1. List: Mt Kosciusko, Wragge Expedition
    Mt Kosciusko, Wragge Expedition thumbnail image
    Public

    No description yet...

    40 items
    created by: birdwing on 2010-12-27 17:54:37.0
    User data
    Tags:
    Add tag(s)
    Comments: No comments yet - Add one!
    Rating: unrated

List items:

Showing: 1 - 40 of 40

  1. Mr. Clement L. Wragge, THE QUEENSLAND METEOROLOGIST. AN AFTERNOON WITH THE GOVERNMENT WEATHER PROPHET. | (See portrait on this page.)
    Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907) Saturday 15 April 1893 p 19 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Recently, in company with a friend, I spent an afternoon with Mr. Wrasrge, the Queensland Government Meteorologist. Atter a pleasant greeting and a s ... 2473 words
    • Text last corrected on 2 May 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-05-03 18:53:34.0

    About his home and job in Brisbane

    Hide note
  2. The Sydney Morning Herald. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1897.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 30 November 1897 p 4 Article
    Abstract: As the result of an amendment by Mr. Curtis, the Federation Bill introduced by Sir Hugh Nelson in the Queensland Assembly, was withdrawn last night. 9027 words
    Digitised article icon
  3. NEW SOUTH WALES. SYDNEY, Monday.
    The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 30 November 1897 p 5 Article
    Abstract: It is reported that Professor Haddon, accompanied by Mr. Ray, the entomologist, and five Cambridge students, intend to visit Thursday Island in Febru ... 1143 words
    • Text last corrected on 6 January 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-07-18 07:35:34.0

    Mr. Clement Wragge, the Queensland meteorologist, accompanied by several of the party with whom he is to make the ascent of Mount Kosciusko, arrived from Brisbane to-day. He will leave for Cooma on Wednesday, when he will establish an experimental observatory on the summit of Mount Kosciusko. The party includes, in addition to Mr. Wragge, Lieutenant Pocock, of the Queensland defence force, Mr. E. Fowler, Mr. C. A. Wragge, jun., Mr. B. Ingleby, of South Australia, and Mr. De Burg, of Newcastle. The three last-named gentlemen will reside at the Observatory during the month that it is to be established. Experimental sea-level stations are to he established at the sea level at Eden and Sale, Victoria. Mr. Wragge has arranged that observations shall be taken simultaneously at the top of Mount Wellington in Tasmania and Mount Kosciusko. ( George Pocock, my grand-mother's father, who had the photographs in an album passed down to us.)

    Hide note
  4. LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Wednesday 8 December 1897 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Legislative Councillors yesterday made very good progress, negotiating all the items save one on the business paper. After formal business, the State ... 2951 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-07-18 07:38:12.0

    ON MOUNT KOSCIUSKO.
    The following telegram was received by the Under Secretary, Post and Telegraph Department, from Mr. Clement L. Wragge yesterday :- Arrived safely on summit of Kosciusko yesterday, all being well save dray, which broke down half-way owing very rough country. Am going back to bring loading on pack-horses. Kosciusko is a magnificent and unique position for meteorological, astronomical, and physical observatory. Mean to make the expedition a complete success. Cold by night ; sun scorching by day. Cloud effects splendid beyond description. Weather is fine now. No wood on top, so have to do a perisher at night till kerosene stove arrives, and hibernate in blankets accordingly. Sunrise simply sublime. Much snow in drifts, and glare on snowfields intense. Alpine flora most interesting. Expect very important results. This goes by special messenger to 'Jindabyne.'

    Hide note
  5. THE EXPLORER. Mount Kosciusko. THE WRAGGE EXPEDITION. ON THE SUMMIT. ACCIDENT TO THE BAGGAGE DRAY.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 18 December 1897 p 1166 Article
    Abstract: The special correspondent of the Sydney "Daily Telegraph" with the Wragge expedition to Mount Kosciusko got the following telegram sent from Jindabyn ... 1516 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-01-06 11:08:50.0

    We are now installed on the top of Mount Kosciusko. It is the first camp ever pitched on this the highest peak in Australia. Tourists who scaled the Australian Alps even in summer generally fix up their tents down below what is called the wood limit., where they can procure heaps of material for camp fires, but here we do without little luxuries of that kind. Even the poles which support our modest tents had to be cut three miles lower down, and carried over our shoulders to the summit, and the same remark applies to the pegs which hold the guy ropes, or, rather, don't hold them, for the ground is too rocky to bear the strain. We had to roll boulders along, and plump them down on the ends of the ropes. Then the searching winds whistle through, and you crawl out with the thermometer about 20deg. below freezing point, and try to stop the gaps. It is an experience not to be for- gotten in a hurry, and I fancy most of us will be glad to get back to the warm climate before this observatory is an accomplished fact. Not that you don't get patches of warmth. On the contrary, the thermometer seems to have lost all control of itself, and, by the way, this is one of the advantages of travelling with a Government meteorologist. You are kept well posted as to what the various instruments are doing from day to day. The barometer cannot fall or rise to any extent without it being remarked, and you begin to feel that everything is being done towards regulating the meteorological condition that is possible. When it comes to crawling out of your snug nest of blankets at 4 o'clock in the morning to look at the rainband in spectroscope, you feel quite content to leave these little attentions to more competent hands.
    We spent the whole of Friday at the spot we called " Wragge's Camp." The heavy, driving mist hardly lifted during the whole of the twenty-four hours, and it was im- possible to go any distance from our camp ing ground without danger of being lost. At 9.30 p.m. the aneroid stood at 22.690 (showing that the high pressure was gradual- ly coming on. At 6 o'clock the following morning (Saturday) the temperature by the dry bulb was 31.3, and by the wet bulb 4.15, while the temperature on the grass was 17.3. The frost lay thick all round us, and the small pools had a thick coat of ice. By half-past 6 the thermometer had risen to 41.8, and the air was beautifully clear. We got up betimes, struck camp, and started off for Kosciusko exactly at 8 a.m. During the early hours we saw some beautiful effects of clouds. We were then above these level delights, and perforce looked down upon them in the valleys. As far as the eye could reach was one sea of billowy clouds, the surface slightly rippled, while from out thin billowy bed rose the peaks of distant hills, for all the world like little islands in the sea. ......The snowdrifts gradually widened, until we reckoned they stretched out to 500 or 600 yards. Mr Spencer, our guide, took us along a route which was accessible to horses even to the summit. Laden with tent poles and fire-wood, we reached the summit at 1.45 p.m and saluted the calm. Captain Pocock was first up. In amongst the loose rocks we found a visitors' book, which consists of an old jam tin, into which tourists, surveyors, and others deposit their cards. It appears that we are the first visitors since August last, so there were no absolutely new cards but we found those of Mr. Kerry and party who made the first recorded winter ascent of Kosciusko on the 17th August last. Mr. Kerry, who is also of our party, has proved invaluable to the expedition. On reaching the summit yesterday, Mr. Wragge and the rest of us drank Mr. Kerry's health, and he in his turn proposed success to the expedition. After lunch we set to work to erect our tent. Mr. Wragge was set upon pitching tents alongside the cairn, and absolutely on the summit. The only drawback is the exposed nature of the place. It catches every wind and every drop of rain. In summer, with a stone wall built round one's tent, it might be possible to live here for months, but the winter would be too terrible. The aneroid shows an altitude of 7525ft., approximately, while the surveyed height is 7328 ft.......

