1. List: Royal Agricultural Society of Queensland
    Royal Agricultural Society of Queensland thumbnail image
    Public

    Bowen Park, Acclimatisation Society, Agricultural related stories and articles in Queensland

    48 items
    created by: birdwing on 2010-12-27 13:52:23.0
    User data
    Tags:
    Add tag(s)
    Comments: No comments yet - Add one!
    Rating: unrated

List items:

Showing: 1 - 48 of 48

  1. THE ROYAL AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY OF QUEENSLAND.
    The Toowoomba Chronicle and Queensland Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1875) Thursday 21 April 1864 p 2 Article
    Abstract: IT is now some three years ago that a public meeting was held in the Argyle Rooms, Ruthven-street, to form an " Agricultural Society" on the basis of ... 1782 words
    • Text last corrected on 8 March 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-06-06 15:43:40.0

    THE ROYAL AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY OF QUEENSLAND.
    It is now some three years ago that a public
    meeting was held in the Argyle Rooms, Ruthven-
    street, to form an " Agricultural Society" on the
    basis of similar societies in the mother country.
    The meeting was very well attended, some excellent speeches were made on the subject, and, after
    much discussion, a Committee was appointed to
    collect subscriptions and make arrangements for
    the first exhibition. Application was made to the
    Government for a grant of land, and Mr. HERBERT,
    entering fully into the importance of forming an
    Agricultural Society in the heart of one of the
    finest Agricultural districts in the colony, at once
    gave instructions for the allotment of ten acres of
    land for the Society in question. This piece of
    ground, situated in one of the finest positions in
    the town, was fenced, stockyards were erected on
    it, a portion of it was cleared, and in 1862 the
    first exhibition took place. It was admitted by
    all that as far as the exhibition of stock was concerned it was a marked success but as an agricultural demonstration it was a failure, and not
    one of the numerous visitors, who on that occasion
    came from all parts of the colony to attend the
    exhibition, could gather from it the remotest idea
    of our agricultural capabilities.

    Hide note
  2. QUEENSLAND EXHIBITION.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 2 June 1866 p 1 Article
    Abstract: THERE have been some further additions to the Exhibition within the last day or two. The cotton exhibits have been increased by three bales from Town ... 678 words
    Digitised article icon
  3. QUEENSLAND ACCLIMATIZATION SOCIETY.
    The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947) Wednesday 29 January 1873 p 3 Article
    Abstract: The annual meeting at Bowen Park, previously postponed in consequence of the inclemoney of the weather yesterday afternoon; and, true to his promise, ... 3334 words
    • Text last corrected on 6 March 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-03-06 14:09:20.0

    Acclimatization Society, Bowen Park

    Hide note
  4. Acclimatisation Society.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 19 December 1874 p 6 Article
    Abstract: THE usual monthly meeting of the Council was held on Tuesday afternoon at the society's office. Present: Mr. L.A. Bernays, F.L.S., in the chair; Mess ... 2386 words
    • Text last corrected on 3 August 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-08-03 13:19:05.0

