1. List: BEARD, KATE
    BEARD, KATE thumbnail image
    Public

    Artist (in oils and miniatures) and Potter.

    Prior to her departure from England, Kate Beard had a studio in James Avenue, Cricklewood, London NW2 4AJ, UK. Miss Beard studied figure painting and modelling at the Lambeth School of Art in London, specialising in animal painting under Frank Calderon, at his school in Baker St., London. "In 1904, when a pupil, she won the prize for the animal section of the Gilbert Garrett sketch competition, which was open to all the Art schools of Great Britain."

    "This artist specialises in animal portraiture, and her work is well known out here to readers of the Tatler and the Ladies' Field. In which reproductions of her studio appear from time to time. The Duchess of Newcastle is one of her patrons, and Miss Beard's painting of the Duchess's wire-haired terriers, Chunky and Comedian of Notts, was chosen the subject for an engraving, "The Bone of Contention." ..... Miss Beard's work varies widely. She is also a miniature and portrait painter. and has exhibited at the Royal Society of Miniature Painters, Arlington Galleries, London, and also at the Royal Academy."
    (The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954) Sat 29 Mar 1930 Page 19 THE WOMAN'S WORLD)

    The daughter of Superintendent Frederic Beard, M.V.O., of the London Police. "Superintendent Beard, M.V.O., Miss Kate Beard's father, played an important part in the Coronation of King Edward VII., as he was in charge of "A" Whitehall Division of the Metropolitan Police, Scotland Yard, and responsible for the route arrangements. Also, just before the arrival of the King and Queen at Westminster he had personally to direct a thorough search of the Abbey and the cellars beneath to see that no one was in hiding who might be contemplating mischief. So smoothly did all arrangements work that the then Duke of Norfolk, hereditary Earl Marshal, presented the wand used by the Gentleman of the Gold Rod to Superintendent Beard as a memento of the occasion."

    Kate arrived in Australia in March 1930 and was interviewed in Melbourne shortly after her arrival saying that she might well remain in Australia. She had earlier been in India and had painted there too. She arrived in Sydney on March 31 : "Miss Kate Beard, a well known London artist, who specialises in portraits and animal studies, reached Sydney to-day on the Esperance Bay, on a holiday trip and to paint local subjects."

    She started exhibiting at the exhibition of Women Painters in May that year (1930):
    "Another portrait, by Kate Beard, that of a young woman in profile, is well drawn, and contains much effective work."

    KATE BEARD, the English animal painter, who has settled in Sydney, says that drawing dogs requires a lot of concentration; she has to be rapid in recording the main, features, and for the rest she relies on her retentive memory. The best subjects are gun dogs and sheep dogs, which are taught to obey, the worst being pet dogs, who are spoiled by their owners. On account of their beautiful hair and lively expressions she is fond of painting setters and spaniels. Recently she has painted the favourite dogs of the Governor, Sir Philip Game, Lady Mac Cormick, Mies Barbara Knox, Miss Gould, and Dora Wilcox, respectively. Behind the scenes she painted "Flush," the canine member of the Barretts of Wimpole Street Company. A well-trained artist, Miss Beard studied at the Lambeth School of Art and at Frank Calderon's School of Animal Painting, and was awarded the first prize in the animal section in the Gilbert-Garret competition; open to students in all the art schools in Great Britain. After exhibiting at the Royal Academy, and with the Royal Society of Miniature Painters, she visited India, and painted rajahs and their horses; and after her return to London she received a teacher's certificate from the Royal Drawing Society." (The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 1 October 1932 p 18 Article)

    In 1932 : "0F course, no Rolls is complete with out its Alsatian; but, as well as finding a soft spot for a ride, many
    of the luckier dogs in our midst are achieving a permanent niche in fame.
    Since she has taken a studio in Macquarie Street, Kate Beard has been commissioned to paint many of the dogs beloved by their owners. Sir Philip Game liked her portrait of red "Mickey" so well that he wrote the artist a warm note of thanks. Now Miss Beard is doing "Rua," the blue cattle dog which is the pride and joy of Mrs. William Moore's heart. While abroad Miss Beard painted dogs of many breeds, including Samoyedes, the Russian sledge dogs, and Salukis, an Asiatic breed introduced into Europe by the Crusaders. In India, Miss Beard was the guest of the Rajah Thakore Sahebog Llmdi. Her very first Sydney commission was given her by Lady MacCormick, when, in deep secrecy, she painted Moma's dog behind locked doors in the MacCormicks' Point Piper home."

