Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 33

Thread: What do you choose to correct?

  1. #21
    It looks like we all have a wide variety of interests! I have looked for (and found) reports of the deaths of various relatives, even the most ordinary people doing the most mundane things.

    My big project at the moment is researching the history of the NSW Cricket Umpires' Association and some of its members preparatory to writing a publication for the 2013 centenary.

    But I, too, have followed contemporary accounts of historical events (reading HG Wells' account of the first tanks in WWI was fascinating!)

    I have found lots of interesting local history by searching for suburbs, streets and landmarks near my home.

    For the most part I will correct the whole article I find, often even if it is not relevant to my research once I open it, but sometimes I get lazy and just back out and leave it for the next guy. If it is a huge article, e.g. a page of births, deaths and marriages, particularly if it has not scanned well and many hundreds of corrections are needed, I might just correct the entry relevant to me.

  2. #22
    Adult Member KerryRaymond's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Brisbane, Qld
    Posts
    240
    I am mostly doing family history research along with some local history research (for Brisbane mostly but I get distracted onto other places too). So I tend to correct articles that are of interest to me. With the local history, I often add information from the newspapers into Wikipedia articles with references back to the newspaper, so I am particularly like to ensure that the text is correct when I am referencing from Wikipedia.

    Aside. The new Wikipedia citation makes adding newspapers references into Wikipedia so easy. The citation itself may look like a dog's breakfast (because it is using Wikipedia templates) but it displays beautifully in Wikipedia.

  3. #23
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    1
    I like correcting the Coroner's Inquests because they give a birds-eye view of social history, though always sad. People brought in as witnesses may not otherwise appear in the paper at all.

  4. #24
    I only started corrections recently, and found it much easier than I thought it would be - although I am aware that it is fairly important to get it right the first time because there is so much to do that to have to go back and correct things a second time is not really possible.

    Iain Stuart's method above is along the lines of my own - I have a few interests I am creating lists for, and these are sort of leading me into related areas. This has also meant that if I do the correcting of related information, I may as well create lists for these too. I have just finished a Library Studies course and know that this sort of work is extremely expensive, but there are people interested in doing it as an interest, so this function in Trove is extremely effective.

    I am responding here to Geoff Blackshaw's post because I agree that the correction's related to WW1 are very important. I have recently been doing some corrections on information related to airships, and have come across heaps of interesting stuff on this subject relating to the Great War.
    (Another anniversary coming around is the sinking of the Titanic - I imagine that many school kids will be searching Trove for Titanic related info in the next few years, and a project to correct and create a few lists related to this topic would be interesting too - there are over 98,000 hits for this subject).

    I also believe that the anniversary of the War is important, and will probably become more so as we get closer to it. Maybe a Forum on this topic is worth starting?

  5. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Neerim South, West Gippsland, Victoria
    Posts
    1
    I started correcting newspaper articles that relate to the history of the area I moved to some years ago. Lately, the local population has been increasing, such that one regularly sees unknown faces in the main street. I see increasing access to the local history of our region as an important part of maintaining a sense of place.

  6. #26
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Coffs Coast, NSW Australia
    Posts
    1
    I started out with Family notices, especially from 1841 onwards, wedding notices which gave more information than the actual registration of the marriage. Naturally progressing to articles about the suburbs and country towns my ancestors lived in. Today have been perusing Brisbane papers for articles about previous Brisbane & Queensland floods. Oh, to have the time to read every story. 1893 appears to have been a bad year.

  7. #27
    I started like most with family history, but have now shifted to an early Hobart newspaper. Strange choice, since I don't live there, but nobody else is editing it (probably due to the small references to specific people), but each issue is only around 4 pages long and the OCR isn't completely terrible.

    I get the feeling that if we all cherry-pick what we edit, there'll be great swaths of ignored text that never get corrected. But that's probably just me.

  8. #28
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    St. Albert, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    1
    A fascinating thread. Over the past couple of months I think I've become something of a "serial corrector," having abandoned it for quite some time. When my two great-uncles died in a gold mine accident at Mount Morgan in 1900, I discovered there were articles about this event across the country, and each and every one I have corrected, saved and printed. I've also discovered other genealogical gems, including legal name changes. Funeral "invitations" are fascinating - and often include names you were not previously aware of. I've also segued into some other areas of late, especially the history of the ABC Military Band, which my late father was a part of. When he was alive I never really asked him about when he went on tour across the country in the 1930s, but now I am fascinated to read what really amount to eyewitness accounts! This week I've worked on shark attack articles. The reporting of the time certainly was different than now! It was so lurid (as also in murder cases) - no details spared. It is fascinating also to see how sharks were regarded in the news of the time - there was no "we share their territory" - they were declared "monsters." The shift in attitudes and also in reporting style overall is very interesting. I make a point of adding keywords to each and every item I correct, no matter how small, and including all names. Somewhere, sometime, it may help someone find someone of a certain name.

  9. #29
    On Probation
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    4
    I only correct missing bits of a newspaper scan if I'm 100% sure of the name or date - otherwise the "correction" may be incorrect !!

    Cheers, Andrew
    Last edited by mraadgev [NLA]; 12-05-2011 at 08:32 PM. Reason: Link removed - Trove forums are for non-commercial use only

  10. #30

    Reward yourself

    After a heavy correction session, here is a suggestion as to how you can reward yourself and get even more use from Trove. Hidden away, but easily found using the word count feature are some interesting long articles written as important world events are unfolding.

    Instapaper.com provides as easy way to gather a reading list for later reading and read these articles in a more visually pleasing way. But wait, there is more. If you have an iPad, the Instpaper app costs all of $6 and lets you read these articles away from your desk and without internet access. The synchronisation of articles read and unread on your various devices is, to quote Dame Edna, "spooky".

    Using Instapaper also overcomes the problem of not being able to scroll the OCRd text column in the iPad version of Safari.
    Last edited by listohan; 15-05-2011 at 04:34 PM. Reason: clarification

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •