1. List: HIGGS, Jean Millicent (1912-2006)
    HIGGS, Jean Millicent (1912-2006) thumbnail image
    Public

    B. 20.01.1912 D.27.04.2006.
    Second wife of Arthur John Higgs. They lived in Bayview, N.S.W.: 93 Alexandra Crescent, Bayview, N.S.W. 2014.
    An earlier marriage to Marjorie Ann Geldard ended in divorce 1944-45.
    Higgs, Arthur John (1904 - 1991) Field of activity : Astronomer; Radiophysics. Education University of Sydney (B.Sc. 1926). Assistant, Mt. Stromlo Observatory, 1926-40. Research officer, C.S.I.R./O. Division Radiophysics 1940-69; Technical secretary, 1945-69.
    He divorced his first wife Marjorie in 1944.

    Jean and Arthur married sometime in the mid Fifties before 1954. In 1954 they were living in Cheltenham with Arthur’s sister Margaret Walstead Higgs at 2 The Boulevarde. But in the next electoral roll in 1958 they had moved to 10 Dunshea Rd. West Ryde these days called Denistone West. They were at that address until at least 1972 according to the rolls. In the 1977 electoral rolls their address was in Bayview. The move to the 93 Alexandra Crescent, Bayview property must have been between 1972 and 1974 because there are entries in the 1974, 1977 and 1985-1988 potters' directories, all with a Bayview, NSW reference.

    Local clays.

    She marked her pots with a painted or incised 'Jean Higgs' or conjoined 'JHiggs' or a painted 'JH' with the H as a single line.

    In 1962 they went to visit their family in the U.S.A. for two months visiting primarily the eastern states of California, Nevada. While in Reno she was shown around by the Assistant Professor of Ceramics at the Uni of Nevada Dr. Gross. Later they went to New York and Washington before heading off to London, Paris, Barcelona, Rome, Athens, Istanbul, Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Bangkok, Seoul and Tokyo. In an article in ‘Pottery in Australia’ Jean wrote of her impressions of these cities in the Vol 2 No 2 edition of October, 1963. pp. 28-32.
    She mentions that in New York she saw an exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Arts on 53rd Street and America House a gallery across the road from the museum. In Washington she was helped by a Miss Freeman at the Smithsonian Institute and was impressed by the collection of pots that she knew well from photographs.
    While in London she visited "the Craft Centre at Hay Hill, Primavera, the Craftsmen Potters' Association, Heal's, The Design Centre and many more. The Geological Museum was completely fascinating, with its display and wealth of information about ceramic raw materials; and hardly less so were the raw materials themselves, in the Cornish stone and huge kaolin pits which are such a feature of Cornwall."
    She said that she was shown around the Leach workshop that reminded her of a film she had seen in Sydney of Bernard Leach in action there. "It was quite an event, too, to see our first 'climbing' kiln; later in our journey we were to see its forerunner, sheltering under a thick roof of thatch on Hamada's propert at Mashiko - and still referred to, by him, as 'Bernard Leach's kiln'."
    Back to London and she was to meet with Lucie Rie at the converted Mes in Edgware Road. "Her studio is downstairs and she lives immediately above, where she took u s to see some Hans Coper pots, with whom she enjoyed working. She was most helpfuil in suggesting where we should go to to see the best in a limited time. Her kiln by the way is an electric one, and loads from the top: I believe that many of her pots are fired ony once. We were just in time to see an exhibition at the Berkeley Galleries of the work of Michael Cardew and his pupils from Abuja, and although it was practically sold out, I did manage to acquire a screw top teapot."
    In Paris she visited some of the small studios around de l'Arcade and in the rue St Honore. Off to the Louvre to see their ceramic collection including Etruscan pots.
    In Barcelona they looked for Artigas pots without success ... he was 50 miles away.
    In Rome she discovered that "there was practically no stoneware being made in Italy." It seems that Etruscan pottery interested her and she found interesting examples at the Villa Giulia.
    In Athens she was impressed by the National Museum's collection of Mycenae Pottery, but was disappointed by the smallish collections of "famous sites such as Corinth, Epidaurus and Delphi."
    In Istanbul visited the blue Mosque but
    did not get to see the Sultan's Palace ceramics collection - temporarily closed.
    In Israel visited museums in Jaffa, Tel Aviv and the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
    In Bangkok visited the "Celadon House".
    In Seoul visited the Ducksoo Palace Museum and the Ewho Women's University where she saw classes tezching the old inlaid slip technique. She brought home materials to trial out this technique in Australia.
    In Tokyo visited the Folk museum, the Nezu Art museum and the Takumi shop. Also visited Kyoto and Naran briefly. They visited Hamada in Mashiko about 80 miles from Tokyo. "He suggested that we should come on the day the large kiln was to be unpacked, and the unhurried delight of that day leaves a vivid impression. A charming scene greeted our arrival. Hamada was surrounded by his group of helpers as he unwrapped a special purchase he had that morning brought back from Tokyo. This was an early english slipware dish which was admired with rapt and complete concentration. The whole setting was like a great painting, which seems to symbolise the beauty of the Japanese countryside, and their devotion to their craft. After lunch Hamada took us to see his neighbour and former pupil, Tatsuzo Shimaoko, who has specialised in the technique of inlaid slip. In marked contrast to Hamada, he had little english, but he managed to explain to us that the small lengths of what looked like plaited threads which he rolled gently over the surface of the pot to imprint the design, later filled with four coats of slip, were quite special and handed down to him from his grandfather. Shimaoko was preparing for his exhibition shortly after in Tokyo."