    Acclimatisation Society. THE usual monthly meeting of the Council was held on Tuesday afternoon at the society's office. Present: Mr. L.A. Bernays, F.L.S., in the chair; Messrs. Barron, Vidgen, Dr. Waugh, &c. The Secretary read the following report :— New Members.—Annual: D. O. J. Beardmore, Tooloomba, Rockhampton; Rees R. Jones, Rockhampton ; W. J. Brown, Rockhampton ; R. T. Jefferies, Brisbane ; Don José do Canto, Azores. Life: Hon. H. O. Simpson, Com-mander R.N.; W. Kellett, the Grange, Ipswich ; — Garbutt, Mount Cotton. Donations. — Plants and seeds from T. H. Barrymore, Southern and Western Railway; E. W. Robinson, Toowoomba ; Robert Fleming, Yandina ; Captain Almond, barque Decapolis, English seed potatoes ; C. W. Cux, Pimpama ; Mrs. A. W. Manning ; Inspector Johnston ; Edwin Whitfield, Cardwell; P. H. Nind, M.L.A.; E. P. Ramsay, Dobroyde, Sydney (Californian seeds); J. Ewen Davidson, Mackay. Birds and Animals.—From — Neaves, eight parrots ; S. R. Davis, Highfields, birds; James Smith, Restdown, Noosa, black swan ; E. Wien-holt, per J. C. White, Tarampa, three black swans ; His Excellency Sir M. C. O'Connell, gold fish ; Alfred Williams, Eight-mile Plains, birds; R. M. Hunter, Rockhampton, three emus; Commander Heath, R.N., sand. Exchanges. — Received : Case plants, Dr. Schomburgh, Adelaide ; seeds, Baron von Mueller ; seeds, Wm. Guilfoyle, Curator Botanic Gardens, Melbourne; case plants, from Royal Gardens, Kew (to arrive per Runnymede); case plants, from Brussels (to arrive); con-signment seeds, from Calcutta ; consign-ment seeds, from Saharunpore ; three orange trees, from Government of Central India, through Baron Mueller, of which our correspondent says :—" The trees are peculiar to this part of India (Nagpore), and the fruit is, in my opinion, the best of all the orange tribe. The great peculiarity in the trees is that they bear two crops at one time, i.e., blossoming during March, they ripen off fruit in November and December, and again blossoming in July, ripen off the crops in March and April. Crop-ping like this soon wears out the trees. I have adopted the system of alternate crops, i.e., trees ripening a crop in November and December are wintered till June following ; thus the tree rests, and good crops are obtained. The soil best suited to them here is a rich clayey loam." The trees arrived in capital order, and will shortly be planted out. Sent out: Numerous cases and par-cels of seeds ; sparrows to Maryborough ; various kinds of South American maize for distribution among the farmers at Highfields. Bowen Park. — The late long drought has caused some losses among trees and plants, coni-fers of considerable size having succumbed and caused gaps in the avenues which it will take a year or two properly to fill up ; but, taken altogether, the losses have been comparatively few out of so many hundreds of young and newly-planted trees and shrubs. This is no doubt due to the two great principles of deep drainage and thorough trenching being now al-ways adhered to in breaking up new ground, and applied, where practicable, to the older cul-tivations. Where the bedrock approaches too near the surface, as in some parts laid out at the first formation of the Park, grass has been substituted, and the attempt to grow trees and shrubs given up, to the manifest improvement in appearance of these parts, and of the gardens as a whole. The whole of the cultivated area is now in excellent order, nor has the other part of the Park been overlooked, as may be proved by the fact that over an extent of some forty acres very few specimens of that terrible pest—the sida retusa—could be found. Nume-rous trees and plants have flowered and fruited this season for the first time; among the flowering trees may be seen the elegant native Erythrina vespertilio, with its clusters of pale red flowers and its singular yet graceful foliage. Two other species (from South America) have flowered, and proved themselves an acquisition as flowering and shade trees. Near the front gate may be seen the delicate blossoms of Bau-hinia Hookerii, and on the left of the fountain the level masses of scarlet flowers of the Com-bretum grandiflorum ; not far from this the exquisite Passiflora racemosa unfolds its pecu-liarly-colored petals, and further down the slope, in front of the Hospital, many new plants reveal for the first time in Queensland, perhaps in Aus-tralia, their beauties and peculiarities. Among these is a well-marked specimen of Bambusa varie-gata (China), with its leaves and stems handsomely streaked with green and yellow. A little lower down is another species of bamboo, of a strange angular and branching habit. In the specimen garden is a fine bed of seedlings of Bambusa stricta, which the sender tells us reaches a height of 100 feet. Here may be seen the Cork oak (Quercus suber) in full flower ; the candle nut tree (Aleurites triloba) bearing aloft its stately masses of white flowers; the coffee shrub, its brilliant white, starlike blossoms show-ing to great advantage among its rich dark foliage, &c, &c. Visitors should by no means omit to see the magnificent flowers of the Pha-lænopsis graudiflora, a superb epiphyte, from Labuan, now flowering near the statue of "Summer" in the plant-house. Among the newly-fruiting trees are the Burdekin plum, the Chinese litchi, the Carob (Ceratonia siliqua), the sugary pod, largely used in Spain and Portugal for horse and cattle feed, and entering, I believe, in quantity into the composition of several well known cattle foods manufactured in England. The crop of mangoes does not promise to be so large this season as last, though the plants look healthy. A new Flacourtia (Jaquinas) is flowering for the first time, and will probably give us a new variety of this too little known fruit. The Flacourtia cataphracta standing opposite was last year the delight—in its pleasant subacid, mealy-fleshed, plum-like fruit, containing in the centre two or three small seeds—of all the elderly visitors who were in the secret, and of all the younger ones who found it out for themselves, for a space of fully two months. It is a tree, however, that requires several years from the seed to arrive at maturity, and is clothed about its stem and lower branches with a wonderful complexity of compound thorns or rather spines, for they are open two or three inches long. People are apt to overlook the merit of its fruit, and tire of waiting for its season of maturity. It would, in my opinion, make an excellent hedge plant ; it grows freely from cuttings, bears the knife well, is almost evergreen, and the young shoots are exceedingly handsome with their bright reddish tints, while its thorns would bring out the reflective powers of a bullock. Lastly, I will call attention to the fruit of the Chrysophyllum oliveforme (allied to star apple), of which I place some specimens before you. It has a distinct and pleasant flavor, bears freely, and is hardy. Our members generally will be interested to hear that the magnificent and unique collection of bananas and plantains sent to the society by the Singapore Government is, notwithstanding firstly the cold and afterwards the dry weather, looking very well and growing strongly. Very few of the plants have failed to put iv an appearance, and if we can get a strong growth this summer we may look for fruit next season, and a general distribution of suckers. There is also a new variety from the South Sea Islands. While speaking of distribution, I may mention with regret that I often have complaints from valued correspondents in the North of consignments of plants reaching them half dead, sometimes en tirely destroyed. This specially seems to happen when cases are not landed direct from the steamer, but are conveyed in small open boats to the port, and it is probable that a gentle dose of saltwater does the mischief. Sometimes we have traced it to too long a sojourn in the fierce rays of a uorthern sun on unsheltered wharves ; sometimes to a prolonged inland journey ; but from whatever cause the result is much to be deplored, every possible care and well-tried ex-pedient being used in the preparation and pack-ing of the plants at Bowen Park, the final touches being frequently given under the per-sonal inspection of one or other of the Park Com-mittee. I can only ask those members who are so unfortunate as to receive cases in bad condi-tion, to let me know at once, that another trial may be made, and at the same time to give such plain directions as to transmit, name of agents, &c, as may secure a rapid delivery. Membership.—lt will be very convenient if those few members who have not yet done so will forward their subscriptions for the years now fast closing, in order that the list of members, appended as usual to the annual report, may be made as complete as possible. The following is a list of the exhibits on the table, specimens of all of which, it was stated, are obtainable by members :— Emblica Officinalis.—A tree of some size, grow- ing in India, both on the plains and at an eleva-tion as high as 8000 feet; girth, from six to nine feet; wood, hard, strong, and straight-grained ; fruit, sour, but is largely used in pickles and preserves; also employed in making ink and in black dye; leaves and bark used medicinally. Dalbergia Sissoo. —India, from the plains to an elevation of 4500 feet; a handsome and rapid growing tree, easily raised from root cuttings ; timber, hard, strong, and heavy, a cubic foot weighing 68lbs.; the foliage is a delicious green, and as an evidence of the rapidity of its growth, it has attained at Bowen Park six feet from the seed in one season. Musa superba.—An Indian banana, the specific name of which indicates its magnificent foliage. Pandanus utillis—the vacoa of the Mauritius, is cultivated for its leaves, which are used for making sugar-bags. It is also a hand-some species for the shrubbery. Naphelium Litchi.—Native of China. 'There are several varieties of this fruit, all of more or less excel-lence. The specimen is a stock pot of seedlings, of which there are some hundreds at Bowen Park. Six distinct grafted varieties in single specimens are also there; one of them, not four feet high, maturing its fruit. Cookia punctata.—The Whampee, another es-teemed fruit of China, but not equal to the Litchi. Durio Zibethinus.—The Durian of the Malayan Peninsula. This fruit has been often described. The society has not more than a dozen plants, which are all destined for the far North. Arenga saccharifera.—A stock pot of young specimens. Of this palm many products are made. As its specific name implies, it produces sugar ; and wine, sago, and cordage are also made from it. Sago Palm.—A species of Cary-ota, from Bangalore (Mysore), Southern India. The society has another very promising species of this palm from Labuan. Antidesma Dal-lachyanum—the Herbert Vale Cherry—comes, as its colloquial name indicates, from the Valley of the Herbert. The fruit is a one-seeded drupe, and is said to be very estimable. A New Ficus.—From the South Sea Islands. Three New Dracænas.—Presented by Sir William Macarthur. Begonia Pearcei.—Presented by the same gentleman. Plants like the two last are of a purely orna-mental character, and the society does not propagate them for distribution, although they are occasionally to be obtained. The members present discussed at some length the various exhibits and their uses, and after some detail business, the meeting ad-journed.

    Hide note
  5. Fountain surrounded by terracotta statues, Acclimatization Society, Bowen Park, Brisbane, 1875
    Wright, G. P
    [ Photograph : 1875 ]
    View online
    At State Library of QLD
    Fountain surrounded by terracotta statues, Acclimatization Society, Bowen Park, Brisbane, 1875
    Note

    2016-08-03 13:20:34.0

    Fountain surrounded by terracotta statues, Acclimatization Society, Bowen Park, Brisbane, 1875
    Creator
    Wright, G. P.
    Published
    John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland, 1875

    Hide note
  6. Bird's eye view of the Queensland Exhibition at Bowen Park, Brisbane, in 1876
    Unidentified
    [ Art work : 1876 ]
    View online
    At State Library of QLD
    Bird's eye view of the Queensland Exhibition at Bowen Park, Brisbane, in 1876
    Note

    2016-08-22 07:43:11.0

    Known locally as the Ekka. The first exhibition on the site of the Brisbane Exhibition Grounds dates to August 1876, with the staging of the first Queensland Intercolonial Exhibition. In 1920 the Prince of Wales [later Edward VIII] visited the Exhibition, following which the Association moved to incorporate the word 'Royal' into its name as the Royal National Agricultural and Industrial Association of Queensland, which over the years has been reduced, unofficially, to the Royal National Association [RNA]. (Information taken from Environmental Protection Agency website, 2005, retrieved on 22 June 2005 from )

