English, Article, Journal or magazine article edition: Modeling for response variables that are proportions Maarten L. Buis

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/101161
Physical Description
  • preprint
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Modeling for response variables that are proportions
Author
  • Maarten L. Buis
Physical Description
  • preprint
Notes
  • When dealing with response variables that are proportions, people often use regress. This approach can be problematic since the model can lead to predicted proportions less than zero or more than one and errors that are likely to be heteroskedastic and nonnormally distributed. This talk will discuss three more appropriate methods for proportions as response variables: betafit, dirifit, and glm. betafit is a maximum likelihood estimator using a beta likelihood, dirifit is a maximum likelihood estimator using a Dirichlet likelihood, and glm can be used to create a quasi–maximum likelihood estimator using a binomial likelihood. On an applied level, a difference between dirifit and the others is that the others can handle only one response variable, whereas dirifit can handle multiple response variables. For instance, betafit and glm can model the proportion of city budget spent on the category security (police and fire department), whereas dirifit can simultaneously model the proportions spent on categories security, social policy, infrastructure, and other. Another difference between betafit and glm is that glm can handle a proportion of exactly zero and one, whereas betafit can handle only proportions between zero and one. Special attention will be given on how to fit these models in Stata and on how to interpret the results. This presentation will end with a warning not to use any of these techniques for ecological inference, i.e., using aggregated data to infer about individual units. To use a classic example: In the United States in the 1930s, states with a high proportion of immigrants also had a high literacy rate (in the English language), whereas immigrants were on average less literate than nonimmigrants. Regressing state level literacy rate on state level proportion of immigrants would thus give a completely wrong picture about the relationship between individual immigrant status and literacy.
  • RePEc:boc:usug06:15
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

Other links

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment