1. List: Ella Baker
    Ella Baker thumbnail image
    Public

    Civil Rights Activist Ella Baker

    25 items
    created by: eacton on 2019-08-18 17:30:19.0
    User data
    Tags:
    Add tag(s)
    Comments: No comments yet - Add one!
    Rating: unrated

List items:

Showing: 1 - 25 of 25

  1. Web page: Baker, Ella: "The Black Woman in the Civil Rights Struggle: A Long View," 1969
    https://repository.duke.edu/dc/holsaertfaith/fhpst05001
    Web page
    Note

    2019-09-15 08:06:28.0

    An excellent primary source of a speech Ella Baker made at the Institute of the Black World in Atlanta, Georgia This speech was given outside the time frame specified the research project aim and question, however there may be able to shed some additional light on Baker's reasons behind her choices and passion.
    Ella Baker was a well education and well spoken black women, given the era this was outstanding accomplishment.

    Hide note
  2. Web page: Ella Baker Letter to MLK
    http://okra.stanford.edu/transcription/document_images/Vol03Scans/139_24-Feb-1956_From%20Ella%20Baker.pdf
    Web page
    Note

    2019-09-15 08:02:14.0

    Short personal letter from Ella Baker to Martin Luther King dated 24th Feb 1956 informing Martin Luther King of the organisation of "distinguished individuals' to provide economic support to people who were suffering financially whist fighting for civil rights at a conference that Philip Randolph would be chairing. Baker requested King's attendance at her expense.

    This letter provides evidence of the allegiance between Baker and King at the height of the movement.

    Hide note
  3. [Ella Baker, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing slightly left]
    [ Photograph : 1942 ]
    View online (access conditions)
    Note

    2019-09-15 08:13:33.0

    Formal portrait of Ella Baker,by far the majority of the photos of Ella Baker are less formal and 'in action' speaking publicly with passion in her face. This portrait is staged, she is well dressed, her hairstyle has a formality to it. Despite the formal staging Baker's face is stern but not authoritarian which aligns with her leadership style outlined by Miller (2016); Empowering Communities: Ella Baker’s Decentralized Leadership Style and Conversational Eloquence.

    Hide note
  4. [Amy Spingarn, Ella Baker, and several unidentified men meeting in the NAACP office, New York, N.Y.] photoprint by M. Smith
    [ Photograph : 1942 ]
    View online (access conditions)
    Note

    2019-09-15 08:19:07.0

    [Amy Spingarn, Ella Baker, and several unidentified men meeting in the NAACP office, New York, N.Y.]
    The photo depicts the only women in the room of men ( Ella Baker) in a away that conveys the impression she was there because she was an equal not in the 'help' capacity. The men in the photo are not identified, this raises questions of what this particular meeting was about if 'key stakeholders' were not involved, yet the meeting was important enough to photograph. Further investigation would be required to answer these questions to give the photograph more context.

    Hide note
  5. Web page: Oral History Interview with Ella Baker, September 4, 1974. Interview G-0007.
    https://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/playback.html?base_file=G-0007&duration=03:34:21
    Web page
    Note

    2019-08-18 17:49:26.0

    Ella Baker played a pinnacle role in not only the the formation of the SCLC in the 1950s but also SNCC during the early 1960s. Through the interview she describes her involvement in National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) from the 1930 to early 1950s formed the foundation of her understandings of the segregation and discrimination that existed during Jim Crow-ism.
    According to Baker, the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education, along with the Montgomery Bus Boycott in 1954, generated strong momentum for direct, collective action against segregation in the South.

    This interview will provide year 12 students with a greater understanding of the underlying issues that occurred that ?? the civil rights movement

    Hide note
  6. Web page: Ella Baker Papers
    http://archives.nypl.org/scm/20899
    Web page
    Note

    2019-08-18 17:59:51.0

    This site provides an excellent overview of Baker's personal life and achievements. However one can not access the papers.

    "The Ella Baker papers provide a snapshot of Baker's life as an activist and visionary for a variety of progressive organizations in the United States, from the 1930s through the 1980s. Documented here are the organizations and individuals that were central to Baker's network such as George Schulyer, The Young Women's Christian Association, In Friendship, A. Phillip Randolph, and Bayard Rustin. The collection, however, does not document her personal life nor does it fully capture her philosophy or political ideas"

    Hide note
  7. Web page: The Students voice
    https://www.crmvet.org/docs/sv/sv6006.pdf
    Web page
    Note

    2019-08-18 18:03:52.0

    Ella Baker, “Report of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee,” May 13, 1960, crmvet.org

    More excellent primary sources

    Hide note
  8. Web page: Iconic Photo of Ella Baker
    https://snccdigital.org/people/ella-baker/
    Web page
    Note

    2019-09-05 15:09:45.0

    This website contains one of the most iconic photos of Ella Baker. The photo was taken when Baker was speaking at the Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, August 1964. the image shows a strong and passionate women.