    A friend of Ada and Jessie Newman : In 1934 IN MANY LANDS Women Tell Of Their Experiences A LEISURELY MEAL In her invitation to be present at a leisurely evening meal in her Ceramic Art Studio, which overlooks Hyde Park, Miss Ada Newman did not mention that there Would he a magic carpet at the disposal of the guests, to whisk them off to other lands. ....Miss Newman was assisted by her sister, Miss Jessie Newman. In entertaining the guests, including Miss Kate Beard, who described her adventures In Spain. where a don endeavored to explain Moorish culture to her in rapid Spanish when her krowledge of the language was confined to the words that appear in hotel bills. Others present were Miss E. Atkinson, Miss Vera Margoliouth, Mrs. D. Simpson, Miss K. Scott, Miss E. Lovegrove and Mrs. Darsow,

    In 1935 she exhibited her paintings : "ANIMAL PAINTINGS. - WORK OF MISS KATE BEARD.
    Animal painting is a small but exacting department of art, demanding from the practitioner a warm sympathy with the subjects [plus] special dexterity in reproducing the texture of fur and feathers, and that talent for indicating character which is part of the equipment of the painter of portraits of human beings. Miss Kate Beard, who is exhibiting a collection of paintings and drawings of animals at the Lyceum Club, seems to have approached her subjects (mainly dogs) affectionately and with humour. The drawings incharcoal particularly are lively and whimsical and must, one feels, be good likenesses. In this section the vivacity of her line has helped to give vitality to the portraits. Some of this liveliness has been lost in the more elaborate dog portraits in oils or watercolours; yet these are not without charm. It is difficult to think of another Australian painter able to produce dog portraits which would better suit the requirements of owners of well-loved pets. The exhibition was formally opened yesterday by Mr. William Moore, who said that Miss Beard had studied animal painting in London and was a well-equipped artist. He recalled that just 90 years ago Charles Meryon a young Frenchman, who was later to become one of the most celebrated of etchers, had visited Australia and had made one picture here - a study of a dingo. Notable Australian painters of animals included William Dexter, Harry Garlick, Frank Mahony, and George Lambert. Lambert used to say: "There are only two men who can paint a horse; myself and ... I forget the other man." Miss Beard was continuing this branch of art in Australia.

    The exhibition will close on Friday, September 13."

    In 1936 an article illustrated shows her and her bookends and mentions that she had a studio in Macleay Street Kings Cross.
    Sydney Mail (NSW : 1912 - 1938) Wednesday 16 September 1936 p 23 Article Illustrated

    WITH a cheque for £120 as a result, the R.S.P.C.A. committee is naturally delighted with the success of "Bob's" Birthday Gymkhana on Saturday. Nell Lefebvre, sister of the well-known golfer, Mrs. T. McKay, won the competition for the neatest ankles at the gymkhana, and collected as a prize the "doggie" book-ends modelled by the noted animal artist, Kate Beard. Captain Pope's cocker spaniel, "Prince," was the model used for the book-end design.

    In 1951 this article appeared the Sydney SUN : "In the Rushton newsagency is a sketch of a once notable character, Kings Cross Bob — a dog who once roamed those parts. The sketch was done by well-known English animal painter Kate Beard, has been sent to the newsagency by Dame Mary Gilmore as an Animal Week gesture. Kate Beard's father, incidentally, was Chief of Police in London and arrested John Burns in the dockers' strike. The two men later became life long friends. Kate Beard's most famous picture was the Duchess of Newcastle's dogs, postcards of which had a great sale."

    37 items
    created by: KEVING. on 2018-05-31 09:12:57.0
    User data
    Tags:
    Add tag(s)
    Comments: Show comments (1)
    Rating: unrated

List items:

Showing: 1 - 37 of 37

  1. Favoured Pets and Champions Modelled by Miss Kate Beard
    Sydney Mail (NSW : 1912 - 1938) Wednesday 16 September 1936 p 23 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Pictured here hard at work is Miss Kate Beard, modelling champion dog book-ends and 319 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 09:12:57.0

    Favoured Pets and Champions Modelled by Miss Kate Beard Pictured here hard at work is Miss Kate Beard, modelling champion dog book-ends and door stops, in her studio in Macleay -street. HAVING lived in Sydney for the past six years, Miss Beard's animal paint ings, particularly dogs, are well known, as her work is hung regularly at art exhibitions. The new departure is the outcome of a visit to Lon don by the owner of a Kate Beard painting of a pet dog. There she found that a fashion had sprung up, sponsored by the Royal Doulton Potteries, of per petuating the champion dogs of the various Kennel Clubs in pottery. Pet dogs in replica are used in many ways. Charmed with the idea, on her return she asked Miss Beard to model her pet dog as well as painting him; the owner wanted a pair of book-ends and a door-stop as well. After experimenting in various mediums, Miss Beard has achieved delightful results, having the gift of depicting the personal ity of each breed ;: the finished product, painted in natural colours, is really life like. Two wire-haired fox-terrier heads are from the Duchess of Newcastle's cham pions, painted by Miss Beard some years ago and reproduced in colour in 'The Field' as 'The Bone of Contention.' So popular was it — depicting two dogs 'at the ready' to pounce upon a bone — that it ran into several editions. As book-ends the dogs are equally successful. 'Prince,' the beautiful black and white cocker spaniel owned by Captain Pope's wife, is the inspiration for a second pair of book-ends. 'Scotty,' a model for a door stop, is an Aberdeen terrier whose owner has had him pictured by Kate Beard in oils, as well as modelled in clay. He lives in the country.