    Hide note
  6. Thc Asccnt of Kosciusko. (See illustrations on page 25.)
    Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907) Saturday 25 December 1897 p 25 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: The expedition to establish a meteorological observatory on the summit of Mount Kosciusko, at an elevation of 7328ft above sea level, left Sydney on ... 1001 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-01-06 11:01:49.0

    The expedition to establish a meteorological observatory on the summit of Mount Kosciusko, at an elevation of 7328ft above sea level, left Sydney on November 30, free railway passes being courtesously granted to Cooma by the Railway Commissioners, who also reserved a carriage for the members. Cooma was reached at 9.40 the following morning. The baggage, consisting of the most delicate instruments Arctic tents, sleeping-bags, and other necessaries for the undertaking, formed an interesting picture. They were safely stowed in Mr. Hyland's van, and that jovial personage drove the whole party thence to Jindabyne, a distance of thirty miles; and that little township, nestling in the pretty valley of the Snowy River, beneath the shadow of the quiet mountains, was reached about 11.15 p.m., quarters being taken up at Keating's Hotel. Mr. Kerry, the well-known Sydney photographer, accompanied the expedition, and very largely assisted in arranging the means of transport. The forenoon of December 2 was occupied in arranging details for the ascent, fixing the instruments and gear on the pack-horses, etc., and the departure for Kosciusko took place at 11.45 a.m. Crossing the Snowy River, undulating country was passed ere the ascent was commenced in earnest, and thence through a forest of cabbage gums to the first peaty moors, halting for lunch at Sawpit Creek. Here a dense mist arose, and it was deemed imprudent to proceed, and a halt was made under the lee of the huge granite rocks, and tents were pitched 'neath the stunted Alpine gums adjacent. The atmosphere was bitterly raw and cold, far worse than had an honest hard frost been experienced, and immense difficulty was felt in lighting the necessary fire, the hands and fingers being so benumbed and cold that they could scarce ly grasp the matches, which were mostly saturat ed, despite the precaution to keep them dry. The tents pitched at that spot, which the party christened Wragge'e Camp, were two calico ones kindly lent by Mr. R. R. P. Hickson (Under-sec retary for Works), and, thin though they were, they proved most serviceable. The following day showed no signs of improvement, so huge fires were lit in front of the tents, and in the short intervals between the drizzling rain, clothes were dried as far as possible. The aneroid barometer showed the camping ground to be about 6OOOft above the level of the sea. The tem perature at noon was about 43deg, and that of the rivulets adjacent 48deg. The following morn ing (December 4) the meteorologlical conditions rapidly changed, and the weather cleared about 4, the temperature of the air being 31.3deg, and on the ground itself a value of 17.3deg was ob tained, or 14.7 deg of frost. About 7 a.m. the party resumed the journey, and the trip onwards towards . Betts's Camp was through most wild country. The clouds soon lifted altogether, the vapors sank below the level of the travellers, and as a result the sun scorched with pitiless intensity. As an instance of the wide range of temperature in that high region, the first of the sun had, as already stated, been en countered when the temperature on the ground was 17.3 deg, and by 11 a.m., after passing Betts's Camp, and at an altitude of 6400ft, the same ther mometer in the same relative position actually registered 85.8deg.
    The summit of Kosciusko was reached at 1.45 p.m. on Saturday, December 4, and after crossing the snow fields, the glare of which proved most trying and painful to the eyes, it was found to be entirely free from snow. The team with the dray actually reached the sum mit, after considerable delay, and the Arctic tent, was duly pitched close to the trigonometrical cairn, at an altitude of about 7319ft. The standard in struments erected in Stevenson's double-louvred screen and the beautiful mountain barometer, veri fied at the Kew Observatory, and having absolutely no error, were safely housed in a cairn of stones specially built for the purpose, and having an aperture wide enough to allow the observer com fortably to read off the indications. The half-hourly readings between 8 a.m. and noon are expected to give specially interesting results, particularly when compared with simultaneous readings at Merimbula, Sale (Vic.), Hobart (Tas.), and the summit of Mount Wellington (N.Z.), where ob servatories would be worked directly in connection with the Kosciusko experiment. When sufficient data had been accumulated, much light, it is said, will be thrown upon ques tions attaching to vertical, barometric gradients, and copies of the results will not only be supplied to the Governments of New South Wales and Queensland, and selected scien tific centres in Australasia, but will also be sent to the learned societies of England and Scotland................

    Hide note
  7. IN COLD STORAGE KOSCIUSKO'S PAST.
    Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954) Monday 16 January 1922 p 8 Article
    Abstract: The site of the Hotel Kosciusko was once packed away under glacier ice, according to Professor David, who has just returned from there, says the Sydn ... 901 words
    • Text last corrected on 27 December 2014 by JanG
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-01-06 10:56:08.0

    IN COLD STORAGE KOSCIUSKO'S PAST.

    The site of the Hotel Kosciusko was

    once packed away under glacier ice, according to Professor David, who has just returned from there, says the Sydney " Daily Telegraph " of the 9th instant.

    Most of the thirty-seven members of

    the geological expedition to Kosciusko, organised by Professor L. A. Cotton, of Sydney University, and led by Professor T. W. Edgeworth David, returned to Sydney yesterday. The party included Professors E. VV. Skeats and H. C. Richards

    respectively of Melbourne and Queensland Universities; Dr. C Anderson. Director of the Australian Museum; Mrs. and Miss Anderson. Mr H Yates, Lecturer in geology at the Ballarat School of Mines, and twenty-nine geological students from Sydney University.

    The object of the expedition was to study the traces left by the now vanished glacier ice. Lake Albina as well as all

    the lakes of Kosciusko owe their origin to glacial action, the water in them being

    held up by vast natural dams of rock rubble, dumped by the glacier ice to form

    the terminal moraines, and later left there by the ice on its final retreat. On January 5 the party walked from Betts' Camp to the Blue Lake and back

    by way of Hedley's Tarn. Excellent specimens of blocks of rocks grooved and

    scratched by glacier ice were obtained by the students from the Helms Moraine, a glacially formed ridge, like a huge rail- way embankment, 400 ft. above the level of the Blue Lake. As the Blue Lake

    is 70 ft. deep, and was formerly filled with ice up to and probably above the level of the Helms Moraine, the glacier ice was once certainly at least 470 ft. thick at the Blue Lake, and in the main valley of the Snowy River over 800 ft. thick.

    Next day interesting new discoveries proved that the old glaciers of Kosciusko once extended at least seven miles farther than they had previously been traced by the Government Geologist, Mr. E. C. Andrews, Mr. C. A. Sussmilch. and Professor David. In fact, according to Professor David, there can be little doubt that even the site of the Hotel Kosciusko was once under glacier ice, the ice terminating only about 200 yards from the hotel down Diggers' Creek. The ice also descended Wilson's Valley, near the hotel, for at least a mile below the source of Sawpit Creek. Thus the glacier ice from near the summit of Mount Kosciusko to Wilson's Valley was about eighteen miles in length.

    These recent observations confirm some of the suggestions hitherto looked upon as not proven, made in 1893 to the Linnean Society of New South Wales by the late Mr. Richard Helms, bacteriologist to the Department of Agriculture, Sydney.

    During the maximum glaciation," said Professor David yesterday, " The Kosciusko plateau must have been a miniature Antarctica with only a few crests and peaks of granite, like the ' nunatakr ' of Greenland, rising above the snowfields; and the glaciers were so closely crowded together as to make a nearly continuous ice cap from the summit (7328 ft.) down to a level of about 5000 ft- above the sea.

    "The geologists estimated that the last glacier ice disappeared from the Kosciusko plateau about 5000 to 10.000 years ago, the traces of the earlier and more extensive glaciation dating back to perhaps 100,000 or more years ago. While Kosciusko was cased in ice, Australia at lower altitudes was probably enjoying a cool but damp and rainy climate, which favoured the development of rich pastures, even in Central Australia.

    " The elephant-like wombats, almost comparable in bulk with the African elephant, the marsupial rhinoceros, with the formidable horn on its nose, and prodigi- ously strong neck for making its horning a more efficient method of defence or attack, the gigantic emu, some 12 ft in height, and the terribly fierce and powerful marsupial lion, roamed over the greater part of Australia during these glacial and interglacial epochs.

    " As remains of dingo are found associated with those the above extinct animals, and the dingo a Northern Hemisphere wolf- was almost certainly brought to Australia in in canoe by early aboriginal man, man. Man too was no doubt contemporaneously in Australia with at least the latest glacial epochs in Kosciusko."

    Professor David hopes that, with the help of Mr J.S. Cormack. Director of the Government Tourist Bureau it may be possible to construct a large, relief model of the Kosciusko plateau as it was when under glacier ice. Such a model could be exhibited at the Tourist Bureau in Syd ney, and replicas at the Hotel Kosciusko, and also at various educational centres. Kosciusko is the only part, of Australia where such old glacial topograhpy can now be studied. Such models should not only interest and instruct those who are unable to visit Kosciusko, but should increase the enchantment of Kosciusko for the visitor.

    Hide note
  8. Web page: Mount Kosciusko
    http://www.bonzle.com/c/a?a=p&p=25645&d=pics&s=Kosciusko&cmd=sp&c=1&x=148%2E2635&y=%2D36%2E45583&w=40000&mpsec=0
    Web page
    Note

    2016-01-04 13:16:23.0

    Some Photorgraphs of Clement Wragge's Expedition 1897

    Hide note
  9. THE SKETCHED. Kosciusko in Spring Time.
    The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912) Saturday 25 December 1897 p 1356 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: When Mr. Clement Wragge announced his intention of invading New South Wales and set out to capture Kosciusko with the express intention of founding a ... 3325 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-01-04 13:25:20.0

    By Chas. H. Kerry

    Hide note
  10. Web page: Wragge's Expedition 1987
    http://www.bonzle.com/c/a?a=pic&fn=qz16x9m8&s=3
    Web page
    Note

    2016-01-30 14:07:40.0

    Photograph from ancestors album George Pocock who accompanied the expedition

    Hide note
  11. The first observatory on Kosciuszko, Snowy Mountains, New South Wales, ca. 1897 / Charles Kerry
    Kerry, Charles H. (Charles Henry), 1857-1928
    [ Photograph : 1880-1910 ]
    Languages: No linguistic content
    View online
    ] At National Library
    The first observatory on Kosciuszko, Snowy Mountains, New South Wales, ca. 1897 / Charles Kerry
    Note

    2016-05-02 15:28:52.0

    The first observatory on Kosciuszko, Snowy Mountains, New South Wales, ca. 1897 /​ Charles Kerry.
    Creator
    Kerry, Charles H. (Charles Henry), 1858-1928.
    Other Creators
    Australian Consolidated Press
    Published
    Sydney, N.S.W. : Australian Consolidated Press, [between 1880 and 1910]
    Medium
    [picture]
    Physical Description
    1 photograph : b&​w ; 20.2 x 25.3 cm.
    Series
    Tyrrell Collection.
    Part Of
    In collection: Tyrrell Collection
    Subjects
    Meteorological stations -- New South Wales -- Kosciuszko, Mount -- Photographs.
    Meteorologists -- New South Wales -- Kosciuszko, Mount -- Photographs.
    Kosciuszko, Mount (N.S.W.) -- Photographs.
    Notes
    Part of: Tyrrell Collection.

    Hide note
  12. Wragges Observatory 1897
    graham scully
    [ Photograph : 1897 ]
    View online
    ] At Flickr
    Wragges Observatory 1897
  13. Clement Wragge, 1899
    Nicholas, Sir Harold
    [ Photograph : 1899 ]
    View online
    ] At State Library of QLD
    Clement Wragge, 1899
  14. BOUND FOR KOSCICSKO. MR. WRAGGE AND PARTY EN ROUTE.
    Wagga Wagga Express (NSW : 1879 - 1917) Thursday 2 December 1897 p 4 Article
    Abstract: "Yes, I am fully determined to make thin thing a unique success," said Mr Clement Wragge, the Queensland Meteorologist, on Monday night. 1117 words
    Digitised article icon
  15. No title
    South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) Thursday 16 December 1897 p 4 Article
    Abstract: THE JOURNEY TO KOSCIUSKO.—Mr. Bernard Ingleby, who recently went to Mount Kosciusko, in company with Mr. Clement Wrasse and others, to take charge of ... 1327 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-02-05 13:48:31.0

    The Journey to Kosciusko.— Mr. Bernard Ingleby who recently went to Mount Kosciusko, in company with Mr. Clement Wragge and others, to take charge of the

    observatory to be established there, has written to us giving a graphic account of the journey, which was not without incident. Writing on the ground, with the tempera turo At. 27*— a contrast to that expe rienced here recently!— Mr. Ingleby says:— "Our party, consisting of C. L. Wragge (Superintendent), Captains lliff (observer) and Pocock, and Messrs. Wilkinson (newspaper representative), Kerry, (photographer). Fowles, and C. Egerton Wragge (observer at Merim- bula, a sea-coast station), my dog Zoroaster, and yours truly, left Sydney for Cooma by special boudoir carriage, kindly provided by the New South Wales Government. On reaching Cooma we were met by an influential commit- tee, headed by the Mayor, and driven to the Prince of Wales Hotel, where compliments and good wishes were exchanged, and success to the Mount Kosciusko Observatory was drunk with cheers. After dinner we started for Jindabyne, en route to Kosciusko, amid the 'godspeeds' of the crowd which had assembled in front of the hotel to see us off. The road is very level for about five miles out of town, but soon we began to ascend, and in the dictance the Australian Alps could just be distinguished with their mighty snow- clad summits towering into the sky. Next morning (November 3) we started from Jindabyne. A more imposing cavalcade it has seldom been the lot of the Jindabynites to see. As we crossed the Snowy River we numbered twelve horsemen, six packhorses, and a dray. With the guide, Spencer, in the lead, we travelled for some distance along the banks of the river, keeping the mountains on our left. We then turned off sharply and got right among the mountains, with the huge gums, which in these altitudes grow to an enormous size, raising their limbs above us. A few miles further on we forded the Crockenback, or Threadbow River, a stream of considerable size, being fed by the eternal snows on Kosciusko and neighbouring peaks. Here luncheon was partaken of, hunger, as the best sauce, enabling us to dispense with many of the little refinements of life — in truth, only surface deep— and using in place the knives and forks with which Nature has provided us. At night we collected around a huge camp fire discussing the events of the day and our future movements. 'Lights out!' was the order at about 9 o'clock; and notwithstand- ing the fact that the thermometer stands at 15' or 17' F. below zero, we soon slept. On the morrow there was no sign of a break in the weather, and we had perforce to remain in camp, for with the thick fog it would be the wildest folly to attempt a forward movement. We christened our resting-place Wragge's Camp out of respect to our honoured chief. Our guide was duly apprised of the fact, and a big 'W' is carved on one of the gumtrees. When during the day the sun would shine by fits and starts the cameras were very much en evidence. On Saturday morning we were all up betimes, the weather being beautiful and clear. I had the good fortune to observe the most sublime

    sunrise that I feel assured either painter or poet in his wildest ecstacy ever imagined. In the valley below lay, like a huge sea of snow, the heary cumulus clouds, with just here and there the peaks of the neighbouring mountains peeping through the mass of vapour, the whole being tipped with golden flame from the rising luminary. To say that we were entranced at the sight would be but weakly expressing our emotions. All one could do was to stand and gaze in awestruck wonder at this most superb limning from the land of the Great Master. The country soon became more rugged and alpine, patches of snow occurred at intervals, until we got well into the higher country, with Kosciusko lying some few miles in front of us. Thus the last stages were soon got over, and with many a cheer the summit was reached and congratu- lations were exchanged."