    Hide note
  9. Web page: Oral History Interview with Ella Baker, September 4, 1974. Interview G-0007. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
    https://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/G-0007/menu.html
    Web page
    Note

    2019-09-15 08:25:11.0

    Ella Baker was an instrumental figure in the formation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) during the late 1950s and in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) during the early 1960s. Baker begins the interview by describing how her work in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) from the late 1930s into the early 1950s gave her a strong background for understanding the conditions of racial segregation and discrimination in the Jim Crow South. According to Baker, the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education, along with the Montgomery Bus Boycott in 1954, generated strong momentum for direct, collective action against segregation in the South. According to Baker, the SCLC was born out of that momentum, primarily at the behest of southern clergy. Arguing that the initial seeds of the SCLC were planted in a meeting she held with Bayard Rustin and Stanley Levinson, Baker describes how an executive committee was formed and how Martin Luther King Jr. emerged as the chosen spokesperson and president of the organization. From there, Baker goes on to explain why ministers were seen as appropriate leaders in the civil rights movement and how they continued to serve as the primary leaders within the SCLC. Baker describes SCLC as less ideological and more spontaneously oriented around philosophies of Christianity and Ghandian nonviolence. Baker spends considerable time describing her perception of the roles various leaders such as Rustin, Levinson, and King played in the organization, as well as the influence she exerted in selecting the SCLC's first executive director, Reverend John Tilly. Additionally, Baker explains why she never was appointed to an official position of leadership within the SCLC, despite the fact that she exercised a high level of responsibility in organizing meetings and activities, citing her age, her gender, and the fact that she was not a minister as the primary reasons for her "behind-the-scenes" role. Baker also spends considerable time in describing her role in the formation of SNCC and tensions between SNCC and other organizations, including the SCLC and the NAACP. According to Baker, SNCC found itself at odds with the more established organizations because of its youthful membership and its adherence to direct action. Researchers will be especially interested by Baker's insider perspective on the formation of and interactions between these preeminent civil rights organizations, as well as her candid portrait of civil rights leaders.
    Excerpts

    Hide note
  10. Web page: Ella Baker Speaks! "The Voice that Says Life is More Sacred Than Property Must Be Heard!"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9d_RulHh6_g
    Web page
    Note

    2019-09-19 15:02:33.0

    Ella Baker Speaks! "The Voice that Says Life is More Sacred Than Property Must Be Heard!"
    Introduced by Howard Zinn is a celebration of Ella Baker 1968.
    The interview is 33 minutes long however Zinn spends a bit of time doing an introduction, potentially this could lose year 12 students as the interviewer may not be seen as important. Potentially a good linking website for further research .

    Hide note
  11. Web page: Ella Baker speech 1974
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t96fnyLMihA
    Web page
    Note

    2019-09-19 15:03:45.0

    Life-long human rights activist and movement organizer, Ella Baker, addresses 1974 Puerto Rico solidarity rally about the need for every person to make the struggle for human dignity and freedom every day.

    TRANSCRIPT:
    Friends, brothers, and sisters in the struggle for human dignity and freedom. I am here to represent the struggle that has gone on for three-hundred or more years -- a struggle to be recognized as citizens in a country in which we were born. I have had about forty or fifty years of struggle, ever since a little boy on the streets of Norfolk called me a nigger. I struck him back. And then I had to learn that hitting back with my fists one individual was not enough. It takes organization. It takes dedication. It takes the willingness to stand by and do what has to be done, when it has to be done. A nice gathering like today is not enough. You have to go back and reach out to your neighbors who don't speak to you. And you have to reach out to your friends who think they are making it good. And get them to understand that they--as well as you and I--cannot be free in America or anywhere else where there is capitalism and imperialism. Until we can get people to recognize that they themselves have to make the struggle and have to make the fight for freedom every day in the year, every year until they win it.

    Hide note
  12. Web page: 2 minute overview
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBz0-bCAF1Y
    Web page
    Note

    2019-09-19 15:06:57.0

    This YouTube clip would be suitable for the Web page as it give a very brief yet informative overview of Baker's life and her accomplishments.
    Ella Josephine Baker
    The Woman who Taught a Movement

    Hide note
  13. Web page: Mini Documentary on Ella Baker
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68U57yi9F1E
    Web page
    Note

    2019-09-19 15:10:55.0

    A secondary source that could be used as external link for further information on Baker's life and accomplishments.

