. MAITLAND CIRCUIT COURT (Before His Honor the Chief Justice.) TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10.
    The Newcastle Chronicle and Hunter River District News (NSW : 1859 - 1866) Saturday 14 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: HORSE STEALING.—John Green, John [?] Francis Conway, convicted on Monday of [?] were sentenced to five years' hard labour on the [?] RAPE.—Michael Br ... 2113 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 18:59:38.0

    FROM A CORRESPONDENT. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18. .... The crown prosecutor intimated that the evidence against Black Harry, the murderer, was now complete and that his trial would take place on Monday next.

    Hide note
  123. Advertising
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 14 September 1861 p 4 Advertising
    1467 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 19:02:18.0

    Anxious are the enquiries as to when Black Harry will be tried, which will probably be delayed till the last, for the purpose of giving time for the arrival of all the witnesses. Harry conducts himself quietly, and is somewhat downcast.

    Hide note
  124. NEWS AND NOTES. CLXXI.
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Thursday 19 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: A WEEK of the new session enables us to form some approximate estimate of probable results; but still our guess must necessarily be wide of the mark. ... 3725 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-11 18:34:07.0

    Black Harry, alias Sippey (not Lippey, as you have it), has been safely lodged in Maitland gaol, and will be tried at the assizes now sitting there, before the Chief Justice, who has assigned him counsel. The rascal persists in denying that he knows what became of the poor little child he carried away; but there can be no doubt he murdered her. The wretch will pay but a poor penalty for all the suffering he has inflicted. Let us charitably invoke for him the ancient exaltation—"A high gallows and a windy day."

    Hide note
  125. NEWS AND NOTES. CLXXII.
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Friday 20 September 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: [A [?] of our cosrrespondent's communicaiton appeared in yesterday's paper.] THE South Australian papers furnish details of the departure of Mr. M'Ki ... 1871 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-11 20:09:22.0

    We have no intelligence as yet of the trial of Black Harry, at Maitland. The case is exciting great interest.

    Hide note
  126. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16. WILFUL MURDER.
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Tuesday 17 September 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Harry, the aboriginal, was indicted for feloniously, wilfully, and of his [?] aforethought, killing and murdering Mary M[?], at Half's Creek, on the ... 4650 words
    • Text last corrected on 19 October 2017 by *anon* [NLA]
    • 1 comment on 31 January 2015
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-31 20:07:02.0

    Trial evidence and sentence (text)



    A gully called "Middle Gully" I suppose was The "Little Creek" mentioned by Thomas Mills in the trial evidence, misheard or misreported by the court reporter? Middle Gully appears to have the alternate name "Murdering Hut Gully", and crosses the Merriwa Scone Rd. close to the 15/50 km signs to Merriwa/Scone.

    Hide note
  127. MONDAY, SEPTERMBER 16. TRIAL OF BLACK HARRY FOR WILFUL MURDER.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 18 September 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Harry, the aboriginal, was indicted for feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, killing and murdering Mary Mills, at Hall's Creek on t ... 4615 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-26 13:14:39.0

    Trial evidence and sentence

    Hide note
  128. TRIAL AND CONVICTION OF BLACK HARRY THE MURDERER AND RAVISHER. MAITLAND CIRCUIT, COURT,—MONDAY, SEPTEMBER, 16. (From the Maitland Mercury, September 17.)
    Bell's Life in Sydney and Sporting Chronicle (NSW : 1860 - 1870) Saturday 21 September 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: WILFUL MURDEER,—Harry, the aboriginal, was indicted for feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, killing and murdering Mary Mills, at H ... 4787 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-01 21:40:34.0

    Trial evidence and sentence

    Hide note
  129. NEW SOUTH WALES. TRIAL OF THE BLACK HARRY, FOR MURDER. (ABRIDGED FROM THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD, SEPT, 18.)
    The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Monday 23 September 1861 p 6 Article
    Abstract: At Maitland Circuit Court, on Monday, the 16th inst., Harry, the aboriginal, was indicted for the murder of Mory Mills, at Hall's Creek, on the 16th ... 2372 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note
    Hide note
  130. SYDNEY. RANDWICK RACES—SATURDAY.
    Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal (NSW : 1851 - 1904) Wednesday 18 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: In the Assembly today, Mr. Cowper stated that the Ministers would not retire for any such vote as that of Friday ; but should endeavour to pass the l ... 156 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 19:10:57.0

    Black Harry was found guilty yesterday. Sentenced to death.

    Hide note
  131. WEST MAITLAND. Monday, 8·50 p.m.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 17 September 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Black Harry was found guilty of the murder of Mrs. Mills, and sentenced to death. He watched the proceedings very earnestly. His Honor gave a very im ... 51 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-01 20:40:16.0

    WEST MAITLAND.

    Monday, 8·50 p.m.

    Black Harry was found guilty of the murder of Mrs. Mills, and sentenced to death. He watched the proceedings very earnestly. His Honor gave a very impressive address to the prisoner in passing the sentence. The little boy, Thomas Mills, gave his evidence very clearly.

    Hide note
  132. WEST MAITLAND. Monday, 8.50 p.m.
    Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal (NSW : 1851 - 1904) Saturday 21 September 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Black Harry was found guilty of the murder of Mrs Mills, and sentenced to death. He watched the proceedings very earnestly. His Honor gave a very imp ... 52 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 19:19:17.0

    WEST MAITLAND.

    Monday, 8.50 p.m.

    Black Harry was found guilty of the murder of Mrs Mills, and sentenced to death. He watched the proceedings very earnestly. His Honor gave a very impressive address to the prisoner in passing the sentence. The little boy, Thomas Mills, gave his evidence very clearly.

    Hide note
  133. WEST MAITLAND. Monday, 8.50 p.m.
    Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW : 1856 - 1950) Friday 20 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Black Harry was found guilty of the murder of Mrs. Mills, and sentenced to death. He watched the proceedings very earnestly. His Honor gave a very im ... 51 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-29 01:06:58.0

    WEST MAITLAND.

    Monday, 8.50 p.m.

    Black Harry was found guilty of the murder of Mrs. Mills, and sentenced to death. He watched the proceedings very earnestly. His Honor gave a very impressive address to the prisoner in passing the sentence. The little boy, Thomas Mills, gave his evidence very clearly.

    Hide note
  134. NEWS AND NOTES. OLXXH.
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Monday 23 September 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: ALTHOUGH the Yarra will not wait for the mail, you will have by her the substance of the news—not only from Europe, but from America also. The detail ... 2552 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-01 22:53:11.0

    Black Harry has been tried at Maitland, found guilty, and sentenced to suffer death. He was only indicted for the murder of Mrs. Mills, of which the clearest possible evidence was given. The testimony of the poor boy Mills, who was left for dead by this wretch, show the treachery and calm cruelty of the ruffian. Harry had got his tomahawk ground for the ostensible purpose of hunting for opossums, and he then proceeded to draw young Mills away on that excuse. The boy proceeds thus with his tale:—


    We went half a mile from the hut. There were plenty of trees there. We got three opossums; Harry caught them. He then told me to get some bark and sticks to make a fire. I went and got them, and laid them down and got some fire. We had made a fire before that to burn the opossums out. I had some matches. I took the bark and sticks to the fire. He put the opossums on, one at a time, and roasted them, and then struck me with the back of the tomahawk. I saw him do it; he did not say anything to me. He was at the side of me, and I saw him raise his hand. He struck me at the back of the ear. I have two wounds on my head, but only remember one blow. I lost my senses. When I recovered them I was at home in bed. My father, and Tom Smith, the (shepherd, were there, besides two other men. I did not see my mother's body. I have not seen my little sister since, nor the prisoner about the place. We went in the direction away from the head station. The nearest hut was a mile off towards the head station. We burnt the opossums out of the trees, and one of them was struck by the prisoner with the back of the tomahawk. We both made the fire. While I was with him we were not talking. All he said was, go and get me bark. I was pleased with the sport. After we had roasted the opossums he struck me. He did not eat them. We had no dogs with us. I was sitting down, and so was he when he struck me. He was on my right side, and had the tomahawk in his right hand. He was sitting a good way off, and came to me. I was looking round when he struck me. I sat with my back to the fire, and he on my right, with his left side to the fire. He had his back to the fire too. He turned round to strike me. I saw him lift his hand. I did not try to get away. He had done the same several minutes before. He had raised the tomahawk as if to strike me. I was struck on the back of the head with the back of the tomahawk. I saw it distinctly. I had never been out with him before. I knew nothing after I fell down senseless. I next saw him before the bench at Merriwa.

    Hide note
  135. Metropolitan Correspondence. SYDNEY, Wednesday, noon.
    Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal (NSW : 1851 - 1904) Saturday 21 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: The mail steamer Northam had not arrived at Melbourne, or been sighted off Cape Otway up to seven o'clock yesterday evening. It is not likely therefo ... 3048 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-09 22:31:51.0

    Black Harry's conviction, and sentence you learnt by telegraph. He lies now in Maitland gaol, awaiting his fate he was only tried for the murder of Mrs. Mills. The evidence of Thomas Henry Mills aged nine years, detailed the manner in which he had been struck down by the treacherous murderer, they were out looking for opossums. "We went (he says) half a mile from the hut. There were plenty of trees there; we got three opossums; Harry caught them; he then told me to get some bark and sticks to make a fire; I went and got them, and laid them down and got some fire; we had made a fire before that to burn the opossums out; I had some matches; I took the bark and sticks to the fire; he put the opossums on, one at a time, and roasted them, and then struck me with the back of the tomahawk; I saw him do it; he did not say anything to me; he was at the side of me, and I saw him raise his hand; he struck me at the back of the ear; I have two wounds on my head, but only remember one blow; I lost my senses; when I recovered them I was at home in bed; my father and Tom Smith, the shepherd, were there, besides two other men; I did not see my mother's body; I have not seen my little sister since, nor the prisoner about the place—By Mr. Ellis : Harry lived about three miles from us for three months; I had seen him five or six times; no other blacks are employed about the station; there were a few blacks there; no black was ever at my mother's hut but one; blacks used to come to the station on their way to Merriwa. Harry came about half-past eleven; I did not see him; I was out with my sister about two hours. I went out before he came : I was there about half an hour while he was with my mother; They had no further conversation than that she asked him to dig the garden. I first saw that tomahawk when father came from Merriwa. I don't know how it came into Harry's possession. My mother told me in his presence that he brought it; this is the one he took out; I gave it him; we want in the direction away from the head station; the nearest hut was a mile off towards the head station; we burnt the opossums out of the trees, and one of them was struck by the prisoner with the back of the tomahawk; we both made the fire; while I was with him we were not talking; all he said was, Go and get me bark; I was pleased with the sport! after we had roasted the opossum he struck me; he did not eat them: we had no dogs with us; I was sitting-down, and so was he when he struck me; he was on my right side and he had the tomahawk in his right hand; he was sitting a good way off and came to me; I was looking round when he struck me; I was with my back to the fire and he on my right with his left side to the fire; he had his back to the fire too; he turned round to strike me; I saw him lift his hand; I did not try to get away; he had done the same several minutes before; he had raised the tomahawk as if to strike me: I was struck on the back of the head with the back of the tomahawk; I saw it distinctly; I had never been out with him before; I knew nothing after I fell down senseless; I next saw him before the Bench at Merriwa."

    Hide note
  136. Reminiscences of a Three Months' Sojourn in Newcastle and Maitland, but particularly in the former. (Continued from last Wedesday's issued)
    The Newcastle Chronicle and Hunter River District News (NSW : 1859 - 1866) Wednesday 1 October 1862 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Poor D.A.R., the only reward he was doomed to receive in return for his literary labours, were the loud murmurs and execration of his numerous foes, ... 3422 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-03 10:59:04.0

    It was really a pleasure to be in the old gentleman's company, and the time passed merrily away till we reached the West Maitland station. Here I determined to alight, although I had taken my ticket for Lochinvar, as I thought some of my acquaintances from the bush might be down witnessing the trial of the notorious Black Harry, and a case of horse-stealing which was tried about the same time; and if there was, I would have the pleasure of their company home, and perhaps get a lift on some of their spare horses or other modes of conveyance, when once we got beyond the boundaries traversed by the mail coaches, which was a distance of sixty miles from home, all which distance I would be under the necessity of travel ling on foot should I not succeed in purchasing or borrowing a horse, or sending home for one. The old gentleman, who, by the way , was a farmer residing near Maitland, alighted at the same time as I


    (column incorrectly scanned)


    did, and insisted that I should accompany him to the nearest hotel for the purpose of having a farewell glass—an invitation which, not being over abstemious, I at once accepted. Instead of having one each, we had two, which soon warmed the old gentleman's heart, and made him, if possible, more hilarous and hearty than ever. He declared I was the best companion ever he had travelled with, and insisted that I should accompany him home, where his wife and daughters would be only too happy to receive me and make me comfortable for the night. I thanked the old farmer heartily for his kind ofter, but assured him I was extremely sorry my time would not permit me to avail myself of his hospitality, and extended my hand to him to bid him adieu; he caught it with the grip of a vyce, as if determined to leave an impression of his friendship upon it, and gave it such a hearty shake that I began to entertain serious doubts that he would dislocate my shoulder.