    She had trained at East Sydney Technical College and produced stoneware fired in an electric kiln made by her husband.

    She exhibited through the Holdsworth Galleries in Woollahra and the Helen McEwen Gallery in Paddington.

    25 items
    created by: KEVING. on 2018-11-06 12:43:40.0
    User data
    Tags:
    Add tag(s)
    Comments: No comments yet - Add one!
    Rating: unrated

List items:

Showing: 1 - 25 of 25

  1. The resource described by this item has been deleted from Trove
    Note

    2018-11-06 12:43:40.0

    pot

    Hide note
  2. The resource described by this item has been deleted from Trove
  3. The resource described by this item has been deleted from Trove
  4. [Potters' Society of N.S.W. : Australian Gallery File]
    Potters' Society of N.S.W
    [ Book ]
    At State Library VIC
  5. [Helen McEwen Gallery : Australian Gallery File]
    Helen McEwen Gallery
    [ Book ]
    At State Library VIC
  6. SOME BRILLIANT STUDENTS CLIMAX OF SCHOOL CAREER
    Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 - 1930) Sunday 5 February 1922 p 3 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Below will be found a notice of some of the fine results achieved by pupils of Sydney schools at the Leaving Certificate Examination. Alma Hamilton, ... 260 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-06 13:29:03.0

    Arthur John Higgs, of Fort-street Boys' High School, took first-class honors in Maths. II. and Physics. He ha.d first-class passes in all his other sub jects, English, Latin, French, Maths. I., Mechanics, and English and Geography for engineering matriculation,

    Hide note
  7. Higgs, Arthur John (1904-)
    Astronomer; Radiophysicist
  8. Measurements of atmospheric ozone : made at the Commonwealth Solar Observatory, Mount Stromlo, Canberra, during the years 1929 to 1932 / A.J. Higgs
    Higgs, A. J
    [ Book, Government publication : 1934 ]
    At 2 libraries
  9. ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS. OBSERVATIONS AT MOUNT STROMLO.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 20 August 1932 p 14 Article
    Abstract: In the Astronomy, Mathematics, and Physics Section, Mr. A. J. Higgs read a paper on three years' observation of atmospheric ozone, carried out at the ... 296 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-06 16:16:25.0

    ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS. OBSERVATIONS AT MOUNT STROMLO. In the Astronomy, Mathematics, and Physics Section, Mr. A. J. Higgs read a paper on three years' observation of atmospheric ozone, car- ried out at the Mount Stromlo Solar Obser- vatory, Canberra. Mr. Higgs described the ozone, which, he said, was found in a rarified condition at a height of about 35 kilometres. The amount of ozone varied with the meteorological highs and lows on tne earth below. The deter- mination of the ozone condition was likely to be of great assistance to the science of meteo tology. He described the apparatus used and the results of his experiments in the con- tinued observation of the ozone condition ol the atmosphere and its correlation with weather map conditions. It was interesting to note that, by absorbing the energy radiated by the sun, the ozone maintained a tempera- ture something like that of the earth below, although it was separated from the earth by many miles of atmosphere as intensely cold as the Interstellar spaces beyond. Dr. V. A. Bailey read a paper on the motions of electrons in NO2, and Mr. J. R. Rudd on the behaviour of electrons in C02. Professor Kerr Grant subsequently explained that there were two hostile camps on the subject, and Germany and Great Britain were again at war. It was to be hoped that all future wars would be no more dangerous to the protagonists. The papers represented a victory for the British point of view. Papers were also read by Mr. A. R. Hogg, on the Mean Life of Small lons in the At- mosphere; Mr. C. E. Weatherburn on some theorems in Rlemannian geometry, and Dr. E F. Simmonds on affine differential variants and elementary proof of a theory of Stern

    Hide note
  10. [Jean Higgs : Australian Art and Artists file]
    [ Published ]
    At 2 libraries
  11. Family Notices
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 17 June 1942 p 14 Family Notices
    8809 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-07 18:29:06.0

    ?? HIGGS.—June 15, 1942, at his residence, 154 Beecroft Road, Cheltenham, Alfred Higgs, dearly beloved father of Arthur, Margaret, and Phillip. Privately cremated.