    Hide note
  7. Fine Arts on display at the first Queensland Intercolonial Exhibition, Brisbane, 1876
    Wright, G. P
    [ Art work : 1876 ]
    View online
    At State Library of QLD
    Fine Arts on display at the first Queensland Intercolonial Exhibition, Brisbane, 1876
    Note

    2016-08-22 07:46:28.0

    Copied and digitised from an image appearing in The Brisbane Courier, 23 August 1876, p. 6
    Item is held by John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland.
    Subjects
    shows &​ exhibitions
    display cases
    paintings
    agricultural shows
    furniture
    Exhibitions - Brisbane National Agricultural &​ Industrial Association Intercolonial Exhibition, 1876
    Brisbane (Qld.)
    Date or Place
    Brisbane, Queensland; -27.46888,153.022827
    Summary
    The walls of the main exhibition building are covered with paintings and photographs entered under the 'Fine Arts' section of the exhibition. The glass case on the left contains millinery of the kind that earned a first-class certificate for exhibitor Madame Harrie of Brisbane. The case surmounted by the stuffed ram at the right of the picture was part of the display of Messrs John Vicars and Company of Sydney. This company produced fine tweed cloth and shawls hanging from the corners of their show-case, are examples of the work which was produced during the exhibiton on their Jacquard power loom. (Description supplied with photograph.)

    Hide note
  8. Catalogue of the ... annual exhibition / National Agricultural and Industrial Association of Queensland
    National Agricultural and Industrial Association of Queensland. Exhibition
    [ Periodical : 1876-1904 ]
    At 2 libraries
    Note

    2016-08-22 07:49:07.0

    Catalogue of the ... annual exhibition /​ National Agricultural and Industrial Association of Queensland.
    Also Titled
    Catalogue of the Intercolonial exhibition 1876
    Official catalogue of the jubilee exhibition 1887
    Official catalogue of the centennial exhibition 1888
    Official catalogue of the ... annual exhibition
    Later Title
    National Agricultural and Industrial Association of Queensland. Show. Official catalogue ... Annual show ...
    Creator
    National Agricultural and Industrial Association of Queensland. Exhibition.
    Published
    Brisbane : Thorne and Greenwell, 1876-1904.

    Hide note
  9. Queensland Exhibition Picnic. (Abridged from the Brisbane Courier, Sept. 2.)
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Tuesday 12 September 1876 p 2 Article
    Abstract: In response to the invitation of the Mayor and Corporation of Brisbane, between three and four hundred ladies and gentlemen were present at the picni ... 1085 words
    • Text last corrected on 13 August 2015 by ellarocks
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-11-23 11:50:40.0

    Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), Tuesday 12 September 1876, page 2 Queensland Exhibition Picnic. (Abridged from the Brisbane Courier, Sept. 2.) In response to the invitation of the Mayor and Corporation of Brisbane, between three and four hundred ladies and gentlemen were pre-sent at the picnic in honour of the promoters of the late Intercolonial Exhibition at Bowen Park. Amongst the guests were the Hon. George Thorn, Commodore Hoskins, and several officers of H M. S Pearl, Messrs Jules Jonbert and Montefiore (Now South Wales Commis-sioners), Messrs A. H Palmer, M.L A.., P. R Gordon, John Fenwick, Gresley Lukin, and other members of the Council of the National Association. A special train was provided to convey the gnuests to the scene of the festivities, which had been chosen at a pretty spot on the river, about a quarter of a mile from the Redbank Railway station, and about equidistant between the line and the river. The train on arriving at Oxley was stopped in the centre of the bridge to allow our New South Wales visitors to admire the view of the river which is obtained from this point. At 1 p.m. the guests, to the number of about 350, sat down to an excellent spread in the marquee. After the usual preliminary toasts, the Mayor proposed, " The New South Wales Com-missioners,"whom he amusingly called " our deadly rivals and great enemies," understanding by these terms our honorable rivals in enterprise-rivals whom we were ever glad to receive and welcome in all friendliness. On behalf of the city of Brisbane, and not only of Brisbane, but of the country, he bade them welcome Brisbane was not all Queensland, but all Queens-land, was glad to have them in its midst. Mr Montefiore, in rising to acknowledge the toast, said he would thank his Worship, and through him Queensland, for the very kind way in which health of the Commissioners had been proposed and received. He had seen the beauties of Queensland coenery, and he was now glad to see the beauty of its ladies. They could hold their own in this respect with any other country under the sun. He could only regret that this would probably be the last occasion on which he should see them, and he was truly grateful for the kind friendliness with which he had been received in this beautiful colony. Mr Jules Joubert said there was a little river called the Tweed, somewhere between New South Wales and Queensland, dividing the two colonies-but he knew nothing now about boundaries, and he was glad his education had been neglected in this particular. No boundary in fact, existed. The fact of the exhibition having been successfully carried out had for ever done away with the miserable boundary line between New South Wales and Queens-land. This was amply proved by the way in which they (the New South Wales Com-missioners) had been received by the public of Queensland. One thing more he wished to say and it was a matter he felt deeply grateful for. To make room for the New South Wales ex- hibits the council had done a thing which spoke volumes for the good feeling which existed between the two great colonies. They had put in the background those exhibits of which they should be justly proud-the sugars and fibres. These had been put in a side annexe where they were hardly seen. He could assure them that the noble example would be followed in Sydney at the Exhibition of April next. The sister colony would open its gates as wide as possible, and the principal position would be given to the Queensland contingent. The Mayor then proposed the National Agri-cultural and Industrial Association of Queens- land. Mr Palmer, in replying, said he quite coin-cided with the sentiments expressed by the New South Wales Commissioners, and he devoutly hoped te see the day when the boundary be-tween the two colonies would be done away with entirely. He deplored as much as any man the existence of the tariff, which was the only pos-sible source of difference between them. Mr Palmer then alluded to Mr Jules Joubert (who modestly veiled himself with a napkin). He lauded his services in the cause of the exhibi-tion. No doubt, he said, Monsieur Joubert was a little disappointed. He thought, naturally, that New South Wales was going to have things all its own way ; but, he had, on his own con-fession, found Queensland a little giant instead of the baby he expected. However, this was no great matter to crow about. Most Queens-landers had been born in New South Wales, so that the two colonies were really but one. He congratulated the Mayor and Corporation in having so markedly and gracefully shown their appreciation of the New South Wales Com-mittee. It redounded very much to their credit that they had recognised the additional charm lent to the gathering by the beauty and rural scenery of the spot they had chosen. He would not approach politics in any way on this occa- sion, but he remarked that a little cash ex-pended in this lovely district would be of mate- rial benefit. Commodore Hoskins, in replying to the toast of the "Army and Navy," said it had been often remarked that ships of war seldom came into those waters, and the ladies were annoyed at the sudden departure of the Sappho. There were two causes why large ships of war did not come here. One was that Brisbane was still a baby, and was scarcely in need of such frequent visits as Sydney. Another reason, and a very potent one, was that the port was not suited to large vessels. As he came up the river he was glad to see signs that the harbour was likely to be improved, and in that case he had no doubt that some day even the Pearl would be enabled to Grop(h)er way up the river to Brisbane. The New South Wales Commissioners, with a few other gentlemen, were conveyed by Mr Alexander, of Redbank, to the Goodna coal mine, into which they defended by the main shaft, and after a pleasant cool walk of nearly three quarters of a mile, they emerged into the glories of the upper world by a tunnel. They expressed themselves highly pleased with the neatness and cleanliness of the mine, and pre-dicted a great future for it judging from present appearances.

    Hide note
  10. OPENING OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY'S' EXHIBITION.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Wednesday 22 August 1877 p 5 Article
    Abstract: IT affords us much satisfaction to announce the successful opening of our second exhibition. To the last moment, in an undertaking of such magnitude, ... 25157 words
    Digitised article icon
  11. FINE ART SECTION. SECOND NOTICE.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 25 August 1877 p 6 Article
    Abstract: That inexorable Jaw of Naturs which forbids the cramming of a quart of anything into a pint measure, or the con[?]pressing of two volumes into one, n ... 17619 words
    Digitised article icon
  12. Acclimatisation Society of Queensland. REPORT FOR 1879.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 29 May 1880 p 692 Article
    Abstract: In presenting the fifteenth annual report of the transactions of the society the council are glad to be able to state that the general commercial dep ... 2954 words
    • Text last corrected on 3 August 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2011-05-20 15:25:12.0

    Acclimatisation Society of qld, nth qld trees grown and fruited

    Hide note
  13. STATON FARM AND GARDEN Forthcoming Shows.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 3 August 1895 p 223 Detailed Lists, Results, Guides
    84 words
    • Text last corrected on 3 August 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
  14. The Field and Garden. REMINDERS FOR AUGUST.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 3 August 1895 p 223 Article
    Abstract: This is the first of our spring month, and In all the cooler districts of the colony much the same conditions obtain, and the same activities are cal ... 2755 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2010-12-27 13:53:23.0

    Spring, August prep

    Hide note
  15. Shows. MARYBOROUGH. [BY TELEGRAPH FROM OUR SPECIAL CIRRESPONDENT..] MARYBOROUGH, July 25.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 3 August 1895 p 233 Article
    Abstract: The twentieth annual exhibition of the Wide Bay and Burnett Pastoral and Agricultural Society was opened at noon to-day by the Governor. 1086 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2010-12-27 14:39:19.0

    Marybourough show

    Hide note
  16. GYMPIE. [BY TELEGRAPH FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.] GYMPIE, July 31.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 3 August 1895 p 233 Article
    Abstract: The fifteenth annual show of the G.A.M. and P. Society was opened today by the Hon. H. Tozer. Nearly all the sections in the show were well 1041 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2010-12-27 14:40:19.0

    Gympie show 15th annual

    Hide note
  17. LORD HOWE ISLAND. The Land of Howea Palms.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 30 January 1932 p 9 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: A very interesting photo-lithograph of an original chart of Lord Howe Island is before me. Its value lies in the fact that it was compiled by the dis ... 1131 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-10-21 12:18:12.0

    LORD HOWE ISLAND.

    The Land of Howea Palms.

    (BY "WHAMPOA.")

    A very interesting photo-lithograph of an original chart of Lord Howe Island is before me. Its value lies in the fact that it was com- piled by the discoverer of the island. Inscribed on the chart are the following words:

    A chart of Lord Howe Island. Discovered By Lieut. Henry Lidgbird Ball, In his Majesty's Armed Tender Supply on the I7th Pebruary. 1788. Long, by Moon and Star 159.04 dcg. E.; lat. 31.36 dog. S.; var. IO dcg. east. There Is no danger In approaching Howe's Island. The Supply anchored there in 13 .athoms, sand and coral: but there lies about four miles trom the SW point oí the Pyramid a dangerous rock which shows Itself a little above the surface of the water, and appears to be larger than a boat. The Island Is in the form of a crescent, the convex side towards the NE. Two points at first supposed to be separate islands prove to be high mountains on the SW, the southermost part of which was named Mt. Gower, the other Mt. Lidgbird. Between these mountains Is a deep valley, which obtained the muna of Erskine Valley; the SE point was called Pt. Klnj!, and the NW point Point Phillip. The land between these two points forms the concave side of the Island facing the SW. and Is lined with a sandy beach, which Is guarded against the sea hy a reef of coral rock at the distance of half a mile from the beach, through which there are several small openings for boats; but it is to be regretted that the depth of water within the reef nowhere exceeds four feet. We found no water on the island, but it abounds with cabbage palms, mangroves, and manchineal trees, even up to the summits of the mountains. No vegetables were to be seen. On the shore there aro plenty of gannet», and a land bird of a dusky brown colour, with a bill four inches long, and feet like those of a chicken: these proved remarkably fat and were very good food; but we have no further account of them. There are also many very large pigeons and white birds resembling guinea fowls, which were found on Norfolk Island, were seen here also in great numbers. The bill of this bird is red, and very strong, thick, and sharp pointed. Innumerable quantities of exceeding fine turtle frequent this place in the summer season, but at the approach of winter they all go northward. There was not the least difficulty in taking them. The sailors likewise caught nlenty of fish with a hook
    and line.

    The above description by the discoverer, with his chart, is accurate. Other points of the coast have been named since then, small [streams discovered, and the hinterland ex- plored and proved to be narrow.

    The "white bird resembling the guinea fowl" referred to by Lieut. Ball has, since then, become extinct, being destroyed by whalers assisted by cats and pigs which the whalers put ashore.

    Lord Howe Island once had a remarkably abundant bird life, but (omitting the Admir- alty Islands), with the advent of settlers and whalers, it now contains very few birds.

    It is, however, very pleasing to be able to state, that the brown wood hen (Ocydromus sylvestris) still exists on the sumi.ilts and upper

    View of Mt. Lidgbird. attitudes of Gower and Lidgbird Mountains This bird is unknown in any other part of the world

    A species of bell magpie (Strepera crlssalls), peculiar to Lord Howe is most plentiful on the upper slopes of the mountains. .............

    Hide note
  18. MAPLETON. Prolific Fruit Area. Interesting History.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Thursday 1 October 1931 p 11 Article
    Abstract: THE history of Mapleton, the prolific fruit-growing centre on the Blackall Range, is one of hard work by determined men and the story as 1558 words
    • Text last corrected on 21 October 2015 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2012-03-05 11:52:37.0

    History of Mapleton

    Hide note
  19. THE EXHIBITION OF 1906. A RETROSPECT.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Wednesday 8 August 1906 p 9 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: The first Exhibition of the Queensland National Agricultural and Hortmiltural Association was held in 1876; but that was by no means 1347 words
    • Text last corrected on 21 October 2015 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-10-21 10:57:10.0

    A RETROSPECT.