    Hide note
  2. Topics for Women IN MANY LANDS Women Tell Of Their Experiences A LEISURELY MEAL
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Wednesday 31 January 1934 p 22 Article
    Abstract: In her invitation to be present at a leisurely evening meal in her Ceramic Art Studio, which overlooks Hyde Park, Miss Ada Newman did not 756 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 09:15:48.0

    IN MANY LANDS Women Tell Of Their Experiences A LEISURELY MEAL In her invitation to be present at a leisurely evening meal in her Ceramic Art Studio, which overlooks Hyde Park, Miss Ada Newman did not mention that there Would he a magic carpet at the disposal of the guests, to whisk them off to other lands. ....Miss Nowmnn was assisted by her sister, Miss Jessie Newman. In entertaining the guests, including Miss Kate Beard, who described her adventures In 8pain. where a don endeavored to explain Moorish cul ture to her in rapid Spanish when her krowledge of the language was confined to the words that appear in hotel bills. Others present were Miss E. Atkinson, Miss Vera Margollouth, Mrs. D. Simpson, Miss K. Scott, Miss E. Lovegrovc and Mrs. Darsow,

    Hide note
  3. WOMEN PAINTERS. Annual Exhibition. GREAT VARIETY OF WORK.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 13 May 1930 p 9 Article
    Abstract: The Society of "Women Painters (of which Mrs. E. Marie Irvine is president) has organised its annual exhibition, which is to be opened this afternoon ... 1177 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 09:22:48.0

    Another portrait, by Kate Beard, that of a young woman in. profile, is well drawn, and contains much effective w k An atti active full-length figuie of a rfirl In canary-coloured evening gown with blade shawl, idly standing ia front of a screen, has been convincingly paint- ed by Norah Gurdon

    Hide note
  4. MARRIED IN LONDON
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Thursday 8 July 1937 p 41 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: A CABLE from London, received in Sydney to-day, says that the marriage was quietly celebrated at All Souls, Langham Place, yesterday, 555 words
    • Text last corrected on 31 May 2018 by KEVING.
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 09:33:33.0

    OF general interest in this Corona- tion year are the unique objects, which Miss Kate Beard showed mem- bers of the Lyceum Club yesterday. in There was one of the wands used by the Gentlemen of the Gold Rod (ushers), at Edward VII.'s corona tion, and presented to her father, Superintendent Frederick Beard, M.V.O., by the Duke of Norfolk, Earl Marshal. Some of the blue and yel- low velvet, embossed with the em blems of England, used as hangings in Westminster Abbey, was also ex hibited. Another article of special in terest was a copy of the London "Sun," printed in gold lettering, chronicling Queen Victoria's corona tion in 1838.

    Hide note
  5. THE LIFE OF SYDNEY
    The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 - 1954) Thursday 12 September 1935 p 10 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: THE lace jabot of the Usher of the Black Rod was the envy of all feminine beholders at the opening of Parliament yesterday, especially as 2709 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 09:34:27.0

    I imagine that when Lady Hore- Ruthven went to see the portrait of Yonka. her little terrier, at Kate Beard's show at the Lyceum Club yesterday, she was tempted to take him with her, so that he might see himself as others see him. Anyway, Yonka's mistress was delighted with his picture, a highlight of the exhi bition, which will continue until Sep tember 20.

    Hide note
  6. THE LIFE OF SYDNEY
    The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 - 1954) Wednesday 28 August 1935 p 10 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: LADY ISAACS was one of the keenest bridge players at the party given by her daughter, Mrs. David Cohen, yesterday afternoon at 2874 words
    • Text last corrected on 31 May 2018 by KEVING.
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 09:35:46.0

    Go walkee? Who could resist Lady Hore Ruthven's Australian terrier? He was given to her when she lived in South Australia, labelled, "My name is Yonka. Love me." When Kate Beard, the well-known animal painter, started on his portrait for her "one-man" show at the Lyceum Club on September 2, he had just been shaved for fear of ticks, but by the fourth and last sitting he had gal- lantly grown another coat. When posing bored him he would trot up to Miss Beard and beg to be taken for a walk.

    Hide note
  7. ANIMAL PAINTINGS. WORK OF MISS KATE BEARD.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 3 September 1935 p 6 Article
    Abstract: Animal painting is a small but exacting department of art, demanding from the practitioner a warm sympathy with the subjects special dexterity in rep ... 296 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 09:38:46.0

    ANIMAL PAINTINGS. WORK OF MISS KATE BEARD. Animal painting is a small but exacting department of art, demanding from the prac- titioner a warm sympathy with the subjects [plus] special dexterity in reproducing the texture of fur and feathers, and that talent for indi- cating character which is part of the equip- ment of the painter of portraits of human beings. Miss Kate Beard, who is exhibiting a collection of paintings and drawings of ani- mals at the Lyceum Club, seems to have ap- proached her subjects (mainly dogs) affec- tionately and with humour. The drawings in charcoal particularly are lively and whimsical and must, one feels, be good likenesses. In this section the vivacity of her line has helped to give vitality to the portraits. Some of this liveliness has been lost in the more elaborate dog portraits in oils or watercolours; yet these are not without charm. It is difficult to think of another Australian painter able to produce dog portraits which would better suit the requirements of owners of well-loved pets. The exhibition was formally opened yes- terday by Mr. William Moore, who said that Miss Beard had studied animal painting in London and was a well-equipped artist. He recalled that just 90 years ago Charles Meryon a young Frenchman, who was later to become one of the most celebrated of etchers, had visi- ted Australia and had made one picture here- a study of a dingo. Notable Australian paint- ers of animals included William Dexter, Harry Garlick, Frank Mahony, and George Lambert. Lambert used to say: "There are only two men who can paint a horse; myself and ... I forget the other man." Miss Beard was continuing this branch of art in Australia. The exhibition will close on Friday, Septem- ber 13.