    Hide note
  137. Advertising
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 18 September 1861 p 7 Advertising
    551 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-11 20:12:18.0

    (NOT Black Harry)
    BLACK HARRY.—Yesterday evening two persons, one of whom was an aboriginal, were escorted by armed police from the Newcastle steamer to the gaol at Darlinghurst and while passing through the streets a report was circulated that the black fellow was none other than Black Harry, who has become so notorious of late; but, on making enquiries, we ascertained that the prisoner who arrived last night was not Black Harry, as he is still in Maitland gaol, under sentence of death.

    Hide note
  138. MULTUM IN PAUVO.
    The Newcastle Chronicle and Hunter River District News (NSW : 1859 - 1866) Saturday 21 September 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: From the tenor of a private letter, just received, we learn that Messrs. Spier and Pond are to leave Melbourne by the City of Sydney, for the purpose ... 1304 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 19:33:18.0

    (NOT HARRY)

    The Herald of the 18th instant says:— Yesterday evening two persons, one of whom was an aboriginal, were escorted by armed police from the Newcastle steamer to the gaol at Darlinghurst; and while passing through the streets a report was circulated that the blackfellow was none other than Black Harry, who has become so notorious of late; but, on making enquiries, we ascertained that that the prisoner who arrived last night was not Black Harry, as he is still in Maitland gaol under sentence of death.

    Hide note
  139. SYDNEY. [FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.]
    Clarence and Richmond Examiner and New England Advertiser (Grafton, NSW : 1859 - 1889) Tuesday 24 September 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: THE town is very dull at present. The races are over and the opera season is over too, and the news by the present home mail is not of a very excitin ... 1370 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 20:49:47.0

    Black Harry has been sentenced to death,

    Hide note
  140. BENEVOLENT ASYLUM COMMITTEE. [?] 23rd September Monday, 23rd September.
    The Star (Ballarat, Vic. : 1855 - 1864) Wednesday 25 September 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Present—R. Lewis, Esq., President; Messrs A. Drury, and J. A. Doane; Revs. J. Potter and Dr Shell; and Messrs A. Dimant, W. J. Higgius, D. O'Donnell. ... 3592 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-31 21:28:03.0

    THE MURDERER, "BLACK HARRY"—

    From a telegraphic despatch in the Sydney Herald, we learn that Black Harry was found guilty of the murder of Mrs Mills, and sentenced to death, at West Maitland, on the 16th inst. He watched the proceedings very earnestly. His Honor gave a very impressive address to the prisoner in passing sentence. 'The little boy, Thomas Mills, gave his evidence very clearly.

    Hide note
  141. MAITLAND MERCURY. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1861. THE ASSIZES.
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Tuesday 1 October 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: As mail after mail arrives from England, it is matter of painful observation that, amidst the records of social progress and advancing civilization, ... 1786 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-01 21:46:49.0

    Strange was the contrast between the Northumberland-street tragedy—a fight for bare life occurring at mid-day, in an inhabited house, not many hundred yards from one of the most densely crowded thoroughfares of a busy metropolis—and the murder of Mrs. Mills at Hall's Creek, at a solitary hut on a sheep run. Seldom has the capture of a culprit caused so general a feeling of satisfaction, and even of relief, as did the capture of the aboriginal Harry. A shepherd, leaving his solitary hut in the morning, returns in the evening, and finds his wife murdered, her head half severed from the body; his two children, who might have witnessed the perpetration of the crime, are missing. One, a little girl, is never more heard of; the other, an intelligent boy of nine—a dangerous observer, as the murderer might well imagine—is subsequently found in the bush, half dead from exposure and the effects of wounds on the head. The child recovers his senses, and lives to tell a tale which, supported by the evidence of minor, but not unimportant circumstances, at once satisfies the public mind of the guilt of the then fugitive Harry. During the interval that preceded his clever apprehension by Mr. Humphries, the repeated offences of the murderer, and the apparent ease with which he baffled his pursuers, invested him with a character partaking somewhat of the fabulous—and hence the eagerness with which people hurried to see him as he was on his way to the place of trial. The evidence at the trial, though falling short of absolute proof, gave the jury little difficulty in ratifying the judgment, as some would say prematurely, expressed.

    Another case, resembling the preceding one in the circumstance that its scene was also a lonely hut in the bush, may possibly have resembled it in some other particulars. To any one acquainted with the character of many of the aboriginal blacks, it will not be difficult to imagine that the crime which, in the case of Michael Breen, was accomplished by means of threats, and the exhibition of a deadly weapon, was at least contemplated by Black Harry. And the crime of the white man, aggravated by its violation of the claims of hospitality received, might have been—who knows how nearly—merging into the double crime of rape and murder, had his victim aroused yet further his blinding passions.

    Hide note
  142. LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.
    Bell's Life in Sydney and Sporting Chronicle (NSW : 1860 - 1870) Saturday 5 October 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: A SAD AFFAIR.—It is much to be regretted that stauncil supportor of the Turf like David Bucha[?] Esq, M.P. for Morpeth, should have been compelled [? ... 2417 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 00:00:28.0

    The day for Black Harry's execution has not yet been fixed by the Executive.

    Hide note
  143. NEWS AND NOTES. CLXX. The Electric Telegraph—Death of Burke—The murders on the Comet—The late Mr. Lyon —The Queensland Exhibiton—The Colonial Treasurer at Gayndah—The New South Wal...
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Monday 11 November 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: POSTCRIPT.—The fate of Burke and his Party. JUDGING from the Brisbane papers, some of us expected to be in direct magnetic communication with you by ... 4587 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 19:11:23.0

    Text

    The ruffian Saunders was hanged at Melbourne last Thursday. He was suspected of other crimes, besides those at Keilor, but he made no confession. Justice was prompt with this rascal. Black Harry has had a longer respite. He is, however, to be hanged at Maitland next Wednesday. He does not seem to care much about his approaching fate.

    Hide note
  144. IPSWICH. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) SATURDAY EVENING.
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Tuesday 22 October 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: I HAVE already given you full particulars, by telegraph, of the capture of a blackfellow at Balbis's. I have now the satisfaction of informing your r ... 773 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 22:58:08.0

    A passing reference to Harry in an unrelated matter

    So that he may be looked upon as a mischievous and deceptive scoundrel, of the deepest dye, something like "Harry" on the New South Wales side, though perhaps a shade less murderous.

    Hide note
  145. NEWS AND NOTES. CLXXVIII.
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Monday 28 October 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: DURING two days we have had practical illustrations of "the seasons," in all their variety, intensity, and extremity. Tuesday was one,of the hottest ... 3684 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-01 21:53:09.0

    As to the Ipswich blackfellow who has been trying to emulate Black Harry, it is to be hoped that if he is not yet grabbed, the government will offer a thumping reward for him. These are the cases which lead to worse, and, as a matter of public polity, the shooting or hanging of such a "child of the soil" would be decidedly commendable. Sippey began in this way, and the murders on the Hunter were the consequences.

    By-the-bye, this black rascal of ours is still lying in Maitland Gaol. His execution is fixed for the 6th of November, but no certainty exists that he will get his desert on that day, as Mr. Ryan Brennan is said to have made that case the one on which especially to found his proceedings in objecting to the Sheriff's commission.

    Hide note
  146. NEWCASTLE POLICE. SATURDAY. (Before the Police Magistrate and the Mayor).
    The Newcastle Chronicle and Hunter River District News (NSW : 1859 - 1866) Wednesday 6 November 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: DRUNKENNESS.— James Dalton, labourer, was fined 5s. LARCENY.— A charge of stealing two hens preferred by Mary Birkell against Mary Anne Escott 1145 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 00:22:16.0

    Black Harry.—The execution of black Harry for the murder of Mrs. Mills will take place this day at the Maitland gaol. Since his conviction, Harry has been attended by a Roman Catholic Priest, and it was rumoured yesterday in Maitland that his Grace the Archbishop was to leave Sydney by the steamer last night, on a visit to Maitland and Morpeth, and that he will take the opportunity of confirming the aboriginal before he paid the last penalty of the law.

    Hide note
  147. BY ELECTRIC TELEGRTAPH. [FROM OUR CORRESPONDENTS.] WEST MAITLAND. Wednesday, 3 p.m.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 7 November 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: BLACK HARRY was executed this morning, and died without much struggling. He confessed to Dean O'connell that he killed the woman, and thought he kill ... 45 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-01 21:54:25.0

    BY ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH

    [FROM OUR CORRESPONDENTS.] WEST MAITLAND.

    Wednesday, 3 p.m.

    BLACK HARRY was executed this morning, and died without much struggling. He confessed to Dean O'connell that he killed the woman, and thought he killed the boy, but denied the murder of the girl.

    Hide note
  148. TELEGRAPHIC NEWS. WEST MAITLAND. Wednesday, 3 p.m.
    Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW : 1856 - 1950) Friday 8 November 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Black Harry was executed this morning, and died without mach struggling. He confessed to Dean O'Connell that he killed the woman, and thought he kill ... 47 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-12-26 11:09:13.0

    TELEGRAPHIC NEWS.

    [From the Herald's Correspondents.]

    WEST MAITLAND. Wednesday, 3 p.m.

    Black Harry was executed this morning, and died without much struggling. He confessed to Dean O'Connell that be killed the woman, and thought he killed tho boy, but denied the murder of the girl.

    Hide note
  149. MORPETH. ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH, MORPETH.
    The Newcastle Chronicle and Hunter River District News (NSW : 1859 - 1866) Saturday 9 November 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: VISIT OF HIS GRACE ARCHRISHOP POLDING.— The foundation stone of a new Catholic Church was laid at Morpeth, on Thursday, by his Grace Archbishop Poldi ... 138 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 16:07:14.0

    ..... His Grace came up from Sydney by the steamer on Tuesday night, and proceeded straight up to Maitland, where he administered confirmation to the aboriginal Black Harry before his execution. ....

    Hide note
  150. INSOLVENCY PROCEEDINGS. NEW INSOLVENT.
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Thursday 7 November 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Nov. 4.—James Morris Davis, of Braidwood, innkeeper. Liabilities—secured, £1523 10s. 5d.; unsecured, £165 1s. 8d.; total, £1688 18s. 1d. Assets—avail ... 4020 words
    • Text last corrected on 20 September 2012 by anonymous
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-22 13:51:07.0

    Text


    Execution; Harry's Story; Postscript


    Same as next article

    Hide note
  151. EXECUTION OF BLACK HARRY (From yesterday's Maitland Mercury.)
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 8 November 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: ON Wednesday morning the aboriginal Harry suffered [?]e extreme penalty of the law, at the gaol, Eaat Maitland, for the minder of Mrs. Mills. The exe ... 1439 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-01 22:46:20.0

    EXECUTION OF BLACK HARRY

    (From yesterday's Maitland Mercury.)

    ON Wednesday morning the aboriginal Harry suffered the extreme penalty of the law, at the gaol, East Maitland, for the murder of Mrs. Mills. The execution took place in presence of Mr. Beverley, who attended as acting deputy sheriff. Dr. Wilton, surgeon of the gaol, Mr. Day the police magistrate, all the available police and about twenty of the townspeople. We understand that the miserable man made no statement to the officials of the gaol; but some words passed between him and Dean O'Connell, who attended him, and it was thought that he was in prayer.

    His behaviour was firm but free from bravado.