    THE first Exhibition of the Queens- land National Agricultural and

    Horticultural Association was held in 1876; but that was by no means

    the beginning of things in the way of competitive demonstrations of industrial development. In 1855, in the days when Queensland was known as Moreton Bay and the Northern Districts, when the ter- ritory was part of New South Wales, when

    "North Australian", was the term for hotels, racing club, and newspaper at Ipswich, the pioneers here set about reviewing their horticultural productions, and with the late Mr. A. J. Hockings as hon. secretary there were frequent shows in Brisbane. These received a great impetus and assumed a wider influence on account of Moreton Bay's successful representation at the Paris Exhibition in 1856; and it is interesting in these days of great things to look back over the half century which has spun itself away to the competitions which the founder of Queensland's industrial entenprises held. After ten years modest yet earnest work, during which time Queensland had become a colony with representative government, and great progress in the way of settlement had been made we find established in 1866 then East Moreton Farmers Association. In 1871 there came the discussion of a cen tral association in the metropolis, the aspirations which have given us the Queensland National Agricultural and Hor ticultural Association finding expresión. This went on without tangible result until l874, when Mr P. R. Gordon, late Chief Inspector of Stock in Queensland, and described as "the father of the National Association," took the matter up with his well-known zeal. Owing chiefly to his organising capacity and indomitable pluck, there was founded the association which is to-day the centre of agricultural and horticultural and industrial life generally in the State Mr Gordon-still warmly interested in the Association's welfare was joined by Mr Gresley Lukin and the late Mr John Fenwick and on May 31, 1875 a meeting was held to give form to the ideas of these three well known Queenslanders. It took time to develop in those days and there were many small conflicting interests which had to be over come His Excellency the Governor, W. Wellington Cairns, Esq., presided and the resolutions were drawn up by Messrs. Gordon, Lukin, and Fenwick, with the assistance of Mr Harlen, then head master of the Brisbane Grammar School, and Mr Harlen later on framed the con stitution of the association..............................................................

    Hide note
  20. THE EXHIBITION.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 26 August 1876 p 5 Article
    Abstract: YESTERDAY the exhibition was again well attended, and the half-holiday given by nearly all the Government departments enabled many of the employes to ... 10875 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2013-05-12 07:24:02.0

    Timber, ect

    Hide note
  21. OUR BRISBANE LETTER. BRISBANE, Nov. 5.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 13 November 1879 p 7 Article
    Abstract: At the recent annual meeting of the National Agricultural and Industrial Association, the friends of the society were forced to regret a falling off ... 1579 words
    • Text last corrected on 11 May 2013 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-10-21 11:08:18.0

    At the recent annual meeting of the National Agricultural and Industrial Association, the friends of the society were forced to regret a falling off of subscribers during the year; though, as the chairman (his Excellency the Governor) remarked, the wonder was considering the depression under which the colonies have suffered so long-that the falling off had not been greater. The speakers at the meeting were unanimous in pleading as a set-off the high position taken by the Queensland Court at Sydney. The official report acknowledged in complimentary terms the efficient aid rendered by Mr. Gresley Lukin, and the Governor, in the speech he delivered in opening the meeting, said the people of the colony owed a debt of gratitude to all concerned, but more especially to the Executive Commissioner and his assistant. Mr. Layton. On the whole, the association has no reason to complain of a weakened condition, for it has an estimated surplus of £"02-1 to its credit, and even tho last exhibition-the full-dress rehearsal prior to tho opening of the Sydney International-was financially a success, although the public generally, until a contrary statement was made at the meeting the other day, were under the impression that it was a losing business. We are to have the forthcoming summer show of fruits, flowers, and produce next January, and the Government have placed the new museum at the disposal of the association for the purpose. It will answer admirably for a flower and fruit show, being in the centre of the two Brisbanes. The exhibition is but a secondary one, but it must be held in pursuance of an agreement between the association and the Horticultural Society, when the latter, two years ago, gratefully ... permitted its body corporate to be absorbed into that of the more substantial association. The Museum is our newest public building. It stands on the northern river bank, nearly opposite the Government Printing Office. As the building was in progress, we were wont to admire it, in the confident hope that at length there was coming a public edifice of which we might all be proud. But now that the finishing touches are being put our confidence lessens. The front is a fine piece of architecture, but the sides and back looking on to the river are so bare, that the effect of the elaborate work of the facade in chief is spoiled ; and the building, standing, as it does, by itself, reminds one forcibly of a nymph surprised bathing. Still, it will do the practical work of a museum for the present, and (to return to the original subject) it will make a most suitable hall for the horticultural display. The National Association appears to be undecided as to the holding of the annual exhibition in 1880 at Bowen.........
    Somebody must be doing well out of the operations of the Marsupial Destruction Act of the session before last. It has raised up a race of scalp-hunters, who-happy individuals-achieve the rare feat of making their pleasures financially remunerative. During October the Secretary of the Ipswich Board paid away £460 for 10,000 scalps secured during that month; .....
    To the short article headed "Notes on the Noosa Pine," appearing in the Herald of November 8, from a Queensland correspondent, I would add a few sentences, in confirmation of what the writer says with respect to the blacks. They are not, as a body, hostile, of course,) as they were in the days of pioneering, but there are a few aborigines still remaining whom I should not care to precede in pushing through a scrub. They are individually known, however, and carefully watched. The one exception is a ruffian named Campbell. For a long while he has been a terror to the settlers in the less inhabited districts, and there are three or four vows registered to shoot him whenever he appears. The scoundrel is in the habit of prowling about a hut, with the intention of maltreating the women when the men are gone away, and though he may not commit actual violence, he keeps the poor people in constant fear. Last Saturday, an Irishman, passing a scrub not far from Tewantin, was fired at by a black-fellow-Campbell beyond a doubt. A posse of police are in pursuit, and they will be fortunate if they can secure a desperado who has heen eagerly sought by the residents for many months.

    Hide note
  22. Bandstand in Bowen Park
    Wilson, E. A
    [ Photograph : 1919 ]
    View online
    At State Library of QLD
    Bandstand in Bowen Park
    Note

    2016-02-07 12:17:24.0

    Bandstand in Bowen Park
    Open bandstand with tiled roof, decorative verandah posts and a balustrade.

    Hide note
  23. Bowen Park, Brisbane, Queensland, ca. 1897
    Unidentified
    [ Photograph : 1897 ]
    View online
    At State Library of QLD
    Bowen Park, Brisbane, Queensland, ca. 1897
    Note

    2016-02-07 12:18:09.0

    Large Staghorn ferns and palm trees in the acclimatisation gardens at Bowen Park, Bowen Hills, Brisbane, Queensland, around 1897

    Hide note
  24. Aviary and Acclimatisation Gardens at Bowen Park, Brisbane, ca. 1889
    Unidentified
    [ Photograph : 1889 ]
    View online
    At State Library of QLD
    Aviary and Acclimatisation Gardens at Bowen Park, Brisbane, ca. 1889
    Note

    2016-02-07 12:22:59.0

    Aviary and Acclimatisation Gardens at Bowen Park, Brisbane, ca. 1889

    Hide note
  25. Bowen Park. The Acclimatisation Society of Queensland's Grounds, Bowen Bridge Road, Brisbane.
    Queensland Country Life (Qld. : 1900 - 1954) Friday 12 July 1901 p 17 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: THE outside appearance of the Park is not attractive, a rough split paling fence built above the shaley rock which crops out alongside the 1641 words
    • Tagged as: Bick
    • Text last corrected on 26 March 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-08-03 13:37:50.0