    Hide note
  12. Family Notices
    The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912) Wednesday 25 February 1903 p 509 Family Notices
    1806 words
    • Text last corrected on 7 November 2017 by jeri
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-07 18:32:42.0

    HIGGS--APPERLY. — January 14, at St. George's Church, Hurstville, by Rev. D. H. Dillon, Alfred Higgs to Alice Mary Apperly.

    Hide note
  13. Family Notices
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 24 October 1940 p 6 Family Notices
    3921 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-07 18:35:32.0

    APPERLY.-October 22. 1940. At her residence, 151 Beecroft Road, Cheltenham, Emmeline Apperly. dearly beloved slster-in-law of Alfred Higgs and loving aunt of Arthur, Margaret, and Phillip Higgs Privately interred.

    Hide note
  14. SOLAR ECLIPSE
    The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) Monday 25 March 1940 p 2 Article
    Abstract: The Minister for the Interior (Senator Foll) announced that the Commonwealth Government had approved of the dispatch of an expedition to 67 words
    • Text last corrected on 21 November 2012 by Rhonda.M
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-12 09:22:52.0

    1940 : SOLAR ECLIPSE The Minister for the Interior (Senator Foll) announced that the Commonwealth Government had approved of the dispatch of an expedition to South Africa to take observations of the eclipse of the sun in October. The personnel will be Dr. R. V. D. Woolley, Director of the Commonwealth Solar Observatory, Dr. C. W. Allen, and Mr. A. J. Higgs, of the Observatory staff.

    Hide note
  15. Attempt to 'fix' space signals
    The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) Wednesday 14 August 1968 p 11 Article
    Abstract: SYDNEY, Tuesday. — The Parkes radio telescope will attempt to accurately time the mysterious space 134 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-12 09:24:03.0

    Attempt to 'fix' space i signals SYDNEY, Tuesday. - The Parkes ra'dio telescope will attempt to accurately time the mysterious space signals received from pul sars at the Mills Cross radio telescope at Molonglo, near Canberra, recently. But it will need all the Information available be fore the "fix" can be ob tained. Mr A. J. Higgs, deputy chief of the division of radiophysics at the CSIRO, said today the Mills Cross' telescope had a much wider 1 beam and covered a large segment of the sky. j The Parkes radio tele scope had such a narrow beam that it was necessary to have an approximate position to work from. When that was obtained, the Parkes radio telescope was as accurate as any in the world to time periods of the pulsar signals. i

    Hide note
  16. ARTS SOCIETY PLAY READING
    The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) Monday 5 November 1934 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Somerset Maughan's play, "The Sacred Flame," which is to be read at the Institute of Anatomy to-night, has been produced in recent months both 167 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-12 09:24:45.0

    ARTS SOCIETY PLAY READING Somerset Maughan's play, "The Sacred Flame," which is to be read at the Institute of Anatomy to-night, has been produced in recent months both in Melbourne and Sydney. In each case it was highly praised by dramatic critics, and it has, in fact, been uni- versally recognised as one of the fam- ous dramatist's greatest play. The cast chosen by Mr. H. L. White for the production to-night is a par- ticularly strong one and should bring, out the full value of the dramatic situ- ations in which the play abounds. The part of the crippled husband, whose death is the central point of the plot, will be read by Mr. White himself. Mrs. A. Turner reads the part of his wife, Stella, whose happiness forms the motive for the crime, while others in the cast are Mrs. White, Miss P. Robinson, Sir Robert Garran, Profes- sor Haydon, and Mr. A. J. Higgs.