    Hide note
  16. Mountain Observatories. MR. WRAGGE IN REPLY.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 3 April 1897 p 733 Article
    Abstract: Mr. Wragge has addressed the following letter to the "S. M. Herald":— Sir,—I should have replied to Mr. Russell's letter in your issue of the 15th ul ... 3588 words
    Digitised article icon
  17. THE KOSCIUSKO OBSERVATORY. A STORY FROM THE MOUNTAIN.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 22 October 1898 p 3 Article
    Abstract: The young meteorologist who has just been appointed first observer at the Mount Kosciusko Observatory, Mr. B. de Burgh Newth, is at present in Brisba ... 1745 words
    Digitised article icon
  18. The [?]ke observatory. A STORY FROM THE MOUNTAIN.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 29 October 1898 p 839 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: The young meteorologist who has just been appointed first observer at the mount Kosciusko observatory, Mr. B. de Burgh Newth, has lately been in Bris ... 1724 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-05-03 14:59:30.0

    Mr. Newth about the Mountain observatory

    Hide note
  19. THE EXPERIENCES OF A METEOROLOGIST. COOMA, Friday.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 21 October 1899 p 11 Article
    Abstract: A letter from Mr. B. De Burgh Newth, the chief observer on Kosciusko, gives an account of terrible sufferings experien[?]ed by Mr. C. E. Wragga, one ... 346 words
    Digitised article icon
  20. Autograph letter signed from John Howard Lidgett Cumpston, Forrest, Camberra, A.C.T. to the Mitchell Library, 9 November 1945 describing a bicycle and hiking trip he made with other university students to the Clement Wragge Hut, Mt. Kosciusko in 1901 ...
    Cumpston, J. H. L. (John Howard Lidgett), 1880-1954
    [ Photograph : 1945 ]
    View online
    ] At State Library of NSW
    Autograph letter signed from John Howard Lidgett Cumpston, Forrest, Camberra, A.C.T. to the Mitchell Library, 9 November 1945 describing a bicycle and hiking trip he made with other university students to the Clement Wragge Hut, Mt. Kosciusko in 1901; with two photographs
    Note

    2016-05-02 15:27:01.0

    Autograph letter signed from John Howard Lidgett Cumpston, Forrest, Camberra, A.C.T. to the Mitchell Library, 9 November 1945 describing a bicycle and hiking trip he made with other university students to the Clement Wragge Hut, Mt. Kosciusko in 1901; with two photographs
    Creator
    Cumpston, J. H. L. (John Howard Lidgett), 1880-1954
    Physical Description
    1 folder of textual material: manuscript; 2 photographic prints: gelatin silver; 11.0 x 15.6 cm, 12.0 x 17.0 cm
    image/​jpeg
    Subjects
    Wragge, Clement L. (Clement Lindley), 1852-1922
    Wragges Observatory Hut (N.S.W.)
    Mitchell Library (N.S.W.)
    Kosciuszko, Mount (N.S.W.)
    Kosciuszko, Mount, Region (N.S.W.)
    Date or Place
    9 November 1945
    Terms of Use
    Reproduction rights owned by the State Library of New South Wales

    Hide note
  21. Meteorologist, Clement Wragge, at home in his tropical garden at Taringa, Brisbane, ca. 1902
    Unidentified
    [ Photograph : 1902 ]
    View online
    ] At State Library of QLD
    Meteorologist, Clement Wragge, at home in his tropical garden at Taringa, Brisbane, ca. 1902
  22. Web page: About his family and early life
    http://america.pink/clement-lindley-wragge_1017214.html
    Web page
    Note

    2016-05-03 13:25:52.0

    Wragge was originally named William, but this was changed to Clement. He lost both of his parents at a young age: his mother at five months and his father, Clement Ingleby Wragge at five years. He was raised for a number of years by his grandmother, Emma Wragge at Oakamoor, Staffordshire who taught him the rudiments of cosmology and meteorology. He became an avid naturalist at a young age, being surrounded by the beauty of the Churnet valley. His formal education was at Uttoxeter Thomas Alleyne's Grammar School. Upon the death of his grandmother in 1865 his Uncles decided that he should he move to London to live with his Aunt Fanny and her family in Teddington. There he later boarded at the Belvedere school in Upper Norwood and at the end of his education he improved his Latin in Cornwall. He then followed in the footsteps of his father, studying law at Lincoln's Inn. He also attended St Bartholomew's Hospital alongside medical students to watch operations. Wragge travelled on the continent of Europe extensively with his Uncle William of Cheltenham. His second cousin was Clement Mansfield Ingleby a partner in the family law firm Ingleby, Wragge, and Ingleby, and who became famous for his Shakespearean literary writings after he left the family legal partnership to pursue his scholarship. At the age of 21 he could now control his destiny and came into his inheritance left to him by his parents. He decided to take eight months break from Lincoln's Inn to visit the Egypt and the Levant......

    Hide note
  23. Clement Wragge at Home.
    The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912) Saturday 8 September 1894 p 491 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: The name of Clement L. Wragge, F.R.G.S., F.R. Met. Soc, Queensland Government Meteorologist, is a household word throughout Australasia. It is scarce ... 2387 words
    Digitised article icon
  24. QUEENSLAND WEATHER STATIONS. Mr. Wragge's Work.
    The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947) Monday 29 September 1913 p 2 Article
    Abstract: To the Editor.--Sir,--A paragraph appeared in a Melbourne paper of the 17th instant, which stated that Senator Maughan had requested in the Senate 492 words
    • Text last corrected on 2 October 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-02 16:59:36.0

