English, Article edition: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Pneumococcal Vaccination of Adults and Elderly Persons in Belgium Diana De Graeve; Geert Lombaert; Herman Goossens

User activity

Share to:
 
Bookmark: http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/95038
Physical Description
  • article
Language
  • English

Edition details

Title
  • Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Pneumococcal Vaccination of Adults and Elderly Persons in Belgium
Author
  • Diana De Graeve
  • Geert Lombaert
  • Herman Goossens
Physical Description
  • article
Notes
  • Objective: To analyse the direct medical costs and effectiveness of vaccinating adults aged between 18 and 64 years and elderly persons >=​65 years of age with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. Design and setting: This was a decision-analytic modelling study from the societal perspective in Belgium. The analysis compared `vaccination' with `no vaccination and treatment'. Methods: Calculations were based on the assumption that vaccination is as effective against all pneumococcal infections as it is against invasive pneumococcal disease. Data on the incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia and meningitis, frequency of hospitalisation, mortality rates and vaccine effectiveness were derived from the international literature. Costs were derived from analysis of historical data for cases of pneumococcal infection in Belgium. Results: Vaccinating 1000 adults between the ages of 18 and 64 years gains approximately 2 life-years in comparison with the no vaccination option. However, to realise these additional health benefits requires additional costs of 11 800 European Currency Units (ECU; 1995 values) per life-year saved. Vaccinating 1000 elderly people (>=​65 years) leads to >9 life-years gained as well as a small monetary benefit of ECU1250. An extensive sensitivity analysis did not greatly affect the results for the elderly population: vaccination in this age group always remained favourable, and thus it is clearly indicated from an economic point of view. A crucial assumption for both age groups is that the effectiveness of the vaccine holds for all pneumococcal pneumonia. It is clear that the results will become less favourable if this assumption is dropped. Conclusions: Preventing pneumococcal infections by vaccination clearly benefits people's health. Reimbursement can be recommended for the elderly group; however, more accurate epidemiological data are still needed to make decisions concerning routine pneumococcal vaccination in adults <65 years of age. Unfortunately, the issue of whether the effectiveness of the vaccine holds for all pneumococcal pneumonia is as yet unresolved in the medical literature.
  • Cost effectiveness, Elderly, Pharmacoeconomics, Pneumococcal infections, Pneumococcal PS23F TT conjugate vaccine, Research and development, Vaccines
  • RePEc:wkh:phecon:v:17:y:2000:i:6:p:591-601
Language
  • English
Contributed by
OAIster

Get this edition

  • Set up My libraries

    How do I set up "My libraries"?

    In order to set up a list of libraries that you have access to, you must first login or sign up. Then set up a personal list of libraries from your profile page by clicking on your user name at the top right of any screen.

  • All (1)
  • Unknown (1)
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.
None of your libraries hold this item.

User activity


e.g. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry"

Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Be the first to add a tag for this edition

Be the first to add this to a list

Comments and reviews

What are comments? Add a comment

No user comments or reviews for this version

Add a comment