    Hide note
  17. INSTRUCTION CLASS AT TECHNICAL COLLEGE FOR CANBERRA "HAMS"
    The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) Tuesday 9 July 1946 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Following the commencement of a course of radio transmitting and receiving for amateur operators at the Canberra Technical College, a revival 356 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-12 09:25:34.0

    INSTRUCTION CLASS AT TECHNICAL COLLEGE FOR CANBERRA "HAMS" Following the commencement of a course of radio transmitting and re- ceiving for amateur operators at the Canberra Technical College, a revival of amateur stations is expected in Can- berra. Applicants for the course contain many ex-servicemen, whose appetite has been whetted by the knowledge they acquired in their respective ser- vice. One or two have expressed the de- sire to continue in the trade, aiming at becoming something more than a ''trouble shooter' who can make minor adjustments but calls in the expert for big jobs. "Ham" operators in Canberra form- ed a small but energetic group before the war. Amateur operating in the A.C.T. first functioned about 1930, but quickly gathered in force with such men as Mr. A. J. Higgs, one of Aus- tralia's leading physicists, Mr. A. J. Ryan whose elementary work paved the way for service with a radar sec- tion, and the Rev. Mr. Nell, who sup- planted technical knowledge with en- thusiasm. Old hands consider that the romance has gone out of erecting your own set, and then operating it. When amateur wireless was in its infancy they were forced to use their initiative, plotting to secure second-hand and often burnt out equipment; then hours of listening to pick up faint signals from overseas, to recognise them and jot them down in their operator's log. .....

    Hide note
  18. L'pool store wins big competition
    The Biz (Fairfield, NSW : 1928 - 1972) Wednesday 14 September 1960 p 7 Article
    Abstract: A Liverpool hardware store, Liverpool Timber and Hardware Pty. Ltd., has won an Australia-wide contest in retail selling procedures. 266 words
    • Text last corrected on 12 November 2018 by KEVING.
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-12 09:28:05.0

    I/pool store wins big competition A Liverpool hardware store, Liver pool Timber and Hardware Pty. Ltd./ has won an Australia-wide contest in retail selling procedures. The win makes them the top bardware store in Australia for firms selling C.S.R. products, The contest was held by Colonial Sugar Refining Co. Ltd, manufacturers of Timbrock ' hardboard and building materials. The general marketing ; manager of CJSJt. (Mr. A. C. Higgs) announced the results of. the contest at Liverpool recently. ;

    Hide note
  19. Sydney's huge telescope LARGEST RANGE
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Monday 26 July 1954 p 10 Article
    Abstract: Sydney's proposed £500,000 radio telescope will be as pewerful as any in the world. Its range will equal 162 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-12 09:29:08.0

    Sydney's huge telescope LARGEST RANGE Sydney's proposed £500,000 radio telescope will be as pewerful as any in the world. Its range will equal i that of the world's biggest optical telescope — at Mt. Palomar. California. And it will be as tall as the highest building in Sydney — 250ft. Mr. A. J. Higgs, CSIRO secretary _ of the radio physics division, announ ced this today. The new telescope will be built between 30 and 50 miles from Sydney. Money offer This is to avoid elec trical interference from city industries. It will be built of Aus tralian materials and by Australian workmen, al though not necessarily by an Australian firm. The telescope should be ready in 1956. The Carnegie Corpora tion of New York, has offered £110,000 toward its cost. . Australia must finance the resh Mr- Higgs said, "It will be a colossal engineering project — nearly a third the size of the Harbor Bridge." "It will weigh 1000 tons."

    Hide note
  20. Sydney May Get Big Radio Telescope
    The Newcastle Sun (NSW : 1918 - 1954) Monday 26 July 1954 p 4 Article
    Abstract: SYDNEY: Sydney's proposed £500,000 radio telescope will be as powerful as any in the world. Its range will equal that of the world's biggest op- 169 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-12 09:29:52.0

    Sydney May Get Big Radio Telescope SYDNEY : Sydney's proposed £ 500,000 radio telescope will be I as powerful as any m the world. Its range will equal that of the world's biggest op tical telescope — at Mt. Palomar (California) — and it will be tall as the high est building in Sydney — 250 feet. Mr. A. J. Higgs, secre tary of the Radio Physics Division of C.S.I.R.O., an nounced this today. The new telescope will be built between 30 and 50 miles from Sydney to avoid electrical I n t e rference from city industries. It will be built of Aus tralian materials and by Australian workmen, al though not necessarily by an Australian firm, and should be ready in 1956. The Carnegie Corpora tion of New York has of fered £110,000 toward its cost. Australia must fin ance the rest. Mr. Higgs said: 'It will be a colossal engineering project — nearly a third the size of the Harbor Bridge. It will weigh 1000 tons.'