    Hide note
  8. THE WOMAN'S WORLD ENGLISH ANIMAL PAINTER COMES TO AUSTRALIA Miss Kate Beard Will Settle in Sydney
    The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954) Saturday 29 March 1930 p 19 Article
    Abstract: PASSING through Melbourne is Miss Kate Beard, an English artist and a member of the Faculty of Arts, who arrived by the Esperance Bay 492 words
    • Text last corrected on 31 May 2018 by KEVING.
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 09:49:34.0

    ENGLISH ANIMAL PAINTER COMES TO AUSTRALIA Miss Kate Beard Will Settle in Sydney PASSING through Melbourne is Mlaa Kate Beard, an English artist and a momber of the Faculty of Arts, who arrived by the Esperance Bay yesterday. Miss Baird. who had a studio in James Avenue, Crlcklewood, intonds continuing her career in Syd ney. This artist specialises in ani mal portraiture, and her work Is well known out here to readers of tho Tatler and the Ladles' Field. In which roproductions of her studio appear from tlme to time. The Duchess of Newcastle Is one of her patrons, and Miss Beard's painting of the Duchess's wlre-halred terriers, Chunky and Comedian of Notts, was chosen the subject for an engraving, "The Bone of Contention." In the picture both dogs appear fac ing one anothor, and the artist con fides that it would have been an impossibility to paint the dogs in this position without encouraging a fight, so she took them in individual sit tings.

    Hide note
  9. PORTRAIT OF SIR CHARLES CLUBBE.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 13 June 1934 p 16 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: "The late Sir Charles Clubbe, K.B.E.," portrait by Kate Beard at the Auatralian Art Society's annual exhibition. 22 words
    • Text last corrected on 6 April 2015 by AnnieR
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 12:57:30.0

    PORTRAIT OF SIR CHARLES CLUBBE. Members of the P.E.N. Club enteitained the Queensland author, Mr. Vance Palmer (fifth fiom ih« right) at luncheon yesterday at the Hotel Metropole. Help 'The late Sir Charles Clubbe, K.B.E.," portrait by Kate Beard at the Australian Art Society's annual exhibition.

    Hide note
  10. BOB SITS FOR HIS PORTRAIT.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 19 November 1936 p 22 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: MISS KATE BEARD, the well-known animal painter, has a restless sitter in Bob, the King's Cross terrier, whose birthday party will be celebrated at th ... 44 words
    • Text last corrected on 31 May 2018 by KEVING.
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 12:58:38.0

    pic : BOB SITS FOR HIS PORTRAIT. -Freemun. . AlfllS. JOHN RALSTON, who is help ?* *? ing io organise the dance to be held on board the Barragoola next Wednes~ day night in aid of the funds of the Kindergarten Union. MISS KATE BEARD, the well-known animal painter, has a restless sitter in Bob, the King's Cross terrier, whose birthday party will be celebrated at the Ä.SP.CA. Gymkhana, to be held at the Ravenswood College oval, Gordon, on December 5. Help -Freemun. . AlfllS. JOHN RALSTON, who is help ?* *? ing io organise the dance to be held on board the Barragoola next Wednes~ day night in aid of the funds of the Kindergarten Union. MISS KATE BEARD, the well-known animal painter, has a restless sitter in Bob, the King's Cross terrier, whose birthday party will be celebrated at the Ä.SP.CA. Gymkhana, to be held at the Ravenswood College oval, Gordon, on December 5. Help MISS KATE BEARD, the well-known animal painter, has a restless sitter in Bob, the King's Cross terrier, whose birthday party will be celebrated at the R.S.P.CA. Gymkhana, to be held at the Ravenswood College oval, Gordon, on December 5.

    Hide note
  11. Let's Talk Of Interesting People
    The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) Saturday 21 September 1935 p 3 Article Illustrated
    379 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 12:59:47.0

    TALENTED ARTIST. MISS KATE BEARD, the well-known English painter of animal studies, is at present holding an exhibition of her pictures at the Lyceum Club, Sydney. One study that has won a great deal of admiration is the portrait of Lady Hore-Ruthven's terrier, Yonka, who is quite famous in Vice-Regal circles. Miss Beard studied figure painting and modelling at the Lambeth School of Art in London, and specialised in animal painting under Frank Calderon, at his school in Baker St., London. In 1904, when a pupil, she won the prize for the animal section of the Gil- bert Garrett sketch competition, which was open to all the Art schools of Great Britain.

    Hide note
  12. AN ARTIST AND HER WORK.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 4 September 1935 p 7 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Miss Kate Beard, the wellknown painter of animal studies, is seen with her portrait of Yonka, the little terrier 65 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:03:59.0

    Miss Kate Beard, the well known painter of animal studies, is seen with her portrait of Yonka, the little terrier which belongs to Lady Hore Ruthven, and is the pet of Government House. An ex- hibition of Miss Beard's pic- tures is now being held at the Lyceum Club, where it was opened on Monday afternoon by Mr, William Moore.