    A gentleman, on the truthfulness of whose word we place full reliance, has communicated to us several important disclosures which Black Harry made to him during frequent visits to his cell which he paid in course of the last few weeks. Harry said the tomahawk which he took out with him on the morning of the tragedy was not the same as that shown in court; it was a sharp new one, which he had ground that morning. He said that after making a fire and roasting the opossum, he lit his pipe and commenced to smoke, when Tommy (the boy who accompanied him) said, "Let me have a smoke." Harry refused to allow him, saying, "Do you want a smoke, you scamp?" The boy was displeased, and called Harry ''a sweep, a black devil and a cannibal." Harry shook his tomahawk at the boy, and said, "If you'll call me that again I'll hit you," but the boy replied "You aint game, you black cannibal." (We give the exact words.) Harry, in describing this, pointed to his forehead saying, "That made me feel in bad temper," and he struck the boy with the tomahawk .On receiving the blow, the boy fell down, and immediately after tried to raise himself, and looked hard at Harry, but fell back again. Harry, thinking he was badly hurt, but not fatally, thought he would go and tell his mother. As he approached, Mrs. Mills saw him coming alone, and asked him "Where is Tommy?" Harry replied, "I've hit him; I think he is killed." Mrs. Mills then ran into the hut and took a pannikin of boiling water out of a pot on the fire, in which beef was being boiled for dinner, and, coming outside with it, threw it over Harry, scalding him severely on the thigh. This so enraged him that he immediately "fetched her a blow" with the tomahawk, when she screamed out and fell down. Harry solemnly declared to the last that he did not again touch her. He said she attempted once or twice to rise but could not. The little girl, when Harry approached the hut, was playing about the door, but when the murder was committed she ran out crying. Harry now made up his mind to go away altogether, and searched in the hut for money, breaking open several boxes, but found none, so he had to content himself with a watch, a gun, a flask of powder and some provisions. At a short distance from the hut, he heard the little girl crying in the bush, and going to her he wanted to take her back, but she refused to go. Harry said. "Well Mary, I'll take you to Tommy (her brother), and brought her to the place where he had left him, but he could not find him. She then begged him to take her to her father, and Harry went some distance with the object of meeting him, but did not see him. Harry and the child camped in the bush that night. He said that during the night the little girl cried a good deal. After that (our informant did not ascertain the exact time) Harry took the girl to a Chinaman's hut, and asked the Chinaman if he would take care of her, the Chinaman said "yes", but she cried bitterly, and would not stop with him. Harry said he was vexed that he could not got rid of the child. He next took her to a station where he thought a woman lived, but when he got to the hut the place was all shut up, and there was no one there. He then intended to go to another station with her, but it came on wet weather and he made a gunyah on the side of a hill, and camped there till it was over. Harry then removed down to the creek and camped there one night. A fortnight had now elapsed since the murder was committed. At this place Harry made a fire, and put on some water to boil for tea. He was lying down, watching it, when the little girl caught hold of one of the sticks in the fire, and moving it, upset the billy with the water. Harry said he was not pleased with her for doing so, and beat her a little, for which she cried a little, but not much. He told her at the same time that if she would not stop at the next station he took her to, "he would kill her as he had killed her mother." Harry said he was afraid that in consequence of his beating her and saying this to her she would leave him, and be lost in the bush , and that he told her, if she did leave him, to go along down the creek and she would come to a station. Next morning, when he woke, he told the girl to get up and gather some sticks to make a fire. She went, and in a short time brought him some in her hands; he said that was not enough, and told her to gather more, and she went away again to do so. Harry said he then lay down and covered his head over with a blanket. After thinking she had been a long time gone, he got up and looked around, but could not see her. He called her, but there was no answer. He searched about a long time for her tracks, but the grass was high, and there were a number of wallabies' tracks all round the place, so that he could not find them. Harry said he never saw anything more of the little girl. He described the place as being near a station belonging to one Berrington (or a some such name). Harry freely confessed to the other enormities with which he was charged. He also confessed to shooting a German woman, on a station on the M'Intyre River, seven years ago. He said he was out shooting, when he came to the hut where the woman was, and asked her for some dinner, but she refused, and he murdered her. On a subsequent occasion he said that he escaped from gaol at Moreton Bay, dragged a boy off a horse, and rode it till it was knocked up, after which he took a racehorse out of a paddock, saddled it, and never halted till he had reached his tribe on the M'Intyre. He was retaken, and sentenced to three years imprisonment in Darlinghurst gaol. Our readers may recollect that an aboriginal gave some information to the pursuers of Harry, tending to put them on his track. This aboriginal belonged to the Namoi tribe, and as is usual in such cases Harry very justly imagined that his tribe (the M'Intyre blacks) would take the first opportunity of avenging his death upon the informer. We believe, however, that Harry a few day since, sent for one of his tribe, and said he had forgiven everyone, and bade him tell the tribe that they must not injure anyone on his account. After the execution one of these aboriginals stood for some time at the foot of the scaffold, weeping, and holding Harry's shoes in his hand. We have been informed that Harry's manner, during a few days prior to his execution, became remarkably mild and docile, and that he even expressed himself more willing to die than live. We believe he received the rite of confirmation on Tuesday.

    Hide note
  152. NEW SOUTH WALES.
    Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1859 - 1929) Wednesday 13 November 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: BY the Rangatira we have Sydney papers to the 9th inst:— EXECUTION OF BLACK HARRY. On Wednesday morning, the aboriginal Harry 2569 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-12-26 11:15:08.0

    On Wednesday doming, the aboriginal Harry suffered the extreme penalty of the law, .....

    Hide note
  153. CITY POLICE COURT. Thursday, 14th November, 1861. (Before Mr. Sturt, P.M., and Messrs Endes, Gutridge and Hull.)
    The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Friday 15 November 1861 p 7 Article
    Abstract: MINOR OFFENCES.—Nine drunkards were fined the usual penalty for their offence.—Mary A. Forester, charged with being drunk, and using obscene language ... 4006 words
    • Tagged as: mcevoy shoes
    • Text last corrected on 22 September 2014 by anonymous
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-12-26 11:18:10.0

    On Wednesday morning, the aboriginal Harry suffered the extreme penalty of the law, ....

    Hide note
  154. COUNTRY NEWS. EXECUTION OF BLACK HARRY. (From Thursday's Mercury.)
    Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875) Friday 8 November 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: THE sentence of death was executed yesterday at the gaol, East Maitland, upon the aboriginal Harry, convicted of the murder of Mrs. Mills. The excecu ... 2915 words
    Digitised article icon
  155. TELEGRAPHIC DESPATCHES.
    Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918) Friday 8 November 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: SYDNEY, Tuesday.—Five horses have been run into by the train on the Southern Line, and killed. The 26th of December, and three following days, have b ... 392 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-01 22:57:18.0

    "WEDNESDAY.— .... Black Harry was executed this morning, at Maitland.

    Hide note
  156. SYDNEY. Wednesday afternoon.
    Goulburn Herald (NSW : 1860 - 1864) Saturday 9 November 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: THE triumphant majority that endorsed the government railway policy last night, must be satisfactory in the south, whatever it may be in the west. Th ... 824 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 16:00:10.0

    Black Harry was hanged at Maitland on Wednesday.

    Hide note
  157. LATEST INTELLIGENCE.
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Saturday 9 November 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: BY the Balclutha we have intelligence from Sydney to the 5th instant, in anticipation of the arrival of the Yarra Yarra. We are indebted to the kinde ... 1571 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 19:39:20.0

    "Black Harry" was to be hanged at Maitland last Wednesday

    Hide note
  158. TELEGRAPHIC DESPATCHES. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENTS.) SYDNEY, TUESDAY.
    The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 7 November 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Five horses have been run into by the train on the Southern Line, and killed. The 26th of December, and three following days, have been fined for the ... 202 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 16:09:06.0

    WEDNESDAY.

    Black Harry was executed this morning at Maitland.

    Hide note
  159. [FROM THE MELBOURNE PAPERS.] SYDNEY, TUESDAY.
    The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) Saturday 16 November 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Five horses have been run into by the train on the Southern Line, and killed. The 26th December, and three following days, have been fixed for the vo ... 515 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 20:28:25.0

    WEDNESDAY. ....


    Black Harry was executed this morning, at Maitland.

    Hide note
  160. Local Intelligence.
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Tuesday 12 November 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: BRISBANE HOSPITAL.—We have been requested to announce, on behalf of the above institution, the receipt from Arthur Hodgson, Esq., who is leaving for ... 1531 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 19:46:46.0

    "SCIPPY."—The blackfellow "Harry," or "Scippy," of murderous notoriety, was executed on Wednesday at Maitland.

    Hide note
  161. TELEGRAPHIC INTELLIGENCE. SYDNEY. November 5.
    Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899) Thursday 14 November 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Five horses have been run into by the train on the Southern Line, and killed. The 26th of December, and three following days, have been fixed for the ... 553 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 20:16:08.0

    Black Harry was executed this morning at Maitland.

    Hide note
  162. INTERCOLONIAL NEWS.
    The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889) Monday 18 November 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: By the arrival of the Havilah we have intercolonial files te the following dates:— VICTORIA............ November 24. NEW SOUTH WALES...... November 9 ... 3666 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 02:35:13.0

    NEW SOUTH WALES.

    The New South Wales papers contain few items of importance. The black named Harry, convicted of the murder of Mrs. Mills, was executed at Maitland after making a full confession of the crime, and also of several other attrocities in which he had been implicated.

    Hide note
  163. NEW SOUTH WALES.
    South Australian Weekly Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1867) Saturday 23 November 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: The New South Wain papers contain few items of importance. The black named Harry, convicted of the murder of Mrs. Mills, was executed at Maitland aft ... 425 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-12-26 11:28:34.0

    NEW SOUTH WALES.

    The New South Wales papers contain few items of importance. The black named Harry, convicted of the murder of Mrs. Mills, was executed at Maitland after making a full confession of the crime, and also of several other attrocities in which he had been implicated.

    Hide note
  164. WEST MAITLAND. Wednesday, 3 p.m.
    Examiner (Kiama, NSW : 1859 - 1862) Tuesday 12 November 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Black Harry was executed this morning, and died without much struggling. He confessed to Dean O'Connell, that he killed the woman, and thought he kil ... 38 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 18:39:24.0

    WEST MAITLAND. Wednesday, 3 p.m. Black Harry was executed this morning, and died without much struggling. He confessed to Dean O'Connell, that he killed the woman, and thought he killed the boy, but denied the murder of the girl.

    Hide note
  165. NEWS AND NOTES. CLXXI.. The Intercolonial Telegraph—Further partier of the sufferings of poor Burke and his [?] —Probable trace of Leichhardt — Sydney Politics—Shocking brutality t...
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Friday 15 November 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: AT last the telegraph has reunited u[?] s— And does not a meeting like this make a[?] mend's For all the long years we've been wand[?]ing a[?]ay? The ... 5374 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 19:54:24.0

    Black Harry was hanged at Maitland last Wednesday. He made a long rambling statement before he died, as to alleged provocation from Mrs. Mills and her son, but I don't believe a word of it. He also persisted in declaring that he did not murder the little girl, but that she strayed away from him in the bush. I don't know whether your readers are aware of the identity of this fellow, but many will remember the incident he mentions in the following part of his confession:—He confessed to shooting a German woman, on a station on the M'Intyre River, seven years ago. He said he was out shooting, when he came to the hut where the woman was, and asked her for some dinner, but she refused, and he murdered her. On a subsequent occasion he said that he escaped from gaol at Moreton Bay, dragged a boy off a horse, and rode it till it was knocked up, after which he took a racehorse out of a paddock, saddled it, and never halted till he had reached his tribe on the M'Intyre. He was retaken, and sentenced to three years' imprisonment in Darlinghurst gaol. The Mercury mentions a report that somebody had dug up Harry's body and carried off his head, to take casts from.

    Hide note
  166. EXECUTION OF BLACK HARRY.
    Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932) Saturday 9 November 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: On Wednesday morning, the aboriginal Harry suffered the extreme penalty of the law, at the gaol, East Maitland, for the murder of Mrs. Mills. The exe ... 1387 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 19:45:47.0

    Harry's story as related a frequent visitor to his cell (Dean O'Connell)

    EXECUTION OF BLACK HARRY - On Wednesday morning the aboriginal Harry suffered the extreme penalty of the law at the gaol, East Maitland, for the murder of Mrs Mills. The .....

    Hide note
  167. EXECUTION OF LACK HARRY.
    Bell's Life in Sydney and Sporting Chronicle (NSW : 1860 - 1870) Saturday 9 November 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: On Wednesday morning, the aboriginal Harry suffered the extreme penalty of the law, at the gaol, East Maitland, for the murder of Mrs Mills. The exec ... 1398 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 01:38:44.0

    Harry's story as related a frequent visitor to his cell (Dean O'Connell)


    EXECUTION OF BLACK HARRY.


    On Wednesday morning, the aboriginal Harry suffered the extreme penalty of the law, at the gaol, East Maitland, for the murder of Mrs Mills. The ....

    Hide note
  168. NEW SOUTH WALES.
    The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 13 November 1861 p 5 Article
    Abstract: THE LATE COACH ACCIDENT.—We mentioned a few days since the currency of a rumour, to the effect that one of the Penrith coaches had met with an accide ... 1755 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 01:38:20.0

    Harry's story as related a frequent visitor to his cell (Dean O'Connell)

    EXECUTION OF BLACK HARRY - On Wednesday morning the aboriginal Harry suffered the extreme penalty of the law at the gaol, East Maitland, for the murder of Mrs Mills. The .....

    Hide note
  169. COURT OF PETTY SESSIONS. THURSDAY.
    Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW : 1856 - 1950) Friday 15 November 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Although there were several [?] on the summons is to business was transacted yesterday owing to the an [?]fendance of a second magistrate. M. G. [?]w ... 3851 words
    • Text last corrected on 29 September 2016 by MarE11
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 02:59:44.0

    Harry's story as related a frequent visitor to the prison (Father/Dean O'Connell)

    EXECUTION OF BLACK HARRY.