    Hide note
  21. Giant Radio Telescope SYDNEY, Tuesday.
    The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate (NSW : 1894 - 1954) Tuesday 27 July 1954 p 3 Article
    Abstract: A radio telescope, costing £500,000 wil be built in Sydney, by 1936 and will be as powerful as any in the world 140 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-12 09:30:22.0

    Giant Radio Telescope SYDNEY. Tuesday. A radio telescope, costing £500,000 will be built in Syd ney, by 1956 and will be as powerful as any in the world and its range will equal that of the world's largest optical telescope at Mount 1'alomar, California. The giant instrument will be as tall as the highest building in Sydney — 250 ft. — and wi.l weight 1000 tons. This was announced by the Secretary of the CSIRO physics Division (Mr. A. J. Higgs) who said that the site wou.d be be tween 3u to 50 miles from Syd ney to avoid electrical inter ference from industries. It will be built by Australian materials and by Australian workmen, although not neces sarily by an Australian firm. The Carnegie Corporation of New York, has offered £110,000 towards its cost. Australia must finance the rest.

    Hide note
  22. He can set the skies aglow
    The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 - 1954) Sunday 9 November 1952 p 36 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: FINAL proofs that he can light up Australian skies by artificially produced auroras are now put forward by Professor V. A. Bailey (Mathematical Physi ... 596 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-12 09:31:20.0

    e can set the : FINAL proofs that he can light up Australian A skies by artificially produced auroras are now put forward by Professor V. A. Bailey (Mathe matical Physics); Sydney University. . Professor Bailey, with ' a team of Aus tralian Scientists, has been creating auroral conditions on a minor scale in the sky over Armidale (N.S.W.) f6;r the past two years be- tweeii 1 and 2.30 a.m. . : No loca inhabitants saw 'any auroras— they were, too .'feeble to be Visible—but proof of their creation was registered at . Katoomba, 231 miles away. , Por the past 18 : years ever since he created a tiny Aurora in his laboratory, Professor Bailey has been trying to convince scien tists that man-made au roras in the sky are feas ible,. and may be put to practical use. To create a visible arti ficial aurora requires huge power (wattage), and Pro fessor Bailey had neither time nor money to build the apparatus. : So he devised an ingeni ous set-up to produce a minor auroral effect in the sky to prove his theory. The apparatus was ar ranged and experiments carried out by Australian scientists R. A. Smith, K. Laiidecker, A, J. Higgs. and F. H. Hibberd. . oA radio wave, cut up into pulses, was shot from Bris bane (Queensland) oh a 230/mile-long slant ;tc> hit thev electrified . E layer of the; atmosphere just' above Anhidale (N.S.W.);

    Hide note
  23. In Canberra Today FROM OUR COLUMNIST IN PARLIAMENT HOUSE Australian Isolation Shaken
    Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954) Saturday 1 January 1949 p 6 Article
    Abstract: WAR TO THE NEAR NORTH of Australia was the dominating theme of the final Cabinet meeting for the year. Australian isolationism received another shaki ... 929 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-12 09:34:15.0

    ch as the Chifley Min istry likes to think Government financial policy is responsible tor | full employment, Ministers know that without primary production and an export income, the Aus tralian prosperity will disappear. Hence the growing interest m the rain-making experiments of the Council for Scientific and Indus trial Research, The scientists have discovered how to make rain, but the C.S.I.R. physicist, A. J. Higgs, said the problem now is to produce it in areas where it is needed. * Another year of experiments will jlupuc oofoit the Uovernment de cides whether it is iiable for actions ior damage for making rain in the wrong places- C.S.I.R. Minister. John teaman is aiready worried about this possibility since reading tne J.S.I.R. account of rainfall in the Blue Mountains brought on by planes dropping dry ice solid car oon-dioxide gas into the clouds.

    Hide note
  24. More Signals By Radar To Moon
    The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 - 1954) Friday 6 August 1948 p 7 Article
    Abstract: Scientists in the radio research branch of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research have sent another series of radar signals to the moon, 208 words
    • Text last corrected on 25 May 2019 by AUS-HFBC
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-11-12 09:35:20.0

    The Shepparton station broadcast the signals to the moon. The C.S.IR. research officer (Mr. A. J. Higgs) said yester day that the research branch had sent signals and received "echoes" from the moon at in tervals for the past six months. "We can use Shepparton only at limited times, because the aerials point in a fixed direction and we can send signals only when the moon is in the right position," he said. "This happens only two or three nights every two months. "The tests are part of our general study of the upper at mosphere and beyond. "Lots , of things happen there which we do not understand. "The experiments are pure research. "I can't say what practical use the information we may gain will have."

    Hide note
  25. Australian Science Archives Project. (1985-1999)
    History of Australian Engineering; History of Australian Science; History of Australian Technology