    Hide note
  13. CORONATION MEMENTO.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 11 May 1937 p 4 Article
    Abstract: KATE BEARD, the animal and portrait painter, has just received an heirloom from London. It is a wand used at the Coronation of King Edward VII. in 19 ... 191 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:04:26.0

    CORONATION MEMENTO. KATE BEARD, the animal and portrait painter, has just received an heirloom from London. It is a wand used at the Coronation of King Edward VII. in 1902 by the Gentleman of the Gold Rod, Gentleman Usher in Westminster Abbey. About a yard long, it is of royal scarlet, and the thickness of a stout walking-stick; gilded at the top, the Royal Crown and Coat-of-Arms show up above the figures in gold, "1902." Superintendent Beard, M.V.O., Miss Kate Beard's father, played" an important part in the Corona- tion of King Edward VII., as he was in charge of "A" Whitehall Division of the Metropolitan Police, Scotland Yard, and responsible for the route arrangements. Also, just before the arrival of the King and Queen at Westminster he had per- sonally to direct a thorough search of the Abbey and the cellars beneath to see that no one was in hiding who might be contemplating mischief. So smoothly did all arrangements work that the then Duke of Norfolk, hereditary Earl Marshal, presented the wand used by the Gentleman of the Gold Rod to Superintendent Beard as a memento of the occasion.

    Hide note
  14. BREVITIES
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Thursday 14 June 1934 p 34 Article
    Abstract: IN the Australian Art Society's exhibition at the Education Buildings Miss Kate Beard has three pictures. One is a water color of a Dalmatian 164 words
    • Text last corrected on 24 February 2018 by HeidiWhite
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:08:25.0

    N the Australian Art Society's ex- hibition at the Education Buildings Miss Kate Beard has three pictures. One is a water color of a Dalmatian, "Inky Bill," which Dame Eadith Walker commissioned Miss Beard to paint as a gift to her cousin, Mr. E. P. Walker. Next is an oil painting of "Benji," belonging to Mr. Donald Maekay. a picture of a foxterrier gaz ing up at a chicken he cannot reach, and is entitled "So near and yet so far." The third picture is a life-size head and shoulder portrait of the late Sir Charles Clubbe.

    Hide note
  15. CASH CUSTOMER
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Monday 10 August 1931 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Art seldom finds a customer these days, so that Miss Kate Beard, an English animal pointer, who is recovering from an operation in St. 120 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:08:54.0

    CASH CUSTOMER Art seldom finds a customer these days, so that Miss Kate Beard , an English animal pointer, who is re covering from an operation in Si, Vincent s Hospital, got a surprise, when a cash customer arrived at the hospital. He was a sergeant, and had been sent by the Sydney Police Sports Club to pay for Miss Beard's head portrait of the police horse "Digger," tohich the club had purchased . The horse , which toon many prizes, had once served as a Governors charger. The picture was exhibited in the Aus tralian Art Society's show recently. Miss Beard has also heard that some of her dog miniatures have been hung at the Royal Art Society's exhibition.

    Hide note
  16. Art and Artists. Well-known Painters of Animals and Pets. | Pets of All Kinds.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 22 July 1933 p 19 Article
    Abstract: IT was a happy idea to hold an exhibition of "Pets in Portraiture" at the Blaxland Galleries, at Farmers Ltd., especially as it was in 1153 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:09:27.0

    Well-known Painters of Animals and Pets. By WILLIAM MOORE. PETS OF ALL KINDS. IT was a happy idea to hold an ex hibition of "Pets in Portraiture" at the Blaxland Galleries, at Farmers Ltd., especially as it was in aid of the Far West Children's Health Scheme. It gave great scope for the arrangement of a variety of subjects, and, while the majority of the exhibits consisted of photographs, the art sec tion contained many interesting ex amples, in various mediums from oil paintings to pen and ink drawings. If you did not care for the famous red dog by Gauguin (in a good colour reproduction), or the modern portrayal of a bulldog by Grace Cossington Smith, you could turn to the por traits of dogs by Kate Beard and Violet Bowring, the zoo subjects by Mabel Barling, and the studies of race horses by Stuart Reid and Martin Stainforth. The collection, of course, would not have been complete with out the Souter cat, the artist donat ing two drawings of this cynical ani mal for the benefit of the fund. .....

    Hide note
  17. Surprise Portraits
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Monday 4 January 1932 p 8 Article
    Abstract: A delightful surprise Christmas gift was given by Lady MacCormick to her daughter Miss Morna MacCormick. It was an oil painting of the latter's favor ... 97 words
    • Text last corrected on 31 May 2018 by KEVING.
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:11:01.0

    Surprise Portraits A delightful surprise Christmas gift was gioen by Lady |MacQormick to her daughter Miss Morna MacCormick. It |was an oil painting of the latlcr's faoorile dog. Hector, the work |of Miss Kate Beard, the English animal painter. The artist secretly executed her work at Kilmorey, in imminent danger of being discovered by the recipient. Miss Beard also did a charcoal portrait of Miss MacCormick, as a gift for her fiance, Mr. Colin Anderson, from Lady Mac - Cormick.