    Bowen Park. The Acclimatisation Society of Queensland's Grounds, Bowen Bridge Road, Brisbane. BY GRAPHITE. THE outside appearance of the Park is not attractive, a rough split paling fence built above the shaley rock which crops out alongside the foot-path, being in strong contrast to the white fence and neat buildings of the General Hospital opposite. An idea of the sylvan pleasance beyond, is only obtained from the outside of the Park by the glimpses of leafy branches of numerous trees foreign to this State which overhang the road. The small wicket gate at the Bowen Bridge Road entrance scarcely warns one of the beauty beyond. And it is beautiful, especially when seen at mid - day, after some welcome shower has washed the leaves of the myriad trees which line the side walks and overhang the paths, which radiate in all directions about this lovely spot. The gravel walk from this entrance is arched over with two giant bones, taking the memory back to the early whaling days of Moreton Bay, for a small metal plate informs the visitor that they are the jaws of a whale, found stranded in Hervey's Bay, Maryborough, almost 30 years ago, viz., 1872. Beyond this arch, which is 22 feet high, there comes into view a choice creeper-covered rockery and fountain surmounting a great basin, wherein choice gold fish disport. At the four points where the walk diverges and joins again at a beautiful avenue, are set statues, each typical of a season, viz., Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter. The avenue is the choicest of all the paths that maze the Park; a lawn welcomes one's feet while to right and left rise giant specimen trees from out the wealth of bushes and flowering plants beneath. Facing the end of the lawn where four paths converge is a Royal Palm of India—sister of the six magnificent specimens alongside the avenue; and at its base are numerous speci-mens of the Cacti family and different orna-mental shrubs. The paths wind from here to all parts of the park beneath leafy canopies and by gems of floral beauty hard to find in any other part of the State. Exhibit of Economic Plants at the late Q.N.A. Show. Queensland Acclimatisation Society-Prepared by Mr. James Mitchell (Head Overseer) and Staff. BUSH AND GLASS HOUSES. The bush and glass houses and propagating department is entered near the O'Connell Terrace gates, and cover over a quarter of an acre. The first part of the bush house is devoted exclusively to young plants, of which altogether Mr. Mitchell informed me there are fully 100,000 ready for distribution in the hands of the Society. Further on is a wealth of tropical and other foliage plants, ferns, stag and elk horns, orchids, etc., growing from the great rockeries, stumps and pillars that intersect the clean gravel paths winding between this wealth of verdure. The glass houses are three in number and adjoin the bush house, being warmed by hot water pipes radiating from the near-by fur-nace. Staging is erected all round the walls as well as down the centre, each piled up with specimens, great and small, of the finest of tropical plants gathered together from the various warm countries of the world, and growing from soil specially prepared. One house is devoted to ferns, palms, etc., and contains all the choicest varieties obtainable Another contains beautiful specimens of en-thuriums, crotons, large ferns, daffenbachias, aralias (varieties), pandanas (varieties), and other beautiful plants, while the orchid house A. Cowan, Bush House. P. Murchie, Flower Garden. A. Gilletta, Experimental Garden. W. Bick, Propagator and General Foreman. Mr. Jas. Mitchell, Head Overseer. J. H. Mitchell, Apprentice. Chief Assistants in the Society's Gardens. holds some of the choicest of this remarkable plant, many at the time of the visit showing their wonderful and beautiful flowers; calan thes, cypripedium, cattlya, dendrobium, etc., etc. These are all ranged on one side of the orchid house. Upon the other side are hundreds of plants, palms, dracaenas, etc., while the centre staging is piled high with specimen tropical plants The propagating department, where first attention is paid to seedlings, cuttings, etc., is on the right of the O'Connell Terrace entrance and is somewhat of a revelation in the methods of raising plants. Multitudes of young plants in various terms of growth are here seen set upon stages or shooting out in the frames that centre the large plot of ground devoted to this work. Two special lots of young seedlings we noticed, in the way of 36 varieties of apples a few inches above the pots, and in a frame are some 20 varieties of seedling hybridised roses. Of the thou-sands of other plants, they must be nameless from me, for who could put down in cold unsympathetic ink the magnificent titles which Mr. Mitchell rolled out into my awe struck ears : sometimes a name wauld carry my bewildered senses beyond this awful Latin dictionary. " This is Gorse," and that " Broom," and this " Privet," and the far-off hills of the Malvern and the Lickey, or the wild spot outside Kidderminster between that carpet town and the old town on the Severn, Bewdley, came before me, or the privet hedges of some rugged lane in far off Devon or Shropshire. One name struck me as being worth recording. It sounded like Diabolus Scandalous, and it was such a skimp of a plant, too, I may be wrong; who would'nt be under the circumstances ? ROSES. Behind where a noble specimen of the Royal Palm of India (Oreodoxa Regia) rears its head, and to the left of the path leading to the Aquatic plants, is a small area devoted to Roses. This is hedged round with a border of diminutive Polyanthus Roses, whose brilliant buds shine out from amidst the green leaves at one's feet, while inside one looks upon a wealth of standard and pillar rose trees, La France, Black Prince, Madame Victor Caillet, Malmaison, The Bride, etc., etc.; the perfume from these blooms and the beauty of their flowers making this small corner one of the most attractive in the Park, and additionally so by the splendid back ground of Flowering Trees, Palms and Shrubs. THE EXPERIMENTAL GROUNDS. Entering through an iron gate, from which a wire-netted fence runs to the right and left, dividing off the ornamental part of the grounds, you come on to an area about an acre in extent, devoted entirely to seedling and other young plants of numerous kinds, chiefly of an economic nature, to the growth and improvement of which, by hybridising and cross fertilisation, great attention is now being paid by the Society. To the right of the entrance is a large bed devoted entirely to the seedling sugar canes, the success of which is considered by sugar planters of great importance to the future of the sugar industry. The canes are chiefly from Barbadoes and Demerara, W.I., and in their home give a great percentage of saccharine matter. Already 150 sets have been sent out to members of the Society interested in sugar culture, these sets being supplied at a total charge of £1 is. per set. Complete results from these canes cannot be expected until the crushing season of 1902, when a knowledge will be obtained as to the relation of the soil and climate of Queensland and the West Indies in connection with this cane. Beyond the cane is a bed of 2,000 young plants of Mocha Coffee ready for distribution, followed by beds of Strawberries and Raspberries, and then a length of Egyptian and South Sea Island cotton plants. A large bed of Australian grasses completes the right hand side. Opposite, on the left, is a companion bed devoted to foreign grasses, of which there are over 70 varieties. Following round one passes a small nursery of Apples, Pears, Plums, Almonds, etc., and numerous young trees of the Citrus family. A long trellis covered with several varieties of the Passiflora family, Granadilla, and Passion Fruit, is next a vinery, framed in with wire netting containing about 40 varieties of seedling grapes. Further on is abed containing about 60 varieties of young grape vines raised from cuttings, while between the rows of the latter are planted numerous other plants, viz.:-White Arrowroot, Ginger, Tapioca, etc., and some 12 varieties of Persimmons ; between here and the gate is a succession of plants of value, seedling grapes mostly hybridised, Pau Pau and Custard Apples, 15 varieties of Chillias, Figs, Olives, Ramie, Fibre and Sisal Hemp, finishing up with a background of handsome trees, and from which a giant specimen of Dillenia Indica, with its great apple-like fruit, stands boldly out, showing its wealth of large green foliage in vigorous contrast to its smaller-leaved brethren. A corner of the grounds, near the entrance, enclosed round with a splendid Acalpha hedge, is known as the Flower Garden, which is at certain times of the year most attractive. Here also are grown a number of plants coming under the head Medicinal; not much has been done in this direction but greater attention is promised. The area of the ground invested in the Trustees is now 17 acres, of which the Park occupies 11 acres. The interests of the Society are looked after by a Council of 18 members, who elect a President (now Mr. L. G. Corrie, F.Q.I.A.), Vice-President (Mr. W. H. Parker) and Treasurer (Mr. E. T. Cooper. The Secretary is Mr. Edward Grimley, who was appointed to the position some 3½ years ago. The membership now amounts to 400 paid subscribers. Mr. Mitchell is in charge of the Garden, with Mr. E. W. Bick as Propagator, Mr. A. Cowan in charge of Bushhouses, and Messrs. A. Gilletta, P. Murchie, and J. H. Mitchell as general assistants.