    Second Edition. queensland weather stations, Mr. Wragge's Work. To the Editor.— Sir,— A paragraph ap- peared in a Melbourne paper of the 17th instant, which stated that Senator Maughan had requested in the Senate that a more efficient system of weather warning stations should be established in the cyclonic areas along the Queensland coast." In this connection I would ask what, has happened to the most complete chains of observing stations, that I per- sonally established there, and equipped with the best instruments that London can produce, when I was in charge of the Queensland meteorological service ? I read further that Mr. Hunt has com- pleted arrangements that will make Bris- bane an up-to-date meteorological sta- tion, equipped with instruments specially made to suit the northern climate. Surely there is such a thing, as justice in Aus- tralia, and that, sacred cause may allow me to speak. Has the best of my life's work gone for nothing ? For 13 years I was head of the Queensland Meteorological Department, and during that time, I established as was admitted, " a meteorological and weather warn- ing system, second to none in the world." The Brisbane station was first- class in every respect, when I had charge, and in ignoring this, a cruel wrong has been done to me. Is all my work, faith- fully done, to the lasst item under most trying circumstances, to be thus nega- tived, and not a word of credit accorded in my declining years ?. Storms were warned, and forecasts issued by me that were verified at 95 per cent in accuracy, and not only was this done, for Queensland, but for every part of Australasia, as the people, will remem- ber. And all this on an annual vote of £1,500, as against. £22,000 (I believe), now expended by the federal weather bureau. What do they do with the money ? The Koombana went down, and so did the Yongala, without a word of warning by the Commonwealth meteorologist, who a few days ago performed cruelly gro- tesque experiments in Melbourne, showing how the latter steamer foundered. Mr. Hunt, talks of instruments specially suited to the northern climate. This is mere moonshine. Standard instruments such as I employed and personally fixed in posi- tion over the whole of Queensland, includ- ing Cape York Peninsula, and the far west, are available all the world over, and the sooner the Minister in charge realises this, and asks a few questions, the better it will be for a long suffer- ing public and shipping. Let justice be done though the heavens fall. Surely Queensland, to which I de- voted the best years of my life, will listen to my voice.—Yours, &c., CLEMENT WRAGGE, F.R.G.S., F.R., Met. SoC., &C., Late Government Meteorologist of Queensland. September 24th, 1913.

    Hide note
  25. WRAGGE'S ALMANAC. THE WEATHER PROPHET'S GUIDE.
    The Inquirer and Commercial News (Perth, WA : 1855 - 1901) Friday 17 March 1899 p 3 Article
    Abstract: We have received from Mr. F. Blakely Dalton—the agent for the publishers in this colony—a copy of Wragge's Almanac and Weather Guide for 1899 304 words
    • Text last corrected on 3 October 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-10-03 15:16:26.0

    WRAGGE'S ALMANAC. THE WEATHEE PROPHETS GUIDE. We have received from Mr. F. Blakely Dalton — the agent for the publishers in this colony — a copy of Wragge's Almanac and Weather Guide for 1899, and, after a careful perusal of the little volume, we can pronounce it as one of the most useful in this particular line that has yet reached us. As the title implies, Mr. Clement L. Wragge, the chief of the weather bureau in Queens- land, figures largely in the production. The information which this clever weather prophet gives is of a most use- ful description, and it has the merit of being easily understood by laymen, and not made mystical by meteorological technicalities which the ordinary reader cannot comprehend. The standard in- structions in the use and management of meteorological instruments, and in the art of accurate weather observations are very readable and made more easily understood by means of illustrations. The article on clouds, explained by three photographs, is worth, reading, and Mr. Wragge notes with satisfaction that cloud study is rapidly progressing, even among amateurs. Another sketch, which will be read with pleasure, is on the Mount Koscuisko Observatory, accom- panied by illustrations. The nautical ephemeris for 1899 from the meridian of the Royal Observatory, at Greenwich, is, of course, invaluable to the practical navigator. Then we have a few pages devoted to a peep at geology, and some very copious information as to the agri- culture of all the Australian colonies, including New Zealand and New Guinea. The shipping signals at the port of Fre- mantle and all the chief ports of the colonies are illustrated in colors; the various coast lights are also described in full. Some excellent medical hints, and a host of other information, outside that of a meteorological character, is supplied this colony.

    Hide note
  26. KOSCIUSKO OBSERVATORY ARRIVAL OF MR. WRAGGE.
    Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Tuesday 30 November 1897 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Mr. Clement Wragge, Queensland Meteorologist, arrived in Sydney yesterday, accompanied by several members of the party who are about to proceed to Mo ... 210 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-05-01 19:31:36.0

    KOSCIUSKO OBSERVATORY ARRIVAL OF MR. WRAGGE. Mr. Clement Wragge, Queensland Meteorologist, arrived in Sydney yesterday, accompanied by several members of the party who are about to proceed to Mount Kosciusko under his leadership, for the purpose of establishing a high-level ob servatory. The party will include Lieutenant Po cock, of the Queensland Defence Force; Mr. E. Fowls, Mr. Wragge's second assistant at Brisbane; his son, Clement Adjutant Wragge; Captain Iliff, Mr. Bernard Ingleby (of South Australia), and Mr. De Burgh Newth. The three lastnamed gentle men will permanently reside at the observatory during the month for which it is to be experimen tally established. Mr. Wragge will leave for Cooma to-day, and will start thence for Kosci usko to-morrow morning. The ascent of the mountain will occupy about a day. Mr. Wragge will also establish stations at Merimbula, near Eden, and at Sale, in Victoria, for the purpose of taking observations simultaneously with those from the mountain. Mr. H. C. Kingswill, Gov ernment Astronomer in Tasmania, will also ar range for observations to be taken at Hobart and Mount Wellington. His opinion is that the new departure will be an unique success. Kosciusko, which is 7328ft high, is as great an altitude as it is possible to secure in Australia.