    Hide note
  18. IMPORTANT Domicile Question WOMEN CONFER
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Wednesday 2 October 1935 p 26 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: Those who had regarded the question of domicile as a legal formality vaguely connected with the place in which they were living, 392 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:12:09.0

    MISS JEAN GILLESPIE, a mem- be r of the committee of the B.S.P.C.A. annual ball, which ulill be held at Elizabeth Bail House to-night. The Couernor and Lady Hare-Rulhven will attend. Miss Kate Beard's por trait of Lady Hore-Rulhoen's pet dog, Yonka, will be included in the decorations,

    Hide note
  19. PETS IN PORTRAITURE. Interesting Collection.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 24 June 1933 p 7 Article
    Abstract: A most interesting collection of "pets in portraiture" has been assembled for the exhibition which will be held at the Blaxland Galleries from July 3 ... 432 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:13:14.0

    PETS IN PORTRAITURE. Interesting Collection. A most interesting collection of "pets in portraiture" has been assembled for the exhibi- tion which will be held at the Blaxland Gal- leries from July 3 to July 8 In aid of the Far West Children's Health Scheme, and camera or colour portraits of pets of many well-known people are included Lady Isaac's lovely setter Prince Is there in photograph form, and a Kate Beard portrait shows Sir Philip Game's famous Mickey Miss Gretchen Borsdorff is showing a Martin Stanforth painting of her pet bulldog Colonel Somerv file's German Schnautzer is among Miss Beard's collection of unusual canines, another being a Sealyham terrier belonging to Mr C Viner-Hall, and still another the champion kelpie of Australia, a magnificent beast Lady McKehey's cocker spaniel Is seen in a photo- graph study, while another series of very charming photographs has been entered by Dr Mervyn Thomns, of his baby daughter playing with Rick, a glorious Dalmatian. There is a study of Mr John Lane Mullins's "Pup" posed under a rose bower and Miss Fairfax has sent in two studies of her "Bobbie," one is a photograph taken in puppy days 12 years ago, the other a charcoal drawing by Kate Beard 10 years later

    Hide note
  20. PERSONAL
    Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Monday 31 March 1930 p 8 Article
    Abstract: Mr. A D. Pauley, New Zealand managing director, and Mr. P. E. Levy, [?]or, of the Goldberg Advert[?]ing Agency [?]d will arrive in Sydney to-morrow f ... 132 words
    • Text last corrected on 31 May 2018 by KEVING.
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:16:47.0

    Miss Kate Beard, a well known London artlst, who specialises in portraits and animal studies, reached Sydney to-day on the Esperance Bay, on a holiday trip and to paint local subjects.

    Hide note
  21. ARTHUR POLKINGHORNE'S Sydney Diary--
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Saturday 12 May 1951 p 5 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: IN the Rush ton newsagency is a sketch of a once notable character, Kings Cross Bob--a dog who 666 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:17:35.0

    In the Rush ton newsagency is a sketch of a once notable character, Kings Cross Bob — a dog who once roamed those parts. The sketch was done by well- known English animal pain ter Kate Beard, has been sent to the newsagency by Dame Mary Gilmore as an Animal Week gesture. Kate Beard's father, incidentally, was Chief of Police in Lon don and arrested John Burns in the dockers' strike. The two men later became life long friends. Kate Beard's most famous picture was the Duchess of Newcastle's dogs, postcards of which had a great sale.

    Hide note
  22. PETS: THEIR PORTRAITS Cats and Dogs In Oils
    The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 - 1954) Saturday 24 June 1933 p 6 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: One of the last of 300 who entered oil paintings, photographs, and statuettes of pets at the Blaxland Galleries yesterday 357 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:19:58.0

    PETS: THEIR PORTRAITS Cats and Dogs In Oils One of the last of 300 who en tered oil paintings, photographs, and statuettes of pets at the Blaxland Galleries yesterday lor the Pets in Portraiture Ex hibition, to he opened by Colonel Spain on Monday week, threw back his coat to show his en- tides. There was a dozen of them, in the form of miniature photographs, each on a button of the entrant's peculiar shirt-waistcoat. Entries came from high and low. Lady Isaacs' dog, Prince, will grace the exhibition in photogravure, with Kate Beard's oil study of the Gov ernor's red setter, Micky,

    Hide note
  23. Unusual Title
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Thursday 16 June 1932 p 31 Article
    Abstract: IT is generally known that musicians enumerate their works as Opus 1 and Opus 2, but it is seldom that an artist follows the example. 185 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:20:25.0

    The students' contribution to the exhibition is very excellent, nnd some lino cuts of Australian animals and birds are not only decorative, but full of life. Miss Kate Beard, accompan ied by Mtf. Roger Fitzbardingc, was at the opening to see her painting of the Governor's dog, and Mrs. T. H. Kelly, whose daughter Is an artist, was also among the spectators.

    Hide note
  24. R.S.P.C.A. BALL. "Doggy" Decorations. BRILLIANT SCENE.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 3 October 1935 p 5 Article
    Abstract: Each spring several large charity dances are listed for the weeks immediately preceding and during the spring racing carnival, and one 417 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:21:00.0

    A Daschund, fashioned in straw, adorned the fireplace of the drawing-room, where the official party was entertained, and Miss Kate Beard's portrait of Lady Hore-Ruthven's ter- rier Yonka attracted much attention from its easel in the hall.