    Hide note
  26. THE LATE MR. WALTER HILL. A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH.
    Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954) Friday 12 February 1904 p 5 Article
    Abstract: A correspondent of the "Brisbane Courier," wiling with reference to Mr. Walter Hill, who was the first curator of the Brisbane Botanic Gardens, says: 736 words
    • Text last corrected on 18 September 2016 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-09-18 15:27:52.0

    Walter Hill

    Hide note
  27. ROYAL EXHIBITION BOWEN PARK BRISBANE 50 Year's Retrospect Brisbane's Shows East Moreton and National
    The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947) Saturday 5 August 1922 p 10 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Jubilee celebration are very much in vogue this year, and though the National Association will have to exist four years longer before it can 8029 words
    • Text last corrected on 15 August 2017 by OLX1
    Digitised article icon
  28. NOTED SILVICULTURIST. RESIGNS STATE SERVICE. JOINS STAFF OF QUEENSLAND FORESTS, LTD.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Monday 8 August 1927 p 29 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Mr. W. R. Petrie, Experimental and Investigation Officer in the Queensland State forest Service, has joined the staff of Queensland Forests Ltd., and ... 691 words
    • Text last corrected on 13 May 2013 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2013-05-13 07:49:25.0

    W. R. Petrie, silvicultural

    Hide note
  29. I have seen the SHOW GROW
    Sunday Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1926 - 1954) Sunday 13 August 1939 p 6 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: THERE must be men older than I who can remember the Brisbane Show even earlier than I do. I can go back only to 1886, when, as a boy of 18 1653 words
    • Text last corrected on 25 August 2017 by OLX1
    Digitised article icon
  30. From Kin Kin Farm to State Botanist
    Queensland Country Life (Qld. : 1900 - 1954) Thursday 26 October 1950 p 13 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: MR. W. R. FRANCIS, who succeeds the late Mr. C. T. White as Government Botanist, first became interested in botanical matters while cutting out a far ... 562 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-10-21 10:59:04.0

    MR. W. R. FRANCIS, who succeeds the late Mr. C. T.

    White as Government Botanist, first became in terested in botanical matters while cutting out a farm from the rain forests of Kin Kin, in the Noosa district.

    The trees and vines of the Kin Kin forests, fascinated Mr. Francis as a young man, and he bought the six volumes on Queensland flora, which had been published by the late Mr. F. M. Bailey.

    From these, he learned to identify the plant species of the Noosa district, and his submission of several species which were not

    listed in these volumes brought him into close association with both Mr. Bailey and the late Mr.

    White.

    After his return from World War 1, he followed Mr. White's suggestion to make botany his career. He was appointed an as sistant botanist in 1920.

    Mr. Francis is a great believer in dispensing with scientific terms as much as possible, for his own ex perience has been that botany can be a most interesting and useful subject for every man on the land. Although his own book on the sub ject is regarded as an Australian authority in scientific circles, Mr. Francis says that, when he wrote it, he kept in mind his farmer and scrub-cutter friends at Kin Kin, and wrote about the trees and plants which they knew so well in language which would bring the subject of botany within reach of those Australian people whom it interested most.

    The Commonwealth Government published his book, "Australian Rain Forest Trees," in 1929. The Commonwealth Forestry and Tim ber Bureau is publishing an enlarged edition at the present time. This book has been used for many years by the Australian Forestry School as both a textbook and re ference book.

    As hoop pine resources have dwindled, the timber trade has been forced to use a great variety of softwoods, and Mr. Francis says that it has become more im portant than ever for the men in the timber trade, and the men on whose land the timbers grow, to be able to identify trees from com mon descriptions in language that all can understand.

    Since his appointment as a botanist in 1939, Mr. Francis has been through all districts of Queensland identifying trees and weeds, and has made a particular study of those plants which are poisonous to stock.

    He identified the native couch grass as the source of the prus- sic acid poisoning from which at least 1100 sheep died in 1939-40.

    The greatest mortality was caused by this grass in the Boombah lane in 1940, when 520 sheep died from a mob of 3000, which were being driven southwards. Mr. Francis re called that the perplexing feature of this outbreak was that sheep being driven over the same stock route from the opposite direction were not affected. Stock routes to the south of Boombah lane were well-grassed, but those to the north were in poor condition. When the south-ward-bound sheep reached the concentration of native couch in the Boombah lane, they wolfed it with fatal results.

    It was Mr. Francis who identi fied the Central Queensland yellow-wood as the cause of the "wasting disease" which played havoc in many herds before graziers took the necessary precautions.

    Mr. W. D. FRANCIS

    Hide note
  31. QUEENSLAND ACCLIMATISATION SOCIETY.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Wednesday 25 December 1867 p 2 Article
    Abstract: A MEETING of the council of the above society was held yesterday, at the Legislative Council Chambers. Present: The Rev. J. R. Moffatt (chairman), R. ... 2148 words
    Digitised article icon
  32. QUEENSLAND HORTICULTURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY'S EXHIBITION.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Thursday 26 October 1865 p 2 Article
    Abstract: YESTERDAY commenced the Spring Exhibition of the Queensland Horticultural and Agricultural Society. It is hold in the Armoury, being the second show ... 3058 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-07-30 15:55:07.0

    QUEENSLAND HORTICULTURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY'S EXHIBITION. Yesterday commenced the Spring Exhibition of the Queensland Horticultural and Agricultural Society.

    Hide note
  33. Acclimatisation. WHAT THE QUEENSLAND SOCIETY IS DOING.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 9 June 1866 p 11 Article
    Abstract: THE establishment of the Queensland Acclimatisation Society, at Bowen Park, near Brisbane, is rapidly becoming not only a credit to the society, but ... 1494 words
    • Text last corrected on 21 November 2017 by mpy1
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-07-30 16:01:41.0

    WHAT THE QUEENSLAND SOCIETY IS DOING. THE establishment of the Queensland Accli-<*> matisation Society, at Bowen Park, near Brisbane, is rapidly becoming not only a credit to the society, but to the colony also. This much we say, because the impression is a common one that at Bowen Park the useful gives place to the ornamental, in which latter sense, under all the circumstances of this colony, we would find a difficulty in discovering much beauty about it.