    On Wednesday morning, the aboriginal Harry suffered the extreme penalty of the law, at the gaol, East Maitland, for the murder of Mrs Mills. The ....

    Hide note
  170. EXECUTION OF BLACK HARRY.
    Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908) Friday 22 November 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: On Wednesday morning the aboriginal Harry suffered the extreme penalty of the law, at the gaol, East Maitland, for the murder of Mrs. Mills. The exec ... 1160 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 02:09:45.0

    (bad scan)

    Harry's story as related a frequent visitor to his cell (Father/Dean O'Connell)

    EXECUTION OF BLACK HARRY.
    On Wednesday morning, the aboriginal Harry suffered the extreme penalty of the law, at the gaol, East Maitland, for the murder of Mrs Mills. The ....

    Hide note
  171. EXECUTION OF "HARRY," ALIAS "SCIPPY." (From the Maitland Mercury.)
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Friday 22 November 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: THE sentence of death was executed yesterday at the gaol, East Maitland, upon the aboriginal Harry, convicted of the murder of Mrs. Mills. The execut ... 1393 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 02:09:02.0

    Harry's story as related a frequent visitor to his cell (Father/Dean O'Connell)

    EXECUTION OF BLACK HARRY.
    On Wednesday morning, the aboriginal Harry suffered the extreme penalty of the law, at the gaol, East Maitland, for the murder of Mrs Mills. The ....

    Hide note
  172. INSOLVENCY PROCEEDINGS. NEW INSOLVENT.
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Saturday 9 November 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Nov. 6.—Fatriok Heffernan, of the Nepean, famer. Liabilities, £72 4s. Assets, £29. Deficit £13 4s. Mr. Mackenzie official assignee. MEETINGS OF CREDI ... 5409 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-02 16:29:25.0

    REPORTED DISTURBANCE OF BLACK HARRY'S BODY.—A rumour was current in town yesterday that the remains of the criminal who was executed on Wednesday, and buried in the East Maitland Cemetery, were on that night disinterred, and that the head was cut off and carried away. We scarcely think that any of our townsmen are so scientifically mad as to instigate or carry out such a revolting deed; but it would perhaps be well if the proper authorities would ascertain whether there was really any foundation for the report. We may mention, in connection with this matter, a circumstance which has called forth a good many remarks, and probably originated the above rumour. Several gentlemen in the district were desirous to obtain a cast of the unfortunate criminal's head, for phrenological purposes. We have seen a telegram which was received from Armidale on Tuesday, by Mr. Issac Gorrick, from Mr. W. D. Cavanough, the young lecturer. It is as follows:—"Please try to get a cast of Black Harry's head; I will pay you when I get down. It will be valuable to me." Mr. Gorrick, we believe, requested Mr. Macgill, the sculptor, to endeavour to take a cast, and furnished him with a letter on the subject to take to Mr. Day, the police magistrate. Early on Wednesday morning Mr. Macgill called on Mr. Day, and was referred to Mr. Beverley, the deputy sheriff, who, we are informed, at once acceded to the request saying he had no objection to a cast being taken. Mr. Day also, we believe, expressed himself quite willing that it should be done. A short time previous to the execution, however, the gaoler came out into the yard, where Mr. Macgill was waiting, and told him that permission to take a cast could not be granted. No reason, so far as we have heard, was given for the refusal. It is alleged that the clergyman who was with the culprit at the time would not give his consent—on what ground is not stated, but it appears to us that such a reasonable request might have been granted without compromising the most scrupulous regard to decency.

    Hide note
  173. LAW. SUPREME COURT MONDAY. BEACH OF PROMISE. MAHONEY V. CUNNINGHAM.
    Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW : 1856 - 1950) Friday 15 November 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: This was an action for breach of promise of marriage. The declaration contained two counts. The first alleged, in general teams, a broach of a promis ... 5193 words
    • Text last corrected on 18 February 2017 by cipwoods
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-02 16:21:03.0

    REPORTED DISTURBANCE OF BLACK HARRY'S BODY.
    — A rumour (says Saturday's Maitand Mercury), was current in town yesterday that the remains of the criminal who was executed on Wednesday, and buried in the East Maitland Cemetery, were on that night disinterred, and that the head was cut off and carried away. We scarcely think that any of our townsmen are so scientifically mad as to instigate or carry out such a revolting deed; but it would perhaps be well if the proper authorities would ascertain whether there was any foundation for the report. We may mention, in connection with this matter, a circumstance which has called forth a good many remarks, and probably originated the above rumour. Several gentlemen in the district were desirous to obtain a cast of the unfortunate criminal's head for phrenological purposes. We have seen a telegram which was received from Armidale 0n Tuesday, by Mr. Isaac Gorrick, from Mr. W. D. Cavanough, [Cavanagh] the young lecturer. It is as follows: —"Please try and get a cast of Black Harry's head; I will pay you when I get down. It will be valuable to me." Mr. Gorrick, we believe, requested Mr. Macgill, the sculptor, to endeavour to take a cast, and furnished him with a letter 0n the subject to take to Mr. Day, the police magistrate. Early on Wednesday morning Mr. Macgill called 0n Mr. Day, and referred to Mr. Beverley, the deputy sheriff, who we are informed, at once acceded to the request, saying he had n0 objection to a cast being taken. Mr. Day also, we believe expressed himself quite willing that it should be done. A short time previous to the execution however, the gaoler came out into the yard, where Mr. Macgill was waiting, and told him that permission to take a cast could not be granted. No reason, so far as wo have heard, was given for the refusal. It is alleged that the clergyman who was with the culprit at the time would not give his consent—on what ground is not stated, but it appears to us that such a reasonable request might have been granted without compromising the most scrupulous regard to decency.

    Hide note
  174. COUNTRY NEWS.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 11 November 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: MORE HOUSE-STEALING.—Last Wednesday evening some more horses were stolen from Mount Elrington. It appears that about eleven o'clock a gentleman, who ... 2520 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-02 16:00:54.0

    REPORTED EXHUMATION OF BLACK HARRY'S BODY.


    —A rumour was current in town on Friday, that the remains of the criminal who was executed on Wednesday, and buried in the East Maitland Cemetery, were on that night disinterred, and that the head was cut off and carried away. We scarcely think that any of our townsmen are so scientifically mad as to instigate or carry out such a revolting deed; but it would perhaps be well if the proper authorities would ascertain whether there was really any foundation for the report. We may mention, in connection with this matter, a circumstance which has called forth a good many remarks, and probably originated the above rumour. Several gentlemen in the district were desirous to obtain a cast of the notorious criminal's head, for phrenological purposes. We have seen a telegram which was received from Armidale on Tuesday, by Mr. Isaac Gorrick, from Mr. W. D. Cavenagh, the young lecturer. It is as follows:—"Please try to get a cast of Black Harry's head; I will pay you when I get down. It will be valuable to me." Mr. Gorrick, we believe, requested Mr. Macgill, the sculptor, to endeavour to take a cast, and furnished him with a letter on the subject to take to Mr. Day, the police magistrate. Early on Wednesday morning Mr. Macgill called on Mr. Day, and was referred to Mr. Beverley, the deputy sheriff, who, we are informed, at once acceded to the request, saying he had no objection to a cast being taken. Mr. Day also, we believe, expressed himself quite willing that it should be done. A short time previous to the execution, however, the gaoler came out into the yard, where Mr. Macgill was waiting, and told him that permission to take a cast could not be granted. No reason, so far as we have heard, was given for the refusal. It is alleged that the clergyman who was with the culprit at the time would not give his consent—on what ground is not stated.
    Maitland Mercury.

    Hide note
  175. MAITLAND.
    The Newcastle Chronicle and Hunter River District News (NSW : 1859 - 1866) Wednesday 13 November 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: ST. MARY'S, WEST MAITLAND.—We understand that a contract has been taken for the erection of a further portion of the new church of St. Mary's, West M ... 870 words
    • Text last corrected on 16 March 2018 by jeri
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-02 16:52:09.0

    REPORTED DISTURBANCE OF BLACK HARRY'S BODY.



    —A rumour was current in town yesterday that the remains of the criminal who was exceuted on Wednesday, and buried in the East Maitland Ceme- tery, were on that night disintered, and that the head was cut off and carried away. We scarcely think that any of our townsmen are so scientifically mad as to instigate or carry out such a revolting deed; ..... etc

    Hide note
  176. Advertising
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 14 November 1861 p 5 Advertising
    141 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 19:51:11.0

    THE GRAVE OF BLACK HARRY.—Tuesday's Maitland Mercury says—With reference to the rumour that the grave of the criminal Harry had been opened, for the purpose of obtaining his skull, we may state that Mr. Day, having ordered an inspection of the grave, has ascertained that there is no indication of its having been disturbed.

    Hide note
  177. EPITOME OF NEWS.
    The Golden Age (Queanbeyan, NSW : 1860 - 1864) Thursday 21 November 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: The Commissioners appointed to select a design for the new Houses of Parliament and Government offices came to a final decision on Saturday. The firs ... 804 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 20:55:31.0

    It was rumoured that the grave of Black Harry had been opened for the purpose of obtaining his skull, but an inspection of the grave proved it had not been disturbed.

    Hide note
  178. LONGEVITY OF THE THOROUGHBRED HOPSE.
    Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW : 1856 - 1950) Tuesday 19 November 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: We are surprised that many of the writers on enquine subjects, who have boldly proclaimed the merits of the thoroughbred horse as a sire of horses fo ... 1887 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 21:10:01.0

    BLACK HARRY'S REMAINS.—The "Maitland Ensign" states that, in consequence of a silly rumour which prevailed about the end of last week, that the grave of Black Harry had been opened, and his skull taken away for phrenological purposes, Mr. Day has caused the grave to be inspected, and we are authorised to state that it bears no indications of having been disturbed.

    Hide note
  179. COLONIAL INTELLIGENCE.
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Thursday 12 December 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: BY the Balclutha we have received Sydney papers to the 7th, and Melbourne to the 2nd instant. There is nothing of a very startling or 3295 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 03:32:05.0

    Mr. Macgill, sculptor, of Maitland, is about to produce a life-sized bust of the celebrated criminal Black Harry.

    Hide note
  180. General Intelligence.
    The Golden Age (Queanbeyan, NSW : 1860 - 1864) Thursday 12 December 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: JUDGE CALLAGHAN AT BRAIDWOOD.—The Dispatch says:—His Honor, Thomas Callaghan, Esq., arrived in town on Wednesday evening from Molonglo, and the repor ... 3004 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 03:19:15.0

    The Maitland Mercury says:—"We were shown the other day, in the studio of Mr. Macgill, sculptor, of this town, a clay model for a life-sized bust of the notorious aboriginal criminal, Black Harry, who met his merited fate on the gallows a few weeks ago, and whose very name will for a long time continue to excite feelings of horror wherever it is mentioned in the Australian colonies. The likeness is said by all who have seen it to be perfect. The most peculiar feature in the face is the enormous jaw bone. The phrenological developement of the original has also been carefully copied, as may be seen by the projecting eyebrows, indicating quick perception; the swelling organs of caution and destructiveness, which he used with such terrible results; and the equally prominent organ of veneration, which, however singular it may appear, was very high in the cranium. We are no advocates of the glorification of crime by the exhibition of the likenesses of its devotees, but in the present case the preservation of the peculiar features of the criminal may, perhaps, be turned to good account.

    Hide note
  181. MAITLAND.
    The Newcastle Chronicle and Hunter River District News (NSW : 1859 - 1866) Wednesday 4 December 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: TESTIMONIAL TO THE REV. MR. SCUELY.—On Monday evening List, a deputation of members of the Roman Catholic Church waited upon the Rev Mr. Scully—a mis ... 972 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 22:41:26.0

    LIFE BUST OF BLACK HARRY.—We were shown the other day, in the studio of Mr. Macgill, sculptor, of this town, a clay model for a life-sized bust of the notorious aboriginal criminal, who met his merited fate on the gallows a few weeks ago, and whose very name will for a long time continue to excite feelings of horror wherever it is mentioned throughout the Australian colonies. The likeness is said by all who have see it to be perfect. The most peculiar feature in the face is the enormous jaw-bone. The phrenological development of the original has also been carefully copied, as may be seen by the projecting eyebrows, indicating quick perception; the swelling organs of caution and destructiveness, which he used with such terrible results; and the equally prominent organ of veneration, which, however singular it may appear, was very high in his cranium. We are no advocates of the glorification of crime by the exhibition of the likenesses of its devotees, but in the present case the preservation of the peculiar features of the criminal may, perhaps, be turned to good account.— M. Mercury, Dec. 15.