    Hide note
  25. SOCIAL AND PERSONAL.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 3 September 1935 p 4 Article
    Abstract: Owing to the Court mourning, the reception for Lady Hore-Ruthven, which was to have been held at the Women's Club on Thursday next, has been cancelle ... 420 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:21:23.0

    A portrait of "Yonka," the charming little terrier belonging to Lady Hore-Ruthven, claimed a good deal of admiration when it was shown among a collection of paintings by Miss Kate Beard, at the Lyceum Club yesterday afternoon.

    Hide note
  26. PET POM WANTED -- DEAD OR ALIVE
    Smith's Weekly (Sydney, NSW : 1919 - 1950) Saturday 1 June 1935 p 15 Article
    Abstract: WHERE is grief at "Yaralla," the lovely home at Concord of Dame Eadith Walker, one of Sydney's wealthiest women. For from among 372 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:21:46.0

    Not very long ago Dame Eadith de cided to have the Pom's portrait painted, and MIsb Kate Beard was commissioned to do the work. Misa Beard has done portraits of many doga belonging to well-known Sydney people. Including Lady MacCormlck's Hector, a strange breed of dog that could trans form Itself Into a pointer In the Bum mer time and Into a setter in winter. Miss Beard painted Dame Eadlth's dog In company with his boon companion, a small Australian terrier.

    Hide note
  27. ARTISTS MUST LIVE Sir Hugh Poynter's Plea Society's Exhibition
    The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947) Tuesday 16 June 1936 p 18 Article
    Abstract: When Sir Hugh Poynter opened the tenth annual exhibition of the Australian Art Society in the gallery of the Department of 493 words
    • Text last corrected on 31 May 2018 by KEVING.
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:22:25.0

    MISS KATE BEARD, who came to Sydney from London some years ago, Is a well-known painter of animals. Her doggie studies, many of them lent by the owners of the pic tures, are notable contributions to the Australian Art Society's Exhibition this month. Lady Gowrie's pet Aus tralian terrier, Yonka, has been one of Miss Beard's "sitters."

    Hide note
  28. VIGNETTES FROM SYDNEY. WINTER GAIETIES.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Thursday 6 July 1933 p 9 Article
    Abstract: TWO college dances—annuals— took place on the same night —one that of St. Paul's College, a handsome old pile within the 596 words
    • Text last corrected on 31 May 2018 by KEVING.
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:23:39.0

    Among the portraits of animals at the Pets and Portraiture Exhibition is a fine photograph of Lady Isaacs's fav- ourite dog, Prince. Miss Kate Beard, whose pictures of animals aré her speciality, has several studies of not- able pets, including a portrait of Sir Philip Game's pet, a setter named Mickey. The Queensland artist, Mrs. Clinton, who signs her work "Frank Payne," shows several sketches of juveniles with feathered pets of the farmyard. One of our most consistent artists in animal painti'.ig, Miss Mabel Barling, who studies jungle animals in the Taronga Park Zoo, sent along some interesting pictures.

    Hide note
  29. TOY ANIMALS Greet Dancers AT R.S.P.C.A. BALL
    The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954) Thursday 3 October 1935 p 38 Article
    Abstract: A kennel made of bright flowers and thatched with shining green leaves was the central decoration of the supper table at 787 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:24:42.0

    A large toy dog with grey fluffy hair guarded the entrance hall, ana upon their arrival the Governor and Lady Hore-Ruthven pasesd by an easel holding a portrait of Lady Hore-Ruthven's pet dog, Yonka, painted by Miss Kate Beard.

    Hide note
  30. Getting Personal.. Golf Links With The Past
    The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 - 1954) Saturday 28 March 1936 p 9 Article
    Abstract: Following the most successful year in the history of the Carnarvon Golf Club, Mr. A. S. Watsford was elected to the presidency of the club recently, 1129 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:25:32.0

    Portrait Of A Sleuth Hound Tess, the Police Alsatian, is having her portrait painted by the well-known animal painter, Kate Beard. The sittings take place at the Police Garage, Alexandria, and Tess is a model sitter, except when Miss Beard produces her parasol. The dog is at her best when the other police dogs are brought out for training. Then she sits like a statue, her whole attention focussed on the young dogs, evidently longing to take a hand in their teaching.

    Hide note
  31. The LIFE OF SYDNEY
    The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 - 1954) Friday 9 June 1933 p 4 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: THERE will be a merry-go-round, slippery slides, a live pony, and an "Aunt Sally" at the children's party which Mrs. Pat Levy is giving 2036 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:26:20.0

    Paintings by well-known animal artists, such as Violet Bowring and Kate Beard; portraits and photo graphs of famous pets like Margaret Rawlings's "Flush" and the Gover nor's dog, "Micky"; reproductions of the work of old masters, as for in stance Durer's engraving of St. Jerome with his lion and dog, are pouring in to the "Pets in Portrai ture" exhibition, to be held at Far mer's Blaxland Galleries from July 3 to July 7. The proceeds will bene fit the building fund of the Far West Children's Health Scheme.