    Hide note
  27. Our Illustrations. A QUEENSLANDER AT KOSCIUSKO. (See illustrations on page 21.)
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 11 April 1914 p 29 Article
    Abstract: Whatever', attributes may be found to describe the Wonderland of the South there must be conceded the charm of to Queensland visitor. The 2435 words
    Digitised article icon
  28. ARRIVAL OF MR. CLEMENT WRAGGE.
    Wagga Wagga Express (NSW : 1879 - 1917) Thursday 2 December 1897 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Mr Clement Wragge, Queensland Meteor[?]logist, accompanied by several of the porty with whom he is to make the ascent of Mount Kosciusko, arrived in ... 221 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-02-08 16:29:29.0

    ARRIVAL OF MR. CLEMENT WRAGGE. Mr Clement Wragge, Queensland Meteoro- logist, accompanied by several of the party with whom he is to make the ascent of Mount Kosciusko, arrived in Sydney on Monday. He will immediately commence the ascent of the mountain with the object of establishing an experimental observatory on its summit. The party will include, besides Mr Wragge himself, Lieutenant Pocock, of the Queensland Defence Force ; Mr E. Fowls, Mr Wragge's second assistant at Brisbane ; his son, Clement Adjutant [Egerton] Wragge ; Captain Iliff, Mr Bernard Ingleby (of South Australia), and Mr De Burgh Newth. The three last-named gentlemen will permanently reside at the observatory during the months for which it is to be experiment- ally established. Speaking to a Herald representative, Mr Wragge stated that stations at or near the sea level were to be established at Merimbula, near Eden, and also at Sale, in Victoria. It was absolutely necessary that observations should be taken at these latter stations simultaneously with those taken at the one en the top of Mount Kosciusko. Mr Wragge has also requested his colleague, Mr H. C. Kingswill, of Tas- mania, to have simultaneous observations taken at Hobart and at the top of Mount Wellington. The party hope to reach the summit of the mountain within a day's journey from the base.

    Hide note
  29. Ocean Current Reports.
    The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947) Saturday 18 February 1899 p 4 Article
    Abstract: 1. Current paper set adrift from the ship Blackadder, by Captain Grassam, on Septem 23, 1897, in latitude 28 degrees 12 mins. south, longitude 158 de ... 255 words
    • Text last corrected on 20 March 2018 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-03-20 13:48:53.0

    Ocean Current Reports. 1. Current paper set adrift from the ship Blackadder, by Captain Grassam, on Septem- 23, 1897, in latitude 28 degrees 12 mins. south, longitude 158 degrees 30 mins. east. Found by a native of the island of Goro, on November 22, 1898, between the port of Sareelle and New Caledonia. 2. Current paper set adrift from the R.M.S. Orizaba, by A. W. Clarke, com- mander, in latitude 38 degrees 10 mins. south, longitude 140 degrees 35 mins. east, on January 4, 1899. Found on the beach at the mouth of the Glenelg River, Victoria, on January 10, 1899, by A. Lindon, of the Geelong Grammar School, Victoria. 3. Current paper set adrift from steamer Damascus, by A. H. H. G. Douglas, on September 29, 1898, in latitude 35 degrees 2. mins. south, longitude 114 degrees 39 mins. east. Found by Mr. J. W. W. Grabam, 40 miles east of Eyre, West Australia, on December 3, 1898. 4. Current paper set adrift from the steamer Tsinan, by G. Ramsay, commander, on August 29, 1898, in latitude 3 degrees 23 mins. north, longitude 124 degrees 26 mins. east. Found by native boys on the shore of Banca (North Celebes) on December 2, 1898. 5. Current paper set adrift from the F.M.S. Polynesien, by Commander Boulard, on June 8, 1896, in latitude 30 degrees 50 mins. south, longitude 193 degrees east (Paris) . Found by W. S. Kenny, first assistant lightkeeper. Double Island Point, on Noosa beach, half a mile from the lighthouse. CLEMENT L. WRAGGE, Government Meteorologist.

    Hide note
  30. GENERAL NEWS.
    Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1860 - 1947) Thursday 25 May 1899 p 2 Article
    Abstract: THE monthly meeting of the Mungore Farmers Association was held on Saturday night, the 22nd inst., in the Mungore school room. There was a fair atten ... 1164 words
    • Text last corrected on 20 March 2018 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-03-20 14:01:01.0

    On the 9th May, Mr. Henry Hatch, of Cootharaba, picked up on the beach about 16 miles south of Double Island, an ocean current bottle, which on opening he found to contain a chart of the Marine Meteor- ology division of the U.S. Navy, inscribed as follows;—'' Mrs. A. W. Warn, schooner ' Pumice,' August 17th, 1896, South Pacific, lat. 34-32, long. 151'57 E.'' The locality stated is about 40 miles off Wooloongong, below Sydney, on the N.S. Wales coast, and as the ocean current runs southerly down the Eastern Australian coast it is remarkable that the bottle should have found its way to Noosa beach, and taken 2 years and 9 months to do the journy. The story of that bottle should be an interesting one. Per- haps Mr. Wragge could outline it.

    Hide note
  31. Kosciusko Observatory.
    The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947) Tuesday 26 October 1897 p 6 Article
    Abstract: It will, doubtless, be of interest to our readers to know that the tent, sleeping-baga, and other gear for the experimental observatory on Mount Kosc ... 161 words
    • Text last corrected on 29 March 2018 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-03-29 10:37:11.0

    Kosciusko Observatory. It will, doubtless, be of interest to our readers to know that the tent, sleeping-bags, and other gear for the experimental observa- tory on Mount Kosciusko are now on view in the "compound" adjoining the Chief Weather Bureau in Elizabeth street. No doubt many of our citizens will obtain both pleasure and profit in inspecting the same. Messrs. Martin and Co. have completed this important part of the work entirely to Mr. Wragge's satisfaction, and are to be congra- tulated upon their somewhat novel per- formance. Matters of detail are now fairly completed, and Mr. Wragge, who has obtained the kind permission of the hon. Postmaster-General to establish the obser- vatory, will probably leave for Mount Kosciusko about the 12th of the ensuing month. He will only be absent a compara- tively short time, just sufficient to see the observatory and its sea level counterparts properly inaugurated. He will then return with all speed to Brisbane.