    Hide note
  182. COLONIAL EXTRACTS.
    Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW : 1856 - 1950) Friday 13 December 1861 p 4 Article
    Abstract: THE NEW PLAGUE.—The caterpillars have committed great devastation this season throughout the Ovens and Murray districts. These pests have never befor ... 1418 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 22:37:22.0

    LIFE BUST OF BLACK HARRY.—We were shown the other day, in the studio of Mr. Macgil, sculptor, of this town, a clay model for a life-sized bust of the notorious aboriginal criminal, who met his merited fate on the gallows, a few weeks ago, and whose very name will for a long time continue to excite feelings of horror, wherever it is mentioned throughout the Australian Colonies. The likeness is said by all who have seen it to be perfect. The most peculiar feature in the face is the enormous jaw bone. The phrenological development of the original has also been carefully copied, as may be seen by the projecting eyebrows, indicating quick preception; the swelling organs of caution and destructiveness, which he used with such terrible results; and the equally prominent organ of, veneration, which, however singular it may appear, was very high in his cranium. We are advocates of the glorification of crime by the exhibition of the likenesses of its devotees, but in the present case the preservation of the peculiar features of the criminal may, perhaps, be turned to good account.— Maitland Mercury.

    Hide note
  183. Advertising
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 4 December 1861 p 4 Advertising
    1574 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 22:28:45.0

    LIFE BUST OF BLACK HARRY.—We were shown the other day, in the studio of Mr. Macgil, sculptor, of this town, a clay model for a life-sized bust of the notorious aboriginal criminal, who met his merited fate on the gallows a few weeks ago, and whose very name will for a long time continue, to excite feelings of horror wherever it is mentioned throughout the Australian colonies. The likeness is said by all who have seen it to be perfect. The most peculiar feature in the face is the enormous jaw bone. The phrenological development of the original has also been carefully copied, as may be seen by the projecting eyebrows, indicating quick perception; the swelling organs of caution and destructiveness, which he used with such terrible results; and the equally prominent organ of veneration, which, however singular it may appear, was very high in his cranium. We are no advocates of tho glorification of crime by the exhibition of the likenesses of its devotees, but in the present case the preservation of the peculiar features of the criminal may, perhaps, be turned to good account. Maitland Mercury.

    Hide note
  184. REPORTED EX[?]UMATION OF BLACK HARRY'S BODY. To the Editor of the Herald
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 16 November 1861 p 8 Article
    Abstract: SIR,—As all intelligent men deem it to be one of the most important functions of the Press to assist in the propagation and defence of the principles ... 1372 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 02:13:57.0

    A. S. HAMILTON. - letter to the Editor exhumation of body justified.

    Hide note
  185. Advertising
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Saturday 14 December 1861 p 1 Advertising
    5418 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 22:52:17.0

    THE BUST of BLACK HARRY,

    Modelled from Life by

    W . M'GILL,

    Can be seen in the Window at HARPS Portrait

    Gallery.

    Hide note
  186. Advertising
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 20 December 1861 p 1 Advertising
    7381 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 03:42:50.0

    PHRENOLOGY—Black Harry.—Mr. HAMILTON
    has the honour to announce that Joseph Eckford Esq., M.L.A.has presented him with a cast of the head of the murderer Harry, and will supply caste of the same to all who apply at 301, George-street, over Caxton Printing Office. How, and what you are, and fit for, faithfully answered by Mr. Hamilton, charge 5s.

    Hide note
  187. Advertising
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 5 September 1864 p 1 Advertising
    6728 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-08-09 12:23:22.0

    MADAME SOHIER'S WAX-WORK EXHIBITION, with its late numerous and important additions, is open DAILY, from 10 a m. to 10 p m.
    Just added to the Chamber of Horrors,
    "BLACK HARRY."
    **Admission ls., children half-price. During the evening the band will play selection from eminent composers.



    Madam Sohier "was Mrs Williams who married phrenologist Philemon Sohier. With his interest in reading heads, Sohier took casts of the skulls of hanged criminals for the Chamber of Horrors for Madame Sohier, who claimed to be an 'artiste in wax', to model." cite:http://www.emelbourne.net.au/biogs/EM01595b.htm



    Black Harry not mentioned in waxworks catalogue, http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/8467401 even though it is a year since he was added to the museum. (possibly in the "Buckeen" section.

    Hide note
  188. LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.
    The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 - 1864) Wednesday 30 April 1862 p 2 Article
    Abstract: DESTROYING PROPERTY.—Late on Monday night, a number of.young men amused themselves by wrenching off the iron bar fastening the window shutters of Mr. ... 1073 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 03:47:58.0

    LECTURE on PHRENOLOGY.—Last evening, Mr. A. S. Hamilton delivered a lecture on "Practical Phrenology," at the School of Arts, before a numerous and respectable audience. Mr. Hamilton stated he would merely give what he would term a "Demonstrative Lecture" that evening, as it was his intention to deliver a course of lectures, during his stay here. He then proceeded to point out the organs of the brain, illustrating his remarks by referring to various skulls, casts, and drawings. He showed that, the larger the brain, the greater would be the influence the man would exercise on society. Dr. Chalmers, Burns, Cromwell, Shakespeare, and many other great men all possessed large and well-balanced brains, and it was only in such men that true greatness was to be found. The New Zealanders were far superior to the aborigines of these colonies in point of intellect, and the appearance of their heads was indicative of many sterling qualities. In alluding to the aboriginal races, &c., Mr. Hamilton exhibited a number of skulls obtained in the different colonies, and among them the skull of Jem Crow, a black, who was executed for a capital offence at Maitland. Of this skull he remarked that the animal powers were very prominent, and the general development, such as to show that the man was a complete idiot. The skull of a person named Jones, who was executed at the same time and place, showed the organs of self-esteem and destructiveness very prominently, and was altogether highly indicative of the unfortunate man's actual character. The lecturer next proceeded to delineate by reference to various skulls and casts, the characteristics of several noted bushrangers and murderers, and stated that, when Black Harry was executed at Maitland, he requested a friend to obtain a cast of the head at the time of execution, but the clergyman, hearing of it, refused to give his sanction, and the only course open to him (Mr. H.) was to exhume the body, take off the head, and thus obtain the cast. Among the skulls shown were those of Donohue, Drake, and other notorious criminals, and among the casts, besides those already referred to, were those of Knatchbull and M'Queeny. After having extended his re- marks to something like an hour and a-half, Mr. Hamilton announced his intention of delivering another lecture on the following evening on "Physiognomy, Physiology, and the natural language of the Passions." Having requested that some of the most noted among the audience would go on to the plat- form for the purpose of having their heads examined, three or four persons, more adventurous and self-confident than the rest, submitted to the ordeal. Mr. Hamilton's skill was remarkably demonstrated in the truthfulness of his estimate of the two best known of his subjects, and the examination, which was not without interest, was also very amusing to the audience, however uncomfortable the "patients" may have felt during some portion of the operation.

    Hide note
  189. MADAME SOHIER'S WAXWORK EXHIBITION.
    Bell's Life in Sydney and Sporting Chronicle (NSW : 1860 - 1870) Saturday 17 September 1864 p 2 Article
    Abstract: The attractivencess of this exhibition continues unabated, the additions made to it from time to time by the energetic proprietress maintaining the p ... 164 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-12-26 11:58:38.0

    MADAME SOHIER'S WAXWORK EXHIBITION.

    The attractiveness of this exhibition continues unabated, the additions made to it from time to time by the energetic proprietress maintaining the prestige or novelty so essential to the popularity of an exhibition of this class. One of the most recent additions is the figure of the aboriginal, Black Harry, who was executed some time ago for the murder of Mrs Mills. The figure is remarkably life-like and bears an evident stamp of being an exact likeness of the original. Another feature of interest during the past week has been the engagement of the "Australian Fat Youth" whose Leviathan proportions have excited the usual amount of astonishment from numerous visitors. This "lusus nuturæ'' was exhibited in conjunction with the waxworks. Tho whole, exhibition will well repay a visit to all who may have a leisure hour to while away. A very excellent band adds materially to the liveliness of the "ensemble."

    Hide note
  190. LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY. WEDNESDAY.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 28 November 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: THE SPEAKER took the chair at twenty-eight minutes past three. QUESTION OF ORDER. Mr. ROTTON drew attention to a point of order which 20646 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 02:01:25.0

    two mentions

    Legislative Assembly.

    For his own part, he did not believe with the honorable Colonial Secretary that the country was in the deplorable condition it was represented. Why, in the case of the very worst offender that had been known for years past, the murderer Black Harry, the country police had followed him most vigilantly till the period of his capture, and, as a general rule, the country police had never displayed any laxity or want of vigilance in the apprehension of offenders. ....


    The magistrates there had to depend mainly on old infirm men who were waiting merely to be superannuated, and who had no other means of living. These were not the sort of men they required in the country districts. Cattle stealing and all sorts of crimes were occurring, and constables were not to be found when wanted. In the recent case when Black Harry murdered a poor woman in the bush, he was apprehended, not by a constable, but by a settler. For this reason such a measure as this was required to get a really efficient set of men in the police force of the interior towns.

    Hide note
  191. THE SKETCHER In the Early Days.-XLIX. THE BIRTH AND GROWTH OF BRISBANE AND ENVIRONS. LOCAL IMPROVEMENTS.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 19 November 1892 p 979 Article
    Abstract: The gold fever having to some extent subsided business resumed its normal condition, and if one may take the amount of building going on at the time ... 2144 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-28 02:50:21.0

    Text

    Hide note
  192. IN THE EARLY DAYS. THE BIRTH AND GROWTH OF BRISBANE AND ENVIRONS. | LOCAL IMPROVEMENTS.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Thursday 24 November 1892 p 2 Article
    Abstract: The gold fever having to some extent subsided business resumed its normal condition, and if one may take the amount of building going on at the time ... 2083 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-28 02:51:35.0

    Text

    Hide note
  193. THE SKETCHER In the Early Days.-LIII. THE BIRTH AND GROWTH OF BRISBANE AND ENVIRONS. EVENTS IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER FROM DISCOVERY TO SEPARATION. 1770.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 17 December 1892 p 1171 Article
    Abstract: May 6.—Captain Cook left Botany Bay for the North. May 17.—Captain Cook dropped anchor in Moreton Bay and named the Glasshouse 2961 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-28 03:20:32.0

    Text

    An error is corrected in an addendum in this issue, "Lippey" should be "Sippey"

    Hide note
  194. In the Early Days. ERRATA.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 17 December 1892 p 1162 Article
    Abstract: In the "Events in Chronological Order from Discovery to Separation" on page 1171 several typographical errors occur. Under the year 1853, November 10 ... 68 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-28 02:52:37.0

    Text

    Hide note
  195. FIFTY YEARS AGO.--XXVI. THE "COURIER" FILES OF 1853. | LATEST NEWS.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 21 November 1903 p 12 Article
    Abstract: Sydney news had been received to the 9th November. The death of Captain Sir James Everard Home, Commander of H.M.S. Callione. 1449 words
    • Text last corrected on 7 November 2018 by billeeb
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-28 02:57:20.0

    Text

    Hide note
  196. FIFTY YEARS AGO.—XXVII THE "COURIER" FILES OF 1858. (Our extracts to-day are from the "Courier" of 26th November, 1859.) SHIPPING. ARRIVALS.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 28 November 1903 p 12 Article
    Abstract: November 19.—Souvenir, from Sydney, Captain Witham. Passenger: Mr. D. Menan. November 20.—Tamar, s., from Sydney, 1449 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-28 02:58:11.0

    Text

    Hide note
  197. FIFTY YEARS AGO.— XIX. THE "COURIER" FILES OF 1853. | MINERAL WEALTH OF THE NORTHERN DISTRICTS.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 3 October 1903 p 12 Article
    Abstract: A project had been announced in an English newspaper, the object of which was to work coal mines in the Hunter and Moreton Bay districts. " We have 1359 words
    • Text last corrected on 12 June 2013 by sandygibb
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-28 02:56:19.0

    Text

    Hide note
  198. FIFTY-YEARS AGO.—XIX. THE "COURIER" FILES OF 1853. (Our extracts to-day are from the "Courier" of 9th December, 1853.) TREATMENT OF THE ABORIGINES.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 12 December 1903 p 12 Article
    Abstract: The leader in the "Courier" was on the "Treatment of the Aborigines," and it began:—"If it be notorious that all the efforts of conceited philanthrop ... 1516 words
    • Text last corrected on 10 November 2018 by billeeb
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-28 02:59:31.0

    Text

    Hide note
  199. QUEENSLAND'S HALF CENTURY 1859 TO 1909 NOTABLE EVENTS ANILLUSTRATED SYNODSIS of QUEENSLAND'S HISTORY FROM THE EARLIEST DAYS TO THE PRESENT TIME[?] ISSUED IN COMMEMORATION of THE 50...
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Wednesday 8 December 1909 p 23 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Aug. 30.—Discovery of Torres Straits by L[?] Valo de Torres. 1770. May 6.—Captain Cook left Botany Bay 29637 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-28 03:17:56.0

    1853. Queensland History: Nov. 10.—Escape of Lippey, notorious black murderer.

    Nb. Lippey is error, should be Sippey, the cause of this error is probably the mistake in an early edition, THE SKETCHER In the Early Days.-LIII. THE BIRTH AND GROWTH OF BRISBANE AND ENVIRONS. EVENTS IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER FROM DISCOVERY TO SEPARATION. 1770.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 17 December 1892 p 1171 Article

    Hide note
  200. Reminiscences of Maitland and the District. No. 63.-1861. BLACK HARRY.
    The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 - 1931) Saturday 30 November 1895 p 6 Article
    Abstract: At the Maitland Circuit Court held in September, his Honor the Chief Justice (Sir Alfred Stephen) presided. There were a good many cases set down for ... 1813 words
    • Text last corrected on 23 November 2015 by maurielyn
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-02 20:26:43.0

    Text


    Retelling of story 34 years later - nothing new here except initials of Mr. E. D. Day.