    Hide note
  32. The LIFE OF SYDNEY
    The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 - 1954) Friday 16 September 1932 p 6 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: A GREAT welcome awaited the Byron Wrigleys yesterday. Alison Smith, Bill Clarke, the Lionel McFadzens, arid many of the 2067 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:26:48.0

    0F course, no Rolls is complete with out its Alsatian; but, as well as finding a soft spot for a ride, many cf the luckier dogs in our midst are achieving a permanent niche in fame. Since she has taken a studio in Mac- quarie Street, Kate Beard has been commissioned to paint many of the dogs beloved by their owners. Sir Philip Game liked her portrait of red "Mickey" so well that he wrote the artist a warm note of thanks. Now Miss Beard is doing "Rua," the blue cattle dog which is the pride and joy of Mrs. William Moore's heart. While I abroad Miss Beard painted dogs of many breeeds, including Samoyedes, the Russian sledge dogs, and Salukis, an Asiatic breed introduced into Eur ope by the Crusaders. In India, Miss Beard was the guest cf the Rajah Thakore Sahebog Llmdi. Her very first Sydney commission was given her by Lady MacCormick, when, In deep secrecy, she painted Moma's dog behind locked doors In the MacCor- micks' Point Piper home.

    Hide note
  33. THE LIFE OF SYDNEY
    The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 - 1954) Thursday 3 October 1935 p 14 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: BETTY HORWOOD gave her last cocktail party at, the Sloane Street (Knightsbridge) flat of her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Keith 2405 words
    • Text last corrected on 31 May 2018 by KEVING.
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:32:55.0

    THE atmosphere at Elizabeth Bay House last night was definitely canine; in fact, the very first thing to greet Lady Hore-Ruthven - when she arrived, with Sir Alexander Hore- Ruthven, was the portrait of her dog Yonka, by Kate Beard, and hardly had. she set foot in the reception room when Irene Strelitz and Pat Gould presented her with a dog-shaped purse. To carry the idea even fur ther, sitting in the centre of the sup per table was a floral kennel and little woolly dog wearing a rug of marigolds. Of course, the function was the R.S.P.C.A, annual ball, so no- wonder dogs appeared in plenty.

    Hide note
  34. NEAR AND FAR.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 5 April 1933 p 5 Article
    Abstract: A meeting was held at Farmer's yesterday morning to make arrangements for the Rugby Union's farewell ball in honour of the Australian team, which wil ... 1158 words
    • Text last corrected on 31 May 2018 by KEVING.
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:34:32.0

    Miss Kate Beard, the animal painter, gave an interesting talk on "Dogs I Have Painted at a meeting of the Tuesday club circle the Women's Club yesterday afternoon. The lecture was Illustrated with portraits of Miss Beard's subjects. Miss Earl Hooper, pre dent of the circle, was in the chair; and there was a large and interested audience of mem- bers and their friends.

    Hide note
  35. Art and Artists. Melbourne.
    The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933) Saturday 1 October 1932 p 18 Article
    Abstract: ON a short visit to the Victorian capital I have been impressed with the way art is being drawn closer to the life of the people. In 1272 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-06-01 09:26:46.0

    KATE BEARD, the English animal painter, who has settled in Sydney, says that drawing dogs requires
    a lot of concentration; she has to be rapid in recording the main, features, and for the rest she relies on her retentive memory. The best subjects are gun dogs and sheep dogs, which are taught to obey, the worst being pet dogs, who are spoiled by their owners. On account of their beautiful hair and
    lively expressions she is fond of painting setters and spaniels. Recently she has painted the favourite dogs of the Governor, Sir Philip Game, Lady Mac
    Cormiok, Miss Barbara Knox, Miss Gould, and Dora Wilcox, respectively. Behind the scenes she painted
    "Flush," the canine member of the Barretts of Wimpole Street Company.
    A well-trained artist, Miss Beard studied at the Lambeth School of Art and at Frank Calderon's School of Animal Painting, and was awarded the first prize in the animal section in the Gilbert-Garret competition; open to students in all the art schools in Great Britain. After exhibiting at the Royal Academy, and with the Royal Society of Miniature Painters, she visited India, and painted rajahs and their horses; and after her return to London she received a teacher's certificate from the Royal Drawing Society.

    Hide note
  36. THE ROYAL SOCIETY'S Art Exhibition
    The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) Saturday 11 August 1934 p 23 Article Illustrated
    1122 words
    • Text last corrected on 24 June 2011 by lucy1934
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:36:22.0

    Lilias Garling is a young woman who has recently re- turned from furthering her studies abroad, and Phyllis Brod- ziak, a young girl who is hoping to leave shortly for abroad. Kate Beard, who usually paints animals, is showing a col- lection of miniature work, and Dr. Sidney Rosebery has the distinction of being the first Macquarie Street doctor to ex- hibit with the Royal Society.— A.W.

    Hide note
  37. GOSSIPY BITS AND PIECES
    The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 - 1954) Tuesday 8 December 1936 p 11 Article
    Abstract: A SON and heir has arrived for the Sam Allen couple of Boggabri. Mrs. Allen was formerly Barbara Read, the pretty Titian-haired daughter of 354 words
    • Text last corrected on 31 May 2018 by KEVING.
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2018-05-31 13:38:01.0

    WITH a cheque for £120 as a result, the R.S.P.C.A. committee is nat urally delighted with the success of "Bob's" Birthday Gymkhana on Sat urday. Nell Lefebvre, sister of the well-known golfer, Mrs. T. McKay, won the competition for the neatest ankles at the gymkhana, and collected as a prize the "doggie" book-ends modelled by the noted animal artist, Kate Beard. Captain Pope's cocker spaniel, "Prince," was the model used for the book-end design.

    Hide note