    Hide note
  32. KOSCIUSKO OBSERVATORY.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Tuesday 14 September 1897 p 6 Article
    Abstract: Matters of detail in connection with the observatory on Mount Kosciusko and the sister co-relative station at the sea level are being rapidly arrange ... 580 words
    Digitised article icon
  33. Mount Kosciusko. Observatory Established.
    The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947) Tuesday 14 December 1897 p 4 Article
    Abstract: The following wire has been received from Mr. Wragge, bearing date December 13, from Jindabyne: "Returned from mountain yesterday. Kosciusko observat ... 47 words
    • Text last corrected on 29 March 2018 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-03-29 10:41:15.0

    Mount Kosciusko. Observatory1 Established. The following wire has been received from Mr. Wragge, bearing date December 13, from Jindabyne : " Returned from mountain yes- terday. Kosciusko observatory satisfactory in every respect. Am just leaving for Morim- bula, via Sydney and steamer, to establish coast corelative station."

    Hide note
  34. Mount Kosciusko Observatory.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 20 November 1897 p 979 Article
    Abstract: Mr. Wragge had intended to leave for Mount Kosciusko by the mail train on Sunday; but, owing to the unfavourable condition of the mountain as regards ... 143 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-03-29 10:42:59.0

    Mount Kosciusko Observatory. Mr. Wragge had intended to leave for Mount Kosciusko by the mail train on Sunday; but, owing to the unfavourable condition of the mountain as regards weather there has been no alternative but to post pone the undertaking for a fortnight. A guide has been watching the mountain on behalf of the Chief Weather Bureau, and reports that, as more snow has fallen, it is impossible for packhorses to get through ; and that if the work were commenced at present it would be necessary to carry all gear, comprising sacks of flour, ship's bis cuits, preserved meat, tents, and sleeping bags, on the shoulder, the only mode of progression, moreover, being by snow shoes. Therefore, as it is of the first im portance that the Kosciusko experimental station should not fail, the temporary post- ponement is thus rendered inevitable.

    Hide note
  35. NEW SOUTH WALES. (By Telegraph from Our Correspondent.) SYDNEY, DECEMBER 8. COLLIERY CONFERENCE AT NEWCASTLE.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Friday 10 December 1897 p 5 Article
    Abstract: A conference between representatives of the colliery proprietors and miners was held at Newcastle to-day. Certain matters were discussed in private f ... 486 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-03-29 10:46:35.0

    MOUNT KOSCIUSKO. The Premier states his intention to visit Mount Kosciusko during the Parlia- mentary recess, with the view of seeing what can be done to make the spot more generally available during the summer weather for the people of the colony. He thinks there will be less disposition on the part of holiday-seekers to visit Tasmania and New Zealand if the Australian Alps dis trict were rendered easier of access.

    Hide note
  36. Mount Kosciusko.
    Western Star and Roma Advertiser (Toowoomba, Qld. : 1875 - 1948) Friday 24 December 1897 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Now that Mr. Wragge has established his observatory on the summit of Mount Kosciusko, and has arranged his meteorological instruments at a 1201 words
    • Text last corrected on 29 March 2018 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
  37. Narrow Escape. Kosciusko Observatory. Thirty-two Hours Without Food.
    The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947) Friday 20 May 1898 p 6 Article
    Abstract: The following telegram has just been received by Mr. C. L. Wragge, from Mr. Newth, second observer at Mount Kosciusko, who, after a short leave of ab ... 165 words
    • Text last corrected on 29 March 2018 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-03-29 13:54:29.0

    Narrow Escape. Kosciusko Observatory. Thirty-two Hours Without Food. The following telegram has just been received by Mr. C. L. Wragge, from Mr. Newth, second observer at Mount Kosciusko, who, after a short leave of absence, has re- cently attempted to regain the top of the mountain. "I was lost within two miles of Kosciusko with a guide named Brodie. We were 32 hours without food or fire, and had a narrow escape from deafh. I will avail myself of first opportunity to start again when the snowshoes arrive." Mr. Newth has therefore been compelled to return to Jindabyne, whence he sent the despatch and where he will remain until the snowshoes arrive from Kiandra. It appears that very heavy snow has fallen on the mountain. The observatory is in charge of Mr. Ingleby, third observer, and Mr. H. Jensen, of Caboolture, who was recently appointed third assistant, and who managed to reach the mountain in safety before the heavy snow set in.

    Hide note
  38. THE ENGLISH CRICKETERS.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Friday 18 February 1898 p 4 Article
    Abstract: By last night's mail train the' English cricketing team reached Brisbane from Sydney after a fairly comfortable journey. Contrary to expectation, the ... 2945 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-03-29 13:55:58.0

    MOUNT KOSCIUSKO OBSERVATORY. Mr. Wragge received the following tele- gram from tho Right Honourable G. H. Reid, Premier of New South Wales, yester- day morning:-"In view of the great import- ance of your labours, and the value of the Mount Kosciusko observatory, I will find the sum of £336." In view of this telegram, Mr. Wragge states that immediate steps will be taken for the erection of a hut on the summit of the mountain for residence dur- ing the winter and the continuance of the observations throughout the year.

    Hide note
  39. LECTURE BY MR. WRAGGE. MOUNT KOSCIUSKO OBSERVATORY.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 19 February 1898 p 5 Article
    Abstract: A lecture was given in the Centennial Hall last evening by Mr. Clement Wragge, the Government Meteorologist, on the subject of meteorology in general ... 930 words
    Digitised article icon
  40. THE JOURNEY TO MOUNT KOSCIUSKO.
    Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904) Saturday 25 December 1897 p 33 Article
    Abstract: Mr. Bernard Ingleby, who recently went to Mount Kosciusko, in company with Mr. Clement Wragge and others, to take charge of the observatory to be est ... 703 words
    • Text last corrected on 23 October 2016 by zoroaster
    Digitised article icon