    Errors introduced: assumption that Humphries managed Borah Station - Harry was captured on Borah Station, and Humphries himself said he was manager of "Ghooli" Station in the article dated Saturday 8 September 1900. Some of these articles say he was from Borah Station but they appear to be incorrect.]

    "scalding him on the legs" [thigh]

    "he was asleep on the Warrah ranges" [ridges]??

    Hide note
  201. MISCELLANEOUS.
    Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW : 1856 - 1950) Friday 25 October 1861 p 2 Article
    Abstract: WE were rather startled by an announcement in the Sydney telegrams of the Goulburn Chronicle, of Saturday week, that MR. WEEKES was immediately to re ... 873 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 00:10:03.0

    Some legal wrangle - probably a different "Black Harry"

    Hide note
  202. Advertising
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 1 November 1861 p 2 Advertising
    4042 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 00:14:58.0

    Some obscure question

    Did Black Harry shirk the question?

    Hide note
  203. SOCIAL.
    Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875) Friday 22 November 1861 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Amid all the defects which we admit, and so often refer to as characterising society in Australia, we, in New South Wales, have much reason to congra ... 777 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 21:20:07.0

    SOCIAL.

    Amid all the defects which we admit, and so often refer to as characterising society in Australia, we, in New South Wales, have much reason to congratulate ourselves on immunity from a frequency of those crimes of great magnitude which seem to have been prevalent in England of late. Since our last summary, nothing of importance has transpired in this way to darken the month's annals; and since the notorious aboriginal, "Black Harry," paid the penalty of his offences the other day on the scaffold, there has been fortunately nothing to occupy the public mind in the way of serious offenders against the laws.

    Hide note
  204. INSOLVENCY PROCEEDINGS. NEW INSOLVENTS.
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Saturday 1 March 1862 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Feb. 26.—John Sentts, of Union-street, Pyrmont, Sydney, butcher. Liabilities, £41 13s. Assets, £8 10s. Deficit, £33 3s. Mr. Mackenzie, official assig ... 4059 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-05 00:41:18.0

    DEBATE ON CAPITAL PUNISHMENT. — MAITLAND MECHANICS' INSTITUTE.—An essay was read by Dr. Bolton, at the Mechanics' Institute, East Maitland, on Wednesday, upon the question, "Ought Capital Punishment to be abolished." Between twenty and thirty members were present, and the chair was occupied by Mr. A. Dodds. The essayist, in introducing his subject, said it was one calculated to stimulate discussion, and hoped some one would be induced to make his maiden speech upon it. He would enquire, first, were capital punishments contrary to the Divine law? and secondly, were they antagonistic to the happiness of man? He held that they were neither. The laws of God were made known to them by direct revelation, and also by the feelings implanted in the bosom. The execution of the murderer was clearly enjoined, in the Old Testament, upon mankind, long prior to the Mosaic dispensation, and as that law had not been abrogated in the New Testament, it was still obligatory. Then, the natural feelings of men, when called into exercise by actual proximity to the murderer, pointed him out as one who had forfeited his right to live. The public feeling, as called forth by the recent atrocities of Black Harry, was an illustration of this. After the crimes perpetrated by that wretch had become known, the utmost interest was felt in the steps taken to capture him, lest he should escape the vengeance of the law, which he had provoked. It was universally felt that the land was polluted by the presence of the murderer, and could never be cleansed except by his blood.

    Hide note
  205. COUNTRY DISTRICTS.
    Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932) Wednesday 21 May 1862 p 9 Article
    Abstract: AGRICULTURAL AND STOCK RETURNS.—Through the courtesy of the Clerk of Petty [?] enabled to furnish a return of [?] of land under cultivation during th ... 1126 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 17:05:09.0

    SKULLS OF BLACKFELLOWS.—Our Maitland readers will remember that some time since, a great stir was made here about an alleged attempt, by a phrenologist, to obtain the skull of Black Harry, after his execution and burial. A similar commotion has just been excited in Brisbane. A short time since a black named Kipper Billy, convicted of rape, attempted to escape from Brisbane gaol, and was shot and killed by one of the warders. His body was buried, it appears, in the bush, in ground not consecrated. Recently Mr. Warry, a prominent Brisbane citizen, a chemist, and magistrate, obtained the head of Kipper Billy, for the purpose of seeing the effect of the gun-shot injury. He made no concealment of the matter, and it came to the knowledge of the Bishop of Brisbane (Church of England). That gentleman, treating the act as violating the rights of "my parishioners" of Brisbane, wrote to the Colonial Secretary, remonstrating against it, and the Colonial Secretary wrote to Mr. Warry, calling on him to show cause why he should not be dissmissed from the commission of the peace. The Brisbane Courier speaks in terms of great reprobation of this course of official treatment of an act not in itself contrary to any law.—Maitland Mercury.

    Hide note
  206. FREEMASONRY.
    Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW : 1856 - 1950) Friday 23 May 1862 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Freemasonry is a sublime science, and derives this peculiar character, from the nature of its symbols, its allegories, and its degrees, which are num ... 2946 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-12 19:06:37.0

    SKULLS OF BLACKFELLOWS. — Our Maitland readers will remember that some time since a great stir was made here about an alleged attempt by a phrenologist, to obtain the skull of Black Harry, after his execution and burial. A similar commotion has just been excited in Brisbane. A short time since a black named Kipper Billy, convicted of rape, attempted to escape from Brisbane Gaol, and was shot and killed by one of the warders. His body was buried, it appears, in the bush, in ground not consecrated. Recently Mr. Warry, a prominent Brisbane citizen, a chemist, and magistrate, obtained the head of Kipper Billy, for the purpose of seeing the effect of the gun shot injury. He made no concealment of the matter, and it came to the knowledge of the Bishop of Brisbane (Church of England). That gentleman, treating of the act as violating the rights of "my parishioners" of Brisbane, wrote to the Colonial Secretary, remonstrating against it. And the Colonial Secretary wrote to Mr. Warry, calling on him to show cause why he should not be dismissed from the commission of the peace. The "Brisbane Courier" speaks in terms of great reprobation of his course of official treatment of an act not in itself contrary to any law.—Maitland Mercury.

    Hide note
  207. Answers to Correspondents.
    Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907) Saturday 27 January 1883 p 18 Article
    Abstract: X. Y.—Air guns were invented in 1646. Garlon—The tank contains 1284cubic yards. Collie Blue—There are 376 cubic yards in the tank. A. R. Crawford—The ... 4853 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-09 19:08:59.0

    Answers to Correspondents.

    The date of the execution of Black Harry, perhaps, may be known by some of our readers.

    Hide note
  208. "Black Harry."
    The Scone Advocate (NSW : 1887 - 1954) Tuesday 2 October 1900 p 4 Article
    Abstract: APROPOS of the black scare, the story is told of Black Harry, who terrorised the Merriwa and Liverpool Plains districts about 35 years 734 words
    Digitised article icon
  209. Black Harry. To the Editor of the Chronicle.
    The Muswellbrook Chronicle (NSW : 1898 - 1955) Saturday 18 November 1905 p 2 Article
    Abstract: SIR,—Will you allow me to correct all error in the account of the capture of the above desperado, which appeared in your issue of the 4th curt. 382 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-25 09:08:36.0

    Some new and some incorrect information



    Black Harry.

    To the Editor of the Chronicle.

    SIR,—Will you allow me to correct an error in the account of the capture of the above desperado, which appeared in your

    issue of the 4th curt.

    Black Harry was not captured, as stated therein, by two civilians, but was arrested in the following manner.

    A man named Harry Humfries, [John Humphries] who was overseer on Goolhi station, had been in search of Black Harry, and was returning home one evening, when he saw him sitting on a fence by the roadside. Humfries, who was armed, instantly ordered Harry to put up his hands, the latter at first only raised one, and, on the order being repeated, complied, dropping, as he did, a shoemaker's hammer, this being the only thing in the shape of a weapon which he had. [not right, the hammer was detected later] Humfries secured him, and conveyed him to the Woolshed, as Gunnedah was then called, and handed him over to Chief Constable Munro [Chief Constable Weston] and Edward Potts, the latter lock-up keeper at Merriwa, to which town he was promptly taken by these two officers, and placed in the lock-up there. This was a wooden structure, occupying the same site as the present one. On the morning on which he was to be brought before the bench, some persons outside noticed smoke issuing from the cells; an investsgation showed that the prisoner had made an attempt to destroy the building by fire, and had succeeded in setting light to the wall of his cell. He was thereafter secured by a chain fastened to a ring in the centre of the floor. When committed to Maitland for trial, he was leg ironed for security, the irons connecting the ankles and passing under the horse, which, not liking the novelty of his treatment, bucked and almost unseated his rider, who was, however, safely conveyed to Singleton by Messrs. E. Potts and D. Munro [Weston] as aforesaid.

    Humfries, who made the capture, received the offered reward of £200; [£150 only received] he died about two years since at Boggabri. D. Munro and E. Potts are also dead. Hundreds looked for the little girl whom Black Harry stole, but beyond a little shoe found by E. Potts, nothing was ascertained. For the truth of these statements I can personally vouch.

    Yours etc.,

    E. P.

    Hide note
  210. Capture of Black Harry.
    The Muswellbrook Chronicle (NSW : 1898 - 1955) Saturday 4 November 1905 p 10 Article
    Abstract: There was a sigh of relief when the news got abroad in the middle of August, 1861, that the murderer, Black Harry, was captured. There was great 740 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-25 11:10:21.0

    Same as another article, and inaccurate




    Capture of Black Harry.

    There was a sigh of relief when the news got abroad in the middle of August, 1861, that the murderer, Black Harry, was captured. There was great excitement locally when, after his commital at Merriwa, he was brought on to Singleton; and placed in the local lockup. The people turned out in great numbers to get a glimpse of the notorious villain, whose atrocities shocked the whole colony. After a brief sojourn in the lockup here he was taken on to Maitland on the morning of September 7th, 1861, the means of locomotion being an old fashioned gig, the property of Chief Constable Horne, of Singleton. Constable Horne drove, and there was an escort of two mounted. police. On;arrival at Maitland, it was seen that the curiosity of the inhabitants there was as manifest as at Singleton, and crowds lined the streets to get a view of the human savage. The charge on which he was arraigned, and for which he subsequently paid the death penalty, was a most revolting murder. It appears that a man named Mills was employed on a run at Hall's Creek, and Harry was also engaged on the same property; but at a considerable distance from Mill's hut, where the latter's wife and two children were always alone, as Mills' duties kept him away from home from early morning till late at night. On July 16th, 1861, Black Harry called at Mrs Mills', and asked if she would allow her little nine year-old son to accompany him opossum hunting. The lad was anxious to go, and Mrs. Mills consented. They were away some time, and had killed three opossums, and then made a fire to roast one. Whilst the boy was silting on a log, Harry walked behind him and dealt him a couple of murderous blows on the head with a tomahawk. Thinking the lad dead, Harry returned to Mills' house and butchered Mrs Mills in a terrible, manner, her dead body being found by her husband on his return from work at night. Harry then took the other child—a little girl about seven years of age away with him into the bush, and her remains were never found. Mills, upon making the awful discovery, at once informed his fellow employees, and the police were also notified. A search was at once made for the missing children, and nothing was seen or heard of them for two days when a bullock driver named Thomas Smith came across the boy sitting up at the spot where he was dealt the murderous blows. The poor lad was covered in blood and quite unconscious.
    Smith carried him till he could obtain assistance, when the dreadful wounds were attended to. The unfortunate boy remained unconscious for 10 days, but gradually got better, and was able to appear at the trial and give evidence. Harry managed to evade arrest for a month, but was eventually secured by two civilians near Merriwa. Scores of men were engaged in the search for the scoundrel. The trial took place at Maitland early in October of the same year before the Chief Justice Sir Alfred Stephens. Sir James Martin (then Mr. Martin) prosecuted. The principal witness was the boy Thomas Henry Mills, but owing to his tender years the Judge questioned him of God and the meaning of taking an oath. Many in court were moved to tears when he recited the prayers his mother taught him every night on going to bed, and as he related how his mother taught him of God, and that she made him attend church on all possible occasions. The evidence of the lad, also Thomas Smith and another employee on the .station, was in conformity, with the above facts. The prisoner was found guilty, sentenced to death, and duly hanged on November 7th same year. On the morning of the execution, he confessed to the murder, also to the murder of a woman at Gunnedah. He also stated that he thought he had killed the boy Thomas Mills, and that after killing Mrs. Mills he took the little girl with him for three weeks, and at last found it was too hard to escape his pursuers while she was with him so he left her one morning. He sent her to collect some chips to light the fire, and while she was gathering them he cleared out—Singleton Argus Oct 28th, 1905.