    Hide note
  34. EXHIBITION OF THE QUEENSLAND H. AND A. SOCIETY.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 21 July 1866 p 12 Article
    Abstract: THE regular winter exhibition of the Queensland Horticultural and Agricultural Society was opened on Wednesday, in the School of Arts, Brisbane. As w ... 1866 words
    Digitised article icon
  35. BOWEN PARK.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 14 November 1868 p 10 Article
    Abstract: WE recently paid a visit to the Acclimatisation Society's grounds, and were agreeably surprised to find that, although the funds of the society were ... 1092 words
    • Text last corrected on 4 August 2017 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
  36. BOWEN PARK.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Wednesday 19 November 1924 p 6 Article
    Abstract: The President of the Royal National Association said yesterday, at the annual meeting, that the nightmare of the committee is the 508 words
    Digitised article icon
  37. Bowen Park.
    The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939) Saturday 28 April 1883 p 672 Article
    Abstract: ABOUT a mile and a-half from Brisbane, in the vicinity of the hospital, and alongside the suburban railway leading to Sandgate, are the very pretty g ... 2037 words
    Digitised article icon
  38. Bowen Park.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 1 February 1930 p 14 Article
    Abstract: No fresh proposal for the addition of another portion of Bowen Park to the Exhibition grounds is now before the Brisbane City Council. The 87 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-08-04 13:32:14.0

    Bowen Park. No fresh proposal for the addition of another portion of Bowen Park to the Exhibition grounds is now be- fore the Brisbane City Council. The Mayor (Aid. W. A. Jolly, C.M.G.) stated yesterday that the scheme for the acquisition of further land in Bowen Park by the Royal National Association had been rejected by the council, which had made available for the enlargement of the show erounds the greater part of Alexandra Park. This land had been used as a road metal dump.

    Hide note
  39. Bowen Park.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 16 September 1911 p 4 Article
    Abstract: On the Estimates tabled in Parliament was a sum of £450 for Bowen Park. The Minister for Agriculture stated yesterday that this was intended for the 86 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2017-08-04 13:35:02.0

    Bowen Park. Oí the Cslimalcs tabled in Pnhamrnt w is a sum of ¡UoO foi Bowen Birk 1 lie Minister tor Agriculture slated veateiday that this wa-, intended foi the improve ment of a poition of the park which would ne left aftci riait had been talen bj the National \s°oeiation, and which reouired a considerable amount of exnendituie to put it in 01 dei Vfterwatds the cost of uiiinteniince would be small The portón would icuiain under the control of the Ac | climstisalian Sociotv

    Hide note
  40. Bowen Park.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 28 June 1879 p 5 Article
    Abstract: WE regret to learn from the following report that the late storm has done much mischief at the grounds of the Acclimatisation Society at Bowen Park:— 1162 words
    Digitised article icon
  41. THE ACCLIMATISATION SOCIETY'S DEPOT.
    Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908) Thursday 20 October 1864 p 3 Article
    Abstract: We recently availed ourselves of an opportunity of viewing the progress that has been made with the improvements at Bowen Park, the Acclimatisation S ... 1275 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-01-22 16:23:21.0

    The Acclimatisation Society's Depot

    Hide note
  42. QUEENSLAND.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 23 July 1864 p 5 Article
    Abstract: OUR dates from Brisbane are to the 19th, and from Rockhampton to the 16th instant. Monday's Guardian states that, in January, 1863, George Bencliffe ... 1838 words
    • Text last corrected on 3 November 2019 by aalunste
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-01-22 16:31:21.0

    The same paper says :—On Saturday afternoon last the committee of management of the Queensland Acclimatisation Society held a meeting at York's Hollow, for the purpose of devising a method for the arranging of the park, &c , which is situated there. Several members of the committee were in attendance. After inspecting the ground, which has been granted to the society (and since cleared and enclosed), the committee decided that the park lodge should be erected in the north-western corner. The laying out of the grounds, &c , was confided to the superintendence of a sub- committee, who will secure the assistance of Mr. W. Hill, the curator of the Botanical Gardens, for that purpose. The place was named "Bowen Park." The quantity of ground enclosed is about thirty-two acres, and it seems to be admirably adapted for the use to which the society have applied it. There is a good deal of water there, and it will be easy to form orna- mental ponds, where various kinds of waterfowl, and aquatic plants can be reared. At the present time there is nothing very attractive in the aspect of Bowen Park. It has been cleared and stumped ; but there is a quantity of dead wood and other debris which has to be removed. There are a few shrubs growing which are to be left as they are ; and there are a few animals in the park, including some of the Chinese sheep lately received by the society.

    Hide note
  43. BRISBANE.
    Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1860 - 1947) Thursday 4 August 1864 p 1 Article
    Abstract: THE recommencement of the business of the Session of 1864, on Tuesday last, presented several features of public interest—namely, the reception of th ... 1723 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-01-22 16:32:30.0

    The piece of ground granted by the Govern ment to the Acclimatisation Society in this city has been named Bowen Park. His Ex cellency has acknowledged the compliment paid him in a letter to the secretary of the society. The grounds are being brought into order, and the various contributions in animals and otherwise placed therein.

    Hide note
  44. QUEENSLAND ACCLIMATISATION SOCIETY.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Thursday 17 November 1864 p 2 Article
    Abstract: SOME time age a request was made by the Council of the Acclimatisation Society to the honorable the Minister for Lands and Works, for the grant of on ... 2183 words
    Digitised article icon
  45. QUEENSLAND ACCLIMATISATION SOCIETY.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Wednesday 16 November 1864 p 2 Article
    Abstract: SOME time ago a request was made hy the Council of the Acclimatisation Society to the honorable the Minister for Lands and Works, for the grant of on ... 2482 words
    Digitised article icon
  46. QUEENSLAND ACCLIMATISATION SOCIETY.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Wednesday 8 June 1864 p 2 Article
    Abstract: THE quarterly meeting of the council of the above society was held at the offices of the society yesterday afternoon, at 4 p.m. Captain O'Connell occ ... 2119 words
    Digitised article icon
  47. The Brisbane Courier. 80th YEAR OF PUBLICATION. TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 1925. THE ROYAL SHOW.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Tuesday 4 August 1925 p 6 Article
    Abstract: Fifty years ago the Association, that is now known familiarly as the Royal National was formed at a meeting in the Town Hall over which a previous 1916 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-01-31 13:29:01.0

    The Royal Show, Royal National or National Agricultural and Industrial Assoc.

    Hide note
  48. NOTES FROM THE ACCLIMATISATION SOCIETY'S GARDENS.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Monday 28 June 1886 p 2 Article
    Abstract: THE present being the dead-winter season of the year is hardly the time to visit these beautiful gardens; nevertheless an item or two useful to the p ... 1345 words
    • Text last corrected on 15 February 2019 by birdwing
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2019-02-15 08:29:19.0

    Acclimatisation Society

    Hide note