    Hide note
  14. Web page: PArt 1 interview with Ella Bakler
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aHmXeFVvk4c
    Web page
  15. Web page: Part 2 Interview with Ella Baker
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlLVPZr5qMw
    Web page
  16. Web page: Part 3 Interview with Ella Baker
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3F5WI5GMjeM
    Web page
  17. Web page: Documentary on Ella Baker
    https://search.alexanderstreet.com/preview/work/bibliographic_entity%7Cvideo_work%7C3231570
    Web page
    Note

    2019-09-20 12:54:35.0

    FUNDI: THE STORY OF ELLA BAKER reveals the instrumental role that Ella Baker, a friend and advisor to Martin Luther King, played in shaping the American civil rights movement. The dynamic activist was affectionately known as the Fundi, a Swahili word for a person who passes skills from one generation to another.

    Hide note
  18. Web page: Baker--Ella Baker papers, 1959-1965; Archives Main Stacks, SC 628
    http://content.wisconsinhistory.org/cdm/ref/collection/p15932coll2/id/18003
    Web page
    Note

    2019-10-24 14:03:22.0

    Newspaper article in the SELMA TIMES-JOURNAL calling for more people to become members of the Citizens Council that comes with a $4 fee to rove your dedication by joining and supporting the work of the Dallas County Citizens Council today. Six dollars will make both
    you and your wife members of an organization which has already given Selma nine years of Racial Harmony since "Black Monday."

    ASK YOURSELF THIS
    IMPORTANT QUESTION:
    What have I personally done to
    Maintain Segregation?

    Hide note
  19. Web page: Photograph Student Leadership Conference
    https://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Records/Image/IM3886
    Web page
    Note

    2019-10-29 07:58:25.0

    Ella Baker front row sitting next to Braden who Baker had previously supported through his trial. Braden is an Ally of the Civil Rights

    Hide note
  20. Web page: Ella Baker standing up perhaps at a meeting?
    http://www.takestockphotos.com/imagepages/imagedetail.php?PSortOrder=62&FolioID=23
    Web page
  21. Web page: Letter from Ella Baker
    http://mdah.ms.gov/arrec/digital_archives/sovcom/photo.php?display=large&oid=731
    Web page
  22. Web page: Newspaper Detroit Tribune
    https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92063852/1963-10-12/ed-1/seq-3/#date1=1789&index=0&rows=20&words=Baker+Ella+J+Miss&searchType=basic&sequence=0&state=&date2=1963&proxtext=Miss+Ella+J+Baker&y=0&x=0&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1
    Web page
    Note

    2019-10-27 10:24:38.0

    Newspaper article featuring Ella Baker post SCLC two civil rights workers have been added to the staff of the Southern Conference Education al Fund
    The Detroit tribune., October 12, 1963, Page 3, Image 3

    Hide note
  23. Web page: vote fraud in Election
    https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn79000083/1945-04-14/ed-1/seq-6/#date1=1789&index=2&rows=20&words=Baker+Ella+J+Miss&searchType=basic&sequence=0&state=&date2=1963&proxtext=Miss+Ella+J+Baker&y=0&x=0&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1
    Web page
    Note

    2019-10-27 10:26:45.0

    Early
    Local chapter under the guidance of Miss Ella J Baker and Dr Allin Jackson ordered a new election to be held
    Jackson advocate. [volume], April 14, 1945, Image 6

    Hide note
  24. Web page: Ella Baker and MLK together
    https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92063852/1959-10-17/ed-1/seq-1/#date1=1789&index=1&rows=20&words=Baker+Ella+J+Miss&searchType=basic&sequence=0&state=&date2=1963&proxtext=Miss+Ella+J+Baker&y=0&x=0&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1
    Web page
    Note

    2019-10-29 07:59:52.0

    Among the persons attending the hearing to express their support was Baker and Rev MArtin Luther King Snr, both of Atlanta
    The Detroit tribune., October 17, 1959, Page 1

    The person they were both supporting was Braden, a Civil Rights Ally

    Hide note
  25. Web page: Dont ride the bus
    https://kinginstitute.stanford.edu/king-papers/documents/dont-ride-bus
    Web page
    Note

    2019-10-29 10:02:20.0

    Jo Ann Gibson Robinson, "Don't Ride the Bus" Martin Luther King, Jr., Papers, 1954-1968, Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center, Boston University, Boston, Mass, December 2, 1955.

    Hide note