    Hide note
  211. IN DAYS GONE BY EARLY LITER JIUNYKK HISTORY. CAPTURE OF "BLACK HARRY."
    The Muswellbrook Chronicle (NSW : 1898 - 1955) Friday 28 August 1925 p 1 Article
    Abstract: The followiinjg Interesting newspaper cutting, referring to incidents in 1861, has been sent in by Mrs. Scott, of Wybong:— 789 words
    • Text last corrected on 23 February 2014 by Stephen.J.Arnold
    • 1 comment on 23 February 2014
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-23 17:25:50.0

    many details are different in this account to earlier ones




    IN DAYS GONE BY

    ———♦———

    EARLY UPPER HUNTER HISTORY.

    CAPTURE OF "BLACK HARRY.''

    The following interesting newspaper cutting, referring to incidents in 1861, has been sent in by Mrs. Scott, of Wybong:—

    "There was a sigh of relief when the news got abroad in the middle of August, 1861, that the murderer, "Black Harry," was captured. There was great excitement locally when, after his commital at Merriwa, he was brought on to Singleton and placed in the local lock-up. The people turned out in great numbers to get a glimpse of the notorious villain, whose atrocities shocked the whole colony. After a brief sojourn in the lock-up here he was taken on to Maitland on the morning of September 7th, 1861, the means of locomotion being an old fashioned gig, the property of Chief Constable Horne of Singleton. Constable Horne drove and there was an escort of two mounted police. On arrival at Maitland it was seen that the curiosity of the inhabitants there was as manifest as at Singleton, and crowds lined the streets to get a view of the human savage. The charge on which he was arraigned, and for which he subsequently paid the-death penalty, was a most revolting murder. It appears that a man named Mills was employed on a run at Hall's Creek, and Harry was also engaged on the same property; but at a considerable distance from Mill's hut, where the letter's wife and two children were always alone. Mill's duties kept him away from home from early morning till late at night. On July 16, 1861, Black Harry called at Mrs. Mills', and asked her if she would allow her nine-year old son to accompany him opossum hunting. The lad was anxious to go and Mrs. Mills consented. They were away some time and had killed three opossums, and then made a fire to roast one. While the boy was sitting on a log Harry walked behind him and dealt him a couple of murderous blows on the head with a tomahawk. Thinking the lad dead, Harry returned to Mills' hut and butchered Mrs. Mills in a terrible manner, her dead body being found by the husband on his return from work at night. Harry then took the other child—a little girl about seven years of age—away with him into the bush, and her re- mains were afterwards found. Mills, upon making the discovery, at once informed his employer, and the police was also notified. A search was at once made for the missing children, and nothing was seen or heard of them for two days, when a bullock driver named Thomas Smith, came across the boy sitting up at the spot where he was dealt the murderous blows. The poor lad was covered in blood and quite unconscious. Smith carried him till he could obtain assistance, when the wounds were at tended to. The unfortunate boy remained unconscious for 10 days, but gradually got better, and was able to appear at the trial and give evidence. Harry managed to evade arrest for a month, but was eventually secured by two civilians near Merriwa. Scores of men were engaged in the search for the scoundrel. The trial took place at Maitland early in October of the same year before the Chief Justice, Sir Alfred Stephens. Sir James Martin (then Mr Martin) prosecuted. The principal witness was the boy, Thomas Henry Mills', but owing to his tender years the Judge questioned him of God and the meaning of taking an oath. Many in court were moved to tears when he recited the prayers his mother taught him every night on going to bed, that she made him attend church on all possible occasions. The evidence of the lad, also Thomas Smith and another employee on the station, was in conformity with the above facts. The prisoner was found guilty, sentenced to death, and, duly hanged on November 7th of the same year. On the morning of the execution, he confessed to the murder, also to the murder of a woman at Gunnedah. He also stated that he thought he had killed the boy Thomas Mills, and that after killing Mrs. Mills he took the little girl with him for three weeks, and at last found it was too hard to escape his pursuers while she was with him, so he left her one morning. He sent her to collect some chips and light the fires, and while she was gathering them he cleared out."

    Hide note
  212. ABORIGINAL HUNTING. AN EXCITING EXPERIENCE THIRTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.
    Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Saturday 8 September 1900 p 2 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: LATELY I was told that someone could tell me an excellent yarn of old times—blacks; but I 2017 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-05 11:12:48.0

    ABORIGINAL HUNTING.

    AN EXCITING EXPERIENCE THIRTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.

    (By "Tackra.")

    LATELY I was told that someone could tell me an excellent yarn of old times—blacks; but I was doubtful. I don't like the usual "old hand's' story, and the memories are so scattered that it is impossible to piece them together within cooee of each other. I went to see several people nevertheless, in the interests of the public, who I like to please, at all personal cost, and found some truly interesting stuff. I went first to Mr. Humphries, now of Marrickville, once manager of "Ghooli" Station. Liverpool Plains way, one of whose stories was so fascinating, and told in such simple, graphic style, that I give if to you as I heard it (supplemented with some notes from the Namoi "Echo," to which paper Mr. Humphries gave some account recently). The couple of hours spent with my friend were full of delightful reminiscences, and he has a marvellous memory for dramatic detail. It was very fine to see Mr. Humphries growing young again, as he told me his tales, and I began to think I had been with him too, in the wild life of long ago. The following was his story: Black Harry was a native of the M'Intyre River, afterwards going to the Merriwa district, where he was a tracker, and broke in horses for the police. He left the police, and shortly afterwards passed close to a sheep station, where a woman and her two children lived—a boy about 12, and a girl about 8. The blackfellow was very friendly to the boy, saying. "Come, and I will cut you a 'possum out of a gum-tree." The boy gladly went, and when they reached the gloomy, silent gully, the black struck the child on the head with a tomahawk; then, his blood being up, went to the house and murdered the mother, afterwards ransacking the house, and taking anything he fancied. Black Harry took the little girl with him, but she was never seen again, except once, by a woman, whom he asked for a drink for the child. The woman asked the child to come to her, but she clung to Harry, who promised to take her to her father. Poor husband and father, he was far away minding sheep, but returned in time to find the lad in the gully, still alive. The aboriginal always said he did not know where the little girl went, but after he was captured he said that he had killed her too and burnt her body in a stump. Some days later, in the Liverpool Range, he found a white girl looking after some miserable sheep, and treated her very badly, following this up by going to different lonely stations, where he picked all he wanted in the way of ammunition, food, and clothes, notably a red sailor cap belonging to Mr. Johnson, of Gunnedah, and a double-barrelled pistol. He passed Ghooli Station, thence to Ganningbah, where he enticed a lame half-caste shepherdess to share his outlaw fortunes. Near Ghooli they dwelt for weeks, and baffled the police. The thick scrub helped them, and 100 police, with parties of civilians, scoured the place in vain, all being anxious to get the glory of victory, and £200—half from Government, half from the local residents. The shepherds about were continually being stuck-up and robbed, so that the manager had hard work to keep them, and the matter had to be taken in hand promptly. The chase was so vigilant, even some blacks joining in the hunt eagerly, that Black Harry told his companion to go home, while he went to his own "Towri," the M'Intyre, via the great scrub between Ghooli and Narrabri. When the half-caste got home, she told all she knew, like many another woman—how her lover had departed with pistol, balls, powder, and a very sharp butcher's knife, wrapped up in rags. The murderer went the opposite way, so that he had learnt enough to know the truth of not letting your left hand know what the right hand does. As he went along, carefully considering his best course—for the aboriginal is not a slapdash character—he met an old German shepherd, to whom he said, "Give me tobacco." The German put his axe on his shoulder, blade out, and threw the tobacco in front of him, saying, "There, pick it up for yourself," but the aboriginal made off towards Namoi, not trusting himself in such a position. At the Rock Inn, Harry saw a black's camp, and very gladly he went in among company again. He grew so merry in the warm firelight, with jests flying round, that he sent a friend with five shillings to buy a bottle of rum. The messenger told Mr. Gosper there was a strange black at the camp who might be the wanted man. Gosper went to the camp, saying, "Hello, where you come from?" "I am looking for work, sir," replied Harry, humbly. "Can you drive bullocks?" "Yes, sir.'' "All right, come over to the house while"——but, here the black slipped off his coat with incriminating things in the pockets, and followed Gosper a few yards, then ran like a streak of lightning for the river, which was running a banker, 300 yards away, and swam over in sight of an admiring and astonished crowd. A little later, wet tired and hungry, he saw glowing firelight in a hut across his path. He crept up to the door, snatched a double-barrelled gun from the corner, and went savagely for the man sitting with his back to the, door, warming his hands. To Harry's surprise, he was seized from behind, and the gun wrenched away by another man who had been sitting in a dark corner. There was a quick struggle, and Harry reached the door, by good luck, but was there covered by Carter's gun so that he dare not move till he thought out a trick. They asked him some questions, and while they were listening to his replies he diverted attention, kicked up the muzzle and flew on, lost in the night. Harry re-swam the river, and before afternoon had robbed another place, near Ghooli, having travelled 40 miles in little over fourteen hours. Just now, Harry saw a half-caste, driving a bullock, and who, he was aware, knew him, so he gave him fifteen shillings to say that he had not seen him. Alas—the same old Judas Iscariot story, the half-caste hurried to Mr. Humphries, manager and part-owner of Ghooli, who kept a horse continually saddled, so as to be able to start at once after the black murderer. Mr. Humphries's own vivid words I will give, as he told me the other day, this exciting experience of 35 years ago: You may imagine, I was young and eager then, and I wanted to do always what others failed in. I believed he would go back to Ganningbah, and pick up the half-caste, and as a flock of sheep had been driven from Ghooli to Borah, I thought it would be easy to track him. I loaded my double-barrel gun, capped, and ready for action. I then took the barrels from the stock, rolled them in a poncho, and placed them before me on the saddle. I went along heedlessly enough. The road was interesting, and I knew my game was a very long way off. I was looking carelessly around, when my eye caught sight of a small scarlet patch above the long grass, and I thought how odd that a poppy should be growing out there. I turned my horse to look closer, when up jumped a tumbled figure, with a scarlet sailor cap—Black Harry. "Ah, the very man I want," I cried exultingly, for it seemed such an easy catch, but he replied fearlessly—"No b----- fear, I'm off on the road," and started off quickly. I had to stop to put my gun together, then galloped after him, not too soon, for he was nearing the scrub at a great rate. A swag dragged at every step, and delayed him—all stolen property, and a great weight for him to carry and travel so fast; but the blacks are very enduring. He had clothing, blankets, tea, sugar, a damper, 35lb weight in all. I presented the gun and told him to "stand" so sternly that he obeyed at once. Round his swag he had two saddle straps, and I tied a big handkerchief from each, so that he could hold on his swag by putting this round his neck. I made him walk before me, and noticed he was very busy with his hands. I said, "You have a pistol; give it up." "No—I have not," he replied sullenly, and I told him to put his arms out. He put out one, then the other. I knew there was something wrong; and made him turn round at once. As he did so, a big hammer several pounds weight fell to the ground. I felt very glad to see this weapon out of his hands, and I made him go on faster, and without it. As soon as I came to a clear space, I made him turn out his pockets, but I found nothing but an old rusty pocket-knife, for in his fear of Mr. Gosper he had thrown off his coat containing his pistol, knife, and ammunition. I then thought it time to tie his hands, for, as he saw escape was impossible, he became desperate, and there was no reason that he should go free. I told him to lie flat on the ground, but he would only go on his hands and knees, so we went on to where some men were at work. Here I jumped down, caught his hands, and strapped them. Later, he was chained to a post at Ghooli, and then taken to Gunnedah by a policeman. The town was beside itself with excitement. Burglars could have robbed every house, only there were no burglars there in those days. One old lady rammed her clenched fist into Harry's face at the lockup, saying, "You murderin' wretch. Wud loike to kill ye." and Harry replied with interest, "When I get out, I will kill you." A Jewish storekeeper now offered me £150 for my chance of the reward, because £200 appeared in the paper as the amount, but this latter sum I never got. The Premier (Sir Charles Cowper) forwarded me a cheque for £100, the amount offered by the Government. The people of Merriwa and Scone offered me the other £100; but the treasurer, the police magistrate, could only get in £50—just the sum Mr. Cohen offered! One day a boy told the police there was a fire in the lockup; and lo! Mr. Harry had been using his wits well, for he had burned a slab half through, and night would have spelt liberty. He had sacrificed his blanket for kindling, but in vain. He was found guilty of murder at Maitland. He often used to talk over his narrow escapes—how he used to see people pass below, when he was stretched along branches; how they came near when he lay under rocks: and how how he used to obliterate his footmarks with little bundles of grass tied to his feet. The blacks are cleverer than we think, and after all this is their own country, and by tradition and practice, know much that it takes us years to learn. I'm not surprised when an aboriginal baffles a white man.

    Hide note
  213. Scene of Many Murders.
    The Clarence River Advocate (NSW : 1898 - 1949) Friday 17 August 1900 p 5 Article
    Abstract: IN connection with the visit of the Governors to the Merriwa district, on the Upper Hunter, tho Singleton ARGUS says:— A former resident of Merriwa d ... 254 words
    • Text last corrected on 23 February 2014 by Stephen.J.Arnold
    • 1 comment on 23 February 2014
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-09 20:31:42.0

    Another dodgy account of Mrs. Mills murder


    Scene of Many Murders.

    In connection with the visit of the Governors to the Merriwa district, on the Upper Hunter, the Singleton ARGUS says:— A former resident of Merriwa district states that numerous murders have been committed in that locality. He recollects a man called "Black Harry" killing Mrs. Mills and her child. Young Mills escaped and gave information of the murder to the police. "Black Harry" made good his escape, and for 18 months defied the efforts of the police to take him. Subsequently he was arrested up a tree on the Balone. Another murder was commited 8 miles from Merriwa on the Scone road, a mother and child being brutally murdered. The body of the infant was never recovered

    Hide note
  214. ANSWERS TO QUIZ
    Singleton Argus (NSW : 1880 - 1954) Friday 21 June 1940 p 3 Article
    Abstract: (1) In the middle of 1861 an aboriginal named Black Harry committed a series of crimes at Hall's Creek, near Merriwa. He was 343 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-23 23:38:42.0

    ANSWERS TO QUIZ

    (1) In the middle of 1861 an aboriginal named Black Harry committed a series of crimes at Hall's Creek, near Merriwa. He was working on a property where a man named Mills was also employed. During the latter's absence he murdered Mrs Mills with a tomahawk, split their son's head open in two places, and then took the little girl, seven years old, to the bush, and she was never heard of again, nor any sign of her remains found. When captured the black said he deserted the child in the bush, after she had been with him three weeks. He was brought to Singleton lock-up and spent a couple of days there, prior to going on to Maitland for trial and execution. It was to get a glimpse of him that made people turn out as he was driven along in Horne's gig.

    Hide note
  215. THE PITT-STREET TRAM OF 89 YEARS AGO
    Bowral Free Press and Berrima District Intelligencer (NSW : 1884 - 1901) Wednesday 7 November 1900 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Now that it has been decided by the Government to construct a tramway along Pittstreet from the Circular Quay to the Redfern railway station, it is i ... 1857 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-24 01:09:28.0

    Coincidences suggest themselves as one looks ever the files of old papers for information, about the Pitt-street tram. Then (1861), as now, a tram in Pitt-street was proposed. Then, as now, there was a great crisis in China. Then, as now, there was a sensational murder by a black fellow—the thirty-nine years back prototype of Jimmy Governor being one "Black, Harry," who murdered a woman at a station in the Singleton district, and who, after a marauding expedition extending over two months, was run down and finally hanged at Maitland (September, 1861).

    Hide note
  216. THE PITT-STREET TRAM OF 39 YEARS AGO. HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF.
    Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Saturday 27 October 1900 p 1 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: [?]W that it has been decided by the Government to construct a tramway along Pitt-street from 1917 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-24 01:22:10.0

    Coincidences suggest themselves as one looks over the files of old papers for information, about the Pitt-street tram. Then (1861), as now, a tram in Pitt-street was proposed. .. etc

    Hide note
  217. Among the Pastoralists and Producers. SCONE AND DISTRICT.
    The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 - 1931) Saturday 30 November 1895 p 13 Article
    Abstract: Scone was incorporated about six years ago, the municipal area comprising 320 acres, and, so far as my experience goes, is one of the best ordered an ... 2302 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-24 01:18:36.0

    "Black Harry" a man of the Deeming species, employed on Mr. Hall's Dartbrook estate, also distinguished himself about this time by mutilating a white woman, in the most fiendish manner—then not content with this—carried off her three-year-old child and never divulged what he had done with it. Whilst the police were in hot pursuit, it was gleaned afterwards that this dusky demon was watching their movements from a tree-top, but was eventually captured and conveyed to Merriwa, where the police treated him well in the hope that he would disclose the whereabouts of the stolen child. All the tobacco and matches in Merriwa, however, failed to elicit the desired information, so that the secret died with the brute who probably had treated the child in the same fashion as he had done the woman. The matches so generously placed at his disposal were chiefly utilized for setting fire to the lockup, the flooring of which was wood, but luckily his attempts in this direction were frustrated.

    Hide note
  218. OTHER DAYS
    Singleton Argus (NSW : 1880 - 1954) Saturday 6 June 1925 p 8 Article
    Abstract: The Great Northern Kailway ivas opened for traffic to Murrurundi oil Thursday, April 4th, 1872. A great many people made the trip .and 1211 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-24 22:47:21.0

    Way back in the sixties an atrocious murder was committed at Giant's Creek, near Muswellbook, when a woman and her infant son were callously murdered by a black, known as "Black Harry." A daughter, three years of age, of the unfortunate woman was carried off by the brute, and no tidings of the little girl could be found. Some time afterwards the murderer was captured, and as Mr Sam Horne, the police officer in charge of this district, brought him into Singleton lock-up, handcuffed and strapped in the officer's gig, the excitement, was intense. Thirty years later the local aboriginals, Jimmy and Joe Governor, began their career of carnage with the Breelong, horrors, and many people, as well as a section of the metropolitan press, claimed, that the missing girl had developed into the mother of the outlaws, as Mrs. Governor was not an aboriginal, but few people in this district, where the family had lived, would sustain the thought.

    Hide note
  219. ABORIGINAL NAMES. TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 23 February 1929 p 14 Article
    Abstract: Sir,—Reading Mr. P. H. Morton's very interesting article on Aboriginal names in Illawarra, I was struck with the similarity of words descriptive of b ... 382 words
    • Text last corrected on 9 March 2014 by Stephen.J.Arnold
    • 1 comment on 4 February 2014
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-30 18:58:44.0

    A distorted recollection of events

    Hide note
  220. EARLY DAYS Incidents Recalled TICHBORNE CASE
    The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 - 1939) Saturday 7 April 1934 p 10 Article
    Abstract: The Great Northern Railway was opened for traffic to Murrurundi on Thursday, April 4, 1872. A great many Singleton 1053 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-24 22:57:53.0

    Atrocious Murder
    Way back in the sixties an atrocious murder was committed at Giant's Creek, near Muswellbrook, when a woman and her infant son were callously murdered by a black, known as "Black Harry." A daughter, 3 years of age, of the unfortunate woman, was carried off by the brute and no tidings of the little girl could be found. Some time afterwards the murderer was, captured and as Mr. Sam Horne, the police officer in charge of the Singleton district, brought him into Singleton lockup, handcuffed and strapped in the officer's gig, the excitement was intense. Thirty years later the local aboriginals, Jimmy and Joe Governor, began their career of carnage with the Breelong horrors, and many people, as well as a section of the metropolitan press, claimed that the little missing girl had developed into the mother of the outlaws, as Mrs. Governor was not an aboriginal, but few people in this district where the family had lived, would entertain the thought.

    Hide note
  221. BLACK HARRY Tragedy of the 'Sixties WOMAN KILLED
    The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 - 1939) Wednesday 25 April 1934 p 6 Article
    Abstract: "I saw in the issue of 7th April, an account of a terrible murder committed away back in the sixties. by Black Harry," 511 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-05 00:51:38.0

    BLACK HARRY


    Tragedy of the 'Sixties WOMAN KILLED


    "I saw in the issue of 7th April, an account of a terrible murder committed away back in the sixties by Black Harry," writes Mr. F. R. Eipper.


    "It is true he killed a woman and thought he had killed her son, but he only wounded the boy, who, was ten years old, not an infant as your correspondent, states. Also, the crime was committed a long way from Giant's Creek.
    "Mrs. Mills, the victim, was the wife of a shepherd in the employ of Messrs. Hall, of Dartbrook, and lived some miles up from the head station, Gundebri.
    "Black Harry was a stranger to the district, and was employed as a stockman on Gundebri. One day, when work was slack on the station, Harry, following his native proclivities, said he was going possum-hunting. He sharpened a tomahawk and went up to the hut where Mrs. Mills lived and took her boy, Tommy, hunting with him.
    "Black Harry returned to the hut some time later. He said he told the woman he had 'pitched into' her son and she threw boiling water over him. Then he struck her with the tomahawk and, taking gun and ammunition and Mrs. Mills' little girl, of three, made off. Why he took the child away is a mystery, for she would only be a hindrance to him as she could not walk far.
    "Mrs. Mills' oldest daughter was at service somewhere and had been on a visit to her mother a week or two before the murder. It was supposed that Black Harry had designs on the girl. He did not know she had gone back to her service, but she fortunately had.
    "The boy was found next day lying beside the remains of a fire. He said they had caught a possum and were roasting it when Harry, after lifting the tomahawk once or twice, struck him on the head with it. The blow fractured his skull but did not kill him.
    "Black Harry, after he was caught, said that he and the boy Tommy, had a row. Tommy called him a "black scorpion' and he hit him with the tomahawk. "He gave two versions of what became of the girl. One was that he sent her to get sticks for the fire one night and she did not come back; the other that he put her into a hollow log and set fire to it. I do not think the idea of her being the mother of Jimmy Governor can be correct. Harry had no meeting with any other blacks while he was 'out.' He was a Queensland native. "I was intimately acquainted with Mrs. Mills eldest son and know the whole family. I was in the employ of Messrs. Hall at that time and was at Gundebri a week or so after the murder."

    Hide note
  222. When Black Outlaws Terrorised New South Wales
    Singleton Argus (NSW : 1880 - 1954) Monday 7 December 1942 p 4 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Unlike most bushrangers, if we except the bloodthirsty Morgan, the Governors did not take to the bush as an easy method to obtain spoil, but to satia ... 2587 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-24 22:39:50.0

    Speculation as to Jimmy Governor's parentage


    MOTHER NOT AN ABORIGINAL

    After Jimmy's tracking days had ended the Governors made westward, and with them was their mother, and other members of the family. She was not an aboriginal, and that gave rise to another rumour that created profound interest, but to the writer appeared to be devoid of substance. It concerned a tragedy at Hall's Creek, near Merriwa, that occurred in the early 'sixities of last century. A callous aboriginal murderer named "Black Harry," who was working for a settler there, took advantage of the absence of his boss from home and murdered his wife. He then cleared out, taking the two children, a little boy and his sister, three years of age, to the bush. He attacked the boy and left him for dead, but the lad was found and nursed back to health. No tidings of the little girl were ever found, and no bones were discovered that might suggest they were her remains. When the Governors began their long list of cold-blooded murders a metropolitan newspaper resurrected the "Black Harry" horror, and as the parentage of the mother of the murderers could not be established it suggested, if it did not openely declare, that she was identical with the missing three-year-old girl that diabolical ruffian had carried off to the bush after killing her mother, and there were many who accepted the story as gospel, and still believe in its possibility.





    ARREST OF BLACK HARRY


    If we may divert for a moment, we would like to say that no incident in the history of this town created greater satisfaction, or gave the then scanty population more pleasure than the arrest of "Black Harry." As Chief constable Horne (the founder of the very early local family of that name) brought his dusky prisoner chained in his old-fashioned gig to the local lock-up, then situated in George Street almost opposite the post office, whilst en route to Maitland for trial, the women lined the street to get a glimpse of the ruffian who had so brutally, treated a member of their sex. Harry was hanged at Maitland chiefly on the evidence of the boy he had left for dead in the bush.

    Hide note
  223. Catalogue of Madame Sohier's Waxworks Exhibition, Bourke Street East, Melbourne, and Pitt Street, Sydney
    Madame Sohier's Waxworks Exhibition (Melbourne, Vic.)
    [ Book : 1865-1866 ]
    View online
    At